18 Burst results for "Rachel Wall Street Journal"

Wall Street discussed on Tony Katz and the Morning News

Tony Katz and the Morning News

00:33 sec | 17 hrs ago

Wall Street discussed on Tony Katz and the Morning News

"A little bit of slow bank The 106th street in those exit lanes, the 4 65, and we're looking at a vehicle that hit a building. This is on the south side. Okay, more street between Senate And West Street is there to marathon station and Cruz are treated it like a structure clams to be careful in the area once out for emergency vehicles. No injuries reported at this moment Traffic sponsored by LAUSD. Oh Miss Lowe's pro Vembu event Now through November. 25th. They have deals on brands like the Wall Spider. Amitabh Ohh, Petey Poise event You won't want to miss slows the new home for pros.

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"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Telling the president of US soccer acknowledges that the federation doesn't actually know how many young soccer players at has playing under its umbrella more from this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka as the US gears up to host the World Cup in twenty twenty six state of soccer in this country seems to be in a little bit of disarray. Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal has interviewed the president of US soccer Carlos Cordeiro about his hopes and dreams for the sport and joins us. Now. Rachel, why is soccer in a bit of a rebuilding mode? Well, a couple of big things one. Of course, the US men's national team failed to qualify for the two thousand eighteen World Cup, which which was quite shocking and disappointing and spurred a lot of turmoil including a new coach, and I think they're they're starting to rebuild. Now, you've got some very young players, but the. The second thing that that's really causing some some turmoil is this ongoing storyline about us participation stagnating by some measures. It's actually in decline, and this is pretty alarming for a sport that tends to attract a wide array of people very diverse age wise racially things like that the the fact that a sport like that is not growing in the US. And might actually be declining is pretty surprising. I was to very shocked to read that in your story. Any idea why participation could possibly be dropping? I think it's a complicated set of factors. One is that the structure of of you soccer in this country is very fractured and there's a number of youth organizations. They they tend to have slightly different goals sometimes and some parents have said that they they sort of feel pressured at you know, to put their kids into sort of more elite type teams and clubs situations at younger and younger ages. And of course, what this does is forced parents and kids to make a choice about how serious they wanna be. And frankly, a lot of kids don't wanna be that serious or the parents don't want to invest the money needed to be in these more intensive clubs, and so there's there's a number of things going on not all disagreement about how to fix them now agreement say about how to fix them. Rachel do kids. Just have too many opportunities as opposed to kids in other countries that really focus on soccer. That's a great point. There are a ton of options in this country. Many many sports kids can choose from. And of course, sports aren't only competing against each other. There are also competing against each sports video games, fortnight Instagram YouTube, all these other things that you know, essentially didn't exist in their current forms five or ten years ago. So there's a lot of things that that soccer is up against. However, you know baseball has showed some growth in recent years basketball has shown a little bit of growth. So it's not impossible. There are sports that are doing it. We're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal, Rachel and speaking to Carlos Cordeiro, what are some of the goals that he would like to see between now and that World Cup in two thousand twenty six well one priority. Of course is increasing participation in soccer because that's not only is that does that feed the grass roots set might ultimately build better, men's and women's. Women's national teams. But also just reflects the health of sport in the country and produces more fans. You know, the NFL knows certainly that if someone has never played a sport, they're less likely to watch it. And so that's certainly in the mind of of soccer officials as well. How can training facilities be improved? Well, one one dream of a handful leaders that US soccer is to build a National Training Center for the whims of women's and men's national teams, and the US really does not have this. Unlike other major soccer countries know in France have Clairefontaine in England they had Saint George's park. He's a very comprehensive somewhat in some cases, kind of sprawling facilities with everything from playing fields to you know, medical and training facilities, sometimes hotel, dining facilities offices for administrators things. Like that you really didn't have that. They have an office office headquarters in Chicago and a couple of places. They sometimes train, but there's there's really no central headquarters. So they've they've considered building one, and which which Carlos Cordeiro told me, and it's it's an very early stages. But I think it's something that some leaders and soccer really want to happen. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman with this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, by the way, the women's World Cup begins this summer in France it kicks off Friday, June seventh it ends Sunday July seventh you pick against the USA at your own risk. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. KOA NewsRadio time is five thirty still in clean up.

soccer Rachel Bachman US Carlos Cordeiro Wall Street Journal Jennifer Kushinka president baseball NFL Chicago France National Training Center reporter England thirty minutes ten years
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Acknowledges that the federation doesn't actually know how many young soccer players at has playing under its umbrella more from this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka as the US gears up to host the World Cup in twenty twenty six the state of soccer in this country seems to be in a little bit of disarray. Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal has interviewed the president of US soccer Carlos Cordeiro about his hopes and dreams for the sport and joins us. Now. Rachel, why is soccer in a bit of a rebuilding mode? Well, a couple of big things one. Of course, the US men's national team failed to qualify for the two thousand eighteen World Cup, which which was quite shocking and disappointing and spurred a lot of turmoil including a new coach, and I think they're they're starting to rebuild. Now, you've got some very young players. But the second thing. That's really causing some some turmoil is this ongoing storyline about youth participation stagnating by some measures. It's actually in decline, and this is pretty alarming for a sport that tends to attract a wide array of people very diverse age wise racially things like that the the fact that a sport like that is not growing in the US. And might actually be declining is pretty surprising. I was to very shocked to read that in your story. Any idea why participation could possibly be dropping? I think it's a complicated set of factors. One is that the structure of of youth soccer in this country is very fractured. And you know, there's a number of youth organizations. They they tend to have slightly different goals sometimes and some parents have said that they they sort of feel pressured know to put their kids into sort of more elite type teams and clubs situations at younger and younger ages. And of course. What this does is forced parents and kids to make a choice about how serious they wanna be. And frankly, a lot of kids don't want to be that serious or or the parents don't want invest the money needed to be in these more intensive clubs. And so there's there's a number of things going on not all disagreement about how to fix them not I'll agreement should say about how to fix them. Rachel do kids. Just have too many opportunities as opposed to kids in other countries that really focus on soccer. That's a great point. There are a ton of options in this country. Many many sports the kids can choose from. And of course, sports aren't only competing against each other. There are also competing against each sports video games, fortnight Instagram YouTube, all these other things that you know, essentially didn't exist in their current forms five or ten years ago. So there's a lot of things that that soccer is up against. However, you know baseball has showed some growth in recent years basketball has shown a little bit of growth. So it's not impossible. There are sports that are doing it. We're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal, Rachel and speaking to Carlos Cordeiro, what are some of the goals that he would like to see between now and that World Cup in twenty twenty six well one priority. Of course is increasing participation in soccer because that's not only that does that feed the grass roots set might ultimately build better men's and women's national teams. But also just reflects the health of a sport in the country and produces more fans. You know, the NFL knows certainly that if someone has never played a sport, they're less likely to watch it. And so that's certainly in the mind of of soccer officials as well. How can training facilities improved? Well, one one dream of a handful leaders that US soccer is to build a National Training Center for the whims of women's and men's national teams, and the US really does not have this. Unlike other major soccer countries, you know, in France, they have Clairefontaine in England. They had Saint George's park. These are very comprehensive somewhat in some cases. Sprawling facilities with everything from playing fields to medical and training facilities. Sometimes a hotel dining facilities, you know, offices for administrators things like that, you a soccer really doesn't have that. They have an office office headquarters in Chicago and a couple of places that they sometimes train, but there's there's really no central headquarters. So they've they've considered building one, and which which Carlos Cordeiro told me, and it's it's an very early stages. But I think it's something that some leaders and soccer really want to happen next. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman with this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, by the way, the women's World Cup begins this summer in France it kicks off Friday, June seventh it ends Sunday July seventh you pick against the USA at your own risk. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Whatever party, you dream of party city will help you bring it.

soccer Rachel Bachman Carlos Cordeiro US Wall Street Journal Jennifer Kushinka president Chicago baseball NFL France England National Training Center reporter thirty minutes ten years
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"The US. Here's something that might be telling the president of US soccer acknowledges that the federation doesn't actually know how many young soccer players at has playing under its umbrella more from this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka as the US gears up to host the World Cup in twenty twenty six the state of soccer in this country seems to be in a little bit of disarray. Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal has interviewed the president of US soccer Carlos Cordeiro about his hopes and dreams for the sport and joins us. Now. Rachel, why is soccer in a bit of a rebuilding mode? Well, a couple big things one. Of course, US men's national team failed to qualify for the twenty eighteen World Cup, which which was quite shocking and disappointing and spurred a lot of turmoil including a new coach, and I think they're they're starting to rebuild some very young players. But the second thing that that's really cool. Causing some some turmoil is this ongoing storyline about youth participation stagnating by some measures. It's actually in decline, and this is pretty alarming for a sport that tends to attract a wide array of people very diverse age wise racially things like that the the fact that a sport like that is not growing in the US. And might actually be declining is pretty surprising. I was to very shocked to read that in your story. Any idea why participation could possibly be dropping? I think it's a complicated set of factors one is that the structure of of you soccer in this country is very fractured. And yeah, there's a number of youth organizations. They they tend to have slightly different goals sometimes. And some parents have said that they they sort of feel pressured at you know, to put their kids into sort of more elite type teams and clubs situations at younger and younger ages. And of course, what this does is. Forced parents and kids to make choices about how serious they wanna be an and frankly, a lot of kids don't want to be that serious or the parents don't want to invest the money needed to be these more intensive clubs. And so there's there's a number of things going on not all disagreement about how to fix them not I'll agreement I should say about how to fix them. Rachel do kids. Just have too many opportunities as opposed to kids in other countries that really focus on soccer. That's a great point. There are a ton of options in this country. Many many sports that kids can choose from. And of course, sports aren't only competing against each other. There are also competing against each sports video games, fortnight Instagram YouTube, all these other things that you know, essentially didn't exist in their current forms five or ten years ago. So there's a lot of things that that soccer is up against. However, you know baseball has showed some growth in recent years basketball has shown a little bit of growth. So it's not impossible. There are sports that are doing it. We're speaking with. Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal, Rachel and speaking to Carlos Cordeiro, what are some of the goals that he would like to see between now and that World Cup in two thousand twenty six one priority. Of course, is increasing participation soccer. Because that's not only is that does that Phoebe grassroots set might alternately build better men's and women's national teams. But also just reflects the health of a sport in the country and produces more fans. You know, the NFL knows certainly that if someone has never played a sport, they're less likely to watch it. And so that's certainly in the mind of of soccer officials as well. How can training facilities be improved? Well, one one dream of a handful leaders that US soccer is to build a National Training Center for the whims of women's and men's national teams, and the US really does not have this. Unlike other major soccer countries, you know, in France, they have Clairefontaine in England. They had seen Georgia's park. He's a very comprehensive somewhat in some cases kind of sprawling facility. With everything from playing fields to medical and training facilities. Sometimes a hotel dining facilities offices for administrators things. Like that you really didn't have that. They have an office office headquarters in Chicago and a couple of places that they sometimes train, but there's there's really no central headquarters. So they've they've considered building one, and which which Carlos Cordeiro told me, and it's it's an very early stages. But I think it's something that some leaders and soccer really want to happen next. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman with this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, by the way, the women's World Cup begins this summer in France it kicks off Friday, June seventh it ends Sunday July seventh you pick against the USA at your own risk. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Lately, it seems like everything we use everyday is getting an upgrade from the bed. We sleep in to the razor we use when we wake up, but we've neglected one of the more impulsive products in a daily routine that old worn out toothbrush..

soccer Rachel Bachman US Carlos Cordeiro Wall Street Journal Jennifer Kushinka president France Chicago baseball NFL Phoebe Georgia National Training Center reporter England thirty minutes ten years
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WRVA

"For place us radio. Eleven forty AM and now on ninety six point one FM. Begins. Jennifer Kushinka as the US gears up to host the World Cup in twenty twenty six the state of soccer in this country seems to be in a little bit of disarray. Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal has interviewed the president of US soccer Carlos Cordeiro about his hopes and dreams for the sport and joins us. Now. Rachel, why is soccer in a bit of a rebuilding mode? A couple of big things one, of course, US men's national team failed to qualify for the twenty eighteen World Cup, which which was quite shocking and disappointing and spurred a lot of turmoil including new coach, and I think they're they're starting to rebuild. You've got some very young players. But the second thing that that's really causing some some turmoil is this ongoing storyline about youth participation stagnating by some measures. It's actually in decline, and this is pretty alarming for a sport that tends to attract a wide array of people very diverse, age wise. Racially things like that the fact that a sport like that is not growing in the US. And might actually be declining is pretty surprising. I was very shocked to read that in your story. Any idea why participation could possibly be dropping? I think it's a complicated set of factors. One is that the structure of of you soccer in this country is very fractured. And you know, there's a number of youth organizations. They they tend to have slightly different goals sometimes and some parents have said that they they sort of feel pressured at you know, to put their kids into sort of more elite typed teams in clubs situations at younger and younger ages. And of course, what this does is forced parents and kids to make a choice about how serious they wanna be an and frankly, a lot of kids don't wanna be that serious or the parents don't want to invest the money needed to be in these more intensive clubs, and so there's there's a number of things going on not all disagreement about how to fix. Them not I'll agreement I should say about how to fix them. Rachel do kids. Just have too many opportunities as opposed to kids and other countries that really focus on soccer. That's a great point. There are a ton of options in this country. Many many sports that kids can choose from. And of course, sports aren't only competing against each other. They're also competing against each ports. Video games, fortnight Instagram YouTube, all these other things that you know, essentially didn't exist in their current forms five or ten years ago. So there's a lot of things that that soccer is up against. However, you know baseball has showed some growth in recent years basketball has shown a little bit of growth. So it's not impossible. There are sports that are doing it. We're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal, Rachel and speaking to Carlos Cordeiro, what are some of the goals that he would like to see between now and that World Cup in two thousand twenty six. Well, one priority. Of course is increasing participation in soccer because that's not only is that does that feed. The grassroots set might ultimately build better men's and women's national teams. But also just reflects the health of sport in the country and produces more fans. You know, the NFL knows certainly that if someone has never played a sport, they're less likely to watch it. And so that's certainly in the mind of of soccer officials as well. How can training facilities be improved? Well, one one dream of a handful leaders that US soccer is to build a National Training Center for the whims of women's and men's national teams, and the US really does not have this. Unlike other major soccer countries, you know, in France that have Clairefontaine in England they have seen Georgia's park, these are very comprehensive somewhat in some cases, kind of sprawling facilities with everything from playing fields to medical and training facilities. Sometimes a hotel dining facilities. You know offices for administrators things like that, you a soccer really doesn't have that. They have an office office headquarters in Chicago a couple of places that they sometimes train, but there's there's really no central headquarters. So they've they've considered building one, and which which Carlos Cordeiro told me, and it's it's very early stages. But I think it's something that some leaders and soccer really want to happen. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman with this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, by the way, the women's World Cup begins this summer in France it kicks off Friday, June seventh it ends Sunday July seven th you pick against the USA at your own risk. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Hi, it's Jeff Katz. You know, it was a former police officer. I can tell you. There's no profession more exciting a rewarding everyday brings you a new challenge. They're all unique. Maybe you're investigating an armed robbery on Monday or rescuing a runaway dog on Tuesday Wednesday. It's your turn to help children. Learn not to use drugs. And then you're helping his senior citizens to their feet after a tumble on Thursday. Most people, of course, look forward to Saturday and Sunday days to relax with family. But for police officers, the weekends are just like regular workdays. Well, I'd at least like to make Friday, especially for police officers here in the RV. That's why I have created blue Friday on the last Friday of each month. Newsradio eleven forty W R V A will honor a local police officer who has gone above and beyond a man or woman who embodies the best of the badge UC our police at work each and every day. So you need to help us to pay tribute to our local heroes..

soccer Rachel Bachman US Carlos Cordeiro Wall Street Journal Jennifer Kushinka officer France baseball Chicago NFL Jeff Katz president National Training Center Georgia England reporter eleven forty W
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WWL

"To go out of state to play in South Carolina. So they've had some very big wins in recruiting a curious speaking with Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachmann. She's got an interesting piece entitled the rivalry that shouldn't be how Clemson competes with Alabama. There was an interesting survey that you pointed out in the story to were like four more kids like chose Clemson as as what more interesting or something then Alabama. Yeah. Basically, the the an online firm polled two hundred twenty four high school football recruits, and they purposely chose recruits who were not, you know, like a level type recruit high school football players who they would be influenced by their interactions with coaching staff. So they're forming their impressions based on what they see. No social media online. Aren't you? And and us two hundred twenty four high school football players ranked Clemson number one in terms of you know, a place where if they had the chance they would want to be I think Alabama was nineteen. So, you know, that's certainly speaks to Clinton's efforts to sort of get the word out about how much fun. It is to be there succeeding. Thanks, Rachel, Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend. Shaquille O'Neal if you battle back a, hip or knee or shoulder pain. You don't have to tough it out. You could just turn it off and smart relief.

Rachel Bachmann Wall Street Journal Clemson Alabama sportswriter football Shaquille O'Neal Rachel Bachman Rachel South Carolina Clinton twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"South Carolina. Oh, really have to make a point to get their until they really have made some headway in especially getting out of state recruits to come in their freshman quarterback Trevor Lawrence from Georgia. So no they've convinced him to go out of state to play in South Carolina. So they've had some very fake wins in recruiting a key areas. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachmann. She's got an interesting piece entitled the rivalry that shouldn't be how Clemson competes with Alabama. There was an interesting survey that you pointed out in the story to were like four more kids like chose Clemson as as what more interesting or something than Alabama. Yeah. Basically, the an online firm polled two hundred twenty four high school football, recruits and the purpose. We chose recruits who were not, you know, like a level type recruit high school football players. They would be influenced by their interactions with coaching staff for they're forming their impressions based on what they see. No. Media online, aren't and and us two hundred twenty four high school football players ranked number one in terms of you know, a place where if they had the chance they would want to be I think Alabama was nineteen. So you know, that certainly speaks to Clinton's efforts to sort of get the word out about how much fun it is to be there succeeding. Thanks, Rachel, Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend. Shaquille O'Neal here if you bet oh, backer, hip pain, or near shoulder pain? You don't have to tough it out. You could just turn it off.

Rachel Bachmann Wall Street Journal Alabama sportswriter South Carolina Clemson Trevor Lawrence Shaquille O'Neal football Rachel Bachman Rachel Georgia Clinton twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"By Clemson, South Carolina, really have to make a point to get there. And so they really have made some headway in especially getting out of state recruits to come in their freshman quarterback. Trevor Lawrence is from. Georgia. So no they've convinced him to go out of state to play in South Carolina. So they've had some very big wins in recruiting at curious speaking with Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachmann. She's got an interesting piece entitled the rivalry that shouldn't be Clemson competes with Alabama. There was an interesting survey that you pointed out in the story to were like four more kids like chose Clemson as as what more interesting or something then Alabama. Yeah. Basically, the online firm polled two hundred twenty four high school football recruits. And we purposely chose recruits who were not, you know, like a level type recruit high school football players who they would be influenced by their interactions with coaching staff for their forming their impressions based on what they see. No, social media online, aren't you? And and us two hundred twenty four high school football players ranked number one in terms of you know, a place where if they had the chance they wanna be I think Alabama was nineteen. So you know, that certainly speaks to clemson's effort to sort of get the word out about how much fun it is to be they're succeeding. Thanks. Rachel, Wall Street Journal sportswriter, Rachel Batman. It is twenty minutes.

Clemson Wall Street Journal Rachel Bachmann Alabama sportswriter South Carolina Trevor Lawrence football Rachel Batman Rachel Georgia twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"By Clemson, South Carolina. Oh, really have to make a point to get there. And so they really have made some headway in especially getting out of state recruits to come in their freshman quarterback. Trevor Lauren is from Georgia. So no they've convinced him to go out of state to play in Carolina. So they've had some very big wins in recruiting at curious speaking with Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachmann. She's got an interesting piece entitled the rivalry that shouldn't be how Clemson competes with Alabama. There was an interesting survey that you pointed out in this story to where like four more kids like chose Clemson as as what more interesting or something then Alabama. Yeah. Basically, the an online firm polled two hundred twenty four high school football recruits, and they purposely chose recruits who were not, you know, like a level type recruit high school football players. They would be influenced by their interactions with coaching staff. So they're forming their impressions based on what they see for media online, aren't and and you to twenty four high school football players ranked number one in terms of, you know, a place where if they had the chance they would want to be I think I'll Bama was nineteen. So, you know, that's certainly speaks to Clinton's efforts to sort of get the word out about how much fun it is to be they're succeeding. Thanks. Rachel Wall Street Journal sportswriter Rachel Bachman is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

Clemson Wall Street Journal Rachel Bachmann sportswriter Rachel Bachman Trevor Lauren South Carolina Alabama football Clinton Bama Georgia twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WWL

"Oh, really have to make a point to get there. And so they really have made some headway in especially getting out of state recruits to come in their freshman quarterback. Trevor Lawrence is from Georgia. So she no they've convinced him to go out of state to play in South Carolina. So they've had some very wins in recruiting at Kiryat speaking with Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachmann. She's got an interesting piece entitled the rivalry that shouldn't be how Clemson competes with Alabama. There was an interesting survey that you pointed out in the story to were. Like four more kids like chose Clemson as as what more interesting or something then Alabama. Yeah. Basically, the online firm poll two hundred twenty four high school football recruits, and they purposely chose recruits who were not, you know, like a level type recruits are high school football players. They wouldn't be influenced by their interactions with coaching staff. So they're forming their Prussians based on what they see no social media online aren't TV and and us two hundred twenty four high school football players ranked Clemson number one in terms of, you know, a place where if they had the chance they would want to be I think our Bama was nineteen. So you know, that certainly speaks to Clinton's efforts to sort of get the word out about how much fun it is to be they're succeeding. Thanks, Rachel, Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, Rachel Bachman. Twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Rachel Bachmann Wall Street Journal Clemson sportswriter Trevor Lawrence Alabama Rachel Bachman football Rachel South Carolina Clinton America Bama Georgia Twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel, what are you hearing? Well, as we know a lot of things in life departments have become sort of required like, you know, fancy weight rooms and nutrition programs things like that. And increasingly one of the things that's become compulsory for college. Athletic departments is in house, psychological services, and their number reasons for this mainly because as as some people know nationwide more college students generally have issues like depression and anxiety. And that certainly is is true for college athletes, as well have the problems always been there and gone unaddressed. Or are we? Suddenly see new health concerns here that that's a good question. I think it's a combination of things I think that the stigma is decreasing to asking for help. So there are more college students and college athletes asking for for help with a variety of mental health issues. But also, I you know, and the causes are debated. I think that there are more problems. You know, it's a it's a fairly stressful world, we live in there some discussion about other contributing factors. But in addition to that, college athletes, of course, are dealing with the stresses of college while also under the spotlight of in some cases, you know, a large national TV audience. And so that can certainly weigh more heavily both in dealing with the issues from day to day and also in seeking help for them. Are there some schools that appear to be out in front on this? Yeah. Well, university of southern California has had a psychologist on staff for twenty years and the staff is now several members and she said that about half of US's athletes on a regular basis, or at least in a given year have seen psychologist one on one and that's for a range of issues. Sometimes it's it's sports performance. You know, maybe they have some anxiety or some feelings during a game are contests that they want some help dealing with and other cases, it's it's just dealing with the stresses of being an athlete or or just stresses of life. And yet other cases, you know, there are some student athletes. Just like there are college students with serious mental health issues suicidal thoughts things like that. And and certainly those apartments want to address immediately. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal sports reporter, Rachel Bachman. Her piece is called college sports newest need psychologists are you referenced Southern Cal. Having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think, okay? You've got one on staff. Does that mean that are accessible helpful beneficial? Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that you're talking about in terms of, you know, getting athletes to ask for help and to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma did something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the department that was close to the trainers trainers office, re where people go to get their ankle taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor. Could just walk down the hall like they were going to get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of a regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to act for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your story who I want up getting help sort of indirectly in indirectly. Right. He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her, and she's the one who sorta said, let's let's do something. Right. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues, and and you know, really stressful things on his life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with just these issues others, and so he athletes found her and started to to visit with her weekly. And you know, got the help he needed. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this.

Rachel Bachman reporter Wall Street Journal Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel depression university of southern Califor Indiana University Indiana US Oklahoma twenty years twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel, what are you hearing? Well, as we know a lot of things in college athletic departments have become sort of required like, you know, fancy weight rooms and nutrition programs things like that. And increasingly one of the things that's become compulsory for college. Athletic departments is in house, psychological services, and their number of reasons for this mainly because as as some people know nationwide more college students generally have issues like depression anxiety. And that certainly is is true for Kadhafi's says well have the problems. Always been there and gone unaddressed. Or are we suddenly see new health concerns here? That's a good question. I think it's a combination of things I think that the stigma is decreasing to asking for help. So there more college students and college athletes asking for help with a variety of mental health issues. But also, you know, and the causes are debated. I think that there are more problems. You know, it's a it's a fairly stressful world, we live in there some discussion about other contributing factors. But an addition to that college athletes, of course, are dealing with assesses of college while also under the spotlight of in some cases, you know, a large national TV audience. And so that can certainly weigh more heavily both in dealing with the issues from day to day and also in seeking help for them. Are there some schools that appear to be out in front on this? Yeah. Well, university of southern California has had a psychologist on staff for twenty years and the the south is now several members and she said that about half of US's athletes on a regular basis, or at least in a given year have seen psychologist one at one and that's for a range of of issues. Sometimes it's it's sports performance. You know, maybe they have some anxiety or some feelings during a game are contests that they want some help dealing with and other cases, it's it's just dealing with the stress of being an athlete or or just stresses of life. And yet other cases, you know, there are some student athletes. Just like there are college students with serious mental health issues suicidal thoughts things like that. And and certainly those apartments want to address immediately. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal sports reporter, Rachel Bachman. Her piece is called college sports newest need psychologists. Are you represent Southern Cal having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think? Okay. You've got one on staff. Does that mean that they are accessible helpful beneficial? Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help. And to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma. Does something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the department that was close to the trainers trainers offense. Where people go to get their ankle taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going maybe to another building to see to see a counselor just walked down the hall like they're gonna get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of the regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to act for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete. In your story, who I one of getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express his feeling. So he's just texting her. And she's the one that sorta said, let's let's do something right? Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who a lot of injury issues, and and you know, really trustful things going on his life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hire a psychologist within that luck department to deal with just these issues mung others. And so he found her and started to to visit with her weekly. And you know, got help you need it. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend. Now,.

Rachel Bachman reporter Wall Street Journal Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel depression Kadhafi Indiana university of southern Califor US Indiana University university of Oklahoma twenty years twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"College sports newest need psychologists are you referenced Southern Cal having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think. Okay. You've got one on staff. Does that mean that there are accessible helpful beneficial? Yeah. Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help. And to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma did something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the athletic department that was close to the trainers office athletic trainers office, re where people go to get their ankles taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor. They could just walk down the hall like they were going to get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of the regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your story who I wind up getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her. And she's the one is sort of said, let's let's do something. Right. Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues, and and you know, really stressful things on life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so. Difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with just these issues mung others. And so he just athletes found her and started to to visit with her weekly. And you know, got the help he needed. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend..

Rachel Bachman Indiana University Wall Street Journal Indiana Oklahoma reporter twenty minutes twenty years
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"That's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help. And to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma. Does something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the athletic department. That was close to the trainers trainers officer where people go to get their ankles taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor. Just walk down the hall like they were going to get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. Yeah. You referenced the one student athlete. In your story who I wind up getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her, and she's the one who sort of said, let's let's do something. Right. Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues. And and, you know, really stressful things go on his life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said, the text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with Justice issues monitors and so he athletes found her and started to to visit with her weekly and got the help you need it. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour. On this weekend. I can't believe that we're playing four.

Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel Bachman Indiana University university of Oklahoma Indiana officer reporter twenty minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on 600 WREC

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel explain well, as we know a lot of things in college. I type departments have become sort of required, you know, fancy weight rooms and nutrition programs things like that. And increasingly one of the things that's become really compulsory for college. Athletic departments is in house, psychological services, and their number reasons for this mainly because as as some people know nationwide more college students generally have issues like depression and anxiety. And that certainly is is true for a college athletes as well have the problems. Always been there and gone on addressed. Or are we? New health concerns here. That's a good question. I think it's a combination of things I think that the stigma is decreasing to asking for help. So there are more college students and college athletes asking for for help with a variety of mental health issues. But also, you know, and the causes are debated. I think that there are more problems. You know, it's a it's a fairly stressful world, we live in there some discussion about other contributing factors. But in addition to that, college athletes, of course, are dealing with the stresses of college while also under the spotlight of in some cases, you know, a large national TV audience. And so that can certainly weigh more heavily both in dealing with the issues from day to day and also in seeking help for them. Are there some schools that appear to be out in front on this? Yeah. Well, university of southern California has had a psychologist on staff for twenty years and the staff is now several members and she said that about half of US's athletes on a regular basis, or at least in a given year have seen a psychologist one on one and that's for a range of of issues. Sometimes it's it's sports performance. You know, maybe have some anxiety or some feelings during a game are contests that they want some help dealing with and other cases, it's it's just dealing with the stresses of being an athlete or or just, you know, stresses of life. And yet other cases, you know, there are some student athletes. Just like there are college students with serious mental health issues suicidal thoughts things like that. And and certainly those apartments wanna address immediately. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal sports reporter, Rachel Bachman. Her piece is called college sports newest need psychologists are you referenced Southern Cal having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think, okay? You've got one on staff. Does that mean that they're accessible helpful be beneficial? Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help. And to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma did something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the athletic department that was close to the trainers office trainers. Where people go to get their ankle taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor just walked down the hall like they were gonna get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of a regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your. Story who I wind up getting help sort of indirectly. And then directly ready was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express his feeling. So he's just texting her. And she was the one is of said, let's let's do something. Right. Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues. And and, you know, really stressful things go on his life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said the attacks methods sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with Justice issues. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Eight is twelve minutes now in front of the hour.

Rachel Bachman reporter Wall Street Journal Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel depression Indiana University university of southern Califor Indiana US Oklahoma twenty years twelve minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel explain well, as we know a lot of things in college athletic departments have become sort of required like, you know, fancy weight rooms and nutrition programs things like that. And increasingly one of the things that's become really compulsory for college. Athletic departments is in house, psychological services, and their number of reasons for this mainly because as as some people know nationwide more college students generally have issues like depression and anxiety, and that certainly is true for college athletes as well. Have the problems always been there and gone unaddressed? Or are we? Suddenly seeing new health concerns here that that's a good question. I think it's a combination of things I think that the stigma is decreasing to asking for help. So there are more college students and college athletes asking for for help with a variety of mental health issues. But also, I you know, and the causes are debated. I think that there are more problems. You know, it's a it's a fairly stressful world, we live in there some discussion about other contributing factors. But an addition to that college athletes, of course, are dealing with the stresses of college while also under the spotlight of in some cases, you know, a large national TV audience. And so that can certainly weigh more heavily both in dealing with the issues from day to day and also in seeking help for them. Are there are some schools that appear to be out in front on this? Yeah. Well, university of southern California has had a psychologist on staff for twenty years and the staff is now several members and she said that about half of US's athletes on a regular basis, or at least in a given year have seen a psychologist one at one and that's for a range of of issues. Sometimes it's it's sports performance. You know, maybe they have some anxiety or some feelings during a game are contests that they want some help dealing with and other cases, it's dealing with the stresses of being an athlete or or just, you know, stresses of life. And yet other cases, you know, there are some student athletes. Just like there are college students with serious mental health issues suicidal thoughts things like that. And and certainly those apartments wanna address immediately. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal sports reporter, Rachel Bachman. Her piece is called college sports newest need psychologists are you referenced Southern Cal having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think. Okay. You've got one on staff. Does that mean that they're accessible helpful beneficial? Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that you're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help and to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma did something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the department that was close to the trainers trainers. Where people go to get their ankle taped things like that. And the reason they did. Did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going? You know, maybe another building to see to see a counselor. Could just walk down the hall like they were gonna get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of a regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your story who I want up getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her, and she was the one who sort of said, let's do something right? Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues. And and, you know, really stressful things go on as life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult. To voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with just issues. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twelve minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's.

Rachel Bachman reporter Wall Street Journal Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel depression university of southern Califor Indiana US Indiana University Oklahoma America twenty years twelve minutes
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Glad you're with us Strengthen. Conditioning coaches in college football have evolved from handy helpers in the gym to overlords of a season outside the season known as off season workouts it is their domain in weight rooms shielded even from the view of head coaches that is increasingly under scrutiny after a series of. Player deaths in, hospitalizations following grueling workouts, Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Bachmann says these strength and conditioning coaches have become among the most highly paid. And. Influential on staffs Rachel what have you found what's happened is a, strength and conditioning coaches particularly who for football programs have really risen in terms of. Their prominence and influence they. Have on on programs this has become an issue in part. Because of the, situation Maryland were player died after a pretty, extreme workout in June the. Strength and conditioning coach there has since resigned allegations that he was really overly harsh with players and and maybe had some Approaches that were a bit too extreme and so what we did in the. Story. Is just look at the phenomenon of the train coach and look, at some of the the some of the aspects that had led to its rise. What'd you find well there. Was some rule changes in the early nineties and early two. Thousands that really, increase their influence for instance practice time was, limited in the early nineties. For for college football teams so coaches really couldn't coach players as much as they would like but Coaches were written as in as an exception so they don't count as, technically as coaches so players can work out with them on a quote unquote voluntary basis you know as much as they want. Year round in the summer when, coaches are. Not allowed to coach them, the strength coaches can. So they can be with them in the weight room and actually design workout programs for them and this has. Given strength coaches really a ton of influence they are basically the defacto coaches in the summer and. And you know they're doing things like helping players shed weight or gain weight which on a football team that only has one a player, only has four or five years to compete is is. Really critical speaking? With, Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Bachmann she's written a piece entitled strength, coaches in college football have become. Strongmen is, largely because of his new found influence that they have you get the. Sense source anybody suggesting that these strength coaches need regulations of their. Own Yes I think there is more of a cry from some from college college sports leaders that maybe the. Standards for certification should increase the NCAA has really sort of. Stepped back and not not exerted a lot of influence in this area they have a few years ago that require these coaches to, have some sort of nationally recognized certification but you know that really farmers out the responsibility to things like weightlifting organizations and strength. Coach organizations to create their own, standards so. It's it's really not a, it's still not a. Universal standard for how much training these guys need to have since Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Bachman thirty..

football Rachel Bachmann Wall Street Journal Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Rachel Bachman Maryland NCAA Strongmen five years
"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"rachel wall street journal" Discussed on WLAC

"Strengthened. Conditioning coaches in college football have evolved from handy helpers in the gym to overlords of a season outside the season known as off season workouts it is their domain in weight rooms shielded even from the view of head coaches that is increasingly under scrutiny after a series of. Player deaths in, hospitalizations following grueling workouts, Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Bachmann says these strength and conditioning coaches have become among the most highly paid. And. Influential on staffs Rachel what have you found what happened is a, strength and conditioning coaches particularly who for football programs have really risen in terms of their prominence and the influence they. Have on on programs this has become an issue in part, because, of the situation Maryland where player died after a pretty extreme workout in June the strength conditioning coach there since resigned allegations that he was really overly harsh with players and and maybe had some So approaches that were a bit too extreme and what we did in the story. Is. Just look at the phenomenon of the train coach and look at, some of the the aspects that have led to its rise like what would you find well there's some rule changes. In the early nineties and that really to thousands that really, increase, their influence for instance practice time was limited in the early ninety s for for college football teams so is really couldn't coach players as much as they would like but Coaches were written as as an exception so they don't count as technically, as coaches so players can work out with them on a quote unquote voluntary basis you know as much as they want. Year round in the summer when, coaches are. Not allowed to coach them, the strength coaches can. So they can be with them in the weight room and actually design workout programs for them and this has. Given strength coaches really a ton of influence they are basically. The the defacto coaches in the summer and. And you know they're doing things like helping players shed weight or gain weight which on a football team that only has a player only has four or five years to compete, is is really critical? Speaking, with Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Bachmann she's written a piece entitled strength coaches in college football have. Become strongmen, is largely because of this new found influence that they have you get the, sense sores anybody suggesting that these strength coaches need regulations of their. Own Yes I think there is more of a cry from some from college college sports leaders that maybe. The standards for certification should increase the NCAA has really sort. Of stepped back and not not exerted a lot of influence in this area they have a few years ago they require these coaches to, have some sort of nationally recognized certification but you know that really farms out the responsibility to things like weightlifting organizations and. Strength coach organizations to create their, own standards. So it's really not a, it's still not a. Universal standard for how much training these guys need to have since Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Bachman thirty. Minutes now after the hour.

football Rachel Bachmann Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel Rachel Bachman Maryland NCAA five years