18 Burst results for "Radcliffe Institute"

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mothers shot. Through to eat. At, babies sometimes pinched stolen to be traffic to be sent off overseas. Pet so trained into taking. Back, the medical? Jayne good old standby. We gotta take a break. We're talking going to talk about a lot more. My Guess Jane Goodall. Thala just conservationists activists best known for her long term study of Z's Anthony Brooks. This is on point. A. This is on point I'm Anthony. Brooks were talking to Jane Goodall about her legacy and the challenges surrounding climate change and species conservation, and let's go right to our calls. Jane Goodall. We've got a lot of callers who want to get in on this conversation. Juniper is calling from Nashville go ahead, juniper. You're on the air. Thanks for the call. Hi. My name is junior juniper I'm eight years old I was wondering what parts of the world need the mostly searched because I want to be that when I grow up juniper. Thanks so much for that Jane. Did you get that? I hunt. She wanted to be a better. Question what part of the world needs the most research? Because? Yes, she wants to be a vet when she grows up. Well I tell you that there isn't a single country where event is needed where we need every single country, animals need help. Animals need to be protected, and sometimes they're veterinarian who come and work in sankt trees to look after the chimpanzees. We have battery help now in in the national parks, the wild chimpanzees because the so few left that we have to make sure to try and keep them healthy, so we can dot them and treat them if necessary a bad wound for example. juniper thanks so much for that. Call Jane Goodall I'm so glad that juniper called a eight years old and I have to say in my household. The th there is cross generational appeal for you. I've been following your work for a long time. My nine year old son knows who you are and is. Really enamored of the of the kind of work that you do so this seems like a good moment to ask you about roots and shoots and sort of what your messages to young people, but tell us about roots and shoots, and and and what it does. Well it. It began in Tanzania and nineteen ninety-one. And it was when twelve high school students came to see me in my house, and they came from eight different schools, and they were very concerned about all kinds of different things. Poaching Fox wasn't the government doing more street children with no homes. A wide range of problems that they felt needed solving so I told them to go and get their friends, and we had a big meeting, and that's when roots and shoots was born, and basically we decided that the main message was every individual makes a difference every day of Rian, individual as role to play in matters, that every group would choose three projects one to help. People want help animals when to help. Help the environment because everything in nature's interconnected, we parked over not separated from the natural world and some big problem today so anyway, what began twelve high school? Students is now in sixty five countries and growing fast, and it's got hundreds of thousands of members i. don't remember how many groups are as many groups. We don't even know about you know. We suddenly found a little group somewhere in the forests of Ecuador. Roots and shoots. We found out about the by accident. and. Changing the world that they literally these young people know that rolling up those leads taking action that planting trees, which is very important today that cleaning streams doing campaigns about. Single, use plastic and today we have members in kindergarten, and we have members in university and everything in between, and they are changing, while they are my greatest reason for hope. And I hope any child parent listening. We'll try and get involved because changes their lives, too. So. Let's go to Tanya. She's calling from Concord Mass Tanya. You're on the air. Jane Goodall! Thanks for the call. Go ahead! Thank you, Anthony. Thanks for your great hosting and Ms Goodall. It's It's a great honor to the listening to you and to be speaking with you. I wanted to point out that in terms of for more experimentation on chimps, year or so ago I was. At the conference at the Radcliffe Institute that's Harvard and there were some researchers from China who were showing slides. Of their experimentation on chimps in in in trying to find a cure for depression, and it involves crisper. Taking a gene modifications and it was very very sad to see the poor suffering chimp and the coordinator of its cage, just huddling over. It was a terrible sight and. and there was a push to get more US support to to get back into experimentation on chimpanzees precisely because of their. closeness to us and I. I just wanted to mention that and hear what you have to say. Thank you. Thank you Tanya Jane Goodall to what extent are his? That kind of research being conducted on chimps, and to what extent are you still concerned about that? Most monkeys now but. The occasional Jim. In Germany, for example to patents were just refused. Could Genetically Modifying Chimpanzee but we have routine shoot salute at China, the huge movement in China to protect animals. It's it's growing fast. many states now banned eating of dogs, and after the Kobe nineteen, the government was very quick to ban the a sale, the trafficking and the eating of wild animals. So it's changing. It takes time you know America for example, until recently was the second largest importer of ice in the world coming to China then China banned the importation of ivory. And these things just take time, but yes, we can try and fight poaching in. Africa but we also have to work on the demand. Because when money is involved when people can get rich by shooting a rhino and selling its horn, they going to go on doing it even if it's illegal, so that's where roots and shoots comes in and we just working working away on reducing the demand for wild animals and cruelty to domestic animals well Tanya. Thank you for that call one more call. Alex is calling from Walpole Massachusetts. Go ahead, Alex you're on the air with Jane Goodall? Thank you for the call. Thank you and I. It's it's an honor i. Agree with everything that's been said in terms of. How we can help..

Jane Goodall Juniper Anthony Brooks China juniper Concord Mass Tanya Jayne sankt trees Tanya Tanzania Nashville Alex Africa Ecuador Kobe Radcliffe Institute US Rian Walpole Massachusetts
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:48 min | 3 months ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Now. You were not a garden designer. Then and here you came to this place, and there's views of mountains and feels, and it feels like a big open place, but. You weren't a garden designer. SORTA figured out how to make a plan. And you speak about in the book about measuring the House and measuring the distance to things and kind of drawing and taking photos and kind of pinning up that and some inspiration on almost like a mood board to get started like you know to figure out what you were going to do, yes. Yes I came here not as a gardener. But I felt that I needed to learn really quickly. And and the way I learned was that. I had been farming and. As I. Tell Maybe in the book I made. Five thousand dollars at it. My first year felt great, and I made five thousand dollars at farming my last year and I'd had enough. And I landed a seasonal job restoring a half miles worth of white, pine and hemlock hedges at the Saint God's national historic site, in Cornish, which was the garden of Augustus Saint Gaudens and was part of an artist colony that included architects, landscape, architects and artists. Like Gerald Plot and Ellen Shipman And I really immersed myself. In the Garden Gardens, but it, but then in learning about the gardens that those artists had made. A really came to gardening? As an art form I. And then I had to learn. How to draw. and. Deal with hard scape, which still not very good at. <hes> but the National Park. Service was great about supporting. It staff. By providing training and I spent a couple years running down to Boston to Cambridge to the Radcliffe Institute and to the Arnold Arboretum and guarding the woods and learning the trade there. Okay, I'm applying it. <hes> on the job at Saint Gaudens and here and in some of the other Corner Gardens. I see so. One of my favorite parts of the book, besides all those big leafed plants in that was seventy foot, long border or something. It's just magnificent. Is that you make a list in the book that I find especially helpful I think you call it guiding principles and and I know this was after the fact because you started making the garden in nearly thirty years ago or twenty years ago, and you wrote the book just recently, but but it's good for those of US making Gardener Getting Ready to find tuna. Revise our gardens to think about guiding principle so is this something like this sort of self assessment? What do I really care about? Is this something you do with clients when you first visit there places? If the let me get away with it, yes! And, sometimes, sometimes more successfully than than others. Yeah I don't have a form. That I had a a client, but I I WANNA. I as a designer WANNA be able to understand the context. The built context, the living context the landscape context. And the social context as well as how the <unk> Oman Gardner is going to use the US the space use the garden, and what their what their goals

Vermont Jim Tatum Betty Mackenzie North Slope partner
Bill Noble on Garden Design

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:48 min | 3 months ago

Bill Noble on Garden Design

"Now. You were not a garden designer. Then and here you came to this place, and there's views of mountains and feels, and it feels like a big open place, but. You weren't a garden designer. SORTA figured out how to make a plan. And you speak about in the book about measuring the House and measuring the distance to things and kind of drawing and taking photos and kind of pinning up that and some inspiration on almost like a mood board to get started like you know to figure out what you were going to do, yes. Yes I came here not as a gardener. But I felt that I needed to learn really quickly. And and the way I learned was that. I had been farming and. As I. Tell Maybe in the book I made. Five thousand dollars at it. My first year felt great, and I made five thousand dollars at farming my last year and I'd had enough. And I landed a seasonal job restoring a half miles worth of white, pine and hemlock hedges at the Saint God's national historic site, in Cornish, which was the garden of Augustus Saint Gaudens and was part of an artist colony that included architects, landscape, architects and artists. Like Gerald Plot and Ellen Shipman And I really immersed myself. In the Garden Gardens, but it, but then in learning about the gardens that those artists had made. A really came to gardening? As an art form I. And then I had to learn. How to draw. and. Deal with hard scape, which still not very good at. but the National Park. Service was great about supporting. It staff. By providing training and I spent a couple years running down to Boston to Cambridge to the Radcliffe Institute and to the Arnold Arboretum and guarding the woods and learning the trade there. Okay, I'm applying it. on the job at Saint Gaudens and here and in some of the other Corner Gardens. I see so. One of my favorite parts of the book, besides all those big leafed plants in that was seventy foot, long border or something. It's just magnificent. Is that you make a list in the book that I find especially helpful I think you call it guiding principles and and I know this was after the fact because you started making the garden in nearly thirty years ago or twenty years ago, and you wrote the book just recently, but but it's good for those of US making Gardener Getting Ready to find tuna. Revise our gardens to think about guiding principle so is this something like this sort of self assessment? What do I really care about? Is this something you do with clients when you first visit there places? If the let me get away with it, yes! And, sometimes, sometimes more successfully than than others. Yeah I don't have a form. That I had a a client, but I I WANNA. I as a designer WANNA be able to understand the context. The built context, the living context the landscape context. And the social context as well as how the Oman Gardner is going to use the US the space use the garden, and what their what their goals

Garden Gardens United States Augustus Saint Gaudens Corner Gardens Wanna Ellen Shipman Saint God Arnold Arboretum Oman Gardner Radcliffe Institute Cornish National Park Gerald Plot Boston Cambridge
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:10 min | 6 months ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Time when de just do at the top. It's the right thing to do the right thing to do. It's up to you by Stein. Scale with the words of Mario Savio this is democracy now democracy now dot org the warn piece report where broadcasting from the epicenter of the pandemic in New York City. I mainly Goodman with nermeen. Shay has returned to the devastating toll. The Krona viruses taking on Black. Americans who are disproportionately dying the virus across the country in Michigan and Illinois African Americans makeup. Oh fourteen to fifteen percent of the population but account for forty one percent of the covert nineteen deaths in Chicago alone. African Americans account for seventy percent of the city's debts yet just thirty percent of the population in Louisiana. One of the hot spots of the virus African Americans comprise about a third of the population but seventy percent of the Kovic nineteen debts. New York governor. Andrew Cuomo wants called the virus. The great equalizer said Wednesday. Black people make up eighteen percent of the deaths in the state. Despite being nine percent of the state population the lat next community makes up twenty nine percent of New York City but thirty four percent of the deaths many of them in Queens the most diverse community in the nation the actual number of deaths due to cove in nineteen will likely be never known as people often undocumented. Those on the margins of society are dying at home uncounted for we turn To Camara Phyllis Jones. She's family physician epidemiologist past president of the American Public Health Association. Her recent piece for Newsweek magazine titled Corona Virus Disease Discriminates. Our healthcare doesn't have to. Why don't you elaborate on that? Dr Jones This issue and why you see this disparate effect on the African American population Kobe. Nineteen is exposing. Us racism in a stark new way because the black and Brown bodies are piling up so fast that they can't be these deaths can't be normalized door ignored and the way that racism is operating in this pandemic is in two separate fronts. It's increasing exposure to the virus and it has increased vulnerability to the virus so increasing exposure to the virus because the way that racism that structures opportunity in science value has structured our educational opportunities and job opportunities. We are a more front facing low. Income underappreciated jobs where we are part of the essential workforce. That really isn't getting. Its full attention and certainly not getting the protection that we need. Racism is increased the vulnerability of us to this virus because living in racially segregated communities that are resource segregated without adequate access to food and our environmental racism. Hazard segregated has made us carry in our bodies all of those same diseases diabetes high blood pressure renal disease asthma that are making people who get infected with the virus sicker and die faster from it and Doug Jones even before I mean. We mentioned the statistics everywhere but but in Chicago even before the pandemic began the life expectancy of African Americans was nine years slightly less than nine years less than white people who live in Chicago. So could you say Dr Jones what you feel should be done? What steps should be taken to compensate for the disproportionate vulnerability of African Americans Latin communities in light of this emergency health? Emergency right I am so glad to ask me that question because we can't just look at these statistics. And then shrug or say. Oh well we expect it that we have to act and so the way that we act is on both fronts. You asked me. How do we act when we recognize that we already? We have chronically. Been Sicker and dying sooner. But that means is if we already recognized that we have to move all of the health resources to those areas where we can already expect higher deaths and also we should not have black people already burdened with these diseases living communities where they can't get adequate test testing number one but adequate access to ventilators and health resources in the not so we need to provide resources according to need and we can already predict that need on that vulnerability side the other thing that. I really need to say as you'll be seeing now in the news. Lots of different ways of people trying to say if we have to ration ventilators. Well maybe we should discount people if they have diabetes or whatever we cannot allow that to happen first of all we should not be working under a scenario of scarcity because there's no reason we have to have scarcity so we should reach out that but certainly if we do have one ventilator three patients there should never be any counting in this person has diabetes heart disease in that allocation. I actually think that if it comes down to that we need to have a random allocation of those resources we need to value all individuals and populations equally. That's one of three core principles for Achieving Health Equity Camara Jones. Let me ask you one last question. And then we're going to do partout and posted democracy now dot org this critical lack of testing that has completely compromise the public health the response in this country. You have talked about the fact that that discriminates against African Americans as well where people can even get tests. Yes that's true where people can get test. But I have to say the kind of haphazard way that we've approached testing is affecting all of us it's affecting our ability to alter the course of the epidemic the way that we're using testing in this country right now is to confirm diagnosis in a very narrow one person by one person kind of clinical in the medical space way we just twenty seconds so what we really need to do is we need to find out everybody. Who has the disease so we need to do a public health? Testing test does with symptoms. Tassos do sample those who don't have symptoms so that we can distribute resources so that we can identify and isolate people who have the disease before they're symptomatic while this spreading it and also do contact tracing. That would be the good for the good of all of us that way. We don't document the epidemic. We actually can change the course of Kamara fellas Jones. I want to thank you for being with us. We're going to do part two posted democracy now dot. Org family physician epidemiologist past president of the American Public Health Association currently Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University fellow. That does it for our show. Thank you to all the team that has made this show possible. I made me Goodman with nermeen shape..

Camara Jones New York City American Public Health Associa Chicago Goodman Camara Phyllis Jones Mario Savio family physician Dr Jones Andrew Cuomo Newsweek Shay Stein diabetes president Queens Louisiana
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

11:57 min | 8 months ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"In high school district. And I think we shen no no I yeah. I didn't public accommodation deepen how integrated education people do. We demand holding who programs program. I took that was fired. Reston speaking August Twenty Eighth Nineteen nineteen sixty three at the historic march on Washington. And those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot org the warring piece report mark. I'm Amy Goodman and I mean Shea. Welcome to our listeners and viewers around the country and around the world the Senate has acquitted president trump of two impeachment charges in just the third presidential impeachment trial in us. History trump was accused of abusing power and obstructing Congress to aid has reelection campaign by pressuring Ukraine to investigate his political rival. Joe Biden Supreme Court. Chief justice. John Roberts presided over Wednesday's phones. The presiding officer directs judgment to be entered in accordance with the judgment of the Senate as follows the Senate having tried Donald. John Trump the president of the United States upon two articles of impeachment exhibited against him by the House of Representatives and two thirds of the senators present not having found him guilty of the charges contained therein. It is therefore ordered and adjudged that the said Donald John Trump be and he is hereby Roy acquitted of the charges and said articles every democratic. Senator voted to remove president trump from office but they were joined by one Republican Publican Senator Mitt Romney of Utah who supported impeaching trump on one count to abuse of power senator. Romney became the first senator to ever vote. Vote against his own. Party's president in an impeachment trial. He spoke on the Senate floor prior to his vote. The allegations made in the articles of impeachment and are very serious as a senator juror. I swore an oath before God to exercise impartial justice. I am profoundly religious. My faith is at the heart of who I am Romney Chokes. I take an oath before God it as enormously consequential. I knew from the outset that being tasked with judging the president the leader by own party would be the most difficult difficult decision I have ever faced. I was not wrong. Senator Mitt. Romney went on to describe how he came to his decision. So the verdict is hours to render under our constitution. The people will judge us for how well and faithfully fulfill our duty. The grave question. The Constitution Task Senators to answer is whether the President committed an act so extreme and egregious that it rises to the level of a high crime and misdemeanor. Yes he did. The president asked a foreign government to investigate sagacious political rival. The president withheld vital military funds from the government to present to do so. The president delayed funds for an American ally ally at war with Russian invaders. The president's purpose was personal and political accordingly. The president is guilty guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust. What he did was not perfect? No it was a flagrant assault out. Under electoral rights. Our national security and our fundamental values corrupting and election to keep heap. Oneself in office is perhaps the most abusive and destructive violation of one's oath of office that I can imagine. President trump responded on twitter by hailing the acquittal vote as quote the country's victory and described the impeachment effort as a hoax. He also tweeted a video claiming Mitt Romney was a secret. Democratic Assert Donald Trump junior called for Romney to be expelled from the Republican Party while the impeachment trial is over the probe of president. Trump's actions could continue on Wednesday house. Judiciary Chair Jerry. Na Nadler said the house will likely subpoena former national security adviser is a John Bolton to talk more about President Trump's equival we're joined by Madison High Professor of American History University of Connecticut Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University author of the Slaves Cause a history of abolition professors. In how welcome back to democracy now I respond to the acquittal this was historic day The only the third time in. US history Senate impeachment trial was held. And yes indeed it's was Trump may think of this as You know having escaped being acquitted even though he remains impeached by the house. I do think though despite their critical that the with of legitimacy that has always been around this precedent ever since election the largest popular world loss. acusations a Russian meddling squeaking into the office through the Electoral College demeaning. The office Ah by his behavior. Korea flouting the rule of law What I think is this impeachment despite the acquittal reinforces that air of illegitimacy around trump? No matter how much she has been grandstanding In the state of the Union and the ways in which overwhelming majority of the Senate. GOP has has basically given him a blank check To do anything he wants and a professor sent high. If you could talk about the significance of Mitt Romney Eh voting against his party. He was the first senator to do so in an impeachment trial. I do think that Mitt Romney is true. Profile in courage Mike Pence and the Republicans have been hailing a corrupt Republican senator from the nineteenth century. who was bribed into quitting Johnson as a profile encourage But really it was Mitt Romney. I do not agree with Senator Romney's politics as arrested of Massachusetts. I regularly voted against him even though he was very popular I I certainly voted against him When he was running against Barack Obama in two thousand twelve but his speech yesterday struck me as historic Both in the ways in which he evoked his oath of office to the Constitution But also the ways in which he evoked his mormon faith His religious religiosity As as moving him to do the right thing as a historian of abolition I also also Appreciated that. I do think that Mitt Romney a will be looked on very kindly by history and I think it is mind boggling boggling that trump called him a democratic asset. I mean this man was the Republican presidential candidate in two thousand in twelve. It just goes to show how much of it's political and moral mooring the current GOP and its leader. Trump in the White House has lost. I'd like to turn to a contrast to Senator Romney. And that's Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska speaking on the Senate floor earlier this week. She called trump's behavior shameful but said she'd vote to acquit him the president's residents behavior with shameful and wrong his personal interest do not take precedence over those of this great nation. The president has the responsibility to uphold the integrity and the honor her of the office. Not Just for himself but for all future presidents degrading the office by actions actions or even name calling weakens it for future presidents and it weakens our country. The response to the president's behavior is not to disenfranchise nearly sixty three million Americans and remove him from the ballot that House could have have pursued censure and not immediately jumped to the remedy of last resort. I cannot vote to convict. So that's that's Alaska Republican Senator Murkowski in the midst of this trial. The questions were what would Murkowski Senator Collins of Maine. Ayn Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. Romney was pretty clear from the beginning. How he felt do Manisa NCAA? Professor of American History University She Connecticut Respond to what she says. And how the Republicans made this decision to acquit. I thought Professor Makaus case decision to vote against witnesses and evidence and also to eventually Acquit trump was deeply disappointing She had been very courageous. In voting against the confirmation off Brad Kavanagh one one of the few Republicans who had the gumption to do that so one was expecting better things from her and her a statement. Afterwards saying saying that Congress had failed was actually Some watt laughable because in fact she and the Senate Gop Gop had failed in this entire process. So I was deeply disappointed by Senator Murkowski. I do know that Mitch. McConnell as the Senate majority leader wields a lot of par- he also has a lot of monies that go into the reelection campaigns of the senators They they are also we hear from an op-ed by Senator Sherrod Brown off Ohio Extremely fearful of trump. Now that really is it's a step toward terrorism when you start fearing the great leader when you do not act on your principles when you do not act as senator of the United States following the rules and procedures of democratic governance I think that is a very scary time for American democracy. See well professor professor. I mean you're you're right about that because you think of what a president. Trump's response.

Senator Mitt Romney president Donald John Trump Senate Senator Lisa Murkowski senator Senator Mitt Senator John Trump Senator Sherrod Brown United States Senate Gop Gop GOP Congress professor Republican Party Alaska Amy Goodman Senator Collins high school district
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

Poetry Off The Shelf

08:09 min | 8 months ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

"Good white people not my phrase. I swear but my grandmother's when someone surprised her by holding open the door or by seeing that same high. See Stephanie Meals holds near the end of I have learned to respect the power of love or by gifting her with Turkey on the twenty fourth of December December after a year of not tipping her for cleaning with they could afford not to clean. You'll have to forgive my grandmother with her good hair and her good white people and her certified good slap across your mouth crack the beaten door to eat or saying but do not speak evil dead. Bad Black woman is still love. She didn't know what we know. In America. Today anyone can turn on a TV or look out a window to see several kinds of bird in the air while each face watching smiles and spits cusses and sings a single anthem of blood. Awed all stained she was ugly. I'm ugly you're ugly to no such thing as good white people thank you. Thank you and this is a poll on that. I don't read a lot because Even though I think it's clear people like to misunderstand it. I mean I can indefinitely feel the defensive reaction right where I'm like. Wait wait a minute. What about my cousin? Bob The only eats fish. Do you like so. There's a lot that this is especially toward. Its end about the fact of our investment in somebody calling us good and the truth about what we know in what we say and what we've experienced. Do you understand what I'm saying like. We are all all of us and especially white people. Yeah participating right. And I'm sorry we're not GONNA get anywhere until till my people can say that they are participating that they are benefiting people think racism is when something bad happens to me but racism is also so all the good things that happened to you just because you were white that you didn't even know happen to you today. The same a person passed by me and frowned pass by you and smiled. That was racism. Not just because they frowned at me. It was racism because they smile at you when you got a raise because you were white. That was racism and it was all the more racists because they didn't know they were giving it to you because you were white. Yeah they didn't know they were looking over me because I'm black do you. Do you understand what I'm saying. Truth if we're GONNA fix things so you know that's you know like no you don't you don't get to be out here trying to get away with foolishness because you wanNA call it yourself. Good right so I have Understanding a history A personal and I think a community History and experience that That has a lot to do with. Why I'm saying the things I say you know? I'm not just interested in what we do also interested in what we go. We take AAC for granted the conversation that they're black and brown families have with their kids about how to interact with. We pleases if that's okay and it's not we're in a political crisis we're in And we are in a crisis of the natural world. We're living in one right now and yet There is beauty. I'm excited about the fact that it's not not over. I'm excited about the fact that no matter what this world or this nation A. Does to us to me. Beauty is not over. You know people people will still fall in love. You know what I like to think about. I like to think about the fact. That Phillis Wheatley married somebody that she chose to marry very. I like to think about the fact that Phillis Wheatley the slave fill in love. Do you know what I mean. Yeah that's still possible under under all kinds of conditions people wanna do stuff like have children in love them to do stuff like cuddle with they mandate woman me I and and I think that's beautiful and I have to tell the truth about that and if I'm a poet if I'm any kind of a poet then I have to be able to look at something and see it for what it is and to see something something for what it is you see it for all its light and you see for all its darkness and nothing is completely like just is nothing is completely dark. Yeah I mean it reminds me of this this thing that Tony Morrison said That out of the monstrosity. That is slavery that that the people who were born under that system were themselves not monsters. Late what a triumph of the of the human spirit year. We're better than anything. The world throws it as. Aren't we in this something. Yeah I mean it. It is such a confusing thing I think too. I don't think everyone has the openness or or that space to hold Aldo's contrasting juice together you know so I'm wondering how do you keep yourself tethered right to to looking for that. Well I don't know if tethered is the word actually. Sometimes I don't feel tethered at all. It'll feel grounded and also think you know different people accept different roles and my understanding of what I was going to do When I when I fell ailing love poetry I fell in love with poetry because I was reading it and if you re poetry and you read about poets you very quickly figure out that throughout history and around the world? The poet is always sort of an outcast figure politicized figure a figure who people are afraid of or don't want to be around I sort of accepted my role as an outcast. Pretty early all understood that in many ways I wouldn't be allowed to be tethered third and I'm just I'm not afraid of difficulty. None of us are actually afraid of difficulty. And we just like to pretend that we are This is bad this is good and if we have to deal he'll with stuff that's in the middle Then we get a little confused and we do not like the people who make us deal with the stuff that you know. This is why people prefer preachers to poets. Do due to a yeah. Poetry like Well and it is difficult. It is difficult. I think to read these poems in front of an audience and on occasion I have and will but I don't think of that I have I have to say my Experience of that is not necessarily an experience bravery. Maybe when am I writing it. I do feel some fear like Oh my God. I'm saying this thing but like almost as soon as I do it. I'm really just trying to get my poem done because i WanNa make a good palm. How long do you want to make a lasting ass Paul? Jericho Brown is the author of three poetry collections. His debut view please which won the American book aboard the New Testament which one the atmosphere Wolf Book Award and his latest. The tradition which was on on every best of two thousand nineteen list. I've seen he has received a guggenheim fellowship. One from the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard. One from the national down for the arts and he wanted to whiting award. He's taught at the University of San Diego at Iowa and now teaches and directs the program of creative writing writing at emory university in Atlanta to find out more about his work. Check out the poetry foundation website. The music in this episode is by Todd sicker foods. I'm healing groups and this was poetry off the shelf. Thank you for listening..

Phillis Wheatley Stephanie Meals America Tony Morrison guggenheim fellowship Jericho Brown Radcliffe Institute at Harvard Atlanta emory university Todd University of San Diego Aldo Iowa Paul Bob The
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WDRC

"Welcome back. Lines and Jones a pleasure to be with. You were on the Stanford University campus this week at the Hoover Institution, which I should mention is celebrating its centennial this year. I want to mention as well that Victor Davis Hanson is going to join me on Friday very much looking forward to talking to him about the amazing success of his brand new book out just this week called the case for Trump. It is already number two on the best seller list beaten, only by Michelle Obama who admits herself she did not think her book was a blockbuster. Well, in that case, maybe the book publisher should take back some of the millions. She was paid for producing a book that is not a bestseller. Meyler? Shouldn't be dang case. How much confidence do you have that? The Muller investigation is going to be fair. I think it's a reasonable question to ask we're expecting as we've been saying for I think a month now any day now the Muller investigations going to be over one of his top investigators has already left the office. And that tells at least a few of the observe. Vers that it is likely that they Muller investigations going to come to an end finally after what two years thirty or forty million dollars of taxpayer money. No, nothing really to show for it. Well, the hill reports today that about six in ten Americans have at least some confidence in the impartiality a special counsel Robert Muller's investigation. According to a brand new poll from the Associated Press the poll finds sixty two percent of respondents have some level of confidence in Muller's investigation about thirty three percent said they were very confident thirty-seven percent said they were not very or not at all confident in the investigations fairness. Well, let me tell you something. I think we know what is going to come out of this. I think that if it had been anything negative for Donald Trump. We would have already seen the leaks of those things we would have already seen some indictments. Brought what have we seen come out of it? So far a bunch of ROY. Russian foreign nationals not connected to Donald Trump. Who ran a rather miniscule social media campaign during the two thousand sixteen election, people indicted in that case, but again, nothing to do with Donald Trump, the indictment of Paul Manafort for tax crimes, a decade old and a bunch of other collection of other cases like that that again have nothing to do with Russian collusion. So I have a feeling that the reason that we're seeing this thing wind down and Democrats and their friends in the fake stream media are suggesting that they're lowering expectations because they know this is not going to be a winner for them, which means Donald Trump can run for reelection beginning this year and heading into next year with a Muller investigation that essentially vindicates everything he said that the thing was a witch hunt from the very get go. So also on the agenda tonight. Do you own the photographs of your ancestors? Now. This is an interesting case, I have some photos, not ancestors. I mean, most of the photos, I have her family photos that go back less than a hundred years, but do you own those photos, a Connecticut woman is now suing Harvard for allegedly profiting from early images of African slaves who she claims are her ancestors tamra Lanier claims that the images taken in eighteen fifty depict an African man by the name of Renton who was her. Great great. Great grandfather and his daughter. Delilah Lanier says in the lawsuit the images were used by a Harvard professor to support a racist scientific theories of their inferiority. So in other words, this is the kind of research that does not even currently published anymore. She reportedly accuses the university of wrongful seizure possession and monetization of the images and claims at Harvard has ignored her request to stop licensing the images her law. Suit cites numerous cases in which Harvard used the images as a source of income such as the cover of a twenty seventeen book published by the Peabody museum and a program for a twenty seventeen conference that was hosted by one of the universities organizations. The Radcliffe institute for advanced study, I don't know if you have an old picture, and you think it might be one of your family members from way way way back when do you own that photo because you have a blood relation to that person. I'd have to say no now if you're thinking that the only crazy ideas coming out of the democrat clown car that how has somewhere between twelve and sixteen different candidates in it all of them vying for the democrat nomination Ono, the crazy ideas of just begun, for example, daily caller reports tonight the democrat presidential candidate, Andrew Yang. You've heard him on this program. He's the guy who suggested that his plan is. Is to give a thousand dollars a month to everyone over the age of eighteen whether they work a job or not whether they want to work or not whether they're capable of working or not a thousand dollars a month. Of course, when you're spending other people's money. It's hard to beat a candidate who acts like Santa Claus. Well, now, he says the federal government will punish media companies for spreading misinformation if he wins in two thousand twenty the next time we've got Andrew Yang on the program is as I said he's been on the program before I need to ask him. If he's read the constitution recently can the government punish you for publishing things that you say are untrue. Now, I've had people call this show who are good loyal listeners of the LARs Larson show. And they've said why we should punish people if they say untrue things. Well, the problem is an awful lot of things that are debated and politics. You can't say if they're true or untrue. Even when it comes to number things. I mean, I've made the case that I think President Obama produced a rather lackluster economy for eight years that he did things in the garment that caused the economy to be really lousy. Now, Donald Trump. I would say has promoted a vigorous economy by cutting regulations by encouraging the congress to cut taxes and the like, but could I prove that the Donald Trump tax cuts and the Donald Trump regulation cuts have actually produced that economy is that misinformation or is it a misreading of the information? I'm not even sure how you determine what part of it is true. And what part of it is not true Yang's proposal would introduce penalties for persistent and destructive misstatements that undermine public discourse wide say that both sides seem to engage in some of that. But do you think under the first amendment of the constitution, you could constitutionally allow the government to punish people for publishing things? I think the government should only limit when people say. Say things that actually produce peril. In other words, if you say something that puts people's lives in danger classically that's shouting, Allahu Akbar in a crowded theatre. No, you can't do that. Otherwise, the government should stay out of it. The average interest rate on a credit card debt. Have you looked at it? Eighteen.

Donald Trump Robert Muller Andrew Yang Trump Harvard President Obama Victor Davis Hanson Stanford University Hoover Institution Jones publisher federal government Radcliffe institute LARs Larson Peabody museum Associated Press Allahu Akbar Delilah Lanier Paul Manafort special counsel
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So I want to ask you also you have been struggling with kidney disease now. Over the last few years. Do you have a donor? I've been reading about your. Did that happen? Well, my kid, my kidneys have have continued my kids as I call them. How how are your kids? People ask me my kids have been behaving. Well, and so I have not. I have not yet had to even cross the threshold of getting a donor finally approved. You don't what what I what occurs to me is? I wondered how this experience has flowed into all the thinking you've done and all the passion you've put all this year's towards thinking about our bodies as at once private and public. Yes. And the concept of donation the concept. I mean, I'm fat it really extended my consciousness around the notion that the whole idea of the gift of life. And I have written a little bit about the relationship between someone giving a part of their body to me. And that. It's like this is so terrible. It's sort of like communion. Okay. That apart of someone else's body is going to be enemy for the rest of my life. And a foreign part that I am going to have to work through drugs. For my body. Not to reject it. These are very interesting philosophical reflections that I've made also for example, when somebody gives a kidney. We applaud that person. As the most altruistic of human beings, but women give their bodies every day. To a fetus to bring it into the world. And every pregnancy carries with it, the risk of death pregnancy is normal having babies is normal. It's natural. It's no big deal that women do this. It is a big deal that women give their bodies to bringing new life into the world. I've always thought that if we were really talking about this theologically as opposed to politically. Yeah, we would have to speak in terms of gifts rather than rights. I mean rights exact concepts foreign to the bible, but gift, but choice and life, right? Right. What do you think you've learned about how social change happens like what what would progress? Look like now in these years. Ahead of you with your own kidneys with other people. Well, I mean, that's very that's a very difficult question. What have I learned? I guess. Really? Something I learned when I left Catholics for choice three years ago. And I was lucky enough to get a fellowship to go to Harvard at the Radcliffe institute. I learned a great deal there about how we learn. And how we communicate with each other. It was it was really remarkable experience and that. The need to approach others positively and with enthusiasm for difference. Is absolutely critical to any change. There is no way to change. Somebody. I'm like, I'm the toughest defied IRS. Let's let's be very clear. I mean, my reputation for being devastating. In debate is legendary but. And I love a good fight. But I I love to win. But I think that what I have learned is that, you know, the the simplistic way of putting it is that you can catch more flies with Honey than vinegar, you that that's a very wise saying, but I have learned that change really first of all I think change comes about at the margins. I've always believed that people in the center are not going to be the big change makers. You've got to put yourself at the margins and be willing to risk in order to make change. But more importantly, you have got to approach differences as I said with this notion that there is good in the other. It's that's it. And that if we can't figure out how to do that. And if we keep thinking, if both sides on the abortion, if there isn't the crack in the middle where there are some people on both sides who absolutely refuse to see the other as evil. This is going to continue. What I think is really emboldening to others. Let's say to people might be listening about what you to set his thinking about change on the margins as opposed to the margins where you were marginalized right because this model this approach you're talking about it really does fly in the face of the logic. And the the etiquette of what happens in politics. What happens on TV talk shows? But you're saying that still is is where the pressure comes that makes it right? Right. And there's a lot of pressure to be that way. It's much easier to be that way. It's much easier. Much easier to you know, like a again, it's it's the preaching to the choir. Versus listening to people who disagree with you. And you know, the choirs already. They're choir doesn't need us..

Harvard IRS Radcliffe institute three years
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"KFI AM six forty And welcome back to coast to coast. George Noory with you we've got a great couple. Hours here for you the great couple more. Hours later on tonight but Sharon Weinberger with us executive editor at the foreign policy and is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe institute for advanced study at Harvard University in a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson. International center for scholars she's also held fellowships at MIT's, Knight science journalism program the international reporting program at Johns Hopkins School, of Advanced International Studies and northwestern university's. Miguel school of journalism she's written on military science. And technology for nature, the BBC discover slate wired, and the Washington Post and others or latest book is called the imagine years. Of war in here. Sharon, is on coast-to-coast Sharon looking forward to talk with you and welcome to the show first, time you've been on I I. Understand yet it is thanks for having lots to talk about DARPA Who created. It so DARPA is a, creation of the defense department that was created back in nineteen fifty eight as a direct, result of the Soviet Union's launched. Sputnik in the fall of nineteen fifty seven The idea was that Sputnik was a psychological defeat for the United States it's the union was a head of the United States and the arms race I'm answering. The space race but also signal more fundamentally that the technology needed to launch a rocket. Into space was linked to the technology that could be. Used to launch, an intercontinental ballistic missile against the United States it's it's signal the end. Of an era post World War Two of US invincibility idea the Soviet Union could send a nuclear weapon United States so President Eisenhower authorized the creation of what became the nation's first space agency. Before now so there was Dr our Arp as it was called at the time that was going to consolidate all, of the rocket. Programs in all the space programs into one agency under the defense department I was seven years old when Sputnik I went up Sharon and I remember my parents and how nervous they appear Cheered when Sputnik was up there I mean who. Was his little basketball size satellite that didn't do much but you right. The Russians the Soviets at the time they got one up there before we. Did did our intelligence even, know that they were about to launch that yes and no so there's both the reality of Sputnik and then some of the midst behind it so of course I mean the very fact. That you remember it that people from that era even even children were member that idea. Gather their parents being scared that there was this beeping. Satellites overhead but, the reality at the time was that President Eisenhower downplayed it initially we. Did not come off well politically at all he was accused of being weak especially by Lyndon Johnson but the idea was he had he knew about classified program secret programs at the public didn't. Know about he knew the United States had the U2. on this high flying aircraft that could fly into Soviet territory He also. Knew that, the CIA the intelligence community we're working on the first reconnaissance earth imaging. Satellites that would be able to take pictures from outer space but? He couldn't talk. About that publicly it was well known that the Soviet Union was developing rockets it. Was well-known they're, developing ICBM's, as was the United States the Soviet Union was a little bit, ahead basically I'm thruster technology they were months ahead but it came on one hand it wasn't shock for, the intelligence committee yes they got their first on the other hand. What, was a shop was how this was going to. Play publicly that it was really, gonna come off as. A symbolic defeat for the United States in a huge symbolic, psychological win for the Soviet Union when we. Formed DARPA then were we scrambling or was it a very logical progression when they put the agency together Oh it was very much, scrambling on one hand? Eisenhower knew some of these things the public didn't know on the other hand. He was dealing with. This sort of panic and political fallout from the event that could kind of be compared to what. Happened after nine eleven the United States and what was, true was the United States had not. Organized their space programs well the army the navy and the. Airforce were also. Just competing with their own rocket programs you. Had Verner von Braun and the German rock. And, saw the rocket. Scientists were stuck down, in Alabama who is basically you. Know we have a rocket that can. Go, into space but the United States it a, place its I bet with a navy program called vanguard that wasn't, going very well I'm so things were a message very quickly in Washington you know when you want to, fix the problem in Washington what. Do you do you create a new agency and so very quickly they put forward this proposal I'm the first one Be just called. Special projects agency and, their word that'd be confused with special operations so. They came up with, a bland name the advanced research projects agency and what was so interesting is it was really thought of as a temporary measure this wasn't, something they thought was. Going to be around for sixty years it was it was kind of a. Quick, fix throw, some bandaids on it and in fact the directive creating what became known as. DARPA basically said this agency is going to you know do such projects as directed by secretary of defense like that was, its whole, remit with the idea that space was going to, be the first part of it but. It was very quick haphazard you know when DARPA. Opened stores in early nineteen. Fifty it was essentially one employee director and when when, the Soviets, got Sputnik up there they too had a German, brain power after the? War to we you know we got our parts they got theirs were their. German scientists the ones Got Sputnik. Up there Well you know what's. Interesting about that period so as you, talk about, at a you know with Germany's defeat, in World War Two the next thing was who is going to, get these, rocket scientists, east German rocket scientists and the United States really got the cream. Of, the crop there, Brandon his rocket scientists the Soviets. Were kind of left I, don't? Wanna say what, what what was left. But they took you the Soviets took. A lot of equipment they got, less of the people but they did get. Some German rocket scientists so there are these great minutes from the US national Security Council after the launch of Sputnik, where they're, talking about you know how is this gonna play, publicly, and they're like well we're going to claim the Soviet Union was the head because they got all the, good German rocket scientists. Which is wasn't true the cream of the crop went. To the United States so like, what the United States what the Soviet Union did had helped them. With their rocket program but you can't say that the German rockets Scientists made the Soviet rocket program they got some. Of the people they got some, of the equipment but it was dot in combination with Soviet scientists. And more importantly you know what democracy is Work really well. For certain, things but the one advantage should have an historic. -tarian regime has the Soviet Union had the time is that you don't have to deal with doing Iraqis you know you could have you know the story. Turn regime. Can just make a decision you're. Not gonna have the army navy. And air force all lobbying for, their funds to the Soviet Union was able to. Sit up with, a singular goal? Move forward More quickly than nited states could so what does Dr darker doing now sharing Well, in some ways DARPA is doing what it was doing some sixty years. Ago meaning it is doing. Such projects has directed by. The secretary of defense they're still doing space programs they're still doing new technologies one of the sort of what I would. Call a Methodist developed over the. Years that we sort of look back retrospectively I'm what was dark as mission I'm a lot? Of. What came out over the years is. You know what is DARPA do okay DARPA -sposed, to stop Sputnik lakes surprises so DARPA will often say that are you. Know, our goal stopped technological surprise which means to stay ahead of the adversary well that's changed. A lot in the past twenty years with the fall. Of the, Soviet Union the United States really doesn't have a close pure adversary, you know maybe China is is getting. Close in some technologies like hypersonic weapons maybe In. Some areas Russia's still, keeping up but really the United States is ahead but but what DARPA. Continues to do is invest. In sort of technologies that. Are far reaching in some cases futuristic but I would say this mythology of what it does has become more and more. Over the years I think there's. More the impression these days it's a science fiction agency and indeed that was always part of. The. DNA of the agency but I was. A mixed back in the early days you know, because Sputnik was his immediate thing so yes star at its earliest days. Did, very sort of futuristic projects one of its first projects was an attempt to create a. Force field around the earth to stop inter continental ballistic. Weapons that, that was very few Charles like Star Wars and Star Trek doesn't, it We're..

United States Soviet Union DARPA Sputnik President Eisenhower Sharon Weinberger George Noory BBC Washington Post KFI MIT secretary Sputnik lakes Miguel school Woodrow Wilson Radcliffe institute Verner von Braun Lyndon Johnson Harvard University
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:46 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Welcome back to coast to coast. George Noory with you we've got a great couple. Hours here for you the great couple more. Hours later on tonight but Sharon Weinberger with us executive editor at the foreign policy in his currently a fellow at the Radcliffe institute for advanced study at Harvard University in a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson. International center for scholars she's also held fellowships at MIT's, Knight science journalism program the international reporting program at Johns Hopkins School, of Advanced International Studies and northwestern university's. Miguel school of journalism she's written on military science. And technology for nature, the BBC discover slate wired, and the Washington Post and others were latest book is called the imagine years. Of war in here Sharon is on Costa kosher and looking forward to talk with you and welcome to the show first, time, you've been on I. I understand it is thanks for having me lots to talk about DARPA Who. Created it so DARPA is a creation of the defense department it was created back in nineteen fifty eight as a direct, result, of the Soviet Union's. Launched Sputnik in the fall of nineteen fifty seven The idea was that Sputnik was a psychological defeat for the United States the Soviet Union was ahead of the United States and the arms race I'm sorry in. The space race but also signal more fundamentally that the technology needed. To launch a rocket into space was linked to. The technology that could be used to launch an intercontinental ballistic missile against the United States it's sort of signaled the end of an era Post World War Two of US visibility idea the Soviet Union to send a nuclear weapons United States so. President Eisenhower authorized the creation of what became the nation's first, space agency before. Now said, there was Dr by Arp as it was called at the time that. Was going to consolidate all of the rocket programmed in all the. Space programs into one agency under the defense department I was seven years. Old when Sputnik I went up Sharon and I remember my parents and. How nervous they appeared when Sputnik, was up there was his little basketball size satellite that didn't do much but you right the Russians the Soviets at the time they got one up there before we did did our intelligence. Even know that they were about to launch that No so there's both the reality of Sputnik. And then some of the myths behind it so of course, the very fact. That you, remember it that people from that era even children were member that idea. Either their parents being scared that there was this beeping satellites overhead But the. Reality at the time was that President Eisenhower should have downplayed initially we did not come off well politically. At all he was accused of being weak especially by Lyndon Johnson but the idea was he had he. Knew about classified program secret programs it's public didn't know, about she knew the United States had. The U2. on this high flying aircraft that could fly. Into Soviet territory. He also knew that the CIA and the. Intelligence community we're working on the first reconnaissance. Earth, imaging satellites that. Would be able to, take pictures from outer space but. He couldn't talk about that publicly it. Was, well-known that the Soviet, Union. Was developing rockets it was well-known they're developing ICBM's as was the United States the. Soviet Union was, a little bit ahead basically I'm thruster technology they were months ahead, but it came on one hand it wasn't shocked for the intelligence committee yes they got their first On the, other, hand what, was a shock was how this was going, to play publicly that it was really gonna come off as a symbolic. Defeat, for the United States and a huge symbolic psychological. Win for the Soviet Union when, we formed DARPA then. Were we scrambling or was it a very logical progression when they put. The agency together it was. Very much scrambling on one hand Eisenhower knew some of these things the public didn't know on the other. Hand he was dealing with this sort of panic and political fallout from the event that could kind of. Be compared to what happened after nine eleven the United, States and what was true the United. States had not organized their space programs well the army. The navy and. The airforce were also just competing with their. Own rocket programs you had Verner von Braun. And, the German rock. Inside the rocket scientists, were stuck down in Alabama who. Said basically you know we have a. Rocket, that can go into To space but the United States it a place, its I bet with the navy program called vanguard that wasn't going very well, so yes things were a message very quickly in Washington when you, want to fix the problem in Washington what do you do you create new agency and so very quickly they put forward this proposal on. The I was be called special projects agency and their word that'd be confused with special operations so they came up, with the name the advanced research projects agency and what was so interesting is it was really thought. Of as a temporary, measure this wasn't something they thought was going to be around for sixty years it was it was kind of a quick fix throw some, bandaids on it and in fact the directive. Creating what became known as DARPA basically said this. Agency, is going, to you know do such projects as directed by the secretary of defense like. You know that was its whole remit with the idea that space was going to be the first part of, it, but it, was very quick haphazard when DARPA opened its Stores and early nineteen fifty eight was essentially, one employee, director and when when the Soviets got Sputnik up there. They, too had, a German brain power after the war to we you know we got our parts they got theirs were, their German scientists the ones that got Sputnik up there Well you know what's interesting about that period. So as you talk about at a you know with Germany's defeat, in World War Two. You know the next thing was who. Is going to get these rocket, scientists east German rocket scientists and the United. States really got the cream of the crop during Navan Brown and his rocket scientists the Soviets were kind of left wanna say what what was left? But they, took, you the Soviets took a lot of equipment they got less of the people but they did get some, German rocket scientists so. There are these great minutes from the US national Security. Council after the launch of Sputnik, where they're talking about how is this gonna play publicly they're like well. We're going to claim the Soviet Union was a head because they got all the good German rocket scientists which is wasn't true the cream of, the crop went to the United States so like what the United. States what, the Soviet Union did, had it helped them with their rocket, program but you can't say that the Rocket scientists, made the Soviet rocket. Program they got some of the people. They got some of the equipment, but it was dot in combination with Soviet. Scientists and more importantly you know what you know democracy is work really well for certain things but the one advantage should have an authoritarian regime has? The Soviet, Union, had the time is that you don't have to deal with doing bureaucracies you know you can have you, know the story Terry. Regime can just make a decision you're not gonna have. The army navy and air force, all lobbying for their funds to the Soviet Union was able to sit. With a singular goal move forward More quickly than nited states could so what does Dr Pepper doing now Sharon Well, in some ways DARPA is doing what it was doing some sixty years. Ago meaning it is doing. Such projects has directed by. The secretary of defense they're still doing space programs they're still doing new technologies one of the sort of what I would call a method is developed over. The years that we sort of looked back retrospectively on what was his mission I'm a lot of what came out, over the years. Is you know what is DARPA do DARPA supposed, to stop Sputnik likes surprises so DARPA will often say that are you. Know, our goal stopped technological surprise which means to stay ahead of the adversary well that's changed. A lot in the past twenty years with the fall. Of the, Soviet Union the United States really doesn't have a close pure adversary, you know maybe China is is getting. Close in some technologies like hypersonic weapons? Maybe In some areas Russia, is still keeping up at the United States is ahead but but what. DARPA continues to do is. Invest in sort of technologies. That are far reaching in some cases futuristic but I would say this mythology of what it does has become more and more over the years I think. There's more the impression these days it's a science fiction agency and indeed that was always part of the DNA of, the agency but. I was a mixed back in the early days, because Sputnik was his immediate thing so yes start at its earliest days. Did, very sort of futuristic projects one of its first project was an attempt to create a. Force field around the earth to stop inter continental ballistic. Weapons that, that was very few Charles like Star Wars and Star Trek doesn't, it Exactly. You're gonna, come back in a moment Sharon and.

Soviet Union United States DARPA President Eisenhower Sharon Sputnik Sharon Weinberger George Noory secretary BBC Washington Post MIT Miguel school Woodrow Wilson Radcliffe institute Harvard University Lyndon Johnson Verner von Braun
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Welcome. Back to coast to coast George Noory with you. We've got a great couple hours here for. You the great couple more hours later on tonight but Sharon Weinberger with us executive editor at the foreign policy and is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe institute for. Advanced study at Harvard University in a global. Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars she's, also held fellowships at MIT's Knight science journalism program the national reporting, program at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced. International Studies and northwestern university's middle school of journalism. She written on military, science and technology for nature, the BBC discover slate wired and the Washington Post and others or. Latest book is, called the imagined. Years, of war and here's Sharon is on coast-to-coast Sharon looking forward to talk with you and. Welcome to the show first time you've been on I I understand did thanks for, having, me, lots, to talk, about Dr Who created it So DARPA is a creation of. The defense department it was created back in nineteen fifty eight as a direct result of the Soviet Union's launched Sputnik in the fall of nineteen fifty seven The idea was that Sputnik was a psychological defeat for the United States in the union was a head of the United States in the arms race I'm sorry in the space race but. It also signalled more fundamentally that the technology needed to. Launch a rocket into space was linked to the. Technology that could be used to launch an intercontinental ballistic missile against the United States it's sort of it's signaled the end of an era Post World War Two of US invincibility idea the Soviet Union could send a nuclear weapon denied. States so President Eisenhower authorized the creation of what became the, nation's first space. Agency before, now so there was Dr by or Arp as it was called at. The time that was going to consolidate all of the rocket programs. In all the space programs into one agency under the defense department I was seven years old when Sputnik I went up Sharon and I remember my. Parents and how nervous they appeared, when Sputnik was up there was his little basketball size satellite that didn't do much but you right the Russians the Soviets at the time they got one up there before we did did our. Intelligence even know that they were about to launch that No so there's both the reality of Sputnik and then some. Of the myths behind it so of course I mean the, very fact that. You remember, it that people from that era even even children were member that idea. Either their parents being scared that there was this beeping satellites overhead The reality at the time was that President Eisenhower should have downplayed it initially we did not come. Off well politically at all he was accused of being weak especially by Lyndon Johnson but the idea was. He had he knew about classified program secret programs it's, public didn't know about he knew the. United States had the U2. on this high flying aircraft that. Could fly into. Soviet territory he also knew that the CIA. And the intelligence community we're working on the. First, reconnaissance earth imaging. Satellites that would be, able to take pictures from outer. Space but he couldn't talk about that. Publicly, it was well known, that. The Soviet Union was developing rockets it was well-known they're developing ICBM's as was the. United States the, Soviet Union, was a little bit ahead basically I'm thruster technology they were months, ahead but it came on one hand it wasn't shock for the intelligence committee yes they got their first On the, other, hand what, was a shock with how this was going to play publicly that it was really gonna come off as a symbolic defeat, for the United States and a huge symbolic psychological. Win for the Soviet Union when, we formed DARPA then. Were we scrambling or was it a very logical progression when they put. The agency together oh it. Was very much scrambling on one hand Eisenhower knew some of these things the public didn't know on the. Other hand he was dealing with this sort of panic and political fallout from the event that could be. Compared to what happened after nine eleven the United States, and what was true was the United. States had not organized their space programs well the army the. Navy and the, airforce were also just competing with their own. Rocket programs you had Verner von Braun and. The, German rock and. Saw the rocket scientists, were stuck down in Alabama who. Said basically you know we have a. Rocket, that can go into The space but the United States at a placed it's I, bet with the navy program called, vanguard that, wasn't going very well I'm so yes things, wore a message very quickly in Washington you know when you want, to fix the problem in Washington what do you do you create a new agency and so very quickly they put forward this proposal on. The I was just called special projects agency they're worried that be confused with special operations so they came up with? A, bland name the advanced research. Projects agency and what was so interesting is it was really thought of. As a temporary measure, this wasn't something they thought was going to be around for sixty years it was was kind of a quick fix throw some, bandaids on it and. In fact the directed creating what became known as DARPA basically said this agency? Is, going to, you know do such projects as directed by the secretary of defense like you. Know that was its whole remit what did you that space was going to be the first part of that but, it, was very, quick Howard you know when DARPA opened its Stores and early nineteen fifty, eight essentially, one employee director and when when the Soviets got Sputnik. Up, there they, too had a German brain. Power after the war to we you know we got our parts they got, theirs were their German scientists the, ones that, got Sputnik up there Well, you know what's interesting about that period. So as you talk about at. A you know with Germany's? Defeat? In World War? Two in the next thing was who is going to. Get these rocket scientists these German, rocket scientists in the United States really got. The cream of the crop their Navan Brown and his rocket scientists the Soviets were kind of left I want wanna say what what what was left but they took, the, Soviets took a lot of equipment they got less of the people but they did get some German rocket scientists so. There are these great minutes from the US national Security. Council after the launch of Sputnik, where they're talking about how is this gonna play publicly and they're. Like well we're going to claim the Soviet Union was the head because they got all the good German rocket scientists wasn't true the cream, of the crop went to the United States so like what the. United States, what the Soviet Union, did had helped them with their rocket, program but you can't say that the German rocket scientists made the Soviet rocket program they. Got some of the people they, got some of the equipment but it was. Dot in combination with Soviet scientists and more importantly you know what democracy work really well for certain things but the one advantage of an authoritarian regime HUD Soviet Union, had, the time is that you don't have to deal with doing bureaucracies you know you could have you know return regime. Can just make a decision you're not gonna have the. Army navy and air force all, lobbying for their funds to the Soviet Union was able to sit. With a singular goal move forward More quickly than nights states could so what does Dr Pepper doing now sharing Well, in some ways DARPA is doing what it was doing some sixty years. Ago meaning it is doing. Such projects has directed by. The secretary of defense they're still doing space programs they're still doing new technologies one of the sort of what I would call a method is developed over the. Years that we sort of look back retrospectively on what was, dark as mission I'm a lot of what came out over, the years is you. Know what is Dr Peduto he DARPA spouse to stops but Nick likes surprises so DARPA will often say that are you. Know, our goal stop technological surprise which means to stay ahead of the adversary well that's changed. A lot in the past twenty years with the fall. Of the, Soviet Union the United States really doesn't have a close pure adversary, you know maybe China is is getting. Close in some technologies like hypersonic weapons maybe In some areas Russia, is still keeping up at really the United States is ahead but but. What DARPA continues to do. Is invest in sort of. Technologies that are far reaching in some cases futuristic but I would say this mythology of what it does has become more and more over the years I think. There's more the impression these days it's a science fiction agency and indeed that was always part of the DNA of the, agency but I it. Was a mix back in the early days you know because Sputnik was immediate thing so yes start at its earliest days. Did, very sort of futuristic projects one of its first project was an attempt to create a. Force field around the earth to stop inter continental ballistic. Weapons that, that was very few Charles like Star Wars and Star Trek doesn't, it Exactly you're gonna come back in a moment Sharon and take more questions.

United States Soviet Union DARPA Sharon Weinberger President Eisenhower HUD Soviet Union George Noory Washington Post Harvard University Johns Hopkins School of Advanc BBC secretary Radcliffe institute MIT International Studies Lyndon Johnson Verner von Braun Woodrow Wilson international c
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

09:46 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WRVA

"To coast George Noory with you. We've got a great couple hours here for. You the great couple more hours later on tonight but Sharon Weinberger with us executive editor at the foreign policy and is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe institute for advanced study at Harvard University and a global. Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars she's, also held fellowships at MIT's Knight science journalism program the international reporting, program at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced. International Studies and northwestern university's Miguel school of journalism. She's written on military, science and technology for nature, the BBC discover slate wired and the Washington Post and others or. Latest book is, called the imagine years of war and here's Sharon is on coast to and looking forward to talk with you and, welcome to the. Show, first time. You've been on I I understand yes it is thanks for, having, made, lots, to, talk, about Dr Who created it So DARPA is a creation of the defense department that was created back in nineteen fifty eight as a direct result of the Soviet Union's launched Sputnik in the fall of nineteen fifty seven The idea, was that Sputnik was a psychological defeat for the United States it said that the Soviet Union was a head of the United States and the arms race I'm sorry in the space race. But also signal more fundamentally that the technology needed to launch a rocket into space was linked to the technology that could be used, to launch an. Intercontinental ballistic missile, against the United States it's it's signal the end of an era post. World War Two of US invincibility the idea that you could send a nuclear weapons the United States so President Eisenhower authorized the creation of what became the nation's first space agency before now so there. Was Dr by or Arp as it was called at the time that was going to consolidate all of the rocket. Programs and all the space programs into one agency under the defense department I was seven years old when Sputnik I went up Sharon and I remember my parents and how nervous they appear Appeared when Sputnik was up there was his little basketball size satellite that didn't do much but you right the Russians the Soviets at, the time they. Got one up, there before we did did our intelligence even know that they were about. To launch that yes and no so there's both the reality of Sputnik and then some of the myths behind it so of course I mean the very fact that you remember it that people from. That era even even children were member that idea either their parents being scared that there was this beeping satellites overhead But the reality at. The time was that president Eisenhower's downplayed it initially we did. Not come off. Well politically at all he was accused of. Being weak especially by Lyndon Johnson but the. Idea, was he had. He knew about classified, program secret programs it's public didn't. Know about he knew the United States. Had, the U2. on this high flying aircraft that could. Fly Soviet territory he also knew that the CIA and the, intelligence community we're. Working on, the first reconnaissance earth imaging satellites that would be able to take pictures. From outer space but he couldn't talk about that publicly it was? Well known that. The Soviet Union was developing rockets it was well-known they're developing ICBM's as what the. United States the, Soviet Union, was a little bit ahead basically I'm thruster technology they were months, ahead but it came on one hand it wasn't shock for the intelligence committee yes they got their first All the other hand what was a, shock was, how this was going to play publicly that, it was really gonna come off as a symbolic defeat for the. United, States and a huge symbolic psychological win for the. Soviet Union when we formed DARPA, then were we scrambling. Or was it a very logical progression when they put the agency together. Oh it was very much. Scrambling on one hand Eisenhower knew some of these things the public didn't know on the other hand. He was dealing with this sort of panic and political fallout from the event that could kind of be. Compared to what happened after nine eleven the United States, and what was true was the United. States had not organized their space programs well the army the. Navy and the. Airforce were also just competing with their own. Rocket programs you had Verner von Braun and. The, German rock and. Saw the rocket scientists, were stuck down in Alabama who. A basically you know we have a. Rocket, that can go into Space but the United States that that have placed its first, batch with the navy program called. Vanguard that wasn't going very well I'm, so yeah things wore a message very quickly in Washington you know, when you want to fix the problem in Washington what do you do you create a new agency and so very quickly they put forward. This proposal on that I was be just called special projects agency and they're worried that'd be confused with special operations? So, they came up with a. Bland name the advanced research projects agency and what was so interesting is. It was really thought, of as a temporary measure this wasn't something they thought was going to be around for sixty years it was it was kind of a, quick fix throw some. Bandaids on it and in fact the directive creating what became known as DARPA. Basically, said this, agency is going to you know do such projects as directed by the secretary. Of defense like you know that was its whole remit the idea that space was going to be the first part of, it but, it was very quick haphazard when DARPA opened Stores and early nineteen fifty eight was essentially one employee, director and, when when the Soviets got Sputnik up there they too. Had, a German, brain power after the war. To we you know we got our parts they got theirs were their, German scientists the ones that got Sputnik up there Well, you know what's interesting about that period. So as you talk about at. At you know with Germany's defeat, in? World War Two, you know the next thing was who is going to. Get these rocket scientists east German, rocket scientists and the United States really. Got the cream of the crop their Navan Brown and his rocket scientists the Soviets were kind of left I don't want to say what what what was left but, they, took the Soviets took a lot of equipment they got less of the people but they get some German, rocket scientists so there. Are these great minutes from the US national Security Council. After the launch of Sputnik where, they're talking about how is this gonna play publicly and they're like. Well we're going to claim the Soviet Union was a. Head because they got all the good German rocket scientists which is wasn't true the, cream of the crop went to the United States so like what. The United, States what the Soviet, Union did had helped them with their, rocket program but you can't say that German rocket, scientists made the Soviet rocket program they got some of. The people they got some of, the equipment but it was not in. Combination with Soviet scientists more importantly you know what you know democracy work really well for certain things but the one advantage should have an authoritarian regime has Soviet Union, had, the time is it you don't have to deal with doing bureaucracies you know you could have you know, authoritarian regime can just. Make a decision you're not gonna have the army navy. And air force all lobbying for, their funds to the Soviet Union was able to sort of with. A singular goal move forward More quickly than nited states could so what does Dr Pepper doing now Sharon Well, in some ways DARPA is doing what it was doing some sixty years. Ago meaning it is doing. Such projects has directed by. The secretary of defense they're still doing space programs they're still doing new technologies one of the sort of what I would call a method is developed over the. Years that we should have looked back retrospectively on what, was dark as mission a lot. Of what came out over the years is. You know what has DARPA duo he DARPA spouse, to stop Sputnik lakes surprises so, DARPA will often say that are you know. Our, goal is stop technological surprise which means to stay ahead of the adversary well that's changed. A lot in the past twenty years with the fall. Of the, Soviet Union the United States really doesn't have a close pure adversary, you know maybe China is is getting. Close in some technologies like hypersonic weapons? Maybe In. Some areas Russia is, still keeping up at really the United States is ahead but but what. DARPA continues to do is. Invest in sort of technologies. That are far reaching in some cases futuristic but I would say this mythology of what it does has become more and more over the years I think there's. More the impression these days it's a science fiction agency, and indeed that was always part. Of the DNA of the agency but I. It was a mixed back in the early days, you know because Sputnik was immediate, thing so yes DARPA at its earliest days. Did, very sort of futuristic projects one of its first project was an attempt to create a. Force field around the earth to stop inter continental ballistic. Weapons that, that was very few Charles like Star Wars and Star Trek doesn't, it Exactly you're gonna come back in a moment Sharon and take more.

United States DARPA Soviet Union Sharon President Eisenhower Miguel school of journalism Sharon Weinberger Johns Hopkins School of Advanc George Noory Washington Post BBC secretary Radcliffe institute MIT Lyndon Johnson Harvard University Woodrow Wilson international c Verner von Braun International Studies
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And welcome. Back to coast to coast George Noory with you. We've got a great couple hours here for. You the great couple more hours later on tonight but Sharon Weinberger with us executive editor at the foreign policy and is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe institute for. Advanced study at Harvard University in a global. Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars she's, also held fellowships at MIT's Knight science journalism program the international reporting, program at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced. International Studies and northwestern university's Miguel school of journalism. She's written on military, science and technology for nature, the BBC discover slate wired and the Washington Post and others or. Latest book is called the imagined years. Of, war and here's Sharon is on to coast Sharon looking forward to talk with you and, welcome to the. Show, first time. You've been on I I understand yes it is thanks for, having, me, lots, to talk, about Dr Who created it so. DARPA, is creation of the defense department it was created back in nineteen fifty eight as a, direct, result of. The, Soviet Union's. Launched Sputnik in the fall of nineteen fifty seven The idea was that Sputnik was a psychological defeat for the United States that the Soviet Union was head of the United States and the arms race I'm sorry in the. Space race but also signalled more fundamentally that the technology needed to launch. A rocket into space was linked to the. Technology that could be used to launch an intercontinental ballistic missile against the United States it's sort of its signaled the end of an era Post World War Two of US invincibility idea the Soviet Union to send a nuclear weapon. United States so President Eisenhower authorized the creation of what became the nation's, first space agency before now so there was Dr by our budget was called at the time that. Was going to consolidate all of the rocket programs in all space? Programs into one. Agency under the defense department I was seven years old when Sputnik I went up. Sharon and I, remember my, parents and how nervous they appeared when Sputnik was up there I, mean he was. His little basketball size satellite that didn't do much but you write the Russians the Soviets at the time they got one up there before we did did our. Intelligence even know that they were, about to launch that yes and no so there's both the reality of Sputnik and then some of the myths behind it so of course I mean the very fact that you remember it. That people from that era even even children remember that The. Idea there their parents being scared that there was this beeping satellites overhead but the. Reality at the, time was, that President Eisenhower should have downplayed it initially we did not come, off well politically. At all Accused of being weak especially by Lyndon. Johnson I'm but the idea was he had he knew about classified program secret programs it's public didn't know. About he knew the United States had the U2. this, high flying aircraft that could fly into. Soviet territory he also knew that the CIA and the intelligence. Community we're working. On the first reconnaissance earth imaging satellites that. Would be able to take pictures from outer. Space, but he couldn't. Talk about that publicly, it was well known that the. Soviet Union was developing rockets it was well-known. They're, developing ICBM's as was the United States the, Soviet Union was a little bit ahead basically I'm thruster technology they, were months ahead but it came on one hand it wasn't a shock for the, intelligence me yes they, got their first on the other hand what was a shock. With how this was going to play publicly that it was really gonna come. Off, as a symbolic defeat for the United States and A huge, symbolic psychological win for the Soviet Union when we formed DARPA then, were we scrambling or was it a very logical progression when they put the agency together Oh it was very much scrambling On one hand Eisenhower knew some of. These things the public, didn't know on the other hand he was dealing with this sort of panic and political fallout from the event that could be, compared to what happened. After nine eleven the United States and what was true was the United States? Had, not organized, their space programs well the army the navy and the airforce were also just. Competing with their own rocket programs you had very nerve on Brown and the German rock and saw the rocket, scientists were, stuck down, in Alabama who's basically you know we have a, rocket that can go into space but the United States that have placed its first batch. With a navy program called. Vanguard that wasn't, going very well I'm so yeah things were, a message, very quickly in Washington you know when you want, to fix the problem? In Washington what do you do you create a new agency and so very quickly they. Put forward this proposal on that I was to. Be, called special projects agency there Our word that'd be, confused with special operations so they came up first. Name the advanced research, projects agency and what was so interesting is it was really thought of as a temporary measure this wasn't something they thought was, going to be around. For sixty years it was it was kind of a quick fix throw some? Bandaids, on it, and in fact the directive creating what became known as DARPA basically said this. Agency is going to you know do such projects as directed by the secretary of defense like you know that, was its, whole remit, with the idea that space was going to be, the first part of that but it was very quick how hazard you know when DARPA. Opened it stores and early. Nineteen fifty eight, was essentially one employee a director and when, when the, Soviets got Sputnik up there they too have a, German brain power after? The war to we you know we've got our parts that they got theirs were their. German scientists the ones that got Sputnik up. There Well you know what's interesting, about that period so as you. Talk about you know with Germany's, defeat in World War Two, you're the next thing was who is going to get these rocket scientists these German. Rocket scientists and the United States really got the cream of the crop. Their Navan. Brown and his rocket scientists the Soviets, were kind of left I. Want to say, with with what was left but they took the Soviets took a lot of equipment, they got, less of the people but they did get some German. Rocket, scientists so, there are these great minutes from the US national Security Council after the launch of Sputnik where they're talking, about how is this gonna play publicly and they're like well we're going to claim the Soviet Union. Was the head because they got all the good German rocket scientists which wasn't true the, cream of the crop went to the United States so like with. The United, States what the Soviet Union did had helped them with their rocket, program but you can't say that the Rocket scientists, may the Soviet rocket program they got some of the. People they got some of the, equipment but it was dot in combination with. Soviet scientists more importantly you know what democracy is a work really well for certain things but the one advantage should have an authoritarian regime has the Soviet Union had, the, time is it you don't have to deal with doing bureaucracies you know you could have you know the, story Terry regime. Can just make a decision you're not gonna have the. Army navy and air force all, lobbying for their funds so the Soviet Union was able to sit. With a singular goal move forward More quickly than nights states could so what does DARPA doing now sharing Well in, some ways DARPA is doing what it was doing some sixty years ago. Meaning it is doing such. Projects has directed by the. Secretary of defense they're still doing space programs they're still doing new technologies one of the sort of what I would call a method is developed over the years. That we should have looked back retrospectively on what was dark as mission I'm a lot of? What. Came out over the years is you. Know what is DARPA do okay DARPA spouse to stop Sputnik lakes surprises so DARPA will often say that are you know. Our, goal stop technological surprise which means to stay ahead of the adversary well that's changed a. Lot in the past twenty years with the fall of. The Soviet, Union the United States really doesn't have a close pure adversary you, know maybe China is is getting close. In some technologies like hypersonic weapons maybe In some areas Russia, is still keeping up it really the United States is ahead but but. What DARPA continues to do. Is invest in sort of. Technologies that are far reaching in some cases futuristic but I will say this mythology of what it does has become more and more over the years I think. There's more the impression these days at a science fiction agency and indeed that was always part? Of. The DNA of the agency but I. It was a mixed back in the early days you know because Sputnik was immediate thing so yes DARPA at its earliest. Days, did very sort of futuristic projects one of its first projects was an attempt to create. A force field around the earth to stop inter continental. Ballistic weapons, that that was very few Charles Star Wars and Star Trek doesn't, it Exactly you're gonna. Come back, in a moment Sharon and take more questions later on tonight. With.

United States DARPA Soviet Union Sharon Weinberger President Eisenhower Miguel school of journalism Johns Hopkins School of Advanc George Noory Washington Post Harvard University BBC secretary Brown Sputnik lakes Radcliffe institute MIT Woodrow Wilson international c International Studies
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"To hillary clinton has now said that she wants to be the facebook ceo that's right failed presidential candidate said that the social media platform is the largest source of news in the world and she liked to be in charge of it she said this today at the harvard university radcliffe institute for advanced study she said about this the former secretary of state explain that facebook is the biggest news platform in the world and she said most people in our country get their news true or not from facebook it really is critical to our democracy that people get accurate information on which to make decisions she also said that she would be like to be the one deciding what is accurate information that the american people see and talking about this she said if you could be a ceo of any company right now what would it be and hillary quickly answered facebook now clinton told the attorney general when she was on this panel that she would not only like to be the ceo facebook while receiving the radcliffe award at harvard today but she said that it is the place where there could be the most influence to things about this there's been a lot of speculation that the founder of facebook or one of the founders of facebook zuckerberg wants to run for office he's done this across america tour where he has been out meeting with different people all over the country we have seen him do this here in this country are in this state where he has been to tennessee he's been to mississippi he's been to arkansas on a get to know people tour is how he explained it getting honestly understand and know people again that's that's what he's set now i think there's a very good chance that zuckerberg has so much money and has so much cash and it's a printing machine in the billions even after the corruption a lot of people and i said that's the reason why i thought facebook will get away with their quote spying scandal is because most people are addicted to facebook and social media like a drug and they weren't gonna walk away now there were other people that said well facebook should just you know what's going to happen is people are gonna leave facebook we have not seen that people are still on facebook we were told that even after republicans news was was clearly being the reach of conservative news.

ceo harvard university radcliffe i facebook ceo facebook harvard founder zuckerberg arkansas hillary clinton radcliffe america tennessee mississippi republicans
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"If you could be a ceo of any company right now what would you choose and why facebook it's the biggest news platform in the world most people in our country get their news true or not from facebook ceo of facebook i don't think that's going to happen there madam secretary because i feel like people might be a little creeped out by you being in control of all of the stuff that they're doing on facebook your made i know i know it's it's a mean thing to say notice how even in an interview like this hillary clinton you know it'd be one thing if if it just occasionally came up the whole russia stole the election thing she's really damaged by this whole thing she's actually not over it she i think she i some of you are going to disagree with me on this this is fine but i think she agrees or or she she believes rather that this is something that happened it's not she doesn't just say it because it plays to her base hashtag resistance although it certainly does that i think she actually believes us that she's somebody who has convinced herself that that she really wanted basically she really won the election i mean al gore did that to this is just it's pretty crazy but she said some of it was the electoral college comment mike is that the same was that the same forum or is that just another random thing said it was the same forum she was speaking at radcliffe institute i believe same place it is maddening because one of the panelists said we get the government that we vote for now we have this odd system with the electoral college and maybe we could get president fouls to explain the roots of that because it's a little troubling but nevertheless we've got it i bet against it by the way since two thousand not not that you you need to know that but i have been because i just think it is absolutely contrary to one person one vote so so she straight up thinks that russia sold the election from her on top of that she also thinks that she knows better than the founders really she's like i'm i'm smarter when it comes to the actual construction of our government than madison jefferson all rest doesn't believe doesn't believe that.

ceo facebook secretary hillary clinton russia al gore mike radcliffe institute madison jefferson president
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Art ceo of the australian koala foundation in australia they call her the koala woman she tells my colleagues at the bbc that the dangerous to koalas go way back to win koalas or seen as trophies eight million koalas skins came to london you'll in the nineteen hundreds is just sickening this week the australian state of new south wales announced its most ambitious game yet to save the country's koalas thirty four million dollars that will be used to establish farce reserves for a koala habitat and a hospital to care for sick and injured marsupials the money will also go towards protective measures like fences along the roads to keep koalas from becoming roadkill supporters say it's a good for step but never to bart says it's not enough i can tell you countries in ecological collapse we had just doing won't destruction and there is not one mention in this press release about decent lewis this is about we'll do this we'll do this will make a big hospital building bigger s hospitals and not capping the airplane for tobar 'em equality dacian the real issues are deforestation and destroyed habitats and fixing those 'cause well beyond thirty four million dollars a few days ago egyptian plainclothes security officers arrived at the home of shoddy opposite outside of cairo they arrested him seized his computer and phone and drove away shoddy is a satirist he produces online satirical videos which often go viral on social media his work frequently pokes fun at egypt's government and how ridiculously widespread censorship is in egypt but we weren't sure if it was tire that got arrested so we decided to ask jonathan geyer he's a journalist who lived in cairo for five years he knows egypt satire seen inside and out and blogs about it at own cartoon he's currently a fellow at the radcliffe institute at harvard so we were able to invite him in over to our studios here in boston thank you marco tell us about shoddy.

ceo australian koala foundation bbc south wales lewis cairo egypt jonathan geyer radcliffe institute harvard boston australia london bart thirty four million dollars five years
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"As systemic and systematic an unprecedented attack against christians in the holy land wbz news time seven fifty one while tomorrow a panel of harvard scholars will be gathering to discuss the history and future of the meat who movement this event will feature four professors in history law african american studies as well as economics weighing in on the cows as and consequences of the movement against sexual harassment organizers say the event mainly aims to deepen tough conversations around a topic that they say often generates more heat than light it's being hosted by the way by the radcliffe institute for advanced study so how exactly can you mend a broken heart cbs news correspondent stephan kaufman tells us about a doctor who let's patients hold them mud call number handyman fixes broken hearts if you to call a doctor roberts judge william roberts with baylor universities heart and vascular hospital has invited about one hundred transplant recipients to return and hold their former heart and view the damage they did to it robert says most patients aren't phased by the experience they're just thankful to be alive out of heart failure so long they were so grateful to out the heart transplant there was very little reaction stephan kaufman cbs news a milestone for let's currently televisions longest running south opera the 14th down since episode of general hospital aired on friday on abc they show debuted on april first 1963 nearly fifty five years later it is still taped at his same hollywood studios guiding light by the way is the only silk to last longer on tv that air for fifty seven years before cbs decided not to renew it and two thousand nine.

radcliffe institute stephan kaufman william roberts cbs harvard harassment baylor robert abc hollywood fifty seven years fifty five years
"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"radcliffe institute" Discussed on Freakonomics

"From wnyc this is free economic radio the podcast that explores the inside of everything here's your nose steven governor drew villepin faust was installed as the president of harvard university in two thousand seven her immediate predecessor was derek bach a long time harvard president years earlier who came back for one year as acting president after the very short and very stormy tenure of large summers faust had spent twenty five years as a history professor at the university of pennsylvania and later became dean of the radcliffe institute for advanced study at harvard as an historian her specialties are the civil war in slavery among her books are this republic of suffering deaths in the american civil war end mothers of invention women of the slaveholding south in the american civil war your friend elizabeth warren now a us senator formally harvard law professor said that you quote were raised to be a rich man's wife instead she becomes the president of most powerful university in the world so how that happen you came from an environment in which president harvard was not really let's say the most expected outcome yes it was an unimaginable act come i grew up in the nineteen 50s in 1960s in rural for jinya in the shadow valley in a conservative community and a conservative family a traditional family in which my mother said to me it's a man's world sweetie and the sooner you figure that out the happier you'll be so the expectation for young women in that environment was that they would grow up in marry and have children and that they would be um subservient in significant ways to the aspirations ambitions and agendas of the man whom they married.

wnyc villepin faust harvard university derek bach acting president professor radcliffe institute civil war elizabeth warren senator harvard jinya shadow valley president university of pennsylvania twenty five years one year