39 Burst results for "Rachel Martin"

Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:31 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Some of Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster's friends tried to convince him not to take the job. But after serving more than 30 years in the Army General, McMaster said yes. When President Trump asked him to serve as his second national Security advisor, his first being, Lieutenant general Michael Flynn, McMaster serve for just 13 months, he says. In that time, he helped shape the administration's response to numerous national security threats. Including Iran, Russia and China, which he explains in his new book battle Grounds, the fight to defend the free world. I talked with General McMaster about his book and two things came through in my conversation one. The successes he had at the NSC sometimes happened despite President Trump, Not because of him. And two how desperately this career military officer wants to rise above partisan divides. Even as the president he served exploits them. What I found Rachel is that is that there are really three types of people. I think who serve in any white house there For those who want to It would provide the elected president options and help that President really decide upon an implement his or her agenda. And then there are is a second group of people who were there not to help the president. Execute his or her Jenna, but instead to advance their own narrow agenda, And then there's a third group, and I think this is true in any White House. Maybe it's more magnified and in this administration, but there are some people who defined themselves in the role of Maybe saving the country and the world from from the president and I was clearly I felt in that in that first category. Those who are in the 2nd and 3rd sometimes don't appreciate what you're doing in providing options to the president and helping the president. Make you have sensible and and the best possible decisions. A cz well, is helping the president implement his agenda. So you were not someone who saw President Trump as some kind of risk from the beginning and that it was your duty to come in because you have been asked and that you could help. Save him from his worst instincts, right? Exactly, because I mean, nobody elected me right. Think they elected? They elected Donald Trump. Let me ask about Russia. Did the president make it more difficult when it came to Russia? I mean, you talk about one of the victories of your tenure being the recognition of Russia as a strategic threat. And the president himself refused to acknowledge that Russia had been behind the spread of disinformation in the 2016 election. How difficult did that make your job? Well, you have made a little more difficult. Time and again in this interview, General McMaster avoided a placing blame on the president on Russia. He went on to say President Trump has repeated a mistake that others before him have made. President Trump isn't the first president. He's the third actually to suffer under the delusion that we can have a good relationship with Putin. We can make him change he's going to become, you know, a nicer guy. He's really not. And what it describes is Putin's playbook in the book and then what we have to do to counter it. During the impeachment hearings for President Trump, your former top Russia expert from the National Security Council, Fiona Hill, was attacked repeatedly by Republicans in Congress and the right wing media who questioned her integrity and her patriotism. Why did you never come to her defense as well as other of your former staffers who were publicly maligned in that process. Well, you know, I do defend come to their defense, but in different ways, Not a public way, right? I mean, I I mean, I'm happy to say on the record any time what a great person Fiona Hill was, and I did multiple times in that in that period, But you know you don't Rachel, I just don't want to get drug down into the vitriolic partisan discourse. I'm gonna try. I don't know if it'll work, but I'm gonna try to transcend it right. I think that if we talk about issues if we talk about the realities About what a fine person would a tremendous civil servant. What a great scholar Fiona Hill is, let's just rise above the partisan vitriol, and I know that is what you tried to do in this book. Nevertheless, I need to ask some of your former colleagues in government and the military have been publicly very critical of this president and his judgment. Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, former national security adviser John Bolton, former Secretary of state Rex Tillerson, to name just a few. You made a name for yourself Early on in your career is someone unafraid to speak truth to power? In fact, you wrote a book called Dereliction of Duty about the negligence of senior officials to question authority during the Vietnam War. Yet you have refrained from any public rebuke of this president. Do you not share those same concerns about the president's ability to govern? Well, I'll tell you, Rachel, my primary duty when I was his national, secretive Isar was to tell the president really what he needed to know not what he wanted to hear. And I came in with the determination to do that. That's what I did every day. It is probably what one of the factors the great the great on him. You know, I was the one who who was always bearing, you know the different perspective or Bringing a different set of facts or analysis. What I'm very concerned about is that we cannot allow the military profession to be drug into partisan politics and again. I just don't think you're being another general to come out to endorse or to disparage a presidential candidate in the midst of all election. I just don't think that would be at this stage. Very helpful. That's why I wrote a much different book, you know from another palace intrigue or another. Tell all you write in the book that is part of trying to remain a political throughout your career. You have never voted. You are retired now. And you no longer serve in government. Will you cast your vote for president this year? Well, my three daughters air working on me. So so we'll see. What are they pushing in any one direction? Yeah, they want they want me to become more engaged. And of course they want me to be. This is what I wrote it. I right right in the preface of battle grounds. This is not the book that most people wanted me to write. No, including my wife and three daughters. So so and you could tell me that sounds like your daughter's air pushing you to vote for Joe Biden. No, I'm not. I won't say I think you know, I really do think one of the important moments where democracy is the secret ballot, you know, and the privacy That it affords us and And I think that you know, I just think that we have to at some point. Stop talking about parties, You know, I mean, I think about of the Federalist Papers and federal is 10 And what what? James Madison and what Alexander Hamilton wrote about they worried about the danger of factions, which they really meant political parties. And on And I think that that really they foresaw what we're going through today. Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster. His new book is called Battle Grounds. The fight to defend the Free world. General McMaster. Thank you so much for your time. Rachel. Thank you so much. And.

President Trump Lieutenant General H. R. Mcmas Rachel Martin Russia Fiona Hill Npr News Steve Inskeep Rachel Noelle King NSC Putin Battle Grounds Iran White House China Officer Advisor Joe Biden
Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:43 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

"That makes a difference. It's 5 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Some of Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster's friends tried to convince him not to take the job. But after serving more than 30 years in the Army General, McMaster said yes. When President Trump asked him to serve as his second national Security advisor, his first being, Lieutenant general Michael Flynn, McMaster serve for just 13 months, he says. In that time, he helped shape the administration's response to numerous national security threats. Including Iran, Russia and China, which he explains in his new book battle Grounds, the fight to defend the free world. I talked with General McMaster about his book and two things came through in my conversation one. The successes he had at the NSC sometimes happened despite President Trump, Not because of him. And two how desperately this career military officer wants to rise above partisan divides. Even as the president he served exploits them. What I found Rachel is that is that there are really three types of people. I think who serve in any white house there, where those who want to It would provide the elected president options and help that president will decide upon an implement his or her agenda. And then there are is a second group of people who were there not to help the president. Execute his or her Jenna, but instead to advance their own narrow agenda, And then there's a third group, and I think this is true in any White House. Maybe it's more magnified and in this administration, but there are some people who defined themselves in the role of Maybe saving the country and the world from from the president and I was clearly I felt in that in that first category. Those who are in the 2nd and 3rd sometimes don't appreciate what you're doing in providing options to the president and helping the president. Make you have sensible and and the best possible decisions. A cz well, is helping the president implement his agenda. So you were not someone who saw President Trump as some kind of risk from the beginning and that it was your duty to come in because you have been asked and that you could help. Save him from his worst instincts, right? Exactly, because I mean, nobody elected me think they elected. They elected Donald Trump. Let me ask about Russia. Did the president make it more difficult when it came to Russia? I mean, you talk about one of the victories of your tenure being the recognition of Russia as a strategic threat. And the president himself refused to acknowledge that Russia had been behind the spread of disinformation in the 2016 election. How difficult did that make your job? Well, you have made a little more difficult. Time and again in this interview, General McMaster avoided placing blame on the president on Russia. He went on to say President Trump has repeated a mistake that others before him have made. President Trump isn't the first president. He's the third actually to suffer under the delusion that we can have a good relationship with Putin. We can make him change he's going to become, you know, a nicer guy. He's really not. And what it describes is Putin's playbook in the book and then what we have to do to counter it. During the impeachment hearings for President Trump, your former top Russia expert from the National Security Council, Fiona Hill, was attacked repeatedly by Republicans in Congress and the right wing media who questioned her integrity and her patriotism. Why did you never come to her defense as well as other of your former staffers who were publicly maligned in that process. Well, you know, I do defend come to their defense, but in different ways, Not a public way, right? I mean, I I mean, I'm happy to say on the record any time what a great person Fiona Hill was, and I did multiple times in that in that period, But, you know, you know what, Rachel, I just don't want to get drug down. Into the vitriolic partisan discourse. I'm gonna try. I don't know if it'll work, but I'm gonna try to transcend it right? I think that if we talk about issues if we talk about the realities about what a fine person would a tremendous civil servant what a great scholar Fiona Hill is, let's just rise above. The partisan vitriol, and I know that is what you tried to do in this book. Nevertheless, I need to ask some of your former colleagues in government and the military have been publicly very critical of this president and his judgment. Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, former national security adviser John Bolton, former Secretary of state Rex Tillerson, to name just a few. You made a name for yourself Early on in your career is someone unafraid to speak truth to power? In fact, you wrote a book called Dereliction of Duty about the negligence of senior officials to question authority during the Vietnam War. Yet you have refrained from any public rebuke of this president. Do you not share those same concerns about the president's ability to govern? Alteration. My primary duty when I was a national secret adviser was to tell the president really what he needed to know not what he wanted to hear. And I came in with the determination to do that. That's what I did every day. It is probably what one of the factors the great the great on him. You know, I was the one who who was always bearing, you know the different perspective or Bringing a different set of facts or or analysis. What I'm very concerned about is that we cannot allow the military profession to be drug into partisan politics and again. I just don't think you're being another general to come out to endorse or to disparage a presidential candidate in the midst of election. I just don't think that would be at this stage. Very helpful. That's why I wrote a much different book, you know from another palace intrigue or another. Tell all you write in the book that is part of trying to remain a political throughout your career. You have never voted. You are retired now. And you no longer serve in government. Will you cast your vote for president this year? Well, my three daughters are working on me. So we'll see. What are they pushing in any one direction? Yeah, they want they want me to become more engaged in. Of course they want me to be. This is what I wrote it. I right right in the preface of battle grounds. This is not the book that most people wanted me to write. No, including my wife and three daughters. So so and you could tell me that sounds like your daughter's air pushing you to vote for Joe Biden. No, I'm not. I won't say I think you know, I really do think one of the important moments where democracy is the secret ballot, you know, and the privacy That it affords us and And I think that you know, I just think that we have to at some point. Stop talking about parties, You know, I mean, I think about of the Federalist Papers and federal is 10 And what what? James Madison and what Alexander Hamilton wrote about they worried about the danger of factions, which they really meant political parties. And on And I think that that really they foresaw what we're going through today. Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster. His new book is called Battle Grounds. The fight to defend the Free world. General McMaster. Thank you so much for your time. Rachel. Thank you so much..

President Trump Lieutenant General H. R. Mcmas Russia Rachel Martin Fiona Hill Battle Grounds Putin Npr News Steve Inskeep Noelle King Rachel NSC Iran White House China Officer Advisor Joe Biden
Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:43 sec | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

"Good morning. Why did the CDC removed guidance from its website? The update briefly said the virus is airborne and aerosol transmission, maybe one of the most common ways it spreads its morning edition from NPR News. A black man on federal death row, admits he's guilty but was a teenager when he murdered two people. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well king, how to race and age factor into who is executed. Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster served in the Trump administration for 13 months. He's written a book about his time coming up, he tells Rachel Martin, how badly he wanted to rise above the partisan divides that the president exploits its Tuesday September 22nd singer Joan Jett is 62. And the news is next..

Npr News Lieutenant General H. R. Mcmas Steve Inskeep Joan Jett Rachel Martin CDC Donald Trump President Trump
Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:45 sec | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "rachel martin" discussed on Morning Edition

"Website. The update briefly said the virus is airborne and aerosol transmission, maybe one of the most common ways it spreads its morning edition from NPR news. Ah, a black man on federal death row, admits he's guilty. But I was a teenager when he murdered two people. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. How do race and age factor into who is executed? Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster served in the Trump Administration for 13 months. He's written a book about his time. Coming up, he tells Rachel Martin, how badly he wanted to rise above the partisan divides that the president exploits its Tuesday September 22nd singer Joan Jett is 62. The news is next..

Lieutenant General H. R. Mcmas Steve Inskeep Joan Jett NPR Trump Administration Rachel Martin President Trump
Seattle Mayor Believes Federal Deployments Are Part Of A Darker Political Goal

Morning Edition

05:26 min | Last month

Seattle Mayor Believes Federal Deployments Are Part Of A Darker Political Goal

"Kinds of tensions in Seattle. Clashes between protesters and police turned violent last weekend, but Seattle's Democratic mayor, Jenny Durkin, told the Department of Homeland Security she did not want federal agents sent into her city. She later discovered a force was deployed and put on standby. Now they have left. Mayor Durkin spoke with our co host, Rachel Martin, about why she and other mayors feel these federal deployments. Part of a bigger, darker political goal. We have, like any other city. We have public safety challenges. But our public safety challenges have been made significantly worse by this president's actions in his words, the dinner in level of criminal activity. We're really deteriorated after the president started tweeting about it, and it was a subject to have Fox coverage every night. So we have seen and I've talked to mayors across the country the same thing when the president actually tweets, and it's not my words saying he's targeting death City is run by Democrats. He's openly admitted it and tweeted about it. Um And I think that that is really a chilling prospect of a president. United States, which is federal resource is for political purposes. The Department of Justice has said that there is an expansion happening right that all of this the deployment of federal agents to a variety of cities Now we're seeing Chicago Albuquerque, Kansas City now Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland. This is all part of so called Operation legend that this has to do with gun violence, quelling gun violence in these cities helping solve murders. This's the DOJ zone characteristic of what this operation is about. I guess I'm hoping you can clarify for me. Is this operation legend something that's happening? Adjacent, separate from from the agents that had been deployed to Portland. And for a couple of days, at least this standby force to Seattle. I actually think they're using it as camouflage. There are ongoing task force in major cities, the deal with gun violence and with gang violence and other violent crime. We had him in Seattle and I worked on him is U. S attorney I know I've spoken with the mayor of Chicago and Albuquerque, and they have a strong collaborative approach with federal law enforcement. It is very rare. If it all federal law enforcement will surge agents to a city to deal with public safety threats that are normally handled by city or state officials. Without talking to or working with local officials. You have described what President Trump is doing as being a political ploy to play his own base ahead of the election into some kind of law and order message. As as a former U. S attorney for the Western District of Washington is anything he's doing or the federal government at his behest illegal. I think it could be unconstitutional. Under the 11th Amendment. Remember, public safety is generally reserved to the states and to their cities, a subdivision of the states by our Constitution. There's also restrictions on the powers that federal law enforcement have and what they can enforce. They generally cannot room the streets of a city in enforce city or state law. But the other thing I will say, though it is unprecedented for federal authorities to take this level of approach for local jurisdictions in cities and Serge Federal resource is in them to take over public safety duties like arresting people. Police protesters. And I've said it before. I know some people think it's it sounds overdramatic, but to me, it looks like a dry run for martial law. And if we see these kinds of federal agents put into places where there's voting right concerns I'm very concerned about what it could do to suppress the vote in America. Say more about that. You're worried that in places where there might be concerns about whether or not people get access to the polls, right? I mean, if you look at it now, the places that that they're sending these Federal agents are primarily in places where there are significant protests against police violence and for racial equity. And it doesn't take much of a lead to also used those agents to say You're protecting the poles but have federal agents in and around polling places, too. Spite against fraud when really a suppression? I think we need a very clear commitment in advance of the election that general law enforcement are not going to be used as some kind of super police. In key battleground states in around you places. You've been talking with different mayor's around the country. Your counterparts in different states. Is that the kind of thing that has come up in conversation with them it has come up. I will tell you were focused day to day on dealing with the crisis in our city. But this kind of action when we feel happening in so many cities across your country, it gives all of us a grave concern is where it is. Jenny Durkan is the mayor of Seattle. We appreciate your time. Thank you for having me

Seattle President Trump Jenny Durkin Serge Federal Jenny Durkan Chicago Rachel Martin Albuquerque Attorney United States Department Of Homeland Securit Portland Kansas City FOX DOJ
A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

Short Wave

10:33 min | 3 months ago

A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

"Joe you have been reporting on the pandemic for months now and specifically one crucial part of this story vaccines right I think vaccines are pretty much the way out of this. Most people agree it's been so far the most successful tool in preventing infectious disease. But, of course we don't have a vaccine right now, and so that's why we're doing all these other things like shutting things down and social distancing and wearing masks in washing hands, etc, until we do have a vaccine that safe and effective and available right, and we're basically hiding from the virus in the meantime right, but I've heard that vaccines have traditionally taking years to develop. So, what are we doing to speed up the process well quite a lot actually and just to give you one example. Example a couple of weeks ago. I got a virtual tour of a vaccine facility in Baltimore. What you're looking at here is one step of multiple step process. It's run by a company called emergent bio solutions, and Sean Kirk overseas the manufacturing and technical operations and what he's doing, he's he's pointing a cell phone camera through a glass window into another room with several large stainless steel pieces of equipment. You can see the banks taken out. Talk you, so what's going to go inside? This bag is actually. Believe it or not insect cells that have been modified to make proteins from the coronavirus. That's going to be used to make the vaccine. The technicians are loading this bag into a fifty liter stainless steel vessel. That's part of what's called a bio reactor around the outside of this is the vessel itself it provides. The heating cooling. And with the inserted agitator, the mixing the cells, spitting out a protein that's going to become the corona virus vaccine. All this is being done with the strict standards of the Food and Drug Administration. The vaccine is from a biotech company called Nova Fax, and emergent says they're ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of it on a short timescale. Hold up Joe. Because I thought there weren't any approved vaccine's yet. So what's happening here with this manufacturing? Well, you were asking what's going to speed up the process and this is part of the answer. They're not just waiting to see if the vaccine works. They're doing what's called at risk manufacturing it. They're getting ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine. And when they finish testing it, it might not work okay, but the government says we don't have any choice because we can't wait until we find out of it works to start manufacturing it. Because that'll just add months and months to the process, so they're getting going right away. Sounds like kind of a gamble, but we don't really have much of a choice. Is that right well? That's what people are saying. I mean it's a gamble that health officials say we have to make if we want to have a vaccine that's GonNa be around in time to put a stop to this pandemic. Okay Today on the show what you need to know about the virus vaccine from how it works to the challenges of disturbing it to. The world. This is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Joe Palca. Let's start with some vaccine basics I read. There are over one hundred vaccines in development for this corona virus, and these vaccines are trying to do the same thing trigger an immune response from your body without actually getting you sick. Yes, I've been thinking about it as a little bit like showing a picture to someone and say if this person comes to your door. Don't let them in and and that's essentially what you're doing with a vaccine. Right and I guess there are a couple of different ways. Occur virus vaccine can maybe trigger that response. Tell me about a couple of them. Well one thing you can do is you can actually kill the virus. What does that mean well? It's not really alive, but let's say treat it with heat or formaldehyde. It's no longer working and you inject into somebody well. It has the shape of virus and the look of a virus, but it doesn't do it. A virus does so the immune system can respond to that. That's kind of how the polio vaccine that Jonas Salk came up with. Or you can take the virus and modify it so that it's no longer able to make someone sick That's basically what the Sabin Polio vaccine did. It weakened the poliovirus. Immune system saw it made all the right responses, but didn't Cause Disease Gotcha. Since those two, there have been married of different ways. It's just the idea of getting the Munin system to recognize parts of the virus so that it'll have an immune. Without actually making somebody sick all right. Let's talk to about why vaccine development takes so long because we mentioned earlier, it's normally very step by step process and I'm guessing that's why it takes a while right well. Yeah I, mean there are lots of steps in the process. First one is to make sure that the vaccine is safe. You're GONNA, be giving it to a lot of people, so you WANNA. Make sure it doesn't cause any problems on its own important, and then you want to make sure it has an immune reaction immune response, so you measure the cells that people make are the proteins that they make from the immune system after you've given them the vaccine. And then you want to make sure it prevents them from getting sick from the coronavirus. None of these sound like easy tasks I gotta say Yeah No it's. It's all time consuming. It's all difficult. It all requires a lot of people and patients and coordination and You can't really speed it up I. Mean if you WanNa, see if something's going to work for six months, you kind of. Of have to wait around for six months to see if it's GonNa work right, and so with this coronavirus receiving manufacturers trying to compress the time line, but this takes a lot of money and a lot of financial risk, so does anthony. FAUCI of the coronavirus task force thinks we can develop a vaccine by the end of this year, because the government is helping these manufacturers financially through. An warp speed. Here's vouch speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin. It's risking hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half a billion to a billion dollars. The government isn't destined that taking that risk way insane precede, and you'll save several months, so joe aside from this. What else can be done to move the process along well I mean one of the things you can do. Do is just get a lot of people working on the problem at the same time, and then you can also do things that will make sure that the regulatory processes smooth so the food and drug. Administration is coming along with you in every step so that they don't have to review everything. After you've done it, they can review everything as you're doing it. But. This idea of having a lot of labs involved in something that's going to really be helpful and I talked with Dr Lewis Fellow over at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School his team is developing something. It's packed with micro needles that contain tiny bits of the coronavirus, and the Niger needles are so small that you don't even feel them, so you while slap on the patch and wait a few weeks and boom, immunity corona virus. Virus Patch. It works if it works, but this is just one approach, and I think that they will basically feed off of each other This is GONNA help us to do these trials both quicker, and to find vaccine. That's most effective when we start to be to be able to compare these different approaches seven Joe. Let's say sometime in the future we have a winning vaccine or a few vaccines that are fully approved. How on planet, Earth Are we going to distribute them like who's who is going to get it I i. m Evi one vaccination. Are Those people born on March tenth? This is a scene from the movie contained I know we promised we wouldn't play this movie again on the PODCAST, but. This scene is kind of how vaccine was deployed at least in the film. So Joe is there massive lottery drawing in our future to decide who gets the CORONA VIRUS VACCINE? I don't think that's going to be the actual way that it's going to be ruled out. Okay. Most of the people I've talked to suggest that it's going to go first to healthcare workers and people who are on the frontlines of combating the disease, but then you want to think about the sort of the societal infrastructure. I mean who makes things go and. I think a number of years ago. People wouldn't necessarily have thought of delivery truck drivers says people who are crucial to the infrastructure of the country, and yet more and more people are now relying on deliveries to get stuff, and so they may be considered critical people who need to be vaccinated or their people who are at high risk for the disease. But the fact is that at some point, we're going to have to figure out a way to get this to everybody. Right Seth Berkley, for the CEO of an organization called Garvey. The vaccine alliance put it really well. We're not going to be safe as a world unless everywhere save so even if you know, we had parts of the world that would have a low spread or no spread. If you had large reservoirs of the virus in other places, of course, you have a risk of reintroduction I like that we're not going to be safe. As a world, unless everywhere is safe. Okay, last question Joe. Will the corona virus vaccine be one that changes every year because the corona virus changes every year. If we know that, or will it be more like the measles are the polio vaccine? We don't know we don't know which I could give you a better answer. But the answer right now is. We don't know so. There's not enough experience with this virus yet to know for sure, of course what's going to happen? It's possible that they'll be a different version that they all need to make vaccines against for every year. or it's also possible, and this is probably more likely that. They'll need to be boosters from time to time, maybe not as infrequently as measles, but may be more frequently that some so that the it's not clear how long the immune response that you get from. A vaccine will work so. The trouble is just I mean it's so new. The understanding of this virus that the people aren't saying

Joe Palca Polio Vaccine NPR Food And Drug Administration Sean Kirk Baltimore Jonas Salk Rachel Martin Seth Berkley Fauci Anthony Dr Lewis Fellow University Of Pittsburgh Medic CEO Garvey
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 3 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Rachel Martin what's it gonna take to fast track is not just a vaccine but the ability to mass produce the mayor of Washington DC had black lives matter painted on the street in front of the White House but what is her city's own track record on policing and long lines non functioning voting machines is the Georgia primary a sign of things to come in November it's Wednesday June tenth turns nineteen years old today news is next live from NPR news I'm Jeanine Hurst the house Judiciary Committee is set to hear testimony this hour on racial profiling and police brutality and here's Kelsey Snell reports the hearing is part of house Democrats attempts to pass sweeping police reforms by the end of this month Democrats a cold felonious Floyd the brother of George Floyd whose killing sparked protests across the country over police brutality the lengthy witness list includes Sherilyn Eiffel the president of the N. double ACP legal defense fund an expert on policing in the U. S. Republicans have called three witnesses including Dan Bongino a conservative commentator and former law enforcement officer in the Senate Republican leaders have tapped him Scott the only black Republican in the Senate to lead an effort to draft their own set of reforms White House chief of staff mark meadows told reporters he's hopeful proposals will be completed sooner rather than later Kelsey Snell NPR news Washington and amid growing calls to defund police departments in favor of community policing around the US the head of the country's biggest police union the fraternal order of police says they have a responsibility to constantly analyze and find ways to be able to improve the criminal justice system federal gross president of the union tells NPR's morning edition that his group welcomes the opportunity to talk about ways to improve law enforcement we want to find a path forward we have got to work together we can point fingers at each other and we can find all of the inequalities like the qualities that exist in blame it on someone else but if we're going to find a path forward it's going to be because we join hands we work together the says the last thing is group wants to do is have bad officers on the street but he says they are concerned about the way that will be achieved in Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff is just shy of the fifty percent needed to avoid a runoff for the democratic nomination the primary account has been slowed by problems with voting machines long lines a lack of poll workers and bad weather the eventual democratic nominee will face Republican senator David Perdue in in November the federal reserve is expected to leave interest rates near zero today when officials wrap up a two day policy meeting in years gone Horsley reports the central bank has moved aggressively to prop up the economy during the coronavirus recession the fed has made no secret of its plans to keep interest rates near zero until the economy has weathered the pandemic and is back on track towards something like full employment that could take awhile another U. S. employers added two and a half million jobs last month tens of millions of people are still out of work and the unemployment rate is higher than any previous recessions since World War two the.

Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 4 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David Greene let's think for a moment about when a coronavirus vaccine becomes available which countries are going to be at the front of the line to receive it and which ones are going to be at the back global health organizations are working on plans for international cooperation but there are also signs of competition a battle between nations it's being described as a kind of vaccine nationalism let's talk about this with NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre hi Greg good morning David so there's certain countries we're talking about here that that are already showing signs of theirs they're competing yeah the really the main competition is between the US and China both president trump and Chinese president xi jin ping have been hurt politically by their handling of the virus and they would love to reverse that by handling the vaccine well at home now they're poachers have been a little bit different in the U. S. trump operation warp speed is designed to get a covert vaccine for Americans it's in line with his America first ideology in it could be a huge boost if it happens before the November election although that's very very optimistic and you've also seen trump become increasingly critical of China what is China's position all this so president she is taken a bit of a softer line at least publicly you could perhaps call it vaccine diplomacy China is offering two billion dollars to help developing countries that deal with the pandemic China also signed on to a World Health Organization resolution that calls the vaccine to be a a global public good in the U. S. has pointedly not joined in but China is pushing very hard for a vaccine it has several trials underway and you know what if China gets a vaccine first to get a very different priorities about how to distribute it to the rest of the world I mean great I just think about this country's rushing to get it first but this is a global pandemic even if their politics playing some role here in leaders minds isn't a recognition that this all requires like a global solution yes absolutely just just consider this one example Oxford university in Britain is working on a vaccine trial that looks pretty promising they've partnered with AstraZeneca which is a Swedish British multinational drug company in the U. S. government has announced it is providing more than a billion dollars to AstraZeneca to make vaccines so there's going to be a lot of international players but it does take time to ramp up production and I spoke about this with Nancy Catholic professor of bioethics and public health at Johns Hopkins university the challenge is going to come and what will be at least the first year in terms of city combined where disagreements about who should be first second and third in line when it comes to who should be first second and third grade I mean is is is the wealth gap in the world going to play a role I mean we can expect wealthy countries to be able to be at the front end and developing countries you know some of which have seen rising cases really really struggle well that's probably gonna happen it always does but global health organizations say this is a recurring challenge in dealing with western pharmaceutical companies which have tremendous leverage in the developing world and I spoke to about this with Kate elder of doctors without borders I think of the global community but ultimately the power pharmaceutical corporations hands to make those decisions it's up to that at once Gail they produce the backing and at what price they set them that as you were the first customer thirty feet that'll cater jail so there will be in school intense scrutiny on whoever gets a vaccine to share it widely fairly in a reasonable price we'll.

Rachel Martin David Greene
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:38 min | 4 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep of famous play and film called twelve angry men depicts people arguing in an overheated jury room they sit close together they get in each other's faces Henry Fonda's character finally talks the others into a not guilty verdict a twenty twenty remake could easily be called twelve anxious people because after a break for the pandemic jury trials are resuming in Oregon Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports earlier this month more than a hundred and twenty potential jurors showed up at the Multnomah county courthouse in downtown Portland space six feet apart court staff offered face masks there were some of the county's first trial in more than a month amid the corona virus pandemic I want to assure you as I know you were told this morning most of you have mass inside a courtroom circuit court judge Thomas Ryan greeted a small group of potential jurors from a distance your mask rips or tears you decide you don't have when you decide you want one just let either artwork works now and we have massport rather than sitting together in a jury box the jurors were spread out around the courtroom so the attorneys and court staff across the state courts have been reduced to only their essential functions under an order by Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice in March there were eighty one jury trials in Oregon by April just one in the entire state the number of trials is once again starting to grow but the fact that they're happening at all is surprising for some it is very unusual Paul I had a four day gore is an expert on juries for the national center for state courts to the best of my knowledge organise been the only state that I'm aware of that has been doing trials and afford agar says across the country some of the orders limiting or halting court functions have begun to expire there's probably no better way to spread the infection than putting anywhere from fifty to three hundred people in a room together sitting side by side for hours at a time Oregon courts know about the risks but the law here is less flexible than other states were in custody defendants who want a speedy trial there's no emergency provision for a delay beyond a hundred and eighty days of a defendant's arrest now if their trial does not go at one hundred eighty days then what happens is they should be released that's what the law says Cheryl Albright is the chief criminal judge for Multnomah county he says that the law requires a trial that's the way the legal system is designed to work people's rights during a pandemic continue I think it is weird to be doing in in person anything right now Justin Berns dean is a professor at UCLA law school where he directs the trial law program and we're gonna be doing any part of the justice system in person it makes sense that it would be criminal jury trials burn scene says the justice system affords criminal defendants more structural protections than any other group of people and he says it's critical for jurors to assess the credibility of witnesses in person he says Jersey to see witnesses faces and attorneys need to be able to see jurors reaction to evidence Carl macpherson is executive director of metropolitan public defender a nonprofit that represents clients in the Portland area he argues the use of mass and social distancing in the court room could raise questions around the fairness of those trials I just don't see this going away anytime soon I feel as though we're going to be in the stay for quite some time as of now Oregon lawmakers said they have no plans to change the state's speedy trial laws meaning there will almost certainly be more trials in the weeks to come and thousands of more.

Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 5 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep of the many challenges in moving schools online special education is one of the biggest which is why teachers and therapists are getting creative NPR's listen that party reports when schools in Wilton Connecticut closed Katie Miller how to transform her speech therapy sessions with elementary students on to the internet Miller's been with the district five years and none of that was online but in the last few weeks she's had to build a sort of digital classroom she sends me a link so I can see how it works exemptions pretty similarly to how I would do it in my classroom she's using a software called presence learning there's a video chat component but also digital versions of the tools that Miller has always used to help her students communicate better this week she's working with her students on articulation and letter sounds the software makes it into a game can you see the activity she fills the screen with an activity grit there are numbers one through six with words next to them in a diet appears on screen click that and it'll I click the die and it rolls and lands on the number two I look for that number it's the word urchin we're working on sound we're gonna find it here at the beginning of the word in earth chan to make that sound Miller says the town needs to come back and up when the student gets the sound right they can click the digital die again to try another word or sound once was first went to distance learning parents and teachers were concerned that students with disabilities would fall through the cracks and not have their services available but now we're seeing kids have services because people are being creators Kelly hello works for cooperative school services and oversee special education at two school districts in Indiana she's inspired by the way teachers have adopted for example it has a second grader was immobile and nonverbal cheer team have been brainstorming ways he can use his family's smart speaker while he's at home there's occupational therapist Grillo works with that sent packets home detailing ways to grip a pencil included in the delivery extra pencils all high band with tools for students who don't have access to good internet Grillo and her team like lots of teachers are leaning on old fashioned phone calls and text messages it's really actually quite exciting I'm a geek like me things like wow this is actually changing appealed to create access for kids with disabilities far beyond what anybody could imagine still for many teachers and therapists what they do is so intensely personal computer it just doesn't cut it join Lawrence is a speech and language pathologist at the high school in Wilton Connecticut she says she's mostly video chatting with students fiercely can you say that yeah try again she loves being able to see your kids but she says with this new innovation there are still lots of limitations for example one of her tricks in person is to change the volume of her voice the softer voices when you're next to them that the more they pay attention the more they listen so you're like yelling into this speaker and your voices echoing through the house it's it's really difficult many of our students had autism or attention disorders for them hi contact and physical proximity is essential but in this new normal she says she's just doing the best she can you're watching me type doing a great job this is hard to do on the screen like this and sharing it with each other right you're doing really well Lawrence knows none of this can replace the personal one on one learning she can do at school her main hope is that these digital tools will help her maintain the relationship she's dealt with her students so when they're back in school whenever that ends up being.

Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rachel Martin we have heard how covered nineteen can spread quickly in nursing homes or another managed care facilities there's another such case in the city of Denton Texas just north of Dallas at a home for people with severe disabilities forty five residents and nine staff members have tested positive for covert nineteen public health officials are now working to try and slow the spread and identify those that have been impacted and as you can imagine the entire situation is just a moshling excruciating for the families of those who live there here's Christopher Connelly from our member station K. E. R. A. more than four hundred people live here at the Denton state supported living center and on this sunny Sunday few cars are driving past the squad car house and the rust colored stone wall that surrounds the sprawling green campus Sundays are when Emily and Tim Sheridan come to visit their sons tie in Tate we go in the apartment we maybe shower get the boys shaved dressed up in their queue is closed and we go and dance pickup truck which is a big deal for them but they haven't been in weeks to visit their twenty four year old son's family shared says her boys who are non verbal autistic and have intellectual disabilities have lived there for five years but in mid March she got a letter saying the center it was restricting visitation here that they were actually locked down and we didn't have that option it is really upped the ante by the next week for residents tested positive for covert nineteen and that grim count has continued to climb last Friday tie in Tate were tested and mom Emily is still waiting for results but she says they're pretty healthy and not showing any symptoms she trusts the center's administration she says but it's very very hard right now we're just kind of from the outside looking in and trying to be positive last week as the number of cases surge state and local officials said they're working closely to coordinate care Denton county public health director Matt Richardson because of the vulnerability in the medical fragility of some of those residents we do anticipate there may be more positives I'm only share it's a retired nurse and she says illness can be incredibly distressing for people with severe intellectual disabilities just the test for covert nineteen the nose swab by a stranger in a face mask can be terrifying and hospitalization I think you spend a lifespan praying that they'll never have to be in the hospital I know I do there is also concerned about staffing tie in Tate require several full time staff members to take care of them what happens if their caretakers have to stay home we'll try to keep public cannot that street and now now my son's service plan or any other individual I mean they're all very specialized because they're all different in their own way more than anything Sharon says she just wishes the family could visit like they do pretty much every other weekend drive around town in dad's pickup truck eat frozen yogurt together you know act as a mom I'd like to get my hands on and and then give me a hug a squeeze but that's not happening right now so so Sherin and her husband talk with their son's social worker every day and they're praying that their boys and everyone else at the centre somehow ends up safe and healthy.

Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Rachel Martin Iran's government is warning that the corona virus could kill millions inside its borders the United Nations and warned of overcrowding in the prevalence of diseases in Iran's jails so now the country has made a dramatic move the government releasing eighty five thousand political prisoners but according to the family of the CMR commodity he is still in prison is an Iranian American businessman who was arrested for years ago accused of collaborating with a foreign government Steve Inskeep spoke with his brother Bob Bach no Mazie yesterday after he found out his brother had not been released I'm thinking on to the hope as is rest of my family in particular Siamak who is in the Petrie dish of horrific conditions in Evin prison that at any moment that inhumane decision will be reversed you just use the phrase Petrie dish what is your best understanding of the health conditions there and whether they meet standards say of social distancing as we've all been trying to follow that the only way to describe it is is is beyond horrific Steve I mean imagine a a room which is very very small with fifteen twenty twenty five people crowded in there not having access to basic products for disinfectants not having medicine I'm not being tested I heard to my heart that someone in C. L. Mike's old cell is displaying symptoms and that person you know as of this moment I'm talking to you is still there as we know all kinds of people can die from corona virus but the people who are most vulnerable are considered to be those who are older or who have underlying health conditions of one kind or another how is your brother's health my brother has been in imprisoned unjustly and illegally for the past four and a half years and and he's had to approve various deficiencies and physical ailments and often times they're complacent not taken seriously then are taken to doctors especially now the prison is not containing the virus and the only humane thing to do is at the very least to provide a temporary furlough as they have for eighty five thousand other criminals do you see any pathway left to appeal within Iran's government yes after four and a half years of just seeing indescribable cruelty I still wake up every day hoping that humanity will prevail also obviously it's still not too late your point is that we're not in the situation we cannot reverse as of this moment so I am begging and I hope someone who can make a difference within the Iranian government and establishment can hear the speech of a brother of really a human being or do we discriminate Adam politicize a corona virus and and this is what appears to have been happening and you want us to forget Iran is is demanding that other nations show of humanity and humanitarian gestures yet we've seen zero signs of humanity you mean that Iran would like the assistance of the world to deal with it's especially bad corona virus outbreak that's what you're saying yes and it's it's the duty of of all of us as as human beings their respective of our nationality to help each other well we we have no nationality when it comes to such a pandemic and and such a crisis and what what exactly will we be achieving by keeping people harm's way and I'm not making a unilateral demands eighty five thousand prisoners have been released and it continues to be really so obviously that you want in a forties have recognized the dire and dangerous situation in prisons Babak Namazi is brother Siamak Namazi is an American into running in prison.

Rachel Martin Iran United Nations
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Rachel Martin Iran's government is warning that the corona virus could kill millions inside its borders the United Nations had warned of overcrowding in the prevalence of diseases in Iran's jails so now the country has made a dramatic move the government releasing eighty five thousand political prisoners but according to the family of the CMR commodity he is still in prison is an Iranian American businessman who was arrested for years ago accused of collaborating with a foreign government Steve Inskeep spoke with his brother Bob Bach no Mazie yesterday after he found out his brother had not been released I'm thinking on to the hope as is rest of my family in particular Siamak who is in the Petrie dish of horrific conditions in Evin prison that at any moment that inhumane decision will be reversed you just use the phrase Petrie dish what is your best understanding of the health conditions there and whether they meet standards say of social distancing as we've all been trying to follow that the only way to describe it is is is beyond horrific Steve I mean imagine a a room which is very very small with fifteen twenty twenty five people crowded in there not having access to basic products for disinfectants not having medicine not being tested I heard to my heart that someone in and still makes old cell is displaying symptoms and that person you know as of this moment I'm talking to you is is still there as we know all kinds of people can die from corona virus but the people who are most vulnerable are considered to be those who are older or who have underlying health conditions of one kind or another how is your brother's health my brother has been in in prison Han justly and illegally for the past four and a half years I'm and he's had to approve various deficiencies and physical ailments and often times their complaints are not taken seriously they're not taken to doctors especially now the prison is not containing the virus and the only humane thing to do is at the very least to provide a temporary furlough as they have for eighty five thousand other criminals do you see any pathway left to appeal within Iran's government yes after four and a half years after four and a half years of just seeing indescribable cruelty I still wake up every day hoping that humanity will prevail also obviously it's still not too late no one is that we're not in the situation we cannot reverse as of this moment so I am begging and I hope someone who can make a difference within the Iranian government and establishment can hear this please off of a brother of really a human being or do we discriminate Adam politicized a corona virus and and this is what appears to have been happening and Yvonne let's not forget Iran is is demanding that other nations shows humanity and humanitarian gestures yet we've seen zero signs of humanity you mean that Iran would like the assistance of the world to deal with it's especially bad corona virus outbreak that's what you're saying yes and it's it's the duty of of all of us as as human beings irrespective of the nationality of to help each other well we we have no nationality when it comes to such a pandemic and in such a crisis and what what exactly will we be achieving by keeping people in harm's way and I'm not making a unilateral demands eighty five thousand prisoners have been released and it continued to be released so obviously that you want in a forties have recognized the dire and dangerous situation in prisons Babak Namazi is brother Siamak Namazi is an American in a rotting in prison thank.

Rachel Martin Iran United Nations
What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

Reveal

09:57 min | 6 months ago

What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

"News covered nineteen what you need to know about coronavirus I'm Lucas Univar now we're going to look at the ways authorities around the world are responding to this pandemic the trump administration's handling of the crisis has been heavily criticized the president has given confusing advice contradicting his own experts and misleading the public about timelines for testing and vaccinations morning edition's Rachel Martin spoke to three of NPR's international correspondents about how other countries are handling the coronavirus Sylvia Julie is in Rome Anthony kun is in Seoul and and Lee Fang is in Beijing Emily I'm gonna start with you because you were covering the crisis in Wuhan from the beginning can you just give us a sense now about what was the trajectory of the Chinese response to this well for the first month after that initial cases of the current affairs sure there wasn't a response there is local cover up in a delay and during that time of about five million people left the virus epicenter in like the spread it to the rest of China but then the country mobilized it did so very quickly imposed very stringent self isolation and quarantine measures and by self isolation I mean people sort of waiting densely populated areas they canceled all public events they shut down factories and offices and by quarantine measures and that the they still sealed off cities and villages completely Anthony how does what and we just say said compared to what's been happening in in South Korea while South Korea got hit right after China and because of south Korea's experience with previous epidemics they decided that rapid mass testing for the virus was going to be the key to their strategy and so they've been testing around fifteen thousand people a day S. three thousand six hundred people per million of population compared to five people per million in the US results also focus on transparency putting out daily statistics and press briefings Sylvia in Italy I mean now Italy is has replaced South Korea as the number two in the world after China when it comes to the the scope of of this pandemic what has been the Italian response drastic curbs on freedom of movement and there's been overwhelming compliance only food shops pharmacies and you stands are open people can go out but if stopped by police they must show kind of affidavit that states the purpose either work grocery shopping health or emergency police are carrying out random checks they face either three months in jail or a fine of two hundred thirty dollars the purposes social distancing keep people apart Italy's following China's lead the Wuhan model so Emily the Wuhan model hasn't worked I mean transmission has decreased there has not yeah and experts pretty much unanimously agreed that's because of social distancing it will destroy your economy as it temporarily has in China but it quickly slows the virus's spread another thing China did was it built these makeshift centers where they sent six people and sending instead of sending them home and researchers in both the US and China have now said this week that that was critical to slowing down the outbreak but this could be a measure that western democracies may be unwilling to take as for quarantine measures though sealing off the ledges and cities that's the jury's still out on the efficacy of of that because quarantines meet harder for medical medical resources to reach heart the hardest hit areas and that's probably why fatality rates in the epicenter in China are nearly four times higher than the rest of the country so Sylvia how have the measures worked in Italy what's the situation right now is there any slowing well nationwide it's too early to say it hasn't hit the peak yet the quarantine that was put in place a few weeks ago in the contagion epicenter in Lombardy eleven pounds fifty thousand people local authorities say it's working the contagion rate has dropped and that's why the quarantine was extended to all of Italy to try to prevent a spread to the south which has much weaker health systems than those of the north which were among the best in Europe but they are severely strained by this crisis now I'm Anthony South Korea chose not to take measures like we've seen in Italy or in China with these dramatic quarantines are lockdowns and yet it seems like the have still been able to to keep the crisis at bay right yeah well okay so numbers have been declining for two weeks in a row and sexualities of been at less than one percent compared to about four percent for China and six percent for Italy and you know doing this without having to log huge regions down is also a kind of effectiveness kind of accuracy was or something specifically about South Korea that made it possible for them to avoid large scale large scale quarantines well it's you know testing capacity is not just about cats it's about investment in basic healthcare infrastructure lab technicians chemicals machines logistics and if any one of those areas has a bottleneck it's going to mess things up and people are going to lose lives and it's just you know at the end of the day it's investment in in a healthcare system hospital beds you know national health insurance and this shows up in survivability for all diseases including covert nineteen and lastly Emily and Sylvia I'd love for you to talk some about how the different political systems in China and Italy have affected the coronavirus responsibly you alluded to this earlier but really how much of China's success in mitigating the spread has to do with the fact that this is this is a country frankly with a long history of human rights abuses it is an authoritarian state we've seen transparency is critical for a fast response that wasn't present in China but because China is a very centralized government one might say authoritarian it was able to mobilize quarantine measures and self social distancing very very quickly the problem is quarantines may have cost more lives than we know but we'll never know the secondary costs of people who are not able to get timely medical care and suffered from it because they were sealed into their villages or cities right and still be obviously Italy is a democracy what is been just the people's response to these kinds of drastic measures the crisis has totally turned the world upside down Italians notorious for cutting into line not very beaten to rules are become the most compliant people I've ever seen in my life and French correspondents based here sent a petition to French president Emmanuel MacColl telling him France underestimates the gravity of the epidemic and failed to prepare French public opinion they say look at Italy it's our duty to tell you there's no time to lose NPR's Sylvia patrolling Anthony kun and Emily Feng talking with rich mark fears about the impact of coronavirus have sparked a financial crisis in the markets Austin Goolsby who chaired president Barack Obama's council of economic advisers says that as the virus spreads American markets might be hit even harder than China's and here's our Shapiro asked him why if you look at the economy of the United States or of the rich countries in Europe they're much more dominated by these face to face services that are exactly the things they get pulled down whether their leisure and entertainment and sports or going to the gym or all sorts of services so if everyone stops doing that that's a bigger hit on the U. S. economy even that it was in China we went when they shut down he also said that virus economics are different from regular economics explain what you mean by that yeah by that I mean the closest thing in our in our collective memories to this moment was a financial crisis right into my house I natural crisis economics and business cycle economics is a little different than the virus in that the main thing that is paralyzing the economy is this year and withdrawal and so in a way the best thing you can do for the economy has nothing to do with the economy with virus economics and that is things like paid leave for people that are sick is actually not stimulus it's paying people not to come to work but anything that slows the rate of spread of the virus is the best kind of stimulus so if we have to get on top of this as a public health matter I think before you can effectively deal with this as an economic except if we do so the rate of the virus in this epidemic continues for weeks or months is there anyway to turn around the financial slide yes and no no in that look if there's going to be a substantial slowdown our goal is and should be allowing us the opportunity to bounce back it as this thing passes over us and that means you can't let everybody go bankrupt or starve or have these persistent lasting problems from what we hope to be a temporary shock and so do you see the crunch that we're experiencing now as an irrational panic or an appropriate response to the cancellation of big economic engines like pro sports like Broadway lever like school like the economic activity that goes on in major cities every day yeah a bit of both as we in fear the withdrawal and have social distancing to try to slow the virus there is going to be a substantial slowdown of economic activity right but I can never get out of my head from the two thousand eight crisis Paul Volcker's words over and over at that time that during a crisis the only asset you have is your credibility and as the U. S. government has not made credible statements that contributes to fear that makes it go down and we've we've got to do better we need the president to

Lucas Univar President Trump
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:07 min | 6 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"Rachel Martin oil prices slide again and stocks plummet into bear market territory for the first time in eleven years the NBA calls a time out indefinitely the league suspends its season as a player tests positive for coronavirus and amid the national debate about curbing gun violence some states move to loosen restrictions it's Thursday March twelfth actress Liza Minnelli turns seventy four years old today the news is next live from NPR news in Washington I'm korva Coleman president trump is issuing new rules to deal with the spread of the corona virus on Wednesday he said the US will ban incoming travelers from Europe except for the United Kingdom Americans and legal residents are not subject to the ban he suggesting proposals to deal with the economic fallout and beers Frank or don't yes reports trump had advice about the virus for older Americans speaking from the oval office president trump told older Americans to be very very careful and avoid nonessential travel in particular we are strongly advising that nursing homes for the elderly suspend all medically unnecessary visits in general older Americans should also avoid non essential travel in crowded areas trump said he would defer tax payments for individuals and businesses in certain areas he said those measures would add more than two hundred billion dollars in liquidity to the economy he is also calling on Congress to consider a payroll tax holiday and would seek an additional fifty billion dollars to help with loans for small businesses Franco or down yes NPR news the National Basketball Association has suspended its season the NBA decision came after a player for the Utah Jazz tested positive for the coronavirus doing Casey head coach for the NBA's Detroit Pistons says the league is acting to protect its members it's always been where you could lean on sports to kinda ease your nerves are ease the situation but now we're in you know we're just like everyone else were involved were looking out for each other looking out for fellow team members by our families so while I think this is a president territories for the whole sports world meanwhile the National Hockey League says that it will update the status of its season later today at least two NHL teams say they will host some home games this month but fans will not be allowed to attend to American service members have been killed in a rocket attack on an Iraqi training base just north of Baghdad and peers Tom Bowman has more eighteen rockets slammed into the Taiji training base just north of Baghdad U. S. official said besides the two Americans killed a British service member also died in the attack at least twelve coalition service members were wounded two seriously there are more than five hundred Americans at the base there was no word on who is responsible but speculation centered on Iranian backed militias which have repeatedly targeted coalition personnel the deadly attack came as U. S. officials said they were already speeding defensive equipment to U. S. bases in Iraq including the patriot system designed to shoot down ballistic missiles in a separate system the targets rockets and drones Tom Bowman NPR news B. O. R. rack you're listening to NPR news from Washington starting today official twenty twenty senses materials will arrive in mailboxes nationwide prompting people to get counted as Brian bull of member station KLCC in Eugene Oregon reports native Americans are a prime demographic corny intercessory the twenty ten census undercounted native Americans by nearly five percent generate for the U. S. census bureau's tribal partnership specialist for Oregon and Idaho so as of six hundred and seventy five billion dollars in federal funding at stake they can't afford to overlook anyone travel reservations and offers of Asian folks utilize one of the services that we see perhaps for instance the colons programs head start programs dollars for transportation Radford says they've hired a sufficient number of native Americans to be census takers persistent challenges include access in remote rural areas and some tribal members distrust of the federal government for NPR news I'm bramble in Eugene Oregon worries about the corona virus continue to roil stock markets major Asian financial markets plunged at least three percent today markets in Europe are currently down about five percent according to the Dow Jones futures the blue chip average may fall nearly twelve hundred points at the opening bell for more than five percent Seattle public schools will temporarily close for two weeks in an effort to slow the spread of the disease there is a cluster of cases in Washington state particularly in the Seattle area there's been at least one confirmed case that was found in the Seattle public middle school I'm korva Coleman NPR news from Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include Subaru the redesigned Subaru outback has standard symmetrical all wheel drive an eight point seven inches of ground clearance for all weather conditions love it's what makes a Subaru Subaru at Subaru dot com you're listening to morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition the World Health Organization has officially declared the corona virus a pandemic we are deeply concerned bows by the alarming levels of spread and by the alarming levels off in action the latest on president trump's plan for addressing the crisis that's coming up on morning edition here on KCRW I'm wearing only a small private lab in southern California wants to start testing for covert nineteen yes it's pretty frustrating.

Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:38 min | 6 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"Rachel Martin and I'm David Greene as you can imagine the corona virus has hit the cruise ship industry really hard the federal government is advising people not to go on a cruise and passengers who got stuck on shift with an outbreak of shared experiences of being quarantined in tiny rooms not knowing when they'd be able to go home as NPR's Chris Arnold reports people who've booked a cruise are now trying to figure out what to do Linda it now be India and is scheduled to go on a cruise ship in April to Bermuda she and her husband recently got married they're combining their families and taking their five teenagers on this cruise was supposed to be their first big trip together the kids were excited and super excited it was a lot of build up over the last couple of months talking about it planning it and then coronavirus the trip was a big expense is six thousand dollars so as the outbreak spread it they've been grappling with what to do they didn't want to rack a great vacation if the odds were really small that there'd even be a problem definitely agonizing you being a bad parent because you're you're buying into panic or hysteria are you being a bad parent because you're bringing into a situation that maybe in retrospect to be like what was I thinking but now many cruise ship companies are trying to reassure customers that they don't need to panic can cancel now they can wait to see what happens with this outbreak and they can even cancel just a few days before their crews and get credit for another trip later landed a bandy and got an email explaining that from Norwegian cruise line this past weekend it was a relief and it definitely left us with a very warm and fuzzy feeling towards the cruise line as far as what the right decision is that Dr Anthony Fauci is the director of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases he spoke to NPR in this program yesterday and said it since elderly people and people with underlying health problems are particularly vulnerable to this corona virus those people should take special precautions you don't travel you don't go to ferry crowded places particularly you don't get on the cruise ship because of what we see what happened with the cruise ship what's happened so far as several cruise ships of the outbreaks and had to quarantine passengers some stricken passengers died after contracting the virus the state department issued an advisory on Sunday saying people in general quote should not travel by cruise ship I was very shocked and disappointed I I think it's it's too far extreme steward sheer ride is worked in the cruise and travel industry for thirty years and books cruises for people through his website called the cruise guy he says it to warn elderly people and those with medical conditions seems reasonable but to tell everybody to stay off cruise ships he says he'd go on a cruise today right now there are hundreds of ships sailing around the world that are not having any issues the cruise line industry association says the ships are taking special precautions including screening people for a fever before allowing them to start a cruise and as some people are deciding that the risk seems small it is worth taking others are of course canceling or trying to Ashley manning is a nurse practitioner in Knoxville Tennessee she's decided to cancel her crew's coming up in ten days to the Mexican Riviera on carnival cruise line I've called delta canceled our flights they were non refundable tickets they automatically refunded everything without even a question but getting through the carnival I was on the phone for about three hours yesterday kept calling and it just never goes to anybody and just as a voice recording and then it'll disconnect you when you think you're still on the line carnival says it's ramping up staffing but as any seasoned lord.

Rachel Martin David Greene
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 7 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Rachel Martin for most of its history solar power hasn't been seen as real competition by the fossil fuel industry is always too expensive to get a real foothold but now prices for solar have fallen so far it's become one of the cheapest kinds of energy on the market Stacey manic Smith and Darius Rafi on from planet money is the indicator podcast have the story back in two thousand six Ben how was the lead energy economist under president George W. bush and he was part of a team looking for energy alternatives and back then like sold it was almost like a joke the energy source to beat was coal it was the cheapest source of energy calls cost one five cents or four cents per kilowatt hour not the gas is also in that range and sold with a dollar per kilowatt hour solar power was twenty times more expensive than coal so it was just never going to happen and then something changed actually a bunch of somethings so for one thing government subsidies on the state and federal level brought costs down for businesses and residents got more people to buy into solar and then companies that made solar panel started competing against each other to make cheaper more efficient panel and sold a series of sort of small process improvements over the past ten fifteen years have brought the cost down like a magical amount of money from one dollar per kilowatt hour fifteen years ago two four cents per kilowatt hour today which makes it the cheapest form of electricity in the U. S. and also in the world cheaper than cheap enough for gas cheaper than coal cheaper than coal might drop yes because this is been everything changed before winning solar and renewable is more expensive it's all about you know sort of getting people to like sacrifice to do the right thing and I was actually just looking people to save money companies like Facebook and Microsoft have started investing millions of dollars and solar energy and so has Blackstone which brought us to the roof of a twenty story brick building in February a roof that is now covered in solar panels mirror standing on the rooftop Stuyvesant town and you're looking at a few of the nine thousand six hundred seventy one solar panels that we put on a roof tops to be precise Blackstone owns the company that manages style town the apartment complex in New York with all the solar panels and Kelly boss is the CEO of that division of the company and he oversaw this big solar project Kelly in his team install the panels last year and they estimated will reduce die towns carbon footprint by about sixteen percent now they have these panels up and running Kelly says lots of other building managers and businesses have been asking about how they might go solar as well what's the biggest question that you get from people who are considering doing it did you make money on it they want to know is return on it is it affordable all of those things and and the answer for us was yes Blackstone was so jazzed about the results of its die town project it is investing another.

Rachel Martin
Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 7 months ago

Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

"Jane Whaley was not satisfied with being a pastor's wife she believed god had bigger plans for her so she pushed against all the norms that kept her from the pulpit and found the church and spend their North Carolina called the word of faith fellowship the church's website shows people singing and smiling Jane Whaley at center stage from the outside it looks like a community of pious believers but some former members say the dangerous cult these people believe that Jane Whaley was their path to salvation and that if they did anything that went against her wishes they would get cancer and die or they would become drug addicts these are things that Jane way we would tell them it was Holbrook more he and Mitch Weiss a fellow AP reporter have been looking into abuse allegations within the church for years our colleague Rachel Martin spoke with them about their new book broken faith and just a note here the story does include descriptions of that alleged abuse there is two sides Jayme wellies yours that's sweet southern grandmotherly type and then there's the Jane that nobody sees except church members the one who screaming at the top of a longs congregants warning them that the devils have to come out it's like the Jekyll and Hyde right Holbrooke can you describe what people saw in her what was bringing them to this church I think that in the beginning when people would go to the church they were selling a lot of love yeah the members of this church they live in nice homes they drive nice cars the children are well mannered they have a Christian school so I think when a lot of families first go there everything seems great but over time Janeway Lee and her other ministers they take more and more control of your lives in fact a lot of times they'll remove children from their families home it and place them with ministers to be raised and what that does is over time sometimes those kids care more about the minister's than their own parents so it makes it difficult for families to leave so it's not a quick thing where you just walk in the door and they say Hey come on in you can come in you can never leave we're gonna take your television magazines radio all that away from you an institute all these rules it's a slow progressive thing and Mitch she when the other church leadership they would use family members against one another I mean hobar talked about how they would separate children sometimes as leverage but they got family members to serve as informants almost absolutely you have to realize they believe that Jane well it was a profit that god spoke to her and everything she said was the gospel and one of the techniques that she used what she had everybody informed on each other it was in a way she would have them tell her their deepest darkest secrets and then she kept the file of those secrets and if they threatened to leave or did something wrong she had all the evidence she needed there to keep them in line so it it was a range of emotional and psychological abuse but from interviews you did with a hundred or so former members you were able to reconstruct a pattern of a violent physical abuse can you just a lay out for us some of those more extreme examples of that yes it was something that that really got worse over time and you have to understand what her philosophy is the doctrine is is really pretty simple doubles a real and if you're a drug addict it's because you have this drug gavel if you know your alcoholic the same if you're having an affair it's the same thing there are there lawful devils and so what she would do is it was called devils and deliverance where they would have people surround you and scream at you at to get the devils out get out double yeah and and it will go on and on and on perfect example is with the baby if babies cry it wasn't because they were hungry or they had a dirty diaper it was because it was a devil inside them that was making them cry so you would have groups of people surrounding a you know in a fan and screaming until that baby would just get tired and finally you know go to sleep and not to scream it just it just to be specific this method call blasting they are they're right in front of the subject's face right there screaming into the baby's ears enter a like inches from her face exactly and that's how she started at the beginning with her congregants over time it became more and more violent it wasn't enough just to screen to scare the devils out of people now you had to punch people you had to hold them down to restrain them you had to choke them you had to do everything possible to get rid of that devil and that's when it became extremely violent that's where the people who who recounted their stories would break down to us they would tell us about their injuries and they couldn't go to doctors they couldn't be treated because they knew what would happen so they had to keep it secret but it's those beatings that that really it's still seared into their planes now they can't get rid of those images those nightmares there is a lot of suspense in this tale but it's it's not fiction I mean this is this is a real life accounting of how the church destroyed these lives but you're you're so specific I mean it reads like fiction though you could you've you're recreating dialogue how did you do that we tried to talk to as many people as we could about any particular incident that we wanted to write about let's not often interviewed him together multiple times over a period of five years really we look for please reports department social services child welfare investigation documents we have recordings from inside the church videos so we just tried to to use all the resources that we could find to tell this story in the most compelling way that we could several lawsuits have been brought against the church and its members over the years has anyone been held accountable for the abuse there are five people currently charged with assaulting a former member of the church Matthew Fenner he says that he was beaten to expel his homosexual demons back in two thousand thirteen but so far nobody's been convicted in that case and Matthew fenders waiting for justice the fact that you have the sheriff you have the district attorney all these people who have looked the

Jane Whaley
Climate and Floodwaters Are Top of Mind for Some Iowa Voters

Environment: NPR

04:50 min | 8 months ago

Climate and Floodwaters Are Top of Mind for Some Iowa Voters

"Number one issue for Democratic voters in this presidential election season is healthcare but trailing a close second is climate change morning edition host. Rachel Martin it has been reporting an Iowa this past week ahead of the caucuses and she spent some time in the city of Davenport Mississippi River. The city was the site of record breaking floods last spring. How does the rising river in the threat from climate change affect how people vote? Here's what she found out. You talked to enough business. Owners down by Davenport's riverfront and you quickly quickly realized that pretty much. Everyone has a flood story. I got a call from my sister in law. That said I drop the kids off. I have to go downtown. The levee broke all the water started coming through the drains. And I get down here and we had four and a half feet in her basement. It was coming up to our doors and we just started sandbagging. It just caught my eye and then I went. Oh my God the weavers coming in that last voices Tim Baldwin. He owns an upscale pub right on the waterfront. Dan Bush runs another restaurant a few blocks away and we met them at low pies. Pizza joint. Andrew Lopez is the owner there. Margarita a really chill are red red sauce. It's got a really nice kick to it so you really don't need much with it. All three of these guys took a financial hit after the flood last year but they were the lucky ones. Some some of the businesses around the area had to shut their doors for good. I mean here. You are sitting couple of hundred feet away from the riverbank right over there so do just write this off or do you expect that this is going to keep happening. I think we're forced to take it seriously. That's Dan Bush. After the disaster he started a coalition of business owners to advocate for better flood. Prevention Science shows shows that this is gonNA progressively get worse uh-huh and that we actually didn't it didn't get as bad as it could have got this year The last big event was a nineteen ninety-three. Don't expect it to be another twenty five twenty seven years before it happens again affects your hearts about climate change and your political choices Andrew. I think it's a big deal and it's been getting worse and worse every year so I think it's signed the take a step forward in China or something about it. I you know I love these guys but we have a different political views. Where's the difference? Well the climate change as we hear about it every day through the national media media. I don't believe is our problem. I believe climate changing and I believe climate's been changing since the inception of this planet. Right all I know is what is obvious is to me and that is when it rains. Water has nowhere to go except to the Mississippi River but is it. Is it related to what driving cars I and eating beef. I'm not convinced of that. Damn I think this event definitely made me think more about climate than ever had in my life but Yeah I think we're at the point. Where the cause is not the conversation? It's okay we tim and I agree. It's happening now. How do we handle it? Their answers for that question are are different too. It's GonNa Shave Danny political choice this year. He says he'll caucus for Elizabeth Warren for lots of reasons including her plans to fight climate. Change Tim on the other hand and is a conservative. His primary issue isn't climate change at all it's the economy and he's voting for Donald Trump. We say our goodbyes. Then walk back along the river. We take a right near retail shops and eventually find our way to e second street where we meet any stop-loss. We've got a lot going on right now. So so that's why it's this. Andy runs trendy. Men's clothing store just a couple blocks from the river. I mean the whole community came together and it was. We were knees deep in water. I see and bagging all this area to protect you know our space power you preparing for the inevitability of it happening again. Since I've lived here we've only had one really really big flood And it was when I was young. I don't remember it so historically the are not very high but when you think of the environment the effects and everything that is included what's happening. The chances are a lot higher. Do those issues motivate you politically absolutely. She doesn't want to say who she's going to caucus for Monday but her fiance Kayla is all in for Elizabeth Warren. She's worried about our children and our children's children and what the environmental merriment earth is going to be like at that point because have kids. No we're yesterday. I got my apartment. Were Planning on it. Yeah in time a year. You're after the flood. Anne and Kayla are looking to the future like so many others. We talked with here and after tomorrow's caucuses they'll have a better idea of what that future might look like.

Mississippi River Tim Baldwin Dan Bush Elizabeth Warren Rachel Martin Davenport Mississippi River Andy Davenport Andrew Lopez Kayla Iowa Donald Trump China Anne
Doctors March On Border Patrol, Demanding It Vaccinates Detainees

Morning Edition

03:23 min | 10 months ago

Doctors March On Border Patrol, Demanding It Vaccinates Detainees

"Till often you yes last year we left it until after the Asian you your in February now the highlight of all these festivities for the kids happens to be the accompanying ritual of gift giving they have learned that the otherwise ignored wishes in this season can see the light of day so request to meet demands a waste and hints of dropped as the dream of endless possibilities slippers beyblades rocket ship slime all nestled for space in the park cloud star color all deal with them our first October celebration the valley was around the corner I thought it prudent to explain to my sons that even though the Vatican celebrating all festivities we cannot expect to receive gifts for each of them you will be getting one gift for the valley in a few weeks and that's about it don't ask me for a Christmas gift again I emphasized my five year old looked at me and talk for a minute he was probably processing all the dates in his head because his eyes suddenly brightened and the US then can I just have a gift for Russia China with the perspective I'm Sunday I tell you Sonya Charlie a is a writer and author of children's book you can share thoughts on commentary online at KQED dot org slash perspectives support for perspectives comes from Comcast dedicated to serving California communities with access to technology volunteering time providing financial support and connecting people in need to high speed internet and home more at California dot com cast dot com support for NPR comes in T. Rowe price offering a strategic investing approach that examines investment opportunities firsthand institutions advisors employers and individuals choose T. Rowe price T. Rowe price invest with confidence and the George Lucas educational foundation creators of edgy topia an online resource CD educated to improving the learning experience for America students with information and strategies about what works in K. through twelve education learn more and and utopia dot org and the listeners of KQED it's morning edition from NPR news I'm not working and I'm Rachel Martin Major League Baseball has long tested for drug use and players especially performance enhancing drugs now the league is going to test explicitly for opioids the decision comes months after autopsy results reveal the presence of opioids in the body of Los Angeles pitcher Tyler Skaggs this was after he was found dead in a hotel room bill shaken covers the lead for the Los Angeles Times and joins us this morning thanks for being with us good morning so bill just explain exactly what the change is is going to mean for clubs and players so it went Tyler Skaggs passed away and then the autopsy results came out a couple months later the natural question that anybody would ask is is there anything that we could have done in Major League Baseball did not test players at that point for opioids so the commissioner's office and the players union sat down and said well maybe we should do that maybe that might have prevented one death in this case because in American society thirty one thousand people died last year because the fat and all which is one of the two opioids that was founded Tyler Skaggs

Five Year
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:43 min | 10 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin campuses around the country are struggling to balance free speech with incidence of bigotry and hate speech this month at Indiana University Bloomington the provost condemned tweets from a tenured professor named Eric Rasmussen the provost described the tweets as racist sexist and homophobic but she said the school could not fire him meanwhile Syracuse University in upstate New York is dealing with a run of anti semitic Islamophobic and racist incidents on their campus and your honor Kamenets has been following the situations and joins us now hi Anya hi Rachel so let's start with Syracuse what's the Backstreet there so it's here Hughes the FBI and local law enforcement are investigating a dozen different incidents including racist graffiti threats and slurs being yelled at some students at least in some cases by fellow students and in response anti racist protestors held a sedan lasting several days and once your keys professor I talked to call the campus a powder keg room and Indiana University so it Indiana an economics professor Eric Rasmussen he shared an article from a right wing website on Twitter with the headline about women destroying academia and some of his previous public statements were north and found to be racist sexist and homophobic and this is where we introduce the provost of that school right Lauren Robles she she can Dennis rate she issued a kind of unusual statement in which he said that no one will be forced to take classes with this professor but that the university wasn't going to fire him because as a public university they're bound by the first amendment and Rasmussen's responded online should say he said that and he's been mis characterizing the call the holding a kerfuffle so many others in any explicit connection between these two situations at least on the service okay was so what do they have in common well they're both examples ritual of an increasingly common trend where racism and bigotry on clearing ahead on college campuses and colleges are struggling to respond because colleges have this institutional commitment to freedom of speech and actually a diversity of thought and ideology and debate and so some experts are saying that Rasmussen's case it's probably best understood as a question of academic freedom and not only the first amendment meaning on campus is there's sort of a super first amendment the core of what it means to be a scholar is to be able to research and debate unpopular ideas and not be silenced and what about Sir case so the same values ritual our intention also it's your cues you know there's a history here the hash tag of the activists that they're using is not again as you because there is anything about a year and a half ago were fraternity members were suspended for creating racist videos and since then the campus has been reviewing its policies on free speech and civil discourse and also trying to increase diversity and inclusion but you know there's a bigger picture here as well the FBI reports that hate crimes are on the rise on campuses nationwide since twenty fifteen in fact just the last few weeks there's been incidents involving swastikas in nooses and other messages at the university of Georgia at Auburn at Iowa state and the university of Wisconsin wild yeah so what the actors is your keys are saying is that this is part of a pattern and they don't want this to be swept under the rug and the university leadership is accepting many the activist man's but there's still a lot of dissatisfaction this is John Jackson she's an assistant professor of political science at Syracuse the primary purpose of university is to teach students and to prepare them for the world if it is a place where they can't even walk on campus and feel safe then the universe is not meeting its primary goal in function objective she told me her students of color L. G. B. T. immigrant Jewish students they're scared and that's not conducive to learning or free debate and here's on your Kamenets.

Inskeep Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 10 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Rachel Martin campuses around the country are struggling to balance free speech with incidents of bigotry and hate speech this month at Indiana University Bloomington the provost condemned tweets from a tenured professor named Eric Rasmussen the provost described the treats as racist sexist and homophobic but she said the school could not fire him meanwhile Syracuse University in upstate New York is dealing with a run of anti semitic Islamophobic and racist incidents on their campus and your honor Kamenets has been following the situations and joins us now hi Anya hi Rachel so let's start with Syracuse what's the Backstreet there so it's here he's the FBI and local law enforcement are investigating a dozen different incidents including racist graffiti threats and slurs being yelled at some students at least in some cases by fellow students and in response anti racist protestors held a sedan lasting several days and once your keys professor I talk to you call the campus at powder keg and Indiana University so it Indiana an economics professor Eric Rasmussen he shared an article from a right wing website on Twitter with the headline about women in destroying academia and some of his previous public statements are north and found to be racist sexist and homophobic and this is where we introduce the provost of that school right Lauren Robles she she can then this rate she issued a kind of unusual statement in which she said that no one will be forced to take classes with this professor but that the university wasn't going to fire him because as a public university they're bound by the first amendment and Rasmussen's responded online should say he said that and he's been mis characterizing the call the whole thing a kerfuffle so many others in any explicit connection between these two situations at least on the surface okay was so what do they have in common well they're both examples ritual of an increasingly common trend where racism and bigotry are hearing ahead on college campuses and colleges are struggling to respond because colleges have this institutional commitment to freedom of speech and actually a diversity of thought and ideology and debate and so some experts are saying that Rasmussen's case it's probably best understood as a question of academic freedom and not only the first amendment meaning on campus is there's sort of a super first amendment the core of what it means to be a scholar is to be able to research and debate unpopular ideas and not be silenced and what about Sir case so the same values ritual our intention also it's your cues you know there's a history here the hash tag of the activists that they're using is not again as you because there is anything about a year and a half ago were fraternity members were suspended for creating racist videos and since then the campus has been reviewing its policies on free speech and civil discourse and also trying to increase diversity and inclusion but you know there's a bigger picture here as well the FBI reports that hate crimes are on the rise on campuses nationwide since twenty fifteen in fact just the last few weeks there's been incidents involving swastikas and uses and other messages at the university of Georgia at Auburn at Iowa state and the university of Wisconsin small yeah so what the actors is your keys are saying is that this is part of a pattern and they don't want this to be swept under the rug and the university leadership is accepting many the activist man's but there's still a lot of dissatisfaction this is John Jackson she's an assistant professor of political science at Syracuse the primary purpose of university is to teach students and to prepare them for the world if it is a place where they can't even walk on campus and feel safe then the universe is not meeting its primary goal in function objective she told me her students of color L. G. B. T. immigrant Jewish students they're scared and that's not conducive to learning or free debate.

Indiana Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Rachel Martin campuses around the country are struggling to balance free speech with incidence of bigotry and hate speech this month at Indiana University Bloomington the provost condemned tweets from a tenured professor named Eric Rasmussen the provost described the tweets as racist sexist and homophobic but she said the school could not fire him meanwhile Syracuse University in upstate New York is dealing with a run of anti semitic Islamophobic and racist incidents on their campus and your honor Kamenets has been following the situations and joins us now hi Anya hi Rachel so let's start with Syracuse what's the Backstreet there so it's here Hughes the FBI and local law enforcement are investigating a dozen different incidents including racist graffiti threats and slurs being yelled at some students at least in some cases by fellow students and in response anti racist protestors held a sedan lasting several days and once your keys professor I talked to call the campus a powder keg room and Indiana University so it Indiana an economics professor Eric Rasmussen he shared an article from a right wing website on Twitter with the headline about women destroying academia and some of his previous public statements were north and found to be racist sexist and homophobic and this is where we introduce the provost of that school right Lauren Robles she she can Dennis rate she issued a kind of unusual statement in which he said that no one will be forced to take classes with this professor but that the university wasn't going to fire him because as a public university they're bound by the first amendment and Rasmussen responded online should say he said that and he's been mis characterizing the call the holding a kerfuffle so many others in any explicit connection between these two situations at least on the service okay was so what do they have in common well they're both examples ritual of an increasingly common trend where racism and bigotry are hearing ahead on college campuses and colleges are struggling to respond because colleges have this institutional commitment to freedom of speech and actually a diversity of thought and ideology and debate and so some experts are saying that Rasmussen's case it's probably best understood as a question of academic freedom and not only the first amendment meaning on campus is there's sort of a super first amendment the core of what it means to be a scholar is to be able to research and debate unpopular ideas and not be silenced and what about searches so the same values ritual our intention also it's your cues you know there's a history here the hash tag of the activists that they're using is not again as you because there is anything about a year and a half ago were fraternity members were suspended for creating racist videos and since then the campus has been reviewing its policies on free speech and civil discourse and also trying to increase diversity and inclusion but you know there's a bigger picture here as well the FBI reports that hate crimes are on the rise on campuses nationwide since twenty fifteen in fact just the last few weeks there's been incidents involving swastikas in nooses and other messages at the university of Georgia at Auburn at Iowa state and the university of Wisconsin wild yeah so what the actors is your keys are saying is that this is part of a pattern and they don't want this to be swept under the rug and the university leadership is accepting many the activist man's but there's still a lot of dissatisfaction this is John Jackson she's an assistant professor of political science at Syracuse the primary purpose of university is to teach students and to prepare them for the world if it is a place where they can't even walk on campus and feel safe then the universe is not meeting its primary goal in function object as she told me her students of color L. G. B. T. immigrant Jewish students they're scared and that's not conducive to learning or free debate and here's on your Kamenets thank you so much for your reporting on this on you.

Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Rachel Martin good morning in California lawmakers have passed a bill that could mean major changes for ride Cher companies like uber and lift the legislation requires out based companies like these to treat independent contract workers like actual employees who would qualify for minimum wage overtime other benefits that they currently do not get really go down a Mike Isaac he's a technology reporter for The New York Times he's been covering this hi Mike. Hey how are you I'm well so how big a deal is is for companies that we now know Cooper lifter basically synonymous with up based ride sharing. it's definitely something that they're fighting tooth and nail and hoping that they can avoid being called calling their their workforce employees at this point I mean it isn't just about money for them which I guess isn't insignificant over hasn't exactly been making a profit. yeah I mean you know to the court of uber and lift sand and a number of the business in the cake economy is basically the idea that they can keep their entire workforce as contractors and and not have to pay you know number of the basic work objections then on all employees in the US have like you know. many health care benefits and employment and and so the idea for them with the if if they do have to convert all of these all of the you know millions of people who work for them as an intern plays it would make it much more difficult for them what this country is that he was just make it much more difficult for them to to keep the most of them are driving for them in the first place will come back to these companies but we've just so we're clear this legislation though covers other kinds of contractors right. yeah that's right you know a nail salon workers and and other independent contractors are are also under the bill I think it's just the the bulk of the attention is going to companies like Google and with just because basically the entire business depends on the contract workers being contract workers but it's my understanding Hooper has just basically looked at this legislation which you know the governors can sign it's gonna be a lot and said it's not going to comply how do they get that. it's funny part of the still essentially makes there's a specific test to determine whether someone of the contract worker or an employee and who were saying that look the way our business works the way that we follow this rule it we do not fall under that cast this even though the test makes it harder for them to say that these people are caught our contractors rather than employees who were still maintains that look they don't they don't direct workers during the fourth of the time that they're working for Cooper we are a transportation company not and agents just platform rather than a right hearing company nine and that is not to the core of their business so we are it the rule is not applicables to us now when it actually stands up and in court in the many lawsuits and and certain cases they have going forward. this TV T. M. as in there they're also concerned because in California as they like to say often leads the way for the rest of the country this would be a big hit for them if other states passed similar legislation no I absolutely I think that this is just sort of the beginning for them you know if if one state like California is is pushing for that Senate it become popular than. story.

Mike Isaac Rachel Martin California Cher Cooper The New York Times
"rachel martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Green and I'm Rachel Martin and now we're gonna bring you the story of the mysterious cube of uranium the cube turned up one day in the suburb of Washington DC after it had been lost for more than half a century and here's Jeff Brumfield as the story of the uranium and its dark past with the coach is a physicist at the university of Maryland and also a huge collector of nuclear memorabilia his offices cramped with radioactive relics pieces of melted glass from beneath the test of the world's first nuclear weapon old watches with glowing dials and this should be in somebody's pocket a few years back he was out for a hot sweaty August drawn when his cell phone rang it was a friend of his they said I need you to meet me as soon as possible so Tim told this person where it was in the voice on the other and says great there's a parking lot nearby head over about twenty minutes later we got together and kind of the car open the trunk of the car and they're in the trunk was a little satchel like a lunch central and inside wrapped in paper towels was this weird looking metal cute charcoal black with little notches on the side and it was really really heavy for its size I looked at my friend and I said do you know what that is responded to me and said why I think so do you know what it is it turned out they didn't need to gas because wrapped around the cube was a piece of paper sort of like a ransom note around a rocket be thrown through somebody's.

Green Rachel Martin Jeff Brumfield physicist Tim Washington university of Maryland twenty minutes one day
"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep the nation's oldest Latino civil rights organization and look at some presidential candidates last night people like Bernie Sanders only on Castro Elizabeth Warren who explained what they would do if they win the presidency they spoke as the trump administration prepares immigration rates this weekend and many migrants are in detention at the border NPR's Daniel Chris Leben was listening as candidates spoke with the league of United Latino American citizens or Lou lack in Milwaukee Wisconsin either Daniel the morning safe I guess we should mention the candidates were already speaking Spanish in debates for mainstream audiences so what are they adding in this this kind of setting right we did have some Spanish again last night about Rourke is here he speaks Spanish pretty well but yes on top of that you know candidates did bring their usual slate of policies you and Bernie Sanders from Vermont he spoke about economic inequality Elizabeth Warren to also talked about reshaping the American economy she talked about her personal story but yeah they talked about immigration against that backdrop that you mentioned there also some a book immigrants in the audience here there was also that backdrop of that census question about immigration so yeah there were a lot of questions about immigration so with that in mind Warren in the run up to this Elizabeth Warren unveiled her immigration plan a wholly on Castro who has made immigration one of the centers of his campaign he really made a point of leaning into decriminalizing border crossings that's a topic that he came out early on and he criticized more moderate Democrats on that question here he was criticizing them last night I would say that secretary Johnson is wrong vice president Biden is wrong on this and congressman o'rourke is wrong on this okay so difference of how to shape the law should one of them become president when Castro put out that immigration plan people pointed out he was the first to be detailed about what he would do as president has anybody else been detailed sense yes Elizabeth Warren has and beat being detailed out policy she has sort of made that her identity as she unveiled that planned this week she said that she wants to decriminalize border crossing as well but on top of that she wants more legal immigration she wants to bring in more refugees and she wants agencies like ice to really focus on different priorities to focus more in areas like smuggling for example and she did a thing that a lot of the candidates here doing a lot of the candidates in this race are doing generally which is try to differentiate themselves from each other but also to make sure it's not all about trump here she was sort of summing it up to the audience now our immigration system is broken and I get the Donald Trump goes out there every single day and tries to exploit that for his political ends but we all know in this room it was broken long before Donald Trump came along and aside from that you had better will work here he also has brought out his own pretty detailed immigration plan he wants to rewrite the law to decriminalize crossing the border for some but definitely not all people he also has a pathway to citizenship any really wants to invest in the asylum system and deal with some of those backlogs it's clear that the president thinks immigration is a strong issue for motivated motivating his base voters it's a thing he wants to talk about the Democrats essentially agreed say yes this is the thing we want to be central to our campaigns you know you've really seen this increase among Democrats that's what's interesting in part just because so many are so angry about trump your policies like family separation and that sort of thing so you really see a lot of firing up there but there's a risk in that trump and other Republicans are definitely the frame some of their policies as open borders which really could upset some swing voters perhaps Daniel Kurtz Levin thanks so much you hear her on morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm ready to learn and I'm cherry Glazer and on this Friday morning you are listening to KCRW.

Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep
Rising Democratic Party Star Urges Hollywood Not To Leave Georgia Over Abortion Law

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Rising Democratic Party Star Urges Hollywood Not To Leave Georgia Over Abortion Law

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR. There's a growing push in Hollywood to boycott the state of Georgia. It comes in response to Georgia passing a Bill that restricts abortion, but a rising star in the Democratic Party is urging Hollywood not to leave Stacey Abrams. Who lost a close race for governor of door to last year says this is the wrong strategy that it could cost tens of thousands of jobs that people who work in Georgia's entertainment industry, Rachel Martin, talk to Abrahams in Los Angeles, where she has been meeting with Hollywood executives this week. There is a strong emphasis on schilling our values through boycotts. And as a daughter of the south, I appreciate that. But the solution to this challenge, does not come simply from REM. Moving economic opportunities. It actually comes from changing the composition of our leadership. Because while this force pregnancy Bill is one attempt to remove access to health care, their other bills that will follow, if this one doesn't succeed if we want a permanent solution, we need a permanent change in that means investing in political change in the state of Georgia, and that's why I need people to stay and fight. Although can't you do both to some degree. I mean, there are examples of how economic boycotts, can at least creep public pressure that leads to change. I'm thinking of the two thousand sixteen boycott of North Carolina over the transgender bathroom Bill or the boycott that in Indiana of the tension between gay rights and religious freedom. I mean those boycotts created public pressure that helped leverage change. They did. But we have to remember that the LT Hugh community years, building a narrative within the corporations that work while it's happening now has not reached the same place. That's why you see that. It's the entertainment industry. That's pushing back. But when the religious freedom bills, removing it with fortune five hundred company that was tech company, the challenges that in two years, this Bill will likely become law, and if we want to repeal it, we have to recognize the people who pass this law for those legislators, this isn't democ too, how they win election. These are not people who are going to rescind their beliefs or their votes. And so the most effective way to change the outcome is to actually change the people were making decision. Do you think Democrats have missed the boat and not creating the kind of foundation and structure around abortion, that Republicans have over the years. I don't think that they've missed the boat. I think there is a belief that because of the supreme court had made Roe v Wade settled law. And because for forty years the battle despite being joined had never truly moved in the direction of repeal of review weighed, I think Democrats did believe that we were in a safer position. How? Ever my responsibilities to meet the challenge where it stands. And I'm proud of the work that's being done by reproductive choice groups. I'm proud of the voices were hearing coming out of the democratic leaders. But we also have to remember that if Roe v. Wade is overturned, it doesn't ban abortion. It's simply returns the responsibility 'cause the state, and we want the state of Georgia to be effective to have a business climate, that invites not only the entertainment industry with other companies we have to solve our healthcare crisis and that includes solving the crisis of making sure women have access to healthcare by having access to reproductive choice. Former vice president, Joe Biden recently reversed, his long-held support for something called the Hyde amendment which essentially bans federal funding for abortion. Do you believe all Democrats should have a uniform position on all aspects of the abortion debate? I believe that leaders are required to serve the people and abortion access is a healthcare. Right. It is the way women can control their bodies until their futures are economic destiny. And while your personal beliefs are absolutely yours as a leader. I believe that we should be pushing for and electing leaders who reflect that value who believe that women should have the right to make healthcare decisions for themselves, and their families that should be a litmus test for all Democrats running for president. I, I don't use that language, but I do think that for the purposes of this election, we have uniformity among the, the candidates, and I think that's a good thing. There are more than twenty Democrats running for president. Is there space for you? I think that there is space formation. I decided that I can add value to this contest. I have not decided that yet and my job right now is to protect jobs in Georgia. Protect women in Georgia by not only holding onto the entertainment industry jobs that we have, but also thinking about the next five years in ten years in forty years. We should not have to continue litigating bodily atonomy for women. Reproductive freedom for women and my mission is the most TJ way we can secure those rights. And right now, that means staying in fighting in Georgia that was Stacey Abrams talking with Rachel Martin.

Georgia Hollywood Frame Bridge Stacey Abrams Rachel Martin ROE Wade NPR Democratic Party President Trump North Carolina Supreme Court Vice President Indiana Joe Biden Los Angeles Abrahams Forty Years Fifteen Percent
Trump says Mexico talks "not nearly enough" to stop tariffs

Morning Edition

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Trump says Mexico talks "not nearly enough" to stop tariffs

"And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning, there will be more talks between the US and Mexico today over a new rift in that relationship. President Trump continues to insist that unless Mexico stops the flow of migrants over the southern border. He will impose tariffs on all Mexican goods that come in to the United States. The president has threatened to do an Enron around congress use emergency powers to start taxing Mexican goods at five percent that could go all the way up to twenty five percent. The Mexican government has said

President Trump Mexican Government Mexico Rachel Martin United States Enron Congress Twenty Five Percent Five Percent
 Pope vows to fight abuse

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Pope vows to fight abuse

"Morning. Pope Francis unveiled some new rules yesterday, priests and nuns will have to report sexual abuse and cover ups to church authorities now here in the United States, some states obligate clergy members to report abuse allegations to civil authorities. But that's not true everywhere. This shouldn't be when level of safety for one child and a different level. Furthers your safety shouldn't depend on part of the world you live in. That's Maree Collins as a child she was abused by a priest two years ago. She resigned from the punt typical commission for the protection of minors. She said the Vatican was resistant to change she welcomed some of the new guidelines like protection for whistle blowers. But on the whole she's disappointed. She talked to our co host Rachel Martin. I

Maree Collins Pope Francis Rachel Martin United States Two Years
Bill Would Ban IRS From Creating Free Electronic Tax Filing System

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Bill Would Ban IRS From Creating Free Electronic Tax Filing System

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from American pest as the leading provider of safe sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests. Visit them today at American pest dot net. It's April fifteenth, which means you have to file your taxes before midnight. If you've not already done. So if you wanna file online, you typically have to go through a private company like h NAR block or Intuit the makers of turbo tax. Why do you have to use them? We'll in agreement with the IRS and private tax prep companies prevents Americans from filing directly online with the IRS. And that rule could become permanent lawmakers on both sides of the aisle or trying to pass the so-called tax payer. I act which would permanently bar the IRS from creating a free electron ick tax filing system. Rachel Martin talked with propublica. Reporter Justin Elliott about why this Bill is needed one of the. Things this Bill does is it caught. If is an existing agreement between the IRS and the private tax prep industry, so companies like the maker of turbo tax and one of the things that agreement says is that the IRS will never create essentially its own version of turbo tax. So the IRS won't essentially compete with the industry. So what that means is that many Americans will have to continue paying fifty or sixty dollars to use turbo tax rates on our block instead of having essentially like a government option to file their taxes. So this has gotten bipartisan agreement. Yeah. I mean, it's it's a longstanding program, and it's also something that the industry has been lobbying for for a long time. So h NAR blog and Intuit had been pushing for this for years, and you know, they do offer a free option if you make below a certain income threshold, but very few people ended up actually finding that. And a lot of people end up using the paid version. So essentially this Bill would continue this deal. The IRS and the industry under which the industry offers this free option, but the IRS agrees to never create its own version of these tax prep services. It's essentially that means Americans have fewer choices. Yeah. Exactly. And you know, one of the remarkable things that happened is after we wrote about this. I people from other countries were sending tweets to me on Twitter saying that in Germany and Finland and other places doing their taxes took like five minutes because the government actually provides their forms pre filled out because the tax agency already has their salary data. So is it safe to assume that there was just a lot of lobbying on the part of companies that get paid when consumers come in and say these are too complicated for me to do. Can you do them? Yeah. I mean, just HR block and intuitive is the two biggest together they spent over six million dollars lobbying on issues, including this one last year have been pushing for this to make it into law for many years now and the current Bill contains a lot of other provisions, including some that are supported by consumer advocates. And I think that's one of the reasons I it's now getting bipartisan support and might might make it into law. But consumer advocates do support this consumer advocates oppose this provision. But there's other totally unrelated provision in the Bill that, you know, speak to the IRS is debt collection practices, for example, that consumer advocates have supported so you know, that's one of the reasons I'm told that that this bills getting bipartisan support in congress just an elite with propublica. We appreciate it. Thanks, justin. Thanks a

IRS Intuit Justin Elliott DMV H Nar Rachel Martin NAR Reporter Twitter Congress Propublica Finland Germany Six Million Dollars Sixty Dollars Five Minutes
Super Bowl Ads 2019: Stunts, Self-Deprecation And Celebrity Sightings

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Super Bowl Ads 2019: Stunts, Self-Deprecation And Celebrity Sightings

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast. Some Super Bowls are thrilling and summer like last night when the New England Patriots beat the Los Angeles Rams and the lowest scoring Super Bowl game in history. Of course, the game is only part of the spectacle, where the halftime show and the commercials anymore. Exciting. We have a tweet review here from one Rachel Martin of NPR news who writes, you wrote Rachel well that was horrible. Don't think you didn't love it very much NPR. Tv critic Eric Duggan's has his judgment the most unexpected moment in the Super Bowl. Halftime show. Didn't come from headliner. Maroon five or guest Travis Scott, it came courtesy of characters from the cartoon SpongeBob squarepants who introduced Scott's part of the performance. Musical genius who needs no introduction. The cartoon clip was a shoutout to sweet victory. Assam spongebob. Squarepants once played on an episode that parody the Super Bowl was a hip surprise. And a halftime show that also included appearances from Outkast member big BOI and a gospel choir. Maroon five frontman, Adam LeVine, stripped off, coats and shirt until he was bare-chested showing off his tattoos while singing one of the group's biggest hits moves like Jagger. Gives me. Show. It was professional mildly. Exciting the kind of ineffective Super Bowl halftime show that the NFL might have been hoping for after its controversies over players kneeling to protest police brutality. But it was also kind of boring like most of the Super Bowl commercials press to avoid social media backlash. Many of the ads in Sunday's game were not edgy groundbreaking or even all that funny. Consider one but lights commercials which featured medieval characters from last year's but light Super Bowl ads preparing to watch a joust a beautiful day for a date. Date things out lucky. Loincloth cold Bud Light comfy thrown I don't have the plague anymore when they're but night is killed by a character from game of thrones called the mountain then a dragon sets fire to the jousting arena. And the whole thing turns into a game of thrones commercial. I'm not quite sure how scenes of carnage and fire cells cans of Bud Light. Maybe it makes you thirsting Harrison Ford fared better in an ad that showed fictional failed products, featuring Amazon, Alexa, including dot collar. Ordering dog the Barco you'll want. I'm not paying for England dog food ordering gravy yet. There is nothing funnier than watching Indiana Jones chases small dog around his house, Pepsi earn some multigenerational cool points by having chance the rapper remix. The backstreet boys hit I want it that way. And the Washington Post scored with a serious ad ended reinforcing the value of journalists and journalism as images of reporters like slain columnists, Jamal kashogi appeared on screen. Tom Hanks provided a reassuring narration when our nation is threatened. There's someone to gather the facts. To bring you the story. No matter the cost knowing keeps us free. Now, I might be a bit biased. But seeing some of the most expensive real estate in television used to remind America that journalism is a key to democracy seemed like the best use of a Super Bowl ad that I've seen in quite a while Americans.

Comcast Bud Light Squarepants Los Angeles Rams Adam Levine NPR Rachel Martin New England Patriots Travis Scott Jagger Outkast Tv Critic Tom Hanks Assam Washington Post Harrison Ford America Eric Duggan
Macron set to address France after massive yellow vest protests

Morning Edition

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Macron set to address France after massive yellow vest protests

"I'm Rachel Martin. French president Emmanuel Macron is facing one of the biggest challenges of his presidency. Thousands of protesters flooded the streets of Paris again this weekend police fired tear-gas grenades and used water cannons against them the yellow vest. Protesters get their name from the fluorescent safety vests. They wear and their demonstrations were initially sparked by Macron's controversial gas tax hike. These protests have been going on for weeks. Now putting pressure on the to step up his response as he prepares to give a

Emmanuel Macron Rachel Martin Paris
UC Berkeley settles lawsuit over treatment of conservative speakers

Morning Edition

01:10 min | 1 year ago

UC Berkeley settles lawsuit over treatment of conservative speakers

"And I'm Rachel Martin. A lot of countries have a stake in figuring out the truth behind the death of Jamal kashogi. He was a U S resident he died inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. So turkeys involved in Saudi fingerprints are everywhere. Now, Israel may have a link specifically secretive Israeli cybersecurity company another Saudi dissident is suing that company he claimed Saudi officials use the company's software to intercept his text messages with Jamal kashogi which in turn led the Saudis to go after the Washington Post columnist NPR's Daniel estrin is online from Jerusalem to talk about this. Hey, daniel. Hi, tell us more about these allegations. And what do we know about the Saudi dissident making them? His name is Omar Abdulaziz. He tells a very compelling story. He's a social media activist. He's a critic of the Saudi Royal family. He lives in Montreal. And in his lawsuit. He says Saudi officials in Canada met him in may told him crown prince Mohammad bin Salman was unhappy with his activism, they asked him to come to the Saudi consulate for further discussion, and he declined and he says that he and Jamal Shoghi started working together on an initiative to organize a group of Twitter activists against the Saudi regime, and then this dissident got a text message with a link supposedly DHL package delivery, and he clicked on the link and later a Canadian group citizen lab said it believed that he fell victim to a cell phone spyware her from an Israeli based company NSO, he spoke with NPR's, Shannon, van sands. And he said he thinks the Saudis intercepted his WhatsApp text messages with cou- show. And that was the deciding factor that led to his death. Here's what he said for. Sure conversations between us. Played a major role of what happened to Jim. They found out what we were working on. And what are these project on? Why was behind what do we know about this company? That makes a spyware NSO is its name. It's a very secretive company. It doesn't have a website. It was founded by three Israelis there. First names form, the initials NSO and their Isreaeli reports that the company recently sold its spyware technology to Saudi officials the company defends itself. It says its products are only sold to governments and to law enforcement till to fight terrorism and crime, but Israel is actually involved in his company, and that is rarely government officials have to give the okay to let it settle its products abroad. This company is faced a lot of controversy. Mexican human rights activists and others say Mexican government officials hacked into their phones using this company spyware same accusations from a human rights activist in the United Arab Emirates Amnesty International also says the software was used against one of its employees and amnesty is accusing Israel of allow. Allowing the spyware to be sold to regimes that violate human rights, well, considering the company's connections to the Israeli government is the suit likely to go anywhere. It seems like it's more of a symbolic lawsuit. Rachel to draw public attention to this issue. I think it's going to be hard to prove these claims in court and the Israeli defense ministry has constantly defended its vetting of NSO technology sales abroad, and I should add that Israel's not the only place in the world where companies are developing spyware technology. But it is Israel is a big player in the field and presumably Saudi officials aren't weighing in on whether or not they actually bought this technology confirming connection, they're not. And it's very interesting Saudi and Isreaeli ties are kind of under the radar. But this may be an example of some those times NPR's, Daniel estrin. Thank you so much Daniel, we appreciate it. You're welcome. On a chilly day. This month veterans marched a dozen miles up the island of Manhattan to a special spot. It was where in November seventeen seventy six. The first woman to fight for the US army fired her candidate British Redcoats, a Bill in congress now proposes to name the Manhattan VA medical center after Margaret Corbin the effort to honor her is linked with a movement to change. The motto of the department of veterans affairs to also reflected women have always served NPR's quil Lawrence reports at the northern tip of Manhattan. There's a high bluff with a great view, just what General George Washington wanted for the defensive of New York against the British the actual defending fell two soldiers like John Corbin and his wife, Margaret, they were outnumbered after John was killed Margaret sponged loaded and fired the gun all by herself. That's Christian rows who served three tours with the army in Afghanistan and witnesses

Saudi Consulate Israel Omar Abdulaziz Jamal Kashogi Saudi Royal Family Daniel Estrin NPR Margaret Corbin Rachel Martin Jamal Shoghi NSO Prince Mohammad Bin Salman Washington Post Istanbul Jerusalem Manhattan Israeli Government Rachel
MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

"In baseball. If the bombers pull off an upset over the Boston, you bang in Harvard, having donkey buying L wives. I mean, the Red Sox it'll break hearts all over New England. The best kind of New York win. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's recall a supreme court battle before the one we're living through now. Judge bread Kavanagh's. Contentious Senate hearing last week recalled some earlier ones, including a nineteen eighty-seven showdown between democratic senators and then federal appeals court judge Robert Bork who been nominated to the supreme court Senator Ted Kennedy led the attack in Robert Bork's, America. There is no room at the end for blacks and no place in the constitution for women and in our America. There

Robert Bork Senator Ted Kennedy Steve Inskeep America Red Sox Bread Kavanagh Rachel Martin Baseball New England NPR Boston Harvard New York Senate
Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

"Sex crimes prosecutor, I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. How can the Trump administration pressure? Other nations to stop buying Iranian oil will question the State Department's Iran onboard the south also Boston educators, look to close the achievement gap between kids of different backgrounds,

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Prosecutor State Department Iran Boston
Rachel Martin Twitter, Twitter and Jack Dorsey discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Rachel Martin Twitter, Twitter and Jack Dorsey discussed on Morning Edition

"Martin Twitter has permanently suspended conspiracy. Theorist Alex Jones and his info wars channel from its platform. Info wars famously promoted the fraudulent idea that the sandy hook shooting was faked. It took Twitter month longer to ban Jones than it. Did apple Facebook YouTube even Pinterest all barred Jones

Rachel Martin Twitter Twitter Jack Dorsey Alex Jones Washington Post Facebook Reporter Tony Romo Tony Romm Tony Paige CEO Senator Marco Rubio Apple CNN Congress Harassment Pinterest Google
Iraqi protesters set fire to provincial government building

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Iraqi protesters set fire to provincial government building

"In the Iraqi city of bonds, another protester was reported killed and dozens were injured. In clashes with security, forces demonstrators, demanding jobs and public services, also set fire to a main government building NPR's. Jane Arraf has details. Witnesses say protesters set fire to the provincial government building in Basra and blocked the entrance to Iraq's main port security forces have tried to disperse the crowds firing live ammunition Iraq's prime minister, flew to Basra and ordered an investigation after several protesters were killed earlier this week port officials said the demonstrations blocked, the main entrance to the port of cluster and set up roadblocks on the highway from Basra to Baghdad. The protests have continued all summer in second. Biggest city they're demanding steady electricity, clean water and John's Jane

Brett Cavanaugh NPR Wnyc President Trump New York City New York Times Scott Horsely Richard Hake India White House Democrats Rachel Martin Basra Senator Patrick Layhee Iraq Ken President Trump ROE Japan
NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

"Demonstrators. Is demanding jobs and public services also set fire to a main government building NPR's? Jane Arraf has details. Witnesses say protesters set fire to the provincial government building in Basra and blocked the entrance to Iraq's main port security forces have tried to disperse the crowds firing lie them munition Iraq's prime minister, flew to Basra and ordered an investigation after several protesters were killed earlier this week port officials said the demonstrations blocked, the main entrance to the port of Kassir and set up roadblocks on the highway from Basra to Baghdad. The protests have continued all summer in Iraq's second biggest city demanding steady electricity, clean water and

NPR New York Times Israel Iraq Kim Npr Nora Raum White House Rob Schmitz Basra Daniel Estrin Japan President Trump Hokkaido Official Steve Inskeep Washington Supreme Court Of India Rachel Martin
"rachel martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"rachel martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And i am rachel martin we turn now to the ongoing protests in iran state run media there say twenty two people have died in the antigovernment demonstrations they started because of longstanding economic woes in many parts of the country and problems that got worse under western sanctions on iran and while runs government admits it should do more to fix the economy it also blames the us and other countries for fuelling the unrest and your peter kenyon has been following the story from his base in istanbul he joins us now good morning peter i rachel so nearly two dozen people have been killed in these protests hundreds arrested what's the latest that you're hearing well one thing that's new is the return of progovernment demonstrations were getting reports today of marchers in a number of places condemning the violence since associated with the antigovernment protests now the government had tried these progovernment rallies last weekend on saturday at that point they didn't have much affect now they're back we'll see what happens in meanwhile the antigovernment protests just keep going and their seventh day in numerous places also not involving huge numbers of people here's a video up from last night that will give you a little sense of what happening a little different from the usual protests saints now it almost sounds like an ordinary traffic sound but what it is is this person focusing not on the demonstrators there in the background but in the foreground you see this motorcycle patrol of paramilitary beseiged unit said moving over to confront them so clearly there's a level of crackdowns still going on in not overwhelming yet and meanwhile the government seems to be trying out these a progovernment rallies well that's what i was gonna ask i mean has the government's response he say there are now progovernment protesters on the streets but is is the government changing or evolving its response to these demonstrations well if so it's pretty slow its essentially a dualtrack approach i mean some officials especially the president hassan rouhani are acknowledging economic problems he's saying please be patient please don't be violent others are more hardline from the supreme leader on down are blaming outside agitators including washington the rouhani government is trying to point out look the.

rachel martin iran us peter kenyon istanbul hassan rouhani economic problems rouhani government president washington