24 Burst results for "Rachel Myrow"

Google Fined $267 Million for Abusing 'Dominant Position' in Online Advertising

The Takeaway

00:45 sec | Last month

Google Fined $267 Million for Abusing 'Dominant Position' in Online Advertising

"France's anti trust watchdog that it abused its market dominance in online advertising. KQED S Rachel Myrow explains from our Silicon Valley desk. French regulators say Google has engaged in algorithmic ad auctions that penalize Google's competitors as well as news publishers. Their investigation was prompted by complaints from European publishers that Google's ad technologies preference in house and servers. Over those arrivals. Google opted to settle and says it will make changes that it expects to roll out globally in the coming months as antitrust regulators in Europe and beyond flex their muscle with Google and other tech giants. I'm Rachel Myrow KQED news. Find more online

Rachel Myrow Google Kqed France Europe Kqed News
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 7 months ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The safety and the efficacy of this vaccine, and I want to encourage everyone who has the opportunity to get vaccinated so that we could have a veil of protection over this country that would end this pandemic. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Cesar was also vaccinated. He and Dr Fauci received the shots developed by American drugmaker Midge Erna, which were authorized by the FDA last week for emergency use. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington Consumers orbit less confident heading into the final days of the year, the business research group. The Conference Board says its monthly consumer confidence index took a tumble, reaching its lowest level since the spring amid a big upsurge in Corona virus cases. December Reading was down more than four points from the previous month, Makes close on Wall Street Today the Dow was down 200 points. The NASDAQ closed up 65 points. The Standard and Poor's 500 ended the session down seven points today. We're listening to NPR live from KQED News. I'm Rachel Myrow Governor Newsome plans to appoint California's secretary of state Alex Padilla, to be our next. U. S. Senator Newsome announced this morning that Padilla will fill out the term vice president elect Kamila Harris is vacating to become the first Latino to represent California in the U. S. Senate. Outbreaks of covert 19 and California prisons are worse than ever, the state's corrections Department reported. Eight more covert 19 related deaths overnight. KQED is Kate Wolf reports 112 incarcerated people have died over the course of the pandemic. More than a third of the state's prison population has tested positive for the coronavirus. Almost every prison is dealing with an outbreak with more than 800 cases each at prisons in Monterey County, Tuolumne County and Los Angeles. Correction staff have also been testing positive in record numbers. With more than 3000 new cases. In the last two weeks, CDCR has said it will receive its first vaccine doses this month, and we'll prioritize people at high risk of becoming infected or severely ill from Cove in 19. I'm Kate Wolf KQED news. Albany Bowl is closing for good. The well known Bowling Alley arcade restaurant and Bar has been around for more than 70 years, the owner of the beloved institution, which hosted countless birthday parties and fundraisers over the years. Hold the East Bay Times he had to lay off 40 workers because of pandemic related shutdowns. The city has identified the site as one that could be turned into a housing development in the future. There's more online at kqed dot org's I'm Rachel Myrow KQED news Support comes from Silicon Valley Community Foundation, whose donors.

KQED Rachel Myrow Kate Wolf Alex Cesar KQED News California Alex Padilla U. S. Senator Newsome Kamila Harris Midge Erna NPR Secretary FDA Windsor Johnston Conference Board Monterey County
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:51 min | 7 months ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"5 30. It's KQED news. I'm Rachel Myrow, according to The Wall Street Journal. Suspected Russian hackers behind breaches at U. S. Government agencies also gained access to Silicon Valley giants like Cisco, Intel on video and VM, where, as well as the California Department of State hospitals. Wall Street Journal reporter Bob McMillan joins me to discuss So remind us of the basics of this hack. This hacked involves a company called Solar winds. There are little known Austin, Texas software company. They were Hatch and their products were then used as kind of like a back door to get into a whole bunch of other companies. And then solar winds basically distributed a backdoor to 18,000 of their customers, some of whom then had further compromises. We're figuring out how many of those entities have further compromises, but we don't really know the full impact of this right now. Many of the companies say they haven't identified any impact from the intrusion. But is it too early to tell? Oh, boy, this whole thing is a mess right? Because the initial incident happened in March. And companies air now basically having to dial back the clock and say where we have to march was their unusual activity on our networks in March. I don't know about you, but I don't have, like, Ah lot of records about what I was doing in March That would allow me to sort of have the kind of granular understanding of a cyber security event in my house back in March. And the truth is that some companies are gonna gonna have the information that will show whether they were hacked. And some companies are just not gonna have that. Is the concern for many of these companies that the hackers could use them or already have used them without anyone noticing as an avenue to get to their clients. No, that is absolutely the scariest thing about this. I mean, it's scary in that the federal government has linked this Attack to the Russians. So it from a national security perspective. It's bad. It's very bad that the Russians were in all these federal networks for so long without being detected, but then separate from that, As you point out the questions that it raises about the supply chain, the provisioning of products in particular software products to other people and Theobald itty to use those as sort of a sneaky way into any corporation or any entity you wanna have. That's the real worrying thing. Is this something that that individual citizens need to be worried about? In terms of their their own home system's been compromised, or it's more of a watch worry and wait. This is probably not at the top of the list of the things that like I would tell my relatives to be concerned about what it comes to cybersecurity over. Christmas holiday. I'd be like, make sure that there is a second factor of authentication on your Gmail. That's what you should be worrying about. If your consumer one other thing that's a concern here is that we don't know who was behind this. I mean, the federal government has said the Russians are behind it, and it's thought to be a nation state espionage focus groups, so in other words, spies, not criminals. If you're a consumer, that's reason for breathing a sigh of relief, right? The criminals are the ones who are going to steal your identity and make your life a misery. The spies or not, they're gonna do other things, but they don't They don't you know, as individual citizens don't have to worry about them quite as much. Wow. Thank you for setting our minds at ease, Bob, I think I did. I did. I do that. Don't worry about it too much. Like get your password thing sorted out first, please. Bob McMillan, Wall Street Journal reporter in them a park I'm Rachel Myrow KQED news..

The Wall Street Journal Bob McMillan Rachel Myrow Hatch federal government reporter KQED Austin California Department of State Texas Intel Theobald Cisco
California Seeks to Join Justice Department Antitrust Case Against Google

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

California Seeks to Join Justice Department Antitrust Case Against Google

"Office announced yesterday that California's Department of Justice intends to join the federal DOJ in a lawsuit alleging Google violated antitrust laws. KQ Edie's Rachel Myrow reports, the complaint alleges Google is stifled competition and rigged the advertising market. How by paying billions each year to device makers like Apple and Samsung. Carriers like 18 19, Verizon to make Google their default Internet search engine in a statement aged heavier, But Sarah wrote Google's dominance leaves consumers with quote little other choice than to accept it's less popular privacy practices and data collection policies. Google's response will continue to make our case in court. I'm Rachel Myrow

Rachel Myrow Kq Edie Google Department Of Justice DOJ California Samsung Verizon Apple Sarah
Crews face strong winds while battling California fires

BBC World Service

00:44 sec | 10 months ago

Crews face strong winds while battling California fires

"In Northern California is Rachel Myrow reports that the high winds in the area are increasing challenges for crews battling the glass fire that's raging in Napa and Sonoma County's The Glass fire is nowhere near California's biggest this record breaking year, but it's raging within a densely populated region something battalion chief Mark Brunton says. Firefighters are keenly aware of We're doing everything we can to try to mitigate that threat, but it is something we're extremely concerned it. The fire conditions such and the fuel conditions are so dry with 24 major wildfires active now across the state. Firefighters air spread thin and leaning on force multipliers from elsewhere, including National Guard troops from his Far East is Wisconsin.

Northern California Rachel Myrow Mark Brunton Sonoma County Napa National Guard Wisconsin
Senate committee revisits the need for federal data privacy legislation

All Things Considered

01:07 min | 11 months ago

Senate committee revisits the need for federal data privacy legislation

"The news. I'm terrorist Siler As U. S senators consider federal data privacy legislation again. They took testimony from Attorney general in California, home to the most comprehensive law in the nation. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of these Silicon Valley desk has more aged heavier. But Sarah has become something of an expert in data privacy as his office is the primary enforcer of the California Consumer Privacy Act. Speaking before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Wednesday, he said today as we battle a pandemic that has moved so much of life online companies know more about us our Children our habits than ever before That data is today's gold. And as with gold, there's been a rush to mine use and sell our personal information. Americans need robust tools that allow them to understand who has their data. What was collected if it can be the leader and how they can opt out of downstream selling. There are a couple of bills at play in D. C. The one from Republicans would preempt state laws. Democrats want to give states like California the freedom to innovate. I'm Rachel Myrow kick you in the news.

Rachel Myrow California Siler Science And Transportation Com Senate Commerce Senior Editor Sarah Attorney U. S
Are Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google Too Big?

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Are Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google Too Big?

"Four titans of Tech are expected to testify virtually to the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust. Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google soon dark pitch high here to preview this star studded panel is our own star needs. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of Our Silicon Valley News desk. Hello, Rachel. Shocks. Hello, Brian. Just for context. Here is a challenge for the two of us who both worked at market place back in the day. Can you tell us how big these companies are without using a dollar figure Using a dollar figure? Okay. Facebook has roughly three billion with a B users across various social platforms. That's user numbers figure. Amazon controls 38% of US online sales. Wal Mart, For contrast, is Amazon's nearest competitors, not even 6% like not even in the game. Google process is about 90% of Web searches globally Apples APP store. You're there. You're nowhere in the apple universe. They take a 30% cut. 30%. Brian. Wow. You did it all right. Four very different companies. Four key parts of modern life and that raises for different sets of antitrust concerns, right It does indeed, And that face is big questions about what lawmakers hoped to accomplish with this hearing today, right? I mean, even though all of them are reportedly targets of probes by the Justice Department Coalition of State attorneys general, we could take all day talking about any one of these tech titans. All right. So let's pick one. Okay, I'll pick one. Amazon. You're a prime member, right? Yeah, me and just about everybody else in America. If I make and or market a product, I have to be on Amazon to sell it to America, and I have to pop up early in the rankings. When American shoppers search for my thing I have to pay Amazon to make that happen. Amazon, by the way, has been known to copy and prioritize marketing. Of its name brand version of popular third party products otherwise known as stealing or counterfeiting. Amazon also criticized for failing to shut down other counterfeiters. Let's say somebody else who shouldn't be making my product is making it and according to the Wall Street Journal fairly recently Amazon's venture capital fund steals ideas from tech start ups that pitch to it, So that's just a short list of things Amazon critics have to say about that company. Wow. So back to this question of why the House Judiciary subcommittee is holding this meeting today. Officially, it caps a big investigation. More than 1.3 million documents gathered. Yes, indeed. And I had to tell Brian it is anybody's guess. How much time Will actually be spent on that investigation. Despite that number of documents as opposed to the other hot, we hate tech topics like election security, hate speech and political bias. Wow. Well, Rachel, thank you. You bet. Cheese. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of Silicon Valley News Desk.

Amazon Rachel Myrow Brian Facebook House Judiciary Senior Editor Google Apple United States Our Silicon Valley News Jeff Bezos Tim Cook Mark Zuckerberg Justice Department Coalition O America Silicon Valley News Wall Street Journal
What's the Real History of El Camino Real?

Bay Curious

07:39 min | 1 year ago

What's the Real History of El Camino Real?

"If you live or work on the San Francisco Peninsula you probably spent a lot of time on El Camino Royale Road that runs from San Francisco to San Jose through the center of many towns. Along the way. It's one of California's best known roads. And if you grew grew up here you probably learned about it in school. The story goes L. Community out is an ancient road built by the Spanish to connect the twenty one missions along on California's coast. But here's the thing that story. It's not exactly true. This big curious. I'm Olivia Allen Price Today. We're bringing you a story that first aired on our show back in twenty seventeen about the real history of El Camino real support for bay. Curious comes from Sierra. Nevada Brewing Company family owned operated and argued over since one thousand nine hundred reminding listeners to think for themselves but drink with others. SIERRA SIERRA NEVADA DOT COM K. Committees Rachel myrow senior editor of the Silicon Valley Newsdesk hit the trail with this week's question. Asker we met at mission in Santa Clara because this story dates all the way back to the Spanish colonial era in California. My name is Debbie Tori. I live in Campbell California Tori aspect curious the question. What can you find out about the El Camino real history? My name is Robert Cinco. wits professor of history at Santa Clara University sank quits is the man who can answer that and then some starting with the perhaps surprising truth that there were many El Camino rails all over the land. Spain used to control in the WHO world from seventeen sixty nine to eighteen twenty one royal roads. That was what you would call the main roads in any particular area because technically all of us belong to the King of Spain but wait. I read on wikipedia that this El Camino real but one in silicon valley is part of the historic mission trail on ancient fro that connects the Spanish missions. Like a string of pearls along the California coast. Also I'm pretty sure I heard somewhere possibly in school that the distance between each mission. It's supposed to be about a day's journey. What happened has to do more with southern California than it does with with Northern California a by about the eighteen seventies? As you get more and more Anglo Americans coming in the southern California and the the angle population really increases With the arrival of the railroads in Los Angeles listen the eighteen eighties now in America. There's a rich tradition of just got here yesterday. People concocting romantic origin myths and a number of influential fluential southern Californians wanted one of their own. They looked around and saw crumbling. Spanish missions twenty one of them stretching from the Mexican border all the way north to Sonoma's. Here's the story is told in Nineteen Fifty one promotional film for Greyhound buses called Freedom Highway Bridge the same road. The Spaniards followed almost two hundred years ago. Only they call it El Camino real kings highway. China imagine how was on horseback. Of course what was really going on here was the enslavement of local tribespeople. who were reeling under? The impact of European diseases forced religious religious conversion and the destruction of their entire way of life. Not that our question Asker Debbie Tori or I learned much of this in the fourth grade which is when a lot of California school. Children studied the subject. You're right they did glamorize it thinking it was a wonderful. The mission passed that they've construct was a fantasy past ROIC missionaries happy contented. Indians Fandango is all over the place. You know the Spanish mich- often enough you read and textbook that they blazed trails but they didn't blaze trails. They follow trails. That had already been developed by the indigenous people up and down the California coast I but at the turn of the twentieth century few people wanted that version of history. They wanted something fun. Happy Exotic groups like the landmarks club and the native daughters of the Golden West pushed to reframe collection of dirt roads into a rediscovered king's highway and the Automobile Appeal Club of southern California kind of sides. This fantasy past is a great way of getting people to buy drive automobiles and so what they do. is they begin. The push the notion that there was one central road which they named the commuter rail that connected the missions they began to push the notion commissions were located A day's journey from each other. You know which kind of when you think about. It makes them motels rather than what they actually were. Agents of simulation immolation of of the native peoples so wind in northern California. Play along with this southern California Fantasy Sanca wits says the concept caught on with wealthy Californians leg Jane Stanford wife of the Real Road Barren Lewin Stanford and wealthy Catholics like San Francisco. Mayor James Phelan Eland. They wanted the Spanish missions restored to something like their former glory. Lot of them were in really sad shape. If you look at pictures from the eighteen sixties exceeds eighteen seventies. The missions are crumbling. Consider this if the Spanish revival movement had not happened we might be looking at a string ruins along the California coast standing inside the sumptuous renovated mission. Santa Clara on the Modern Day campus of Santa Clara University Tori agrees. I'm actually kind of speechless. Listen here it's it's just magnificent. I feel like I'm in Europe. Then we hop in a modern day car and drive a half an hour to mission San Jose which is actually in modern day Fremont think of it as a mini mission road trip focused on the South Bay and here in Fremont we find one of the most historically accurate restorations in the California commission system and the on site museum is not to miss. debby Tori grabs a fact based map of the missions from the gift shop. So so debbie do you see yourself going on a mission tour. After this as a matter of fact yes. Tory took her kids on a mission tour like this years ago but told them a lot of Steph. She genuinely believed the turns out to be bunk. Her grandkids will get the truth. But Rachel I still have a question so every now. And then. When I'm driving along El Camino scenerio I will see a shepherd's crook on the side of the road and from the Crook hangs a bell that I have been told Marks this historic historic trail. Are those what's deal with spells. I guess those also stem back to the same period of time when people I came up with El Camino Rail There was a wife of a foundry owner in Los Angeles who conveniently suggested that she could manufacture these handy bells that were sort of reminiscent. I'm a nuisance of the Spanish era. Up and down the new route that they had just created Mrs Arbitrage C. E. Forbes and and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six cal trans decided to resurrect the bells So you'll spot him one or two miles apart on a variety of state routes because of course there isn't one route reality fantasy. Don't quite match up REX payer dollar's have helped to feed this fantasy fans. Yes well the taxpayer dollars to feed it the first time too so people are making money off of this. Yes this is a a two million dollar testament to the enduring appeal wheel of a made up version of history.

California Asker Debbie Tori El Camino El Camino Rail Santa Clara San Jose San Francisco Peninsula Santa Clara University San Francisco Rachel Myrow Los Angeles Campbell California Northern California Spain California School Nevada Brewing Company Real Road Barren Lewin Stanfor L. Community Sonoma
"rachel myrow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For NPR news. I'm Rachel myrow in San Jose. And we should Google is a financial supporter of NPR. This is NPR news. And this is WNYC in New York at five forty two it's sixty seven degrees. Cloudy skies in New York City, and we're going to take a quick look a check in with John Schaefer for today's gig alert. The parade is how the story of Peter and the wolf and you may know this family favorite, by Russian composer. Sergei prokofiev. It's been recorded by everyone from forest Karloff. David Bowie but it's never sounded like this. The Scottish national jazz orchestra does a big band version of Peter and the wolf with a new text and almost impenetrable still witty Scots English enough comes the hut. The wound. A bit of Peter and the wolf Scott style. The Scottish actor tempting burn joins the Scottish national jazz work in the performance of it. Tonight at dizzy club. Coca Cola for details. Go.

NPR Peter New York City Rachel myrow Coca Cola Sergei prokofiev forest Karloff David Bowie Google dizzy club San Jose John Schaefer sixty seven degrees
Twitter yanks thousands of fake accounts

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Twitter yanks thousands of fake accounts

"Siler Twitter and Facebook disclosed today, they coordinated to take down thousands of accounts mostly tied to Iran, but also Russia and Venezuela Kikuchi Silicon Valley editor Rachel myrow reports on the same day Twitter said it removes several thousand militias accounts. Facebook said it removed roughly eight hundred accounts pages and groups engaged in quote, coordinated inauthentic. Behaviour Nathaniel glacier is Facebook head of cybersecurity policy pages and these accounts up. Appear to be local voices. They use fake accounts to conceal their identity, and they would post new stories on current events and current developed so accounts pretending to belong to independent news outlets instead of say Iran's

Facebook Siler Twitter Nathaniel Glacier Iran Rachel Myrow Editor Venezuela Russia
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:00 min | 2 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Forum. I'm Rachel myrow information for Kim in the early hours of January first two thousand nine Oscar grant, an unarmed black man was fatally shot at Oakland's fruitvale station by a Bart police officer, his death sparked widespread outrage and grief around the nation, but it also galvanized many people in the bay area to take action including his family activists and artists today on forum. We remember Oscar grant and here to help us do that. And share their stories of how grant inspired are sif. His johnson. Oscar grant's ankle founder of the Oscar grant foundation and the love not blood campaign. Thank you for being here. Thank you for having me Pandora's Harshad columnist for K Q E D arts, author of OG told me thank you for being here. Thanks for having me and helping organize. Latifah Simon president of the economic foundation and Bart board member representing district seven she is a local civil rights activist. And the winner of a MacArthur genius grant. Thank you so much for having me and Reverend Areco, Blackman spiritual activists and vice provost at Stanford University where she focuses on diversity and inclusion. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Well, uncle Bobby. I thought I would start with you. I want to go around the table just for the benefit of some listeners who were there at the time, or you know, weren't paying attention at the time where were you on January first two thousand nine well, of course, New Year's Eve, I was at home. You know, actually resting. Oscar was really heavy on my spirit. I couldn't understand why. But I responded to that that call that. He was touching my spirit, in textile words, uncle love, you guys love your guy loves his family. Got God loves your family in an hour and a half later. He was shot in the background Jonah's mezzanine. And of course, he died that morning. So when I got the call, of course, it was New Year's day early in the morning, I proceeded to Hayward got there to my mother's house with the family. And of course, didn't quite understand. What was going on? So to make a long story short. I was at home in the bed when I got the call. And of course, went to my mother's house in experienced that tragedy that morning. Come into know, they're my nephew Oscar actually had succumbed and died from the shooting must have been such a shock. It was a tremendous shock because you know, not knowing the details. I couldn't understand why he was basically shot in the back. But what I was hearing face down by police officer ahead no clue. But I just knew that here in a way it was sounding that it wasn't right. And of course, eventually we saw the video and the video caused me to collapse unconscious, and when I basically came back, I was an extreme rage. I was really really just angry. Somehow of spirit hit me, and it calms my nerves in brought to memory how blessed I was to be able to tax Oscar the night before or early that morning. I should say. And I was really thankful, and it was from that point that I realized that this was more about. Do something constructive, then destruction. Because I realized that really wasn't Oscar that Tex was for me 'cause head on responded chances are people with no me who I am today from the work that I've done in the community concerning police terrorism. I know there are a lot of people who probably think they know Oscar grant because they saw the movie fruitvale station, but you you actually knew what was he like Oscar was a, you know, he was very funny nephew. And he loved being the center of attention. Very very smart. I mean, he learned to play chess at an early age. So we sat down we would play chess and just have conversation. He was very likable person. He had many friends of all types of different. Nationalities. You know, he was just that person. That was always the glue to the friendship, and you can hear his friends talk about that today and how he was glued to their relationship. Same at home in the house. You know? My mother used to call me all the time to do little knickknacks around the house cut, the grass, you know. Do this do that paint this fix this as Oscar begin to mature and understand how to do that type of work? She stopped calling me. Call oscar. But that was really rewarding to know that I had a nephew that was so attentive to his grandmother's needs and that responsible to whenever she made that call that. He would be there for her. He was already in a sense, you know, a pillar of his social society. Exactly, exactly. Yes. Durica? Do you wanna? Yes. Well, I mean, obviously, I didn't will not obviously, I didn't know ask her personally, I got to know him through the family and for me. What drew me to the movement for Justice really was as a mother, I merely I went I was able to go to the funeral and seeing the family and the grief and hearing Wanda as his mother talk about, you know, her loss, I also met Jack Bryson who was a father of one of the other young man who is on the platform and understanding that all of them a father. I'm sorry. Two of the young men on the platform. But. Just understanding all of the impact that this horrible event had on them. We drew me in as a mother, and as a person who had already been involved with youth development and activism. It just really was very clear call to action, and I can say that in our community. We always knew that police abuse and brutality was thing. But it was that moment where we thought that. If people actually saw it if there was this is win video and video taping of these kinds of things we thought that if people side, then of course, they would be as outrageous. We were and when we began to hear the justifications it just fueled. Now as uncle Bobby said if fueled in anger like how could you see this? And then even raise a question of whether an injustice has happened here. And so Criag Omegas called me and said that there was a young man who was organizing a protest at the Bart station. And that he needed some help. And so we just got on the phone like activists and community, folks. Do and said, hey, can we get a sound system? Hey, can you perform, hey, can you mobilize? The next thing. We knew we had over five thousand people at the fruitvale Bart station at immediately called for a second rally at city hall, which I think is a big part of how the movement grew. And there were countless activists and educators, and we'll have one of the artists who was really involved on today and elected officials, and ministers, and I think that is what made this movement so significant is that so many people heard that call and I love what you're doing today is to talk about how that call impacted all of us. You put the defense. I'm already in tears as uncle Bobby describes the life of a young a young boy. Twenty two year old daughter now, and I realize that she is a child. She's a college aged child the adults advocation of black men is is so that they can't be children. And so when you were talking about the nature of this young boy, cutting his grandmother's grass, I remember the days after his murder hearing the vitriol from racist America about a young man about a young man that was tried accused tried and executed. In minutes. And I remember the morning of the murder. My then and forever husband who passed away. Kevin Weston who was a journalist. He had tears in his eyes. And this was a grown, man. And we're watching the news, and he said they killed him on his stomach, and then he blinked a little bit. But he said the babies were watching the children on that. Bart train were watching. And he said that there was that morning. He said that boy's death. He was starting as a young journalist who worked with other young girls. He was getting pitchers, and he said this boy's death is going to change the world, and he cried all day, and this was a man in his late thirties. And what I realized in that moment as somebody who had been working with young people in the criminal Justice system. Many who had been beaten abused caged on concrete floors that. There's a moment that this family has given us an opening up their lives in opening almost giving the world the spirit, son. That we have the ride that we have to ride for this family for that mother. And for that child. Oscar was a father and immediately we begin to learn in our community that there was a little girl who didn't have her father because not because he did anything, but because someone who was an employee of a state institution killed him. And I think our duty not only today, but forever is to keep telling that story. And so I wanna thank you uncle, Bobby. I wanna thank you wanna thank you for just offering up so much of yourself. So that a movement could birth. Thank you. And as hard act to follow now. The question the prompt is just worrying how did it strike you start the college days kid that was me? I was twenty one. I was in my junior year at Howard University, the late great, Kevin westerns, my mentor. I'm doing summer camps with Tariq mama d and no Clinton uncle, Bobby. I get to know later that year through him coming out to Howard University and speaking about Oscar grant, and really what it spawned in me was that. I am Oscar grant. Were you see a young black, man? He's all of a year older than me at the time with the hoodie on wear. Hoodies. I've a beanie on right now. I saw myself in Oscar grant, I go to fruitvale station all the time. And so in wanting to keep that story alive and take it further. I saw my story going further. And so that I mean even today that's a part of what led me to say. Hey, no, we need to make sure this is recognized these ten years that have passed since we need to recognize this onerous story in the right way. I imagine a lot of people went beyond that collective grown. We hear on the video. That's the moment for me. I that's what echoes in my head and a lot of people showed up to March and protest, and then and then that quieted away and the decade stretched beyond that. I'm wondering if you guys can tell me what his death inspired you to do. And you know, uncle, Bobby. I know you've got to organizations to talk about and I want to hear about both of them, right? Right before I get into that. There's a segment of the community adult want to be forgotten and that is labor. The I l w local tin San Francisco longshoremen's union that embraced a family. You know in this is to be said not just to the Labor's segment, but also to the community as a family. You know, we're clear that it was the community that embraces stood with us cried. With those went back and forth court with us. But most importantly, utilize the first amendment right to speak to the very injustice what they witnessed it was because of that community in given us the strength to even allow the possibility of hope in getting Justice come ally. And so we as a family always will always be indebted to the community. Light sister Ricky here in Penn for allow me to come to Howard to speak to students, of course, Latifa of being voice in the community. And so I just wanted to make sure that we didn't forget labor 'cause Alameda County. San Francisco labor council, I spoke to and they. Join forces down amid a county labor council also joined forces so labor was an important aspect of a too because we know on ten twenty three two thousand ten two ports here in northern California up and down the coast were shut down because of what happened to Oscar. So I definitely never ever forget about the Sherman union. Helped me with the question. Tell me what the Oscar grant founded. Yes, yes. And your sister's involvement, right, right? It was it was really painful to see my sister in tears in unable to speak. You know? So it was just I would just blessed to be able to have that voice. And I felt that it was necessary. That me I begin speak on her behalf until she got her voice. But also, I didn't want Oscar to be forgotten. So I thought well, what is it that we can do and idea came to maybe create some kind of organization or some foundation in his name. And so, of course, I started the Oscar graph foundation with the intent to give it to Oscar's mother Wanda intact Yana as a legacy for Oscar to take an a direction that they knew Oscar you wanted to go. And so that's what really sparked that in that organization itself began to reach out to families..

Oscar uncle Bobby Oscar grant fruitvale station San Francisco officer Bart fruitvale Bart station Pandora MacArthur Stanford University Reverend Areco johnson Oakland Latifah Simon Wanda Bart station Alameda County
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the California report. I'm John sepulveda's. Oh, we're going to start in Butte county because as you know, the devastating campfire has leveled nearly the entire town of paradise killed over eighty people and destroyed thousands of homes and its path. Paradise has or maybe it's procreate to say had a population of roughly twenty six thousand people more than four thousand of those are children under the age of eighteen PR Kuni spoke with students from paradise intermediate school about how they're holding up in the aftermath. Twelve year old Bryce has life changed on November morning two weeks ago today on his way to school his mom calls about a wildfire and evacuation they narrowly escaped with their lives. It was scary. We had to drive through fire who saw cars and fire was really bad. I didn't know gonna make it out. I thought maybe the car was on fire on their way out of paradise. Bryson his mom stopped at their home for the last time. Scrambling to grab a few possessions. They could Bryce fill the pillow case with some clothes and some pictures of his friends and his grandma twelve year old Tiffany from paradise only managed to grab one thing in her evacuation a softball. It was pretty stressful to know that you're touted was possibly God. And that your house and everything that you had could be like destroyed for twelve year old processing this magnitude of loss. We'll take time. I don't think it's hit me yet. The like everything's gone. A lot of my friends are like really sad. But I'm just I'm waiting for it to happen. Because I know that it will. But it's really hard. Both Tiffany and Bryce lost their homes to the fire. They also lost a sense of normalcy. The routine school life though, the orange touch with friends on social media. They both have places to stay in the short term. But where they'll go from here is still uncertain right now price and his mom are celebrating thanksgiving with family in Portland. We call to ask him what he's thankful for my family. Well, I'm alive and stuff. So yeah. The California report, I'm Peter Kenyon. We're going to move on and talk about something a little lighter, or perhaps heavier depending on how dinner went at the thanksgiving table. Because once the Turkey is cleared from the table the holiday shopping season begins in earnest cuties. Rachel myrow owes me chocolate because she's talked us into sending her to eat bay area. Chocolate factory too. I don't know a bunch of samples somebody told me there's a story in here somewhere. Do you ever get sick of chocolate? I start eating chocolate. At about nine in the morning, that's.

Bryce paradise intermediate school California Tiffany Butte county John sepulveda Kuni Rachel myrow Bryson Peter Kenyon Turkey Portland twelve year Twelve year two weeks
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chips and cocoa powder in the market, but Gary guitar says most of its chocolate supplies bigger. Name brands, like Starbucks See's candies and shake shack. Everybody's had it at. And they don't realize it, you tired also supplies high end chocolate tears like Cutie in Charles chocolates. Each customer has a special recipe involving particular cocoa beans and a particular mix of chocolate liquor cocoa butter sugar, and possibly milk truly is an art and a science and there is in the complexity, but we can drive yourself. Crazy. Yeah. But a good kind of crazy in Burlingame. I'm Rachel myrow for the California report. Rates all I'm so hungry. Now, let's talk about a good kind of crazy and another way and talk about what astronauts at the international space station are going to eat for this holiday meal. There may not be a wide selection of side dishes. Like we're used to down here on earth. But astronauts stand love says all of the Staples are there either freeze dried or thermal stabilized kinda like Marie military ration type food that's holiday food. So they can get Turkey and cranberry sauce, and you know, sweet potatoes and things like that that sounds gross really, really gross. But love says that since the space station has astronauts and cosmonauts from all over the world, the often get the trade holiday meals to share in each other celebration. I'm glad to have something to celebrate. Because the food I'm sorry. It sounds really really gross. Support for the California report comes from personal.

California Starbucks Rachel myrow Gary guitar Burlingame Staples Marie milk
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Heller is also working with UC Berkeley, d lab on a project called the online hate index to crowd source from hate speech screeners all of the world. But there are those who argue scrubbing social media of hate speech is a fool's errand New York law school, professor Nadine Strossen wrote a book called hate why we should resist it with free speech, not censorship. I think it's really important for us to know about them. And we're going to be more effective in identifying and refuting, those ideas, and in monitoring the people who have them and preventing them from engaging in hateful actions. If we know who they are. But how exactly do you identify? Somebody about to switch from hateful words to hateful actions. That's not something artificial or human intelligence has been able to decipher yet. I'm Rachel myrow. Kiki news wildlife biologists. In Marin county are in the midst of the study that will help conservation efforts for a somewhat mysterious. Some may even say frightening creature, bats Gabriel biologists. With the US Geological Survey says bats, well, they're just miss understood. They've been described as flying rodents. They're actually not they're more closely related to the common. Ancestors of camels and Wales and fearsome critters the really nothing to be afraid of. I think they're all adorable Ray says bats play an important role in our ecosystem there like winged exterminators eating thousands of bugs night, and they're plant pollinators side note, we wouldn't have tequila without bats pollinating Gava plants, but we don't know what. The population or habitat is like in Marin so USGS along with conservation group one Tam set out to fill those data gaps last year. They're incredibly challenging to study their silent. They fly around at night. They live in really hard tax us places, but things like tiny radio transmitters and ultrasonic microphones do help to see raise an action. I met him in Marin at bat o'clock or dusk. So this is actually.

Marin Marin county US Tam Nadine Strossen Rachel myrow Heller New York professor Ray Wales
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening. To weekend edition from NPR news from news I'm Jeremy Siegel if you've attended a cultural event in the bay area. There's a chance you might have noticed a lack of diversity in the audience you go, to the opera and, you might see mostly white people you go, to a South Asian concert and you get the idea Rachel, myrow tells us about one south bay organization that's. Trying to mix up its, audience for the last five years sunk arts has brought together, artists from wildly different? Artistic, traditions to co create. Why co-founder, Russia chigney Vasan says even as the bay area gets more diverse it's become more silent tend to have. A nuanced understanding cultures but we are still your typical understanding of others and so by doing this we, help create meaningful, dialogue when she says by doing this what does she mean well something. Like an upcoming Dance concert later this month, focused on the divine feminine half of the show features the, classical south Indian dance? Form, known as Bartha Nadia The other half of the show New, ground theatre dance delivering western contemporary Both forms, of dance communicate, with rhythm, and expression but new. Ground autistic director calling Laurent says tunnel I think it that divine feminine essence is really about seeing. Underneath that and what brings us together literally the show sangam arts produces bring, together the fan. Bases of the. Performers expanding their audiences just like that I'm Rachel myrow kick you eighty news and we'll tweet out a link to Rachel story with info.

Rachel myrow Vasan Jeremy Siegel NPR Russia co-founder Laurent director five years
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But check this out let's say I just streamed Mifumi the last samurai on Netflix, and now I wanna watch some of the original feature films buffoon made more than one hundred. Seventy but might. Be happy with a handful of the greatest hits I typed to. Share him, a phony in the search box streaming nothing okay now let's, try DVD I get films inspired by him sure, but not starring, him, okay let's. Try by foam title seven samurai Russia Your JIMBO throne of? Blood, yes But all of these films are only available on DVD and only for now, as all distribution deals eventually expire in which case I would get the option to save the movie down. At the bottom of my cue, but, you know what that means availability? Unknown Now I know what I'm looking for. But what if I'm eight years old eighteen and I don't know about buffoonery or anybody else famous in the twentieth, century net flicks isn't going to serve up the ancient past. Not to me or any of its other one hundred twenty five million subscribers worldwide Rick prelature is professor of film and digital media. At UC, Santa Cruz, and a board member of the internet archive a. Free, to the public digital library based in San Francisco I think it's much, of the business for and that flicks or for a Hulu and nobody's going to take a risk, on archives prowling. Says entertainment companies naturally waters looking at what they're spending money on now if you want a comprehensive set of, foreign classic gore independently produced films you have to subscribe to a streaming service like fan door Mugabe or. Film struck or watch? Dubious bootleg copies, upload To YouTube torrent yes there's, a lot of product available if you really really look hard but we're avoiding the. Question do we as audiences and do we ask citizens deserve access to are moving Emma charity well do we I'm, Rachel myrow KiKi news you're listening to morning edition on support..

Netflix Rachel myrow Rick prelature Hulu Mugabe UC Russia Emma Santa Cruz San Francisco professor internet eight years
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The original, feature films buffoon made more than one hundred seventy but I'd be happy with a handful, of. The greatest hits, I type to share them in the search box for streaming. Nothing okay, now let's try DVD I get films inspired by him sure, but not starring him okay let's. Try by foam title seven samurai Russia Your JIMBO throne of? Blood, yes But all of these films are only available on DVD and only for now, as all distribution deals eventually expire in which case I would get the option to save the movie down. At the bottom of my cue, but, you know what that means availability? Unknown Now I know what I'm looking for but what if I'm eight years old eighteen and I don't know about anybody else famous in the twentieth, century net flicks isn't going to serve up the ancient past. Not to me or any of its other one hundred twenty five million subscribers worldwide with prelature is professor of film and digital media. At UC, Santa Cruz and a board member of the internet archive a free. To, the public digital library based in San Francisco I don't think it's much, of the business for that flakes or for a Hulu and nobody's going to take a risk on, archives prowling says. Entertainment companies naturally want us looking at what they're spending money on now if you want a comprehensive set of, foreign classic gore independently produced films you have to subscribe to a streaming service like fan door movie or. Film struck or watch? Dubious bootleg copies, upload To YouTube torrent yes there's a lot of product available if you really really look hard, but we're avoiding the question do we as audiences and do. We ask citizens deserve access to our moving image heritage well do we I'm Rachel myrow KiKi weedy news you're.

Rachel myrow Hulu UC Santa Cruz Russia San Francisco professor internet eight years
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The job here's npr's don gonyea price was the secretary of health and human services for seven months ending in september of last year he resigned after the spending scandal broke now the hhs inspector general in official watchdog that's part of the agency says the former secretary's travel which included extensive use of chartered flights did not comply with agency rules the report says the federal funds wasted total three hundred forty one thousand dollars it goes on to state that a review of twentyone trips price took showed only one was in compliance that's npr's don gonyea reporting you're listening to npr news news from k q e d news i'm brian watt democrats are calling on president trump to cancel his planned meeting with russian president vladimir putin in the wake of new charges in the russia investigation today's indictments outlined by deputy attorney general rod rosenstein accused twelve russian intelligence officers of hacking into democratic email accounts during the two thousand sixteen presidential election democrats on the house foreign affairs committee wrote to the president to say they are profoundly concerned about the meeting and can't understand president trump's decision to ignore clear evidence that russia interfered in the election san francisco based twitter is removing tens of millions of suspicious accounts silicon valley reporter rachel myrow tells us many big names could see a big decline in their number of followers it's an open secret many users inflate their follower count with automated or fake accounts creating the appearance of popularity to bolster their careers and entertainment retail even politics rebecca lieb is a digital marketing consultant who says fake followers are the social media equivalent of spam and they are bad for business it makes the internet into more of a cesspool it makes consumers users more suspicious of everything that they consume the average user will lose about four followers but often these fake followers flocked to accounts with large followings so if the rockstar or politician you love to hate looks like she just lost a lot of people that doesn't necessarily indicate she was cheating i'm rachel myrow cake huitieme us if you're real follow.

rachel myrow rebecca lieb reporter deputy attorney general brian watt official hhs don gonyea consultant npr twitter san francisco russia trump president rod rosenstein vladimir putin
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Member station k c u r reports this year's gathering comes amid newly heightened prospects of an increasingly antiabortion supreme court the national group is holding its meeting in a state seen as a leader in passing restrictions on abortion the movement got a boost this week when the us supreme court overturned a law requiring crisis pregnancy centers to be more transparent about not providing abortion services now there's the pending loss of a crucial swing vote the retirement of justice anthony kennedy will allow president donald trump tips the nation's high court further right and to possibly nominate a conservative willing to overturn the nine hundred seventy three roe versus wade decision that made abortion legal organizers for this right to life conference already had an eye toward future antiabortion victories one workshop is titled what happens when roh goes for npr news i'm madeline fox into pika a mole street the dow jones industrial average is down twenty three points at twenty four thousand ninety four the nasdaq is up twelve points at seventy four hundred fifty seven you're listening to npr from k q e d news i'm brian watt the ceo of the silicon valley community foundation is officially out emit carson spent the last couple of months on paid administrative leave during the investigation of alleged managerial misconduct at the nation's biggest community foundation acuity rachel myrow reports the board of the silicon valley community foundation commissioned it investigation by an outside legal firm in april following reports of harassment and bullying by the nonprofits top fundraiser a summary of the full report substantiates many of the allegations from current and former employees in a written statement the board acknowledged that quote this failure happened under our watch it also promised to address the toxic work environment under former ceo emmett carson and national search firm is now looking for his replacement i'm rachel myrow katie news the close to three thousand firefighters battling the pointy fire in lake county have made significant advances on california's largest wildfire evacuation orders that covered about five hundred homes in spring valley in the spring valley area were lifted yesterday cal fire says the fire is now thirty percent contained it has charted thirteen thousand seven hundred acres and destroyed a dozen homes the weather has improved for firefighters since the pointy fire ignited last saturday but hot dry conditions are expected to return this weekend in sports the giants beat the rockies one to nothing they play again at at and t at twelve forty five the a shut out the tigers three to nothing that series resumes in detroit at ten this morning our time i'm.

harassment npr wade detroit tigers giants spring valley california lake county ceo emmett carson us rachel myrow silicon valley community found ceo brian watt madeline fox roh roe
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to weekend edition from npr news from k q weedy news i'm tiffany cam high traditional chinese ink painting is done on paper and silk and it often features calligraphy and nature scenes but an exhibit that opened this week at the cantor arts center on the stanford campus features two dozen artists who've given a modern twist to the ancient art form the exhibit is called inc world's kiki dee silicon valley arts and cultural reporter rachel myrow has more no one piece is like the other similar lyrical others aggressive a lot of the paintings are abstract others evoke traditional chinese landscapes what most have in common is they come from the home collection of jerry yang former ceo of yahoo and his wife akiko yamazaki there is a certain way that you have to put energy into the brush that is something that is quite unique about ink paintings and i hope that people can feel that gang started collecting our connector is chinese heritage but he finds the dynamism of living artists exciting part of it is is reflection of what's happened in asia particularly china over the last thirty years there's been an explosion of both tradition and innovation in art and is still evolving i asked the silicon valley veteran if he's worried artificial intelligence will soon make chinese artists obsolete but optimistic about the future of human talent guy these guys jobs are safe from four while i'm rachel myrow katie news we'll tweet out a link to rachel story where at cake news and i'm.

cantor arts center jerry yang ceo yahoo akiko yamazaki asia china npr reporter rachel myrow thirty years
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to weekend edition from npr news and from k q e d news i'm queen kim this steinbeck festival is an annual three day event down in the monterey bay area and it celebrates all things john steinbeck this year the festival focuses on women steinbeck loved and admired kiki witty's rachel myrow has more this year's festival is called the women of steinbeck's world and its focus goes beyond the characters in john steinbeck's books like ma jody in the grapes of wrath there wanna in the pearl to include real life women who influenced him like first lady eleanor roosevelt photographer dorsey alang and the environmentalist rachel carson why because steinbeck said the book that he most wished that he'd written was silenced spring susan showing law directs the national steinbeck center in salinas when she's not teaching english at san jose state she says she wouldn't call steinbeck a feminist but he so admired strong resolute women he married three of them and he was very close to his sisters and his family and fished with women had women as companions it's after there will be lectures local tours homebrew fest and a taco lunch but the highlight of the weekend happened saturday night that's from a musical based on steinbeck's classic of mice and men which will have its west coast premiere it's one night only though unless the theater called the western stage and the steinbeck's center get the go ahead to do more i'm rachel naira kiki dee news we'll tweet linked to.

kim kiki witty rachel myrow john steinbeck dorsey alang rachel carson national steinbeck center salinas npr monterey bay steinbeck eleanor roosevelt san jose three day
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Corporation for public broadcasting welcome to forum i'm rachel myrow sitting in for michael krasny you may have never heard of pailin tier technologies but odds are apparently here knows a bit about you the company silicon valley vc peter thiel fat co founded in two thousand four uses software to collect and connect data for national security agencies wall street firms and law enforcement the company sells itself is able to identify quote unquote pre crime suspect sala the tom cruise film minority report you may not be cool with that but then you weren't asked for your permission bloomberg reporters liz at chapman and peter waldman wrote the latest expose of pailin tier and they join us in the studio now to talk about it thank you so much for being here thank you so you know this this isn't the first in depth look at pailin tear that's been published as since they started in two thousand four what kind of questions did you want to explore when you started reporting this story well we looked at this from ten thousand feet in we're thinking about well what role does pound tier play in the whole sort of data sharing privacy civil liberties arena and we were struck to see a number of a number of ways that they do have a great deal of influence over people's lives without us knowing it start out by saying it is just a tool and the user or in this case the client determines how that will play out but once you once a client has engaged volunteer whether it'd be a police or sheriff's department or a major bank they they can gain access to an extraordinarily wide array of data sources and really string together synthesize synthesize analyze think about and layout in pretty pictures how people and things are knitted together out there it can literally go six january six degrees of separation and and really sort of.

rachel myrow michael krasny sala chapman peter waldman liz ten thousand feet six degrees
"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of k q e d dry unseasonably warm conditions are expected to continue throughout the day today with highs ranging from the low seventies to the upper eighties we are expecting a cooling trend beginning tomorrow through the end of the week is an area of low pressure that's offshore right now slowly approaches the coast this low pressure might produce scattered showers late friday into saturday mainly across the north bay it's six minutes past nine welcome to forum i'm rachel myrow sitting in for michael krasny the only child of an irish american father and a burmese mother alex wagner grew up feeling different from most people around her she became a cbs news correspondent and co host of the circus on showtime she's also hosted now with alex wagner on msnbc and was a co anchor on cbs this morning saturday this hour she joins us to discuss her memoir future face which chronicles journey to solve a family mystery and learn more about her genealogy and her identity reading some of this book i recalled my own experiences a child when you're growing up adults don't tell you the whole story they tell you something candy coated they sidestep uncomfortable truths what was it like for you going back as an adult and as a journalist to fact check your parents that's such a great day right i did a long extended fact that turned into a book on my mother's side i'd always been told these incredibly romantic stories about burma my grandmother would talk about having bananas at teatime and handrolled chariots and dot we were the first family to have a dodge motor car in rangoon and it was beautiful existence the center frangipani blossoms the palm leaves they would use his umbrellas when the monsoon rains arrived but there was never any even acknowledgement of what was happening in the country that ultimately forced my family to leave there were sort of little asides here and there but there was no exploration there was no exposition about how burma became so poisoning instead burma was always treated as this magical brigadier like place and the same is true for my father's side he had grown up in this tiny town on the mississippi river called lansing and they skated on the frozen river in the winter and had doughnuts on sunday and they had this beautiful kitchen garden he was a young second youngest of six kids his father was a.

rachel myrow alex wagner msnbc cbs burma rangoon mississippi river lansing michael krasny six minutes
"rachel myrow" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"rachel myrow" Discussed on Here & Now

"The war in syria continues this week with a battle by turkish troops to capture the kurdish held city of afrin the united nations says there have been numerous casualties and significant displacement of civilians meanwhile in this country many advocates are trying to figure out how to stir up interest in compassion for syrian refugees one san francisco bay area theater company has an idea that involves two onions a quarter cup of pine nuts and one pound of beef rachel myrow of qa d reports the scene is a kitchen in a private palo alto home to dozen people are sitting in foldout chairs in the breakfast nook a couple of feet away from actress nor elsa monte the star of this one woman show called own my sweet land she plays his syrian german woman who relates over the hump of the kitchen fan the story of her affair with a syrian refugee while she cooks kid bay fried bulgar wheat balls filled with meat and spices recipes vary regionally but they're popular throughout the middle east in the recipes they say take it on what kind of big small it not that unit of measurement it's like saying demand which she never gives her name but we learn a lot about kibet we eat meet it's the characters re entry point back into the syrian half of her heritage she entices a handsome syrian into her apartment with kibben later on when she travels to lebanon to look them up again she finds that sharing food with guests is one way the people there cling to their humanity in the midst of a civil war wait you say did i just say lebanon yes most of the five and a half million syrians who fled their country settle just over the border in lebanon turkey and jordan every they can space now shelter for the refugees every shop were store dream has been rented out every now share many.

syria united nations rachel myrow elsa monte jordan afrin san francisco palo alto lebanon one pound