15 Burst results for "Rachel Clark"

"rachel clark" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

The Red Box Politics Podcast

06:33 min | 9 months ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

"Test is now if date real test earlier and can keep dying patients life along as a test so death may be going uncounted the flip side of that as when you've got fewer because this this issue of dying from cova versus dying with covert. This is someone who has died. Who has please lee tested positive in the previous in theory as a bit too simplistic. You could test positive. Then whatever over by bus in in theory. Yes i mean. I think the really high those those nominees matter less but when when you've got lower numbers of deaths that becomes a more complicated picture. I think the most important things remember is looking at the excess mortality figures which is where they they compare the number of deaths that were seeing the moment too. How many deaths we saw on average in the past five years and at the moment we are still seeing a few hundred excess deaths Every every week and that basically means that you well we know that people are dying from the pandemic and it's not like it folds of calculation of and i was looking at the a last week some state out from the which showed that covy was the ninth leading cause of data in july kind of a two point four percent of all deaths in july in england. I think that was similar. Sort picture in wales so is reminded sounds. It does sound like a lot one hundred deaths a week but it reminded that people die. Do die all the time. And dimension ousama the leading cause of death in england about ten percent of all desa so is just sort of put that into perspective but you're right if the oval exit death pictures showing then more people are dying on normal. It is part of of the mix. Just funny then the lot. Let's let's do the last one. Be next line please. Yes oh this. Last slide is a bit different. It's looking at social mixing the key thing that might mean covert doesn't spiral out of control over. The next few weeks is all about our behavior now. Covet spreads through people meeting close contact with that sort of conversation or or skins kinko skin contact now every week researchers from the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. Ask everyone in britain. How many close contacts they make a day now because it's not a perfect study. It's distorted by people who stay at home and don't meet anyone. Those who meet dozens a day at work but nonetheless it is quite interesting and it shows that we're still seeing far fewer people than we used to so before the panic. The average person had close contact with about ten of his day. Now that plummeted. About to in april twenty twenty when of course we went into the first lock down but even now in late august. We're still seeing about four people a day on average. What does this mean well. It suggests that we're perhaps a bit more cautious that we used to be even after the great knocking on july. The nineteenth loss asked working from home and that may change of the next few weeks but all of this means fewer opportunities for kobe to spread now. A lot of what happens over. The next few months could be down to human behavior as much as anything so something. Spur mind and it's interesting. That is the whole thing about how long it takes to form a habit and break your happy if you've spent months and months and months just without even realizing that you're not seeing as many people because africa. Megan tom thank you very much. Talking to today's tom cavalier From the times data team Like i said you can see all the charts we've just been discussing of tweeted them and There's really good trackers all on the times website so every time i have a look at that in a moment we're going to speak to our very own chief medical advisor and chief scientific adviser dr rachel clark and we were heaney matter. Matha will be here in just a moment. This is charlie on video and association with go daddy part of the help and told you need to go your business online. Next line please. On times radio go daddy. The official domain name website builder and web hosting partner of teen. Gp it's been all my seven weeks since both johnson Did a press conference updating us on what was how to us With chris whitley impact chevelle. So we've we've formed our own expert panel our chief medical officer we've advisor we've appointed as the doctor. Short clark is with us. Rachel hello matt and chief scientific advisor where he matter epidemiologist at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine halloween nicer. So rachel give us. We were just discussing. How cases have gone up. Dramatically hospital. admissions are up but not by the same sort of proportions. Wants the picture on the front line in the asia for you. Well the the positive news is that the vaccines are superbly effective. So will though cases Rocketing at the moment as tom said that's translating into a much smaller number patients in hospital with covert than we saw for instance in january this year. Thank goodness and also a much smaller number of death. But we still at the moment. We've got nearly eight thousand patients in our hospitals in the uk with covert very very sick indeed many of them. And we've only got about a hundred thousand acute hospital beds in the uk. So that's not that far off one in ten of every acute hospital bed in britain filled with a covert patient. And the reason why. That's such a problem is there is never any slack in the system in the nhs we we know. What's what it's like usually if you think back to creek over times every winter. We have a winter crisis. You know patients on trolleys incorrigibles. And there isn't ten percent spare capacity in beds or crucially and starved numbers of doctors and nurses and everyone else so what that means is right now. In in sort of height of summa we are routinely seeing hospitals on blacula day after day after day. So that means that is not a single free hospital bed in hospital say my hospital routinely on black alert an enormous. You see in the summer and all those awful images that with familiar with from winston months patient stacked on.

london school of hygiene and t covy england Megan tom tom cavalier dr rachel clark Matha lee chris whitley wales Rachel hello matt britain heaney africa charlie johnson clark rachel
"rachel clark" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:18 min | 11 months ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"City lights. Some double your A B E. I'm Lois. Right? Says thank you for listening. Let's get back to my conversation with Will and Jim Pattison, The filmmakers of the new documentary, Carter Land here will talks about how their background in environmental conservation informed their approach to conveying Jimmy Carter's achievements. In nature preservation. Geminis background is in public lands filmmaking, and that was what originally brought us into the project. We're really excited to tell that story specifically, I mean, President Carter doubled the size of the National Park Service. He tripled the size of our wild and scenic river system. And I believe the stat is probably doubled the side as if not more than that for our wilderness system as well with the capital, W wilderness, and so for us, you know, you look at him. Work, not just in Alaska, where I mean, if you look at a conserved lands in Alaska, it's unbelievable. You're looking at 150 Million plus acres, which is like the size of the state of California. It's tough for folks to wrap your head around just the amount that he did for conservation and a lot of these lands. I mean climate change. He he's As far as presidents go until the modern until President Obama President Biden Really, presidents have never taken on climate change, and he was going to, But just with that Alaska lands contribution alone. You think about all the Forests that he saved and all of these places that are preserved just because he pushed for it. And so many of the things like you mentioned he did at great. Political cost to himself. Alaska He spent a lot of political capital on as well. But man in generations later look at what we have this crown jewel of America and Alaska as far as our public land system, go And again. Decades before we knew how Fred trial these lamps were, or I guess we knew, but no one listened, right? Yep, the film brings out how Jimmy Carter's love of the out towards is entwined with his spirituality, his faith. Would you talk about Rachel Clark and her role in his life? Yeah, Jim here. That's a story that few Americans get to hear. Unless you're going to make the trip down two planes and go to the Jimmy Carter National Historical Side or if you really want to do some digging around the Internet, But it's a very important story because President Carter. First of all his environmentalism. He really was the first president. You'd have to go back to Theodore Roosevelt, who really made the environment and conservation a top priority of his and it meant so much to him, and that was part of as well touched on what made this film personal for us. But Rachel Clark, her husband worked on the Carter farm in planes and she lived there and she would take young Jimmy through the woods in southwestern Georgia, and she would take him fishing and she would teach him all about the wildlife. And the natural world and she would do it through a spiritual lens and that inspired I think a young Jimmy Carter to really gain this appreciation for the environment. Living in rural Plains, Georgia at the time, you know Jimmy Carter as a young boy, they didn't even have electricity. So you lived very close to the land. And I think that combined with Rachel Clark, taking him under her wing and nurturing his love of the outdoors, was instrumental in his developing such a passion for conservation and the environment. And it really course comes out when he's governor of Georgia, and then President of the United States, and we felt like there's a really important story to tell in this film, his declaration that we are stewards of the environment we must be stewards of the environment reflects a moral imperative that governs his life to this day. And yet that moral imperative was something that other scared or alienated people. Why, Why do you think that was so? Yeah, This is will great lens to look through his presidency. His actions and his leadership model revolves around this idea of a moral imperative that we don't need to do this because of financial reasons or because of self interest, but really this idea that we need to do something because it is the right Thing to do. I think Americans we are kind of hard wired to not really always think that way and especially increasingly so and so to hear somebody say. We need to do this simply because it's right. You know, It's just so it's a strange asked, you know you save yourself. Well, what else? What's in it for you? What's you know? What's the rub here, and we interviewed several folks who are in the Carter administration. They say, If you really wanted to tick off Jimmy Carter, you would go into his office and say We need to do something and give a political reason as to why something needed to be done. That's that was the way you can almost be assured that that thing would not be done. And so as far as morality, it's something that's really important to him, and that we admire as far as making a film in a takeaway we want for folks when you leave the theater, leave your screen experience to say. Maybe I should do this as well. That's okay. Well, the very idea that he describes the energy crisis in terms of a national security issue. The underpinning there is that. Do you want to lose lives because of our dependency on oil from the Middle East? And people resisted being told to conserve energy and and didn't have that moral imperative as a guiding force in their lives you mentioned in the best way to tick him off. I thought it was sort of mark Couple when Jason Carter Jimmy Carter, his grandson states in the film that his grandmother, Rosalynn Carter, what's the best politician in the family, and that in.

Rosalynn Carter Will Rachel Clark Jason Carter Alaska Jim Pattison Jimmy Carter Theodore Roosevelt Middle East Jim Jimmy California America Fred National Park Service 150 Million plus acres President Obama first president two planes southwestern Georgia
"rachel clark" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:05 min | 11 months ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Northern kentucky university week engage. Students can help a community thrive. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute. Rachel clark professor. In the department of psychological sciences describes one instance where it made a difference and twenty thirteen northern kentucky university began a partnership with the west side neighborhood in newport a community across the ohio river from cincinnati and a few miles from our campus. The west side would receive help with parks community gardens public art and even a bicycle maintenance class. That was a way to teach science and math while having fun in k. U. students in turn would have experiential education opportunities early on in. Ku's community engagement team asked. If one of my psychology classes could measure hope in the residents of the west side. We agreed and also measured meaning in life. Hope is important because over the last two decades it has emerged at the moderately strong predictor of wellbeing on the west side. Most families live at or below the poverty line you might reasonably expect residents to have lower hope and meaning in life. They didn't my students surveyed west side residents and for the sake of comparison in k. U. students our findings published earlier. This year showed no major difference between the two groups. Indeed the newport residents generally scored higher for hope and meaning in life especially among newer residents. Who share a vision of what the west side might become as residents take greater ownership of the old neighborhoods future rather than seeing it to absentee landlords because of these surprising findings we decide to explore a results with a focus group with learned. That residents while hopeful. Personally were less optimistic about external forces shaping their neighborhood. They felt for example that municipal services were more readily provided to wealthier residents neighborhood and socio political factors impacted their levels of hope more so than individual factors still that didn't diminish their personal faith in their future or their commitment to a better westside. That was rachel..

northern kentucky university dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg Rachel clark department of psychological sc newport ohio river Ku cincinnati west side rachel
"rachel clark" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Larry O'Connor shell right now. I want to do want to talk about Trump's greatest treatment, or at least the Trump administration's greatest achievement because he didn't do it alone. There's some pretty good people in that white house on some marginal people. Triple 86 30 now and by the way, obviously, you know if you want to respond to what I have to say, I don't think you could get in right now. You can always reach out of social media and also email it, Larry. Oh, show it could be a male calm as many of you know. Will respond. I have been responding to a lot of emails and I do. Read them all. Triple 86 30 W m a L up Max. Women Phone. Max Blumenthal. Let's go to Duke in West Virginia. Duke Duke here on W A. L. Hey, Larry. Hey. Hey, Larry. How are you? Good. What do you say here on Friday? Well, I'll tell you what. One of the things is that President Trump took the chains and like the eagle fly and took out our country's enemies there and wipe it out that Iranian Revolutionary Guard commander who's got a lot of American blood on his hands. Sulamani yet, Yeah. So you know what is? I was thinking through his achievements I totally for I shouldn't have. But that's the thing. There are a lot of achievements. This was a hell of a four years. And you're right. Getting rid of stolen money was a huge deal for justice in the name of all of the dead and and also all the maimed American soldiers. That's that. That was an important thing. Thank you for reminding me do well done. Hey, Carol, Larry, be face and have a great weekend you to my friend? I appreciate that. How about Rachel Clark County, Virginia? Rachel, What do you think, is Trump's greatest achievement? Hi, Larry. How are you? Good. What do you think That does? What's so my thing is Aziz his the wall. My story quickly is in 2009 to illegal immigrant brothers broke into my home on day terrorize us. There were People on the outside banging on our windows. Luckily, we were able to spring the action quickly, but these two brothers and they were arrested, so I had to testify against these two who are on their forced deportation tour back in America. Drug dealers s O. They were sentenced and deported. Two years later. I got a phone call from Virginia letting me know that one of them was back, and I'm telling you right now. The fear. I felt constantly watching my back because I testified against you guys was terrifying..

Larry O'Connor President Trump West Virginia Duke Duke Max Blumenthal Sulamani Iranian Revolutionary Guard Aziz Rachel Clark County Rachel America commander Carol
"rachel clark" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Clark. He only knew the bishop when he was young, but he was struck by by his success and his education. Why was this stunning to a young Jimmy Carter? Why would it make such an impression that time? Well, um, nobody in Jimmy Carter's family ever going to college. And so suddenly, when he's a young boy, a big event in archery Georgia population 25 would be when This bishop, a big shot in African Methodist Episcopal. Church. Um Came to town and this bishop was highly educated. And had been actually a child prodigy. Traveled all over the world. It was a photograph of him at the Eiffel Tower that just stunned young Jimmy the idea that somebody could go abroad. And so the first Truly successful person in his life. Was black. But because he was black, he wasn't allowed. Into the Carter home except from the back door, which she would too dignified and proud to ever use. So when Jimmy's father wanted to talk to the bishop, and he had respect for him They would do so from the bishop's car under a tree outside the Carter farmhouse. Andre of need on neutral territory so that they could have Abide by the Jim Crow segregationist. Customs that prevented him from going through the front door. When Bishop Johnson died, there were Packards and Cadillacs from all over the country lined up. Um For his funeral, and it was the biggest event of Jimmy's childhood when he was about 11 years old. Um and, uh, in any event, Bishop Johnson success that somebody from such a small community. Could be that successful and travel around the world that fired Jimi's imagination. A woman named Rachel Clark. You describe her as a surrogate mother, Jimmy Carter said at her funeral. I knew Rachel Clark in many ways better than my mother. Why Well, um Lillian Carter was not hugely attentive Parent And Rachel Clark, whom Jimmy described. In a book he wrote a few years ago was reminding him of an African queen. She introduced him. To his love of nature. And it also had a lot to do with him spiritually development. And they would, um, and both of these things. Obviously we're enormously important in his life, I mean, grew up to become Arguably our greatest environmental president. I'm including theater Roosevelt in that if you look at the actual record of what he did The environment as governor and president. And of course, he was arguably our most religious president. Crate is often is 30 times a day, though strong believer in the separation of church and state. So Rachel had meant influence on him. It was until after his mother. When we also revered Died in the eighties that Carter started to tell people How much he loved Rachel Clark and Um There's there's some video of his him weeping. Rachel Clark's grave in planes. And, um, when I discussed Rachel Clark with Jimmy Carter, he He became pretty emotional. It's clear that he regarded her as a third parent. My guess is Jonathan Alter the name of his new biography is his very best. Jimmy Carter. Ah, life. Rosalynn Carter and Jimmy Carter have been married for how many years now as of January 2021 74 years. 74 years. They've known each other longer than that. Miss Lillian delivered Rosalynn As part of this book, you were privy to letters that he wrote to her. While he was in the Navy. What did you glean from those letters about their relationship? Um well, First of all, I have to tell you that I was Stunned to get those letters from Mrs Carter. They are most Sting me intimate. Love letters exchanged between a future president and first lady. In American history, and they make John Adams's letters tow headed boy look pretty tame by comparison. So Um The letters that he wrote from the Navy when he was at sea. Um Are A window into his emotions and At one point in one of my more than a dozen interviews with Jimmy Carter, he Said to me, you know, I don't really express my feelings very much. Uh, excited my poetry. I have a hard time expressing my feelings. And, um, so that's one of the reasons you turn to poetry as a former president, but in those letters that were full of feeling full of not just longing for his wife, but Real emotion on Even when they're quarreling a little bit of the letters you glimpse Intensity of They're now 75 year. Love affair and she became Most influential first lady in history at that time that you could argue that maybe after her maybe Maybe Rosen. Maybe Hillary Clinton was more influential. But she had many more responsibilities, for instance, in the White House than Eleanor Roosevelt did. And she was much closer to her husband and Eleanor Roosevelt was too Franklin. On and she was responsible. Or considerable amount of policy on mental health and Age discrimination and vaccination of school Children and other issues. But it's mostly that connection. Which you know when I interviewed them together. I could see it was even when he would sometimes snap at His wife, which wasn't very Nice of him. He They're his eyes would light up when she came into the room. And, um, their connection across all these years is It's just astonishing. Love story and then in the post presidency, she's a company of him to more than 100 countries, and she Um Takes notes and Is his partner, You know, in all of his meetings with foreign leaders. And she also often takes the leadership role. In, uh, in their activities overseas. And of course, she works with him on Habitat for humanity projects. I built the house with them. In Memphis and was, you know a little bit afraid of Harder because he would Jin come over and instruct you not her..

Rosalynn Carter Rachel Clark Jimmy Lillian Carter president Carter Carter farmhouse Eleanor Roosevelt Bishop Johnson Navy Georgia Eiffel Tower African Methodist Episcopal Jonathan Alter Hillary Clinton Memphis John Adams Jimi Andre Rosalynn
"rachel clark" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on WGN Radio

"All day in the sixth block, our by the way, I'll be joined by award Miller of Preservation Chicago talking about the seven most endangered buildings in Chicago. It's a list that preservation Chicago puts out. Every year. I find that stuff fascinating. We'll be joined by WGN. Steve Dale, my old friend who obviously will cause trouble while he's with us, But we'll see what happens. And Tommy whole who is the real health does all sorts of charitable work. You see him everywhere, man. He's he's dressed. He spends most of his life dressed up is the elf, but he is really enough. So who knows? We'll talk to him. But joining me now is award winning. Author and historian and columnist and documentary filmmaker Jonathan Alter's the author of Many New York Times bestselling books, including The Center holds Obama and his friends. The Promise President Obama actually the promise. You know, Obama just picked up on that title. You might want to sue him, John now that I think about that with his new book, But anyway, I'll represent you. We get the money out of this. His latest book is called his Very Best. Jimmy Carter a life by the Great Jonathan Alter John's agreed to stay with us for this half hour because we want to talk about the book, but hey, look, we see you, you analyzing politics all the time on television. I said, Could you hang with me and talk a little bit about all that's going on? And you agreed to, And I appreciate that. You have questions for John. You can join us at 312981 72 100. So what was the need? With all these great books you have written? There hasn't really been a definitive biography of about Jimmy Carter. Some would say, why do we need one? Because first of all, Paul, Thanks for having me on. You know, I'm a native Chicago in and I grew up. Watching and listening to W GM on the north side of Chicago. We all saw him. Thrilled to be here and you know, toe Try to give you some sense of why? I think my book is a good last minute Christmas friend s O Jimmy Carter, Um It was a political failure. But I argue a substantive and far sighted success. So when presidents are in office, and this is true of presidents like Harry Truman and even George H. W. Bush, You know they're judged by whether they get reelected and whether they are politically popular at the time by journalist Historians have a different job, which is to see what actually got accomplished. What changed? In the country because of their efforts as president and in Jimmy Carter's case, of course, as a former president, so there was a huge hole in the line of scrimmage here. Is nobody had really taken a look at this guy. He's been kind of Gotten about her shunned or or people felt he was a failure and they didn't have to pay any more attention to him. And you know, the truth is is really quite different. If you look at the record And there's somebody things. I think that people would find fascinating. For example, having just lost Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and that really hit a lot of people this country very hard. The icon that she was arguably without President Jimmy Carter, there might not have been a justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Well, I mean, she certainly thought so. You know Jimmy Carter appointed Five times as many women to the federal bench as all of his predecessors combined, and one of them was Ruth Peter Ginsberg, and she was asked after Carter. You know, plucked her from relative obscurity and and put around the second highest court in the land, the D C circuit. You know, When did you know you wanted to be a judge? And she said, Well, I never thought I could be a judge until Jimmy Carter to started that half the human race at something to contribute on. He brought the brought diversity of the federal government, both gender and racial diversity. As he had done in Georgia and that that grew out of, you know, partly out of his extraordinary partnership with His wife of more than 70 years, Rosalynn Carter, who was the most powerful first lady, influential first lady. Uh, of all time when she became first lady, and I think, actually, that would still be Crew. If you look at how much influence she had on policy, and they lead this kind of epic American life, uh, they were both from Plains, Georgia, and he was Born out of farming had no electricity, no running water. It might have been in the 19th century and then You know, rigid segregation is Father was a white supremacist and mother and the illiterate black farmhand who essentially raised and Rachel Clark. They Helped give him this broad mindedness. On sense of compassion. And yet he's living through basically white terrorism in the American South. So Nope. All. I was trying to write American epic here, and I think it turned out to be that way that this man's life is just tremendously. Compelling and his complexity. Kept me interested through five years of research. I think 800 pages counts is an epic, so I would certainly join you on that on. I read the book. By the way. Last time I interviewed you on my W. It's not that daunting. Well, I wanted to make you want to make it sound a little bit longer, but assumes I'm gonna beat you last time on my political report show I Maybe I have messages from friends thing. I want to borrow the book. I'm gonna go buy it. Um, you're welcome. I also want to point out but we're gonna take a break. But but People. You know, it was so much attention on the environment Now, People don't realize that Carter was actually you. Are you one of the greatest environmental president? Certainly since Teddy Roosevelt Yeah, that's that's true. So I mean, you know, I think people know that he put solar panels on the roof of the White House, which Ronald Reagan took down. But that was mostly symbolic. He was the first president to fund Green energy. First President Tol clean up toxic wastes and label uh, poisons. So you know what was in them?.

President Jimmy Carter president Chicago Rosalynn Carter Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Obama Jonathan Alter John WGN Jonathan Alter Steve Dale Tommy whole Teddy Roosevelt federal government Many New York Times bestsellin White House Rachel Clark Ruth Peter Ginsberg GM
"rachel clark" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"So just to wrap up all kind of this story. Once again, here's Rachel Clark. So quote for a long time. There were stories of large cats in Michigan that were sort of dismissed. And now we have cougar sightings. There's been a quite a few in the last few months. So I'm not saying there's a dog man that's going to show up. However, nobody knows what's living in the forests of Michigan. And those forests of Michigan I think would be the perfect place to give that interpretation. When I think of all the different sightings that happened over the years. It takes me think of well, where did they happen and some people have to know and it would be interesting to think of an interpreter maybe even an interpreter of a nature trail or LV natural site to incorporate that folktale into their whole tour to kind of diversify it and to state that these are just places of the natural world, but also signifiers of the human imagination and to go to these different sites where the dog man was spotted and used that as long as a provocation to discuss the tail and to tell about What the dog man was and the different contending stories. And you know, what year was this was this where the video was shot in the 1970s and so on so forth. So great. Do you have anything else to say about this? Yeah. Absolutely. I think just as importantly as to location is as you touched on the provocation because if I'm not mistaken, the legend of the Dogman involves the Dogman making appearances every ten years and on years ending in seven. And with that being said, I think on the next year ending in 7020 7 would be a fantastic time for an interpreter to really take hold that this story with so much technology in the world today that can detect changes in temperature electromagnetic field not even motion sensing technology. I think it's very important to provoke the audience into believing that they could be the ones who in fact find approved in shed.

Michigan Rachel Clark
Disappearance of Jennifer Kesse

True Crime Garage

09:59 min | 2 years ago

Disappearance of Jennifer Kesse

"Picking up where we left off captain we are discussing some of the possible suspects or at the very least people that we think should be looked at in this case we we now need to take an in depth. Look at two men whom Jen worked with many people believe that one of these men not both is likely responsible for Jen's ends abduction. There is a lot in this case that points to Jennifer being abducted by somebody who knew her knew where she lived her routines whom she might have have trusted and possibly let her guard down with. Perhaps this person confronted her over her recent trip with her boyfriend and an argument ensued. Dude the story about the two co workers at Jen's workplace makes them suspects in the eyes of many followers of this case. The Orlando Police Least Department did not prioritize Jen's workplace in their investigation. Probably because she never made it into work that day the crime happened elsewhere. Swear we said that in the week after Jen's disappearance the Orlando Police Department conducted interviews with some colleagues of Jennifer's and took her computer. But really that's about it. The building she worked in had over three thousand employees Orlando. PD did not speak with every every or actually very many of them at all and there are two in particular who are Internet favorites for being her abductor. These men and were not interviewed in-depth until three years after Jennifer vanished drew. CASSIE has long told a story that may have helped spark public interest in a Co.. Oh worker of Jennifer's as a possible person of interest. He enjoys maintain that a manager in JEN's office. We're going to call. Oh Him John. He was her peer not her superior but he was very interested in Jennifer and repeatedly pestered her about going out with him. Jennifer did not date colleagues and this manager was married. Drew enjoys suggested Jennifer that she handle it by having lunch with the manager in the building's cafeteria and letting him know firmly that she did not date in the workplace drew says that as far as he knows. Jennifer did do this then after her abduction at a public event the Kassy's conducted publicizing Jennifer's case. This manager approached the Kassy's en- gave them a secret Santa Ornament Jennifer cap on her desk. Now if that were all there is is to it. Then the manager would likely get a side I from the public but he might not be a person of interest but there is much much more to this story. Oy In two thousand ten. Another Co worker of Jennifer's who is known in online forums as the pseudonym Adam Frank although although that is not his real name filed a harassment suit at cf I west gate resorts against the manager. Who We said had a crush rush on Jan rain? The manager was Adams Superior at work this lawsuit alleged that the manager was known to have a relationship with Jennifer Kesse and to have made comments deemed threatening since Jennifer went missing these included comments. That Jennifer was likely eaten up by alligators by now which he said to more than one person. It also alleged that the manager was late for work on the morning of the twenty fourth of January. Two thousand six the day that Jennifer went missing according to this complaint. The manager made disparaging comments about about Jennifer's boyfriend and he was obsessed with her Adam. Frank claimed that the manager and Jennifer had a confrontation about her trip. With Ron Ron on that Monday morning after Jennifer got back from Saint Croix within days of Adam. Filing this Rasmus suit. He was fired from West Gate. Now it is is not known whether the manager was actually late for work that day as alleged by Adam managers were not required to keep time cards but in the wake of of Adam suit and dismissal from the company a source told on concluded that it was Adam not the manager who was obsessed with Jennifer. He had sent her an email telling her she looked nice and he was creepy Stalker Ish by these accounts. It seemed that this Adam Adam Frank Guy may very well have made up the whole thing about the manager to cast suspicion on this manager on John Rather than himself right. The upshot is and we don't know but a private investigator who worked for the Kassy's views this manager as the the prime suspect and says that he has not been cleared by Orlando PD. Which one the manager? John John this this manager John was the boss us of this other employees. Who later filed the complaint Adam? Yeah thank you it is. It is difficult to follow because you really have one man saying. Look look at the manager. He said some weird stuff he might be guilty of this one. He's also saying that he also came in late that day and we have no evidence of Jennifer talking bad about this Adam before she went missing but we have evidence of her talking to her parents about this John Character. That is correct. The weird thing though is we have other sources that say that it was Adam who was late for work on the twenty-fourth and not the manager The private investigator also states. That Adam Frank again. A fake name passed a polygraph and she was able to corroborate his statements. Somehow the manager knew about Adams complimentary email to Jennifer indicating that he was monitoring her emails emails again. Another thing we just do not have answers to but it looks interesting. And I'm going to point this out here captain i. I firmly believe in reviewing this case that the individual or individuals responsible for her disappearance. They had some knowledge judge so it whether it be extensive knowledge about Jennifer Cassie or even just some general vague knowledge but they had some knowledge about this young young woman and her activities. One man that we have not yet addressed and now many feel could possibly be linked to what happened happen to Jennifer because of similarities between Jennifer's disappearance and one that he is believed to be responsible for this is two two thousand and nine a young woman named Tracy. A Cossio left a lar- in Metro. West neighborhood of Orlando with a man named James Hat. Away away the bar was called the taproom and Jennifer Cassie and her friends had been to this bar at least on one occasion which was in Jen's old neighborhood. Tracy Cossio was never seen again after this at that bar at the taproom with this man and her case is is still unsolved her. Chevy Cobalt Tracy's car was found in Cohee just blocks away from the home of the man. She left the bar with James Hat away away. Jennifer Kesse worked in Cohee hat away is now serving life in state prison in Florida convicted of an attack on another young woman. Rachel Rachel Clark whom he tried to strangle to death in her car after she gave him a ride. He was known to Brag about how he liked to strangle his victims and break their necks. Had Always ex-girlfriends told detectives. He had a morbid obsession and vampires cannibalism encierro murders. The Orlando Police Department has looked at James Halloway and Jennifer Kesse case but the fact it is there just is no real evidence to make a connection for one thing. Both Rachel and Tracy were voluntarily in hathaway's presence whereas it is very unlikely that this would ever have been the case Jennifer Cassie. It is theoretically possible that had away saw all Jennifer cassie somewhere and decided to attack her. That is possible but again it doesn't seem to be that there's any anything of evidentiary value to connect him to her missing persons case. Yeah doesn't seem like there's much of a link at all. I mean definitely similar cases but no link yet and it's it's interesting that one of his possible victims. It sounds to me has never been found as well. I think that is. There are several problems with Jennifer Kesse case. And when I say problems I mean. They're they're mysteries. These little mysteries that are inside the big mystery and one of them is not only. When did this abduction take place? And where. But also why is she never been found Bryant. There was not that big of a window a to get rid of her or conceal her and we went through a lot of the searches that were conducted. They had some hits and some leads along the way but she's never been found and that's another thing that is cadaver dogs hit on her car. Rei either right. And that's the that's the other thing that is still so troubling and hurtful to her family to this day

Jennifer Jennifer Kesse Adam Adam Frank Guy Jennifer Cassie Adam Frank Jennifer Vanished JEN Orlando Orlando Police Department Orlando Police Least Departmen Tracy Cossio Investigator Drew Cohee Rachel Rachel Clark Ron Ron West Gate CO
"rachel clark" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

11:18 min | 2 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"For liability and risk you may have for damage to somebody else's vehicle. I'm also a big believer in you having higher deductibles on your coverage. okay is the way the insurance industry works now you don't want to make smaller claims you want to use insurance is true for homeowners to you want to use insurance for big things not for little ones. John joins us on the Clark Howard show hello John. thanks for taking my call certainly John you got a question for me about when it's a good idea when it's not to ensure an automobile well exactly I have an older model on the line for you kind of keeping tabs on in terms of insurance costs yeah I'm trying to determine what the best time is to get rid of the collision and comprehensive when I use the formula that actually had on your website server looms far my perfect about ten percent of the value if the cost of the comprehension and collision exceeds ten percent of the value of the vehicle you're recommending it to drop that coverage exactly. what I'm wondering is you should. the included in that formula at all I don't I don't include the deductible as part of that calculation because actually the deductible is part of why I say when it exceeds ten percent of the remaining value of the vehicle that's when you dont but because your deductible it's going to be let's say five hundred or a thousand dollars if we need to make a claim you're gonna lose that money right away and then all you're going to be left with this the difference from that the remaining value how much would you guess your older vehicle is worth at this point. well Clark added to the call box it would be about twenty five hundred dollars a job order vehicle laws no way you said you should have collision and comprehensive on the vehicle were twenty five hundred dollars instead what we do is look at it as a you want liability of course but you just look at it as you now have a deductible of twenty five hundred dollars basic guide but your insurance per year for collision comprehensive is how much on that vehicle yep total for both is about a hundred and forty four dollars a year. hundred and forty four so that would that would violate my rule to say you don't have it by the end of vehicle cost if you have how are you in terms of savings rainy day funds that kind of thing well we pretty well prepared if you are then I would say even though you're still violating my ten percent rule your below that I don't see it worth you spending that hundred and forty four year. and if you were in a position the purpose of insurance is to cover what you can't afford and so if you can afford if your car was to get totaled in twenty five hundred dollars out the door if that something that is completely manageable in your life I wouldn't spend the one forty four year I agree absolutely just becomes a disposable item at that point exactly you know the average cost of a new car is thirty five thousand or so dollars. you know most people have cars that have enormous cost to them value remaining payments when you have an older car that the value is is really way down at this point having collision comprehensive just doesn't add up to me especially if you're in a position that you can absorb a loss like that. Rachel is with us on the Clark Howard show hello Rachel Clark how are you great thank you Rachel you. have had something happen to you that is a fairy scary fast growing crime I have yes my cell phone number was a legally ported to another service provider. last week not one but two and during the midst of that when the criminals had control of my phone number they were able to. call my bank pretend to be me. our reset. all of our own security on our bank accounts. using password retrieval they were also able to hack into my email and not sure what they were able to get my email but I actually witnessed them trying to send password retrieval back and forth to my links email accounts because I didn't realize that that was a bad thing to do I do now and that our cell phone accounts are. account enter phone numbers and those payments that are on your wireless account are so important thanks as important as your social security number and your banking information and the cell phone industry has been behind the curve on this yes in this cell phone carriers offer higher levels of security because it never occurred to the cell phone carriers how valuable your cell phone number would become to criminal rings and so you are a victim twice of what's known as Sam hi jacking. and so they steal your cell phone service because we two factor authentication most banks brokerages mutual fund companies retirement account people they do that thing where they send you a one time use tax and when they do that back then opens you up if a criminal has hijacked your cell phone service they're the ones that are getting the one time use patterns and they're able to try to empty every financial account you have have you been able to keep your money safe had they gotten to any of your money in any investment our bank account we believe they did get her money both times USA bank has reversal transaction quickly I guess the most inviting a go ahead is since it started to slip out are a U. S. A. is got hit twice correct were you able to react and they able to react quick enough that the criminals did not make off with the money I do not know the answer to that we still have to are going through the process of getting the affidavit so that local law enforcement in USA and sell providers can talk to each other and try to find the people that are responsible they're very persistent Steve. individuals we believe it's more than one I guess for me the most infuriating thing about the whole process was one fire phones were just shut off and we found out that they had been illegally ported I called the bank and they said Hey this is what's happening. lock everything up for me please. and they didn't do that USA I didn't jump to it quickly enough now and that criminals are so persistent and they knew enough little information about the. that they were able to ban a couple hours later. get into the account reset everything that I had done to try to upgrade the security on my bank account. we thought that all again and. the transfers well the good news is that when it involves money in a bank account you have no liability right in this is Emily is unsettling for people in brokerage accounts and mutual fund accounts and things like that there is no specific law that gives you total blanket protection like you have in a bank or credit union all right more and more of the investment community outfits are providing it any way where they're saying that you have zero liability from fraud actors like this and all four cell carriers are putting in place procedures were you have a separate secret code there you put in place there are criminal would not know and have access to to steal your phone number your cell phone number did your cell phone carrier have any such procedure like that once this happened to you know and that was what was really tough to it because we had a pin on the account and how about a criminal grateful to get the pain we we are not sure we don't know yet whether they called our sole provider and increasing it out the new enough information for them to be for them to reset it over the phone we we don't know but then after it happened the first time we thought we were safe we thought that they wouldn't let this number get ported out again but but in my conversations exactly what you're saying if they're behind the curve they don't even know much about how to protect the consumer from this yet because according to them it can happen all like chronically it doesn't have to be any ID shown to port a phone number there doesn't have to be another person they don't the criminals don't have to walk into the store they if they have the electronic information about you your account number your pain any their names like they can they can do it all electronically and it happens instantaneously and. you'll have to wait. you. for us it was four days to get your phone number back well and so this is an industry wide problem with the the cellphone hijacking and the industry knowing the vulnerability now and that this works so well for criminals means that they're going to have to put additional layers in place because what the criminals are doing is they're going to any cell phone carrier they want to different than the one you're with. being the number out and then they have control of your number usually within fifteen minutes right and then they're free already knowing your bank account information all that they're free to then go to the races to try to steal your money now it's not certain but it's likely that this crime is become so rampant because of the Equifax data breach yeah so the criminals know who your cell phone carrier is they know where you do your banking they know where you do your brokerage they know all the stuff about you and so it's like on a silver platter for them do you have your credit frozen yet we do have our credit frozen in your credit was frozen before all this happened no it wasn't okay so that isn't a precaution did I would advise others to put in place I hope Rachel you'll keep us up to date on how all this plays out over the next few weeks. you're listening to the Clark Howard show..

Rachel Clark Clark Howard John John. twenty five hundred dollars ten percent one forty four year forty four dollars thousand dollars fifteen minutes forty four year four days
"rachel clark" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Like every snowflake is unique, and you know, seen humpback whales breaching and the other day, we saw a giant group of seal swimming, which was something I hadn't seen yet in such large numbers. They were hundreds of them. So looking out the window never got boring or blood? So caroline. I'm always kicking myself. When I go somewhere new I've neglected to bring that one key piece of gears or something you really wished you'd brought with you. But didn't I would've brought my big puffy code from Boston because parkas are part of the standard issue that you pick up at the warehouse when you're getting ready to deploy. And the folks at the warehouse were telling us, no, you're okay. Their coats on the ship. But what's on the ship? Are these flow coats, so their coats and flotation devices in one so they're very hard to like move in a very, bulky. So I wish I would have had a regular coat that I could throw on whenever I wanted. So one more listener question for you Carolyn that I understand you've been working on answering. This question comes from gen Kramer, who listens to the world on K UT in Austin, Texas, and Jen asked how the scientists on the ship deal with the emotional impact of their work on climate change. Yeah. That's something. I've been asking people for the past several weeks and put together a little report on it. And I was actually surprised by the range of reactions. I got some people said they weren't panicked by climate change. They were more professionally curious other people did give answers I was expecting a bit more like they found it Dongting or depressing. That was the word that Gabe or to loto used when I think about everything not only climate change. So anything about all the issues that we have get to be the press, really? He's a marine ecologist at the university of Saint Andrews in Scotland, and he used particularly worried when he thinks about his two year old son. We still have the feeling that he just arrived in this world. And when my wife, and I we talk about this like wondering if he's going to be happy with all the issues that were has also worries about the fate of his hometown. He's from a low lying coastal city in Brazil. But he says he's really careful not like these feelings interfere with his work. What I'm doing my job thinking that my hometown will be on what I'm thinking that. This is a global issue that I need to help to understand. That's the kind of thing I heard from nearly everyone down here for activists and policymakers emotion can be a really important way to spur people to take action on climate change. But these scientists are trained their motions asides. They don't cloud the analytical thinking that's central to their work. Here's how Alexandra Mazar who researches sea ice at Sweden's university of Gotham. Berg put it when we were sitting on the floor for cabin. I'm just trying to be very neutral to analyze the results properly because if you include emotions into that back at home, some people say they feel helpless when they think about climate change. But that's not something I heard down here. And I think that's at least partly because the scientists here feel like they can actually do something about climate change by studying it and helping the you're out what lies ahead that's part of what motivated Rachel Clark to start a PHD at the university of Houston. If there's an issue. I don't like belaboring how difficult it is. I just want to find a solution. So maybe I just sort of transfer my emotions into action when it comes to climate change getting PHD in geology and shipping out to Antarctica is clearly not how everyone's going to cope with their feelings about climate change. But LARs, Bouma strategy that might be a little more doable going out site appreciating every day and. Says that helps sometimes and then you have moments where you listen to news, and you hear a change in policies. And you think like why are they doing that we know better, and that's very depressing. I think as a scientist, then you go outside and have another walk, and then you worry about your children, and what you leave them..

scientist caroline Gabe Boston Carolyn gen Kramer Texas LARs Alexandra Mazar Austin university of Saint Andrews Brazil Scotland Rachel Clark Berg Antarctica university of Houston Jen university of Gotham
"rachel clark" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:25 min | 3 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on KCRW

"Crash blocking the carpool and three left lanes on the westbound t- ten before mountain avenue, and that has you stopped from Zach Lauren Holly, thanks so much. We'll check back with you a little bit right now. Sixty one degrees in Santa Barbara, sixty one in Santa Monica. I'm Marco werman. You're with the world at this point. It's gonna be weird not to talk to the world's Caroline Baylor. And Artika she's been there for almost two months. Reporting back to us from onboard a research ship Fulla scientists studying the effects of climate change on glaciers and now they're headed back to port in Chile. So Caroline, this is gonna be our last chat while you're onboard. And then you'll be Palmer. I gotta say I'm gonna miss checking in with you down in Antarctica. How you feeling I'm feeling good? I am excited to get home. Eat a giant salad and go for a run. And it also feels a little surreal to be heading back to Boston and the office and seeing everyone again, it it kind of feels like this is just my life now. So it's kind of strange that it's going to be ending in a handful of days. Well, you'll be happy to see that. None of us have changed. I hope everything's this fan when I get back. What is the mood on board as his voyage wraps up? People are definitely excited to be heading home. I assume the scientists done here what they are most looking forward to you about getting home and university of Alabama PHD student, Victoria, FitzGerald was excited to see her ten month old daughter, I left and she was barely crawling. And now, she's like standing up by herself and stuff university of Gothenburg researcher. Alexandra Mazar is looking forward to some uninterrupted sleep at home in complete silence. No voices. No is heating that is can be pretty noisy hitting the ship and Peter she hand from the university of East Anglia is looking forward to a couple of the little things in life. I'm looking forward to glass of wine. I'm looking forward to my bet. Again, I am looking forward to just guys push those little things like like cycling to work. They can little routines of daily life that you don't really realize that you'd miss pumps until he don't have them anymore. So when. We spoke just before you left. Caroline, one of the things you were worried about was going stir crazy or fuelling board on the ship. Did that ever happen? Oh my gosh. That was not a problem at all. There was so much going on on the ship. Twenty four seven literally that I wanted to cover that I needed to learn about I've watched half a movie while I've been down here. I've read a couple of books, but really there's been almost no downtime. Did you develop any new daily routines that you think might be hard to kick when you're back in Boston? Oh, that's a good question. I will miss going up to the bridge in the evening and just looking out at the natural, beauty, and whatever we're passing. So it wasn't like the astounding beauty of these glaciers ever got ho-hum for you. It wasn't like, oh, there's another mammoth. Glacier, man. Whatever. No. It wasn't. And everything looks different. I mean every iceberg is is unique. Like every snowflake is unique, and you know, seen humpback whales breaching and the other day, we saw a giant group of seals swimming. Which was something I hadn't seen yet in such large. Numbers. There were hundreds of them. So looking out the window never got boring or blase? So caroline. I'm always kicking myself when I get somewhere new, and I've neglected to bring that one key piece of gears or something you really wished you brought with you. But didn't I would've brought my big puffy code from Boston because parkas are part of the standard issue that you pick up at the warehouse when you're getting ready to deploy. And the folks at the warehouse were telling us, no, you're okay. Their coats on the ship, but what's on the ship? Are these float coats so their coats and flotation devices in one so they're very hard to like move in a very, bulky? So I wish I would have had a regular coat that I could throw on whatever I wanted. So one more listener question for you Carolyn that I understand you've been working on answering. This question comes from. Jan Kramer, who listens to the world on K UT in Austin, Texas, and Jen asked how the scientists on the ship deal with the emotional impact of their work on climate change. Yeah. That's something. I've been asking people for the past several weeks, and I put together a little report. On it. And I was actually surprised by the range of reactions. I got some people said they weren't panicked by climate change. They were more professionally curious other people did give answers I was expecting a bit more like they found it daunting or depressing. That was the word that Gibo to loto used when I think about everything not only climate change. So when I think about all the issues that we have I get to the press really, he's a marine ecologist at the university of Saint Andrews in Scotland, and he is particularly worried when he thinks about his two year old son. We still have the feeling that he just arrived in this world. And when my wife, and I we talk about this like wondering if he's going to be happy with for the issues that were has also worries about the fate of his hometown. He's from a low lying coastal city in Brazil. But he says he's really careful not to let these feelings interfere with his work. What I'm doing my job? I'm not thinking that my hometown will be underwater. I'm thinking that. This is a global issue that I need to help to understand. That's the kind of thing. I heard from nearly everyone down here for activists and policymakers emotion can be a really important way to spur people to take action on climate change. But these scientists are trained put their emotions aside. They don't cloud the political thinking that's central to their work. Here's how Alexandra Mazar who researches sea ice at Sweden's university of Gothenburg put it when we were sitting on the floor for cabin. I'm just trying to be very neutral to analyze the results properly because if you include emotional into that Danube back at home, some people say they feel helpless when they think about climate change. But that's not something I heard down here. And I think that's at least partly because the scientists here feel like they can actually do something about climate change by studying it and helping figure out what lies ahead that's part of what motivated Rachel Clark to start a PHD at the university of Houston. If there's an issue. I don't like belabouring how. How difficult it is. I just want to find a solution. So maybe I just sort of transfer my emotions into action when it comes to climate change getting up, and geology and shipping out to Antarctica is clearly not how everyone's going to cope with their feelings about climate change. But LARs, Bouma strategy that might be a little more doable going outside appreciating every day. And he says that helps sometimes and then you have moments where you listen to news, and you hear a change in policies. And you think like why are they doing that? We know better, and that's very depressing. I think as a scientist, then you go outside and have another walk, and then you worry about your children, and what you leave them. And it's up and down all the time. Scientists LARs boom, they're talking about the emotional ups and downs of climate change research. So Caroline dealers. I said you're coming back to Boston from Antarctica. How is this trip impacted you and how you think about climate change and? Thinking about two main things right now, Marco the first is how difficult it is to know and gathered data about climate change in places like Antarctica took seven years for the scientists. And then to get the robotic submarine that she just resembled to send down under the floating shelf of tweets. It takes a full date sometimes to find a seal to put a tag on that will track ocean temperature going forward. So it takes a lot of work to get this really good data that will help us figure out. What's coming in the future? And the other thing that I've been thinking about is once the scientists on this ship right up the findings right up the data that they've gathered and publish it. What happens next and how we use? That information is not up to these scientists it's up to policymakers and the public I've been thinking a lot about what needs to happen next. If this information is actually going to have a real world impact and help people better prepare for future. The world's Caroline Baylor from the Southern Ocean heading to port Carolyn. Can I just say it has been great living vicariously through you for these past couple of months and enjoy your salad back. Thank you Marco. Caroline's been sending us behind the scenes pictures from the ship like the time she wrapped her microphone in plastic and lowered it overboard by rope to get sounds of the ice..

Caroline Baylor scientist Boston Antarctica Marco werman university of Gothenburg Alexandra Mazar Zach Lauren Holly Santa Barbara LARs boom Santa Monica Palmer Fulla university of East Anglia Chile Alabama university of Saint Andrews Carolyn Peter
"rachel clark" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:33 min | 3 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fish house. I'm Judy Woodruff. On the next news hour, we sit down with the secretary of housing and urban development. Ben Carson that's Tuesday on the PBS NewsHour. Stay with us for the news hour from PVS. It comes on after the world this afternoon at three o'clock. The time now is to twenty one. I'm Marco werman. You're with the world at this point. It's going to be weird not to talk to the world's Caroline Baylor in Antarctica. She's been there for almost two months. Reporting back to us from on board a research full of scientists studying the effects of climate change on glaciers and now they're headed back to port in Chile. So Caroline, this is gonna be our last chat while you're on board. And then you'll be Palmer. I gotta say I'm gonna miss checking in with you down in Antarctica. How you feeling I'm feeling good? I am excited to get home. Eat a giant salad and go for a run. It also feels a little surreal to be heading back to Boston and the office and seeing everyone again, it it kind of feels like this is just my life now. So it's kind of strange that it's going to be ending and a handful of days. Well, you'll be happy to see that. None of us have changed. I hope everything's the same. When I get back. What is the mood on board? As is. Void wraps up. People are definitely excited to be heading home. I some of the scientists down here what they are most looking forward to you about getting home and university of Alabama PHD student, Victoria, FitzGerald was excited to see her ten month old daughter, I left and she was barely crawling. And now she's like standing up by yourself and stuff university of Gothenburg researcher. Alexandra Mazar is looking forward to some uninterrupted sleep at home in complete silence. No snow is heating. That is can be pretty noisy hitting the ship and Peter she hand from the university of East Anglia is looking forward to a couple of the little things that I'm looking for glass of wine. I'm looking forward to my bet. Again, I am looking forward to just those little things like like cycling to work can little routines of daily life that you don't really realize that you'd miss perhaps until you don't have them anymore. So when we spoke just before you left. Caroline, one of the things you were worried about was going stir crazy or fuelling board on the ship. Did that ever happen? Oh my gosh. That was not a problem at all. There was so much going on on the ship. Twenty four seven literally that I wanted to cover that I needed to learn about I've watched half a movie while I've been down here. I've read a couple of books, but really there's been almost no downtime. Did you develop any new daily routines that you think might be hard to kick when you're back in Boston? Oh, that's a good question. I will miss going up to the bridge in the evening and just looking out at the natural, beauty, and whatever were passing. So it wasn't like the astounding beauty of these glaciers ever got ho- home for you. It wasn't like, oh, there's another mammoth. Glacier, whatever. No. It wasn't. And everything looks different. I mean every iceberg is is unique. Like every snowflake is unique. And I've seen humpback whales breaching and the other day we saw a giant group that feels swimming which was something I hadn't seen yet in such large numbers. There were hundreds of them. So looking out the window never got boring or blase? So caroline. I'm always kicking myself when I get somewhere new, and I've neglected to bring that one key piece of gears or something you really wished you'd brought with you. But didn't I would have brought my big puffy code from Boston because parkas are part of the standard issue that you pick up at the warehouse when you're getting ready to deploy. And the folks at the warehouse were telling us, no, you're okay. Their coats on the ship. But what's on the ship? Are these float coats so their coats and flotation devices in one so they're very hard to like move in a very, bulky? So I wish I would have had a regular coat that I could throw on whatever I wanted. So one more listener question for you Carolyn that I understand you've been working on answering. This question comes from. Jan Kramer, who listens to the world on K UT in Austin, Texas, and Jen asked how the scientists on the ship deal with the emotional impact of their work on climate change. Yeah. That's something. I've been asking people for the past several weeks, and I put together a little report on it. And I was actually surprised by the range of reactions. I got some people said they weren't panicked by climate change. They were more professionally curious other people did give answers I was expecting a bit more like they found it daunting or depressing. That was the word that keyboard to loto used when I think about everything not only climate change. So when I think about all the issues that we have I get to be the press, really. He's a marine ecologist at the university of Saint Andrews in Scotland, and he is particularly worried when he thinks about his two year old son. We still have the feeling that he just arrived in this world. And when my wife, and I we talk about this wondering if he's going to be happy with the issues that they were has also worries about the fate of his hometown. He's from a low lying coastal city in Brazil. But he says he's really careful not to let these feelings interfere with his work. What I'm doing my job? I'm not thinking that my hometown will be underwater. I'm thinking that this is a global issue that I need to help to understand. That's the kind of thing I heard from nearly everyone down here for activists and policymakers emotion can be a really important way to spur people to take action on climate change. But these scientists are trained put their emotions aside. They don't cloud the analytical thinking that's central to their work. Here's how Alexandra Mazar who researches sea ice. That's weans university of Goth. Sandberg put it when we were sitting on the floor for cabin. I'm just trying to be very new child to analyze the results property because if you include emotional center that biased back at home, some people say they feel helpless when they think about climate change. But that's not something I heard down here. And I think that's at least partly because the scientists here feel like they can actually do something about climate change by studying it and helping figure out what lies ahead that's part of what motivated Rachel Clark to start a PHD at the university of Houston. If there's an issue. I don't like belabouring how difficult it is. I just want to find a solution. So maybe I just sort of transfer my emotions into action when it comes to climate change getting PHD in geology and shipping out to Antarctica is clearly not how everyone's going to cope with their feelings about climate change. But LARs, Bouma strategy that might be a little more doable going outside appreciating every day. And. He says that helps sometimes and then you have moments where you listen to news, and you hear a change in policies. And you think like why are they doing that? We know better, and that's very depressing. I think as a scientist, then you go outside and have another walk, and then you worry about your children, and what you leave them. And it's up and down all the time. Scientists LARs Bouma they're talking about the emotional ups and downs of climate change research. So Caroline dealers. I said you're coming back to Boston from Antarctica. How is this trip impacted you and how you think about climate change and thinking about two main things right now Marco the first is how difficult it is to know and gathered data about climate change in places like Antarctica took seven years for the scientists and a Volen to get the robotic submarine that she just resembled to fend down under the floating shelf of tweets. It takes a full day sometimes to find a seal to put a tag on that will track ocean temperature going forward. So. It takes a lot of work to get this. Really good data that will help us figure out. What's coming in the future? And the other thing that I've been thinking about is once the scientists on this ship right up the findings right up the data that they've gathered and publish it. What happens next and how we use? That information is not up to these scientists it's up to policymakers and the public. So I've been thinking a lot about what needs to happen next. If this information is actually going to have a real world impact and help people better prepare for future. The world's Caroline Baylor from the Southern Ocean. Now heading to port Carolyn. Can I just say it has been great living vicariously through you for these past couple of months and enjoy your for salad back. If thank you Marco Caroline's been sending us behind the scenes pictures from the ship like the time, she wrapped her microphone in plastic and lowered it overboard by rope to get.

scientist Marco Caroline Boston Antarctica Caroline Baylor Alexandra Mazar Marco werman Judy Woodruff Ben Carson secretary university of Gothenburg PBS university of East Anglia Chile Palmer LARs Bouma port Carolyn Alabama Southern Ocean
"rachel clark" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:42 min | 3 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Buried her father. So yes, she she never goes far enough. Do they keep do they keep slaves? Does she keep a slave? That's unclear certainly jobless. He never owned a slave that much. I think we can we can know this twenty cents is living in the household and. It's likely that it was it's ice and say likely, but there's a very good chance that it was her nieces who was living with them. This is racial Clark, the the young woman. Rachel Clark, right? And the Clark family later becomes troubled and they ask for John Quincy for help. And he doesn't give it. So what we have here is a mixed picture of Louisa and John Quincy opinion of slavery at this moment. John Quincy competition, we know we know the opinion, and you know, John Quincy nation. But it's also, you know, Hugh makes compromises in daily life part of the compromises is to deal with the political dilemma of the time and Louisa plunges right into it. Because she likes Andrew Jackson. Why Louisa oh, he's dashing charming? And also, she loves the fact that he drives Washington crazy. However for John Quincy, he is a political help mate because John Quincy wants to acquire Florida and Jackson's invasion of Florida and his depredations of Florida helps John Quincy a lot. So they at this point of their lives their working together. It. She thinks there's a change when John names performed for the presidency this time, which is really hard for us to understand. Now, you did not campaign for the president's. You do not declare. You do not know you do not give speeches. You did not even admit running for president. So he was you know, you kind of wink nod and you participated Mukul debater relationships, but it sounds like Andrew Jackson was like I'm going to run for president. But his name was put forth and. She was John Quincy of talking like. Well, maybe make a good vice there are other competent competitor competitors. At this time. There's William Crawford of Treasury Secretary is John Calhoun, certainly a Senator who is prominent and rising. And then there's Henry clay speaker of the house I understand Louise's surrounded by this tension. These are all very famous names prosperous names of the of the time, they were powerful men Luisa sees them. However as stepping stones for her John Quincy a detail here. She's raising her children while this is all spinning around her. And she's keeping a household, and they have a great big party. And Louisa Thomas, you deserve an invitation to this party. It is January of eighteen twenty three. I believe I believe it's eighteen twenty three or maybe it's eighteen twenty four when Sheila twenty four eighteen twenty four the beginning of the election year and she holds a party for Andrew Jackson. Jason, and they have a po- a poem in the national Republican that ends bells and matrons, maids and Madame's all are gone. Mrs alums. The refrain. In fact, that is this is the party of the age, then Lewis Adams held it. Everybody wanted to be there. And it was a very Kenny because it turned what was going to be. It was Andrew Jackson was the anniversary of the battle of New Orleans, basically celebration of Andrew Jackson, and it turned the Jacksonville typical Jackson monthly Adam's fall at a critical moment and. In in the campaign, and it's also important because. The other thing is understand is that the people do not use the president yet and in eighteen twenty four. In fact, the house of representatives chose the president which meant that those relationships are critically important and one of the ways in which you could call these kinds of relationships. By doing things like that. Detail because Louisa Adams is running a household, George and John have a competition over a cousin Mary Helen oil roles. Relative cousin. George and John are growing up with relationships with their mother that that are not transparent. There's a difficulty here. And at first appears in this part of the storytelling because while Louisa is working to build up. John Quincy to be the president a man who won't ask for the president presidency. Expects to be rewarded. She's also dealing with sons who need her does. She at this point believe that she is disappointed her, son, George and John. Disappointed. Difficult words, she had very close relationship with them at this point. She was very very close to them. She would later come to regret having not been there when they were young. And she. At this point. You know, she was worried about them, right? Because she's she sends that they had. Secrets and they she sounds that. There were things that she was not off. They're off to Harvard and they're outside of her reach. When we come back the presidency. The book is Louisa.

John Quincy Louisa Andrew Jackson president John Louisa Adams Louisa oh Louisa Thomas John Calhoun Rachel Clark Luisa Louise Lewis Adams Harvard George Florida Henry clay William Crawford Washington Hugh
"rachel clark" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Only success of the Monroe administration. The only thing that comes to anything, and we'll be remembered is foreign policy by the State Department. And he's right. We have the Monroe doctrine, we don't know Monroe for anything else. He's absolutely right. However at this point around him everywhere, and in Louise's home in Washington in every home, they visit at the White House, certainly in all the debates is slavery. And there is no one version of Louisa Adams is opinion of slavery. So I wanna start right here at the moment of the Missouri compromise eighteen twenty what is your opinion? Louisa will you know before? Then she never talks about it never mentioned that an chocolates. He doesn't really they just accept. You know? And she does start talking about it. She does think about it. She goes, the basic congress. She asks her father in law was he thinks you know, she starts. She's also scare you know, she thinks will lead to civil war, and she seems something of war and her family, the southern family, and she's very as we've discussed buried her father. So guess she she never goes far enough. Do they keep do they keep slave? So she keeps us live. That's unclear they certainly job with you never owned a slave that much. I think we can we can know the twenty cents. This hasn't played living in the household. And it's likely that it was it's I shouldn't say likely, but there's a very good chance that it was her nieces. Who was living with that? This is Rachel Clark. The the young woman. Rachel Clark, right? And the Clark family later becomes troubled and they ask for John Quincy for help. And he doesn't give it. So what we have here is a mixed picture of Louisa, John Quincy's opinion of slavery at this moment. John Quincy competition, we know we know the opinion, and you know, John Quincy thinks it's an abomination. But it's also, you know, he makes compromises in daily life part of the compromise is to deal with the political dilemma the time and Louisa plunges right into it. Because she likes Andrew Jackson. Why Louisa oh, he's dashing charming? And also, she loves the fact that he drives Washington crazy, however for John Quincy, he is a political help mate because John Quincy wants to acquire Florida and Jackson's invasion of Florida and his depredations of. Florida helps John Quincy lot. So they at this point of their lives their working together. It. She thinks there's a change when John names put forward for the presidency understand something about this time, which which is really hard for us to understand. Now, you did not campaign for the president did not declare. You do not announce you do not give speeches. You did not even admit that.

John Quincy Louisa Louisa Adams Monroe Rachel Clark Monroe administration Louisa oh Washington Florida State Department Missouri White House president Andrew Jackson Louise congress
"rachel clark" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"rachel clark" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"With you never owned a slave that much. I think we can we can know the twenty cents census hasn't played living in the household and. It's likely that it was it's I shouldn't say likely, but there's a very good chance that it was her nieces. This is Rachel Clark, the young woman racial Clark, right and the Clark family later becomes troubled and they ask for John Quincy for help. And he doesn't give it. So what we have here is a mixed picture of Louisa and John Quincy opinion of slavery at this moment. John Quincy center competition. We know we know the opinion, and you know, John Quincy. The nation. But it's also, you know, she makes compromises in daily life part of the compromise is to deal with the political dilemma of the time and Louisa plunges right into it. Because she likes Andrew Jackson. Why Louisa oh, he's dashing charming? And also, she loves the fact that he drives Washington crazy, however for John Quincy, he is a political help mate because John Quincy wants to acquire Florida and Jackson's invasion of Florida and his depredations of Florida helps John Quincy a lot. So they have at this point of their lives their working together. She thinks there's a change when John names put forward for the presidency. Your dinner me up this time, which which is really hard for us to understand. Now, you did not campaign for the president did not declare. You do not know you did not give speeches did not even admit you're running for president. So he was kind of waiting to not and you participated new cultivating relationships, but it sounds like Andrew Jackson was like I'm going to run for president. But his name was put forth and. She was John Quincy service talking with like, well, maybe make good. There are other competent competitor competitors. At this time. There's William Crawford of Treasury Secretary. This John Calhoun, certainly a Senator who has prominent and rising. And then there's Henry clay speaker of the house I understand Louise's surrounded by this tension. These are all very famous names prosperous names of the of the time, they were powerful men Luisa sees them. However as stepping stones for her John Quincy a detail here. She's raising her children while this is all spinning around her. And she's keeping a household, and they have a great big party. And Louisa Thomas, you deserve an invitation to this party. It is January of eighteen twenty three. I believe I believe it's eighteen twenty three or maybe it's eighteen twenty four when she twenty four eighteen twenty four the beginning of the election year, and she holds a party for Andrew Jackson, and they have a pulse. A poem in the national Republican that ends bells and matrons, maids and Madame's all are gone, MRs alums. So the refrain in fact that is this is the party of the age then Louisa Adams held everybody wanted to be there. And it was a very Kenny because it turned what was going to be. It was Andrew Jackson was the anniversary of the battle of New Orleans is basically a celebration of Andrew Jackson and it turned the Jacksonville Jacksonville. They Adam's fall at a critical moment and. In the campaign, and it's also important because. Understand is that the people do not choose the president yet in eighteen twenty four. In fact, the house of representatives chose the president which meant that those relationships are critically important and one of the ways in which you could call eight these kinds of relationships. Doing things like that. I detail because Louisa Adams is running a household, George and John have a competition over a cousin Mary Helen roles. Relative Khasan geor-, George and John are growing up with relationships with their mother that that are not transparent. There's a difficulty here. And at first appears in this part of the storytelling because while Louisa is working to build up. John Quincy to be the president a man who won't ask for the president presidency. Expects to be rewarded. She's also dealing with sons who need her does. She at this point believe that she is disappointed her, son, George and John. Disappointed. Difficult words ship very close relationship with them at this point. She was very very quick. Then she would later come to regret having not been there when they were young. And she. At this point. You.

John Quincy Andrew Jackson Louisa president Louisa Adams John John Calhoun Louisa Thomas Louisa oh Rachel Clark Florida William Crawford Henry clay George Luisa Louise Kenny Madame MRs