18 Burst results for "Rachel Bachman"

"rachel bachman" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:17 min | 4 months ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on WTVN

"Off community to play the twenty twenty season the NFL's chief medical officer says he doesn't think living in a type of bubble is either practical or appropriate football is the country's most popular sport and it also faces the most complexities for return to action more from this weekend's Jennifer Katanga football players are some of the best athletes in the world they also could face outside risk as they return to the field amid this pandemic Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street journal has the story Rachel why would football players face a disproportionate risk well there's a number of reasons of course is the nature of the sport itself it's very high contact high touch on the rosters are big so any potential outbreak could spread that you know very quickly two hundred player doesn't have more coaches in some cases and also in Epik high school and part of the college and pro level in particular there's a high percentage of African American players about half of the players and major college football are African American and more than half the apple players and African Americans as we know are at higher risk of complications if they get quoted nineteen but they actually are impacted so there's a number sort of layering risks that make football particularly problematic during this pandemic retail what are some of the early guidelines that the NFL has put in place to protect players well certainly they want to make sure that hygiene is in place and you know follow all through the regular stuff but all of us are they are going to undergo daily Scripps screenings and have prepackaged meals instead of buffets which are common with a lot of teams so that you know those are some of the preliminary stuff but it's likely that they'll be a lot more involved as in approaches we're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street journal about football maybe coming back Rachel on the NFL and collegiate level obviously these team spends an enormous amount of time together what about eating in locker rooms and weight rooms how does that all pose different kinds of problems yeah I I think you know generally speaking outdoor activities are safer than indoor activities scientists are saying so actually playing football outdoors might be slightly less risky especially if you're you know a receiver somebody's playing apart from other players than for instance being in a crowded meeting room and you know in in college football it's very common for the entire team to beat it out of Korea is sitting you know elbow to elbow and we're not going to be that this even if we do we're gonna see a lot more infections so you know colleges are gonna have to either hold meetings outside or hold meetings and larger auditorium so players can space out I mean they're just gonna have to make a lot of accommodations to try to minimize inspections as much as possible are there any protocols in place for shutting down the season shutting down certain players shutting down for a certain amount of time depending on positive tests well it's too early to tell friends with me a follow on it in college football you know there's an interesting dynamic and that the NCAA really is not it is not weighing in on sure policing how schools handle the corona virus particles and so I don't think you'll see from NCAA commands to shut down the few that possible really is ruled that the conference level and so you might see conference commissioners say Hey we're seeing too many infections but more likely this is going to be out of school by school basis what you know how genes behave what happened up there a lot of positive tests and and certainly opponents eventually got away and if if she can get to the scene then and for instance there are a lot of cases recently reported on an opposing team it's possible that that team you know it's going to face won't want to play it so there are all kinds of questions that the infection rate this weekend's Jennifer to sync it with Wall Street journal sports reporter Rachel Bachman thirty minutes.

NFL medical officer football
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:41 min | 4 months ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The twenty twenty season the NFL's chief medical officer says he doesn't think living in a type of bubble is either practical or appropriate football is the country's most popular sport and it also faces the most complexities for return to action more from this weekend's Jennifer Katanga football players are some of the best athletes in the world they also could face outside risk as they return to the field amid this pandemic Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street journal has the story Rachel why would football players face a disproportionate risk well there's a number of reasons of course there's the nature of the sport itself it's very high contact high touch on the raptors are big so any potential outbreak could spread that you know very quickly two hundred player seven thousand four coaches in some cases and also in the epic high school I'm sorry at the college and pro level in particular there's a high percentage of African American players about half of the players and major college football are African American and more than half the apple players sh and African Americans as we know are at higher risk of complications if they get a good thank you if they actually are impacted so there's a number sort of layering risks that makes football particularly problematic during this pandemic retail what are some of the early guidelines that the NFL has put in place to protect players well certainly they want to make sure that hygiene is in place and you know follow all the regular stuff but all of us are they are going to undergo daily screech cleanings and have prepackaged meals instead of buffets which are common with a lot of teams so that you know those are some of the preliminary stuff but it's likely that they'll be a lot more involved as if you can approach it we're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street journal about football maybe coming back Rachel on the NFL and collegiate level obviously these team spends an enormous amount of time together what about eating in locker rooms and weight rooms how does that all pose different kinds of problems yeah I I think you know generally speaking outdoor activities are safer than indoor activities scientists are saying though actually playing football outdoors might be slightly less risky especially if you're a receiver somebody's playing apart from other players than print being in a crowded meeting room and you know in in college football it's very common for the entire team to beat it out of Korea and be sitting you know elbow to elbow and we're not going to be that this even if we do we're going to be a lot more infections so you know colleges are gonna have to either hold meetings outside or hold meetings that larger auditorium so players can space out I mean they're just gonna have to make a lot of accommodations to try to minimize inspections as much as possible are there any protocols in place for shutting down the season shutting down certain players shutting down for a certain amount of time depending on positive tests well it's too early to tell friends with me a follow on it in college football you know there's an interesting dynamic and that the NCAA really is not it is not weighing in on sure policing how schools handle the corona virus particles and so I don't think you'll see from NCAA I commands to shut down the season college football really is ruled that the conference level and so you might see conference commissioners say Hey we're seeing too many infections but more likely this is going to be out of school by school basis what you know how genes behave what happened up there a lot of positive tests and and certainly opponents eventually got away and if if he can get to the scene then and for instance there are a lot of cases recently reported on an opposing team it's possible that that team you know it's going to face won't want to play it so there are all kinds of questions that the infection rate this weekend's Jennifer to sync it with Wall Street journal sports reporter Rachel Bachman thirty minutes after the hour on this weekend a news radio time five thirty five time PGA tour winner Nick Watney has.

NFL medical officer
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Generate gate, revenues that equals or exceeds the men is important to their equal pay lawsuit. It's a story by Rachel bockman at the Wall Street Journal who's with us today from France covering the US women at the World Cup, Rachel set this up. US soccer, the US lockup automation, made in response to the pay equity lawsuits that US team was, hey, the reason why one reason why then than women's players are paid differently is because they have different revenue streams. I looked at the fight nations over the gutter Asians own records and discovered that over the last three years in total, the women have actually had more revenue from their games, mainly ticket revenue than the men's team, which is surprising. Of course. The women won the World Cup and twenty fifteen in that provided a boost and really vaulted them into parody with the men in recent years. So important to remember this is only one revenue stream. But the other I've made streams are a really not broken out by men and women. So it's very difficult to tell which team generates what and which team generates. Other amounts. So is that why it's not so simple as the women being able to come forward and say, listen, we, we pulled in more money from ticket revenue pass the same released. We win the men don't do anything, right? It's still complicated on date. Receipts are only one measure of revenue on US. Soccer also sells broadcast rights, the US men's and women's games, but also sponsorships to companies like, Nike and Budweiser. But it sounds those in bundles. And so when Mickey for instance is sponsoring. Yeah. Soccer, it's not sponsoring just the men or the women sponsoring the whole federation, you know, Nike might decide to use women more often than its ads for instance, they in a one Cup here and that we pick just maybe the women carry more value, you know, men qualified for the twenty eighteen World Cup. Maybe Nike would've been more interested in using the men players in their advertisements. So, so it does get fairly complicated for speaking with Rachel Bachman Wall Street Journal, sportswriter, she's with us from France. She's covering the World Cup. Her piece is called US women's soccer games out earned men's games. I know for your story US soccer declined to comment, but what could your number crunching here? Mean for that equal pay lawsuit that the women's national team has filed. Certainly. They would argue, hey we've, we've improved dramatically the menus to out earn us at the gate significantly. We really caught up. He's Rachel Rachel Bachman Wall Street Journal reporter with us today from France. Thirty minutes after the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

US Rachel Rachel Bachman soccer Wall Street Journal Nike Rachel bockman Rachel Bachman France reporter America sportswriter Thirty minutes three years one Cup
"rachel bachman" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"And they didn't even wanna talk to you. Right. Yes. A few wouldn't talk. And I certainly understand that I think some of them maybe just one of a boy at the fan backlash that I mentioned the ones this speak to me. You know, they had some really interesting insights, and one of the ones that I really hadn't heard elsewhere is Nick Sabin choice of holder. Now, the person who who takes the stop and and actually holds the ball for the kick Sabin really prefers quarterbacks to do this to add this to their duties, but a few cases, I talked to you said that may not be the best idea because in practice quarterbacks really have to spend most of the time, of course, running. Off and honing them protecting them. So they don't have much time to spend practicing holding ticker and as a result. These players said they think that some of these kickers might be uncomfortable. Once again in the game or does not have the rapport, and you know, the level of ease that you might have if you spent most of your practice time with the same holder and to break that down a little further. It's not just a quarterback. But the starting quarterback that makes a huge difference. Yeah. Tight. Title started out you held some last. He said he helps them for about half of the season. He's not doing most of the whole now. But a backup quarterback is. But even the backup quarterbacks spend most of their time in practice on the offense. They're still not spending their time with the kicker is practicing holds most of the time. And so certainly it was kind of an extreme situation. When you start the season with a Heisman Trophy candidate quarterback holding on kicks an extra point. But they still have a situation where the holder really doesn't spend most of his practice time with the kicker. This weekend's Jennifer Kushinka with Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman, Alabama and Clemson Monday night, eight o'clock on ESPN thirty minutes after the hour on this weekend. I use Twitter information continues to be Frank. We bring information together stuff. Get updates in one place by connecting and linking clear understanding of the facts on NewsRadio nine twenty four seven FM..

Nick Sabin Frank Wall Street Journal Rachel Bachman Jennifer Kushinka Clemson ESPN reporter Alabama thirty minutes
"rachel bachman" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Alabama has won five national championships in the past nine seasons. They face Clemson in the national championship game Monday night in pursuit of another title, the crimson tide are unbeaten just landed. The nation's top recruiting class and have one eighty eight percent of its games in twelve years under head coach Nick Sabin. What's the weak spot? Here's this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka as Alabama gears up to try to win it six national football title in ten years. It may have only one flaw kickers who are below average Rachel Bachman or the Wall Street Journal has delved into this mystery and has more Rachel with a crimson tide consistently head and shoulders above everyone else in the world of college football. Why are they having any kicking woes? Well, that's a great question. Because you know, they have excellent players that every other position. But one of the issues is that it's difficult to develop kickers everywhere in college football there. You know, there are limits to the number of quotas. You can have some most teams don't have. A kicking coach per se, of course as roster limits. So you can't have five on the roster suddenly to to have backups ready. If one isn't up to now, and then there are some things that are unique to Alabama that I found in my research, Irby's unusual Alabama that I think are having an effect as well. Just coach Nick Sabin. Not emphasize kickers. Oh, I think he does. I think this issue is probably driving him crazy over his twelve year stint at at Alabama. But it's a it's a very difficult thing. You know, they're they're relatively few kickers in highschool. So the talent pool is smaller to begin with and one of the things I found really is unusual Alabama is because they're so excellent at everything else. A lot of the fan frustration really concentrates on this position. So when kicker messes up, which is not terribly unusual, Alabama, the backlash tends to be really extreme at Alabama particular. And of course, they're their fans are legion. And are, you know, famous for their devotion in general? And so when something is bothering them, they definitely make it known in some cases through no issuing threats, or you know, really nasty messages on social media when someone for instance, has to kick Rachel is that really unique to Alabama. People are getting so nasty on social media. Well, that's a great question. It's not Bama that. There is backlash on those terrible behavior on social media. I do think that it's it's possibly at a different level. Bama because there really is very little other place to concentrate fans frustration as I said, you know, they defeated this year. They've won five national titles in nine years. They really don't mess up in many other areas. And so this is the one bugaboo that has really dogged them, and and tickers have made mistakes and very high profile games. Which also I think sort of like exacerbates the fan reaction. We're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal, Rachel, I know you reached out to some of those kickers who have messed up in the past..

Alabama Rachel Bachman Nick Sabin Wall Street Journal football Clemson Bama Jennifer Kushinka Irby one eighty eight percent twelve years twelve year nine years ten years
"rachel bachman" Discussed on WWL

WWL

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on WWL

"Alabama is because they're so excellent that everything else a lot of the fan frustration really concentrates on this position. So when kicker messes up, which is not terribly unusual, Alabama, the backlash tends to be really extreme at Alabama particular. And of course, they're their fans are legion. And are, you know, famous for their devotion in general? And so when something is bothering them, they'd definitely make it known in some cases through no issuing threats, or you know, really nasty messages on social media when someone Franson pessimistic kick, the Rachel is that really unique to Alabama people are getting so nasty on social media. Well, that's a great question. It's not Bama that. There is backlash on this terrible behavior on social media. I do think that it's it's possibly at a different level at all Bama because there really is very little other. Place to concentrate stands frustration as I said, you know, they are defeated this year. They've won five national titles in nine years. They really don't mess up in many other areas. And so this is the one bugaboo that has really dogged them, and and tickers have made mistakes and very high profile games. Which also I think sort of like exacerbates the the fan reaction. We're speaking with Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal, Rachel, I know you reached out to some of those kickers who have messed up in the past. And they didn't even wanna talk to you. Right. Yes. If you wouldn't talk, and I certainly understand that I think some of them maybe just want to avoid the fan backlash that I mentioned the ones did speak to me. You know, they had some really interesting insights, and one of the ones that I really hadn't heard elsewhere is Nick Sabin choice of holder. Now, the person who takes the sap in and actually holds the ball for the kick Sabin really prefers quarterbacks to do this to add this to their duties, but a few. Because I talk to you said that may not be the best idea because in practice quarterbacks really have to spend most of the time, of course, running the offense. Flirting plays honing them perfecting them. So they don't have much time to spend practicing holding ticker and as a result. These players said they think that somebody's kickers might be uncomfortable. Once again in the game or does not have the report, and you know, the level of ease that you might have if you spent most of your practice time with the same colder and to break that down a little further. It's not just a quarterback. But the starting quarterback that makes a huge difference. Yeah. To type started out you held some lasts. He said that he helps them for about half of the season. He's not doing most of the whole now. But a backup quarterback is. But even the backup quarterbacks spend most of their time in practice on the offense. They're still not spending time with the kicker is practicing holds. Most of the time. And so certainly it was kind of an extreme situation. When you start the season with a Heisman Trophy candidate quarterback holding on kicks in extra points. But they still have a situation where the holder really doesn't spend most of his practice time with the kicker. This weekend's Jennifer Kushinka with Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman, Alabama and Clemson Monday night, eight o'clock on ESPN thirty minutes after the hour on this weekend. Everyone. You. Let's stop what we're.

Rachel Bachman Alabama Wall Street Journal Nick Sabin Bama Jennifer Kushinka Clemson ESPN reporter thirty minutes nine years
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"College sports newest need psychologists are you referenced Southern Cal having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think. Okay. You've got one on staff. Does that mean that there are accessible helpful beneficial? Yeah. Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help. And to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma did something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the athletic department that was close to the trainers office athletic trainers office, re where people go to get their ankles taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor. They could just walk down the hall like they were going to get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of the regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your story who I wind up getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her. And she's the one is sort of said, let's let's do something. Right. Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues, and and you know, really stressful things on life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so. Difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with just these issues mung others. And so he just athletes found her and started to to visit with her weekly. And you know, got the help he needed. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend..

Rachel Bachman Indiana University Wall Street Journal Indiana Oklahoma reporter twenty minutes twenty years
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"That's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help. And to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma. Does something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the athletic department. That was close to the trainers trainers officer where people go to get their ankles taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor. Just walk down the hall like they were going to get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. Yeah. You referenced the one student athlete. In your story who I wind up getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her, and she's the one who sort of said, let's let's do something. Right. Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues. And and, you know, really stressful things go on his life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said, the text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with Justice issues monitors and so he athletes found her and started to to visit with her weekly and got the help you need it. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour. On this weekend. I can't believe that we're playing four.

Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel Bachman Indiana University university of Oklahoma Indiana officer reporter twenty minutes
"rachel bachman" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel, what are you hearing as we know a lot of things in college departments have become sort of required like, you know, fancy weight rooms and nutrition programs things like that. And increasingly one of the things that's become really compulsory for college. Athletic departments is in house, psychological services, and their number of reasons for this mainly because as as some people know nationwide more college students generally have issues like depression, anxiety, and that certainly is is true for college athletes. There's well have the problems always been there and. Gone unaddressed. Or are we? Suddenly seeing new health concerns here that that's a good question. I think it's a combination of things I think that the stigma is decreasing to ask him for help. So there are more college students and college athletes asking for for help with a variety of mental health issues. But also, I you know, and the prices are debated. I think that there are more problems. You know, it's a it's a fairly stressful world, we live in there some discussion about other contributing factors. But in addition to that, college athletes, of course, are dealing with the stresses of college while also under the spotlight of in some cases, you know, a large national TV audience. And so that can certainly weigh more heavily both in dealing with the issues from day to day and also in seeking help to them are there some schools that appear to be out in front on this. Yeah. Well, university of southern California has had a psychologist on staff for twenty years and the staff is now several members and she said that about half of US's athletes on a regular basis, or at least in a given year have seen a psychologist one on one and that's for a range of issues. Sometimes it's it's sports performance. You know, maybe they have some anxiety or some feelings during a game are contests that they want some help dealing with and other cases, it's it's just dealing with the stresses of being an athlete or or just, you know, stresses of life. And yet other cases, you know, there are some student athletes. Just like there are college students with serious mental health issues suicidal thoughts things like that. And and certainly those address immediately. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal sports reporter, racial Bachman. Her piece is called college sports newest need psychologists are so you referenced US Southern Cal. Having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think, okay? You've got one on staff. Does that mean that are accessible helpful vita beneficial? Yeah, I think that's that's another battle that. You're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help and to to come and see psychologists, you never see a Oklahoma. Did something interesting. Just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the department that was close to the trainers trainers office, re where people go to get their ankle taped things like that. And the reason they did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going. You know, maybe to another building to see to see a counselor. Just walked down the hall like they were going to get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of a regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your story who I want up getting help sort of indirectly indirectly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express his feeling. So he's just texting her. And she's the one is sort of said, let's let's do something right? Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues. And and, you know, really stressful things go on his life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he initially confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult to voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. A couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with just issues among others. And so he this athletes found her and started to to visit with her weekly. And you know, got the help he needed. Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend..

Rachel Bachman Wall Street Journal reporter US university of southern Califor Indiana Oklahoma Indiana University twenty years twenty minutes
College Football Fans Fret Over Tax Deductions

WSJ What's News

03:43 min | 2 years ago

College Football Fans Fret Over Tax Deductions

"College. Football fans are struggling with a change in the nation's tax code that. No longer allows them to write off the bulk of their season ticket costs that deduction was repealed with the nation's tax overhaul. Joining us now in our studio to explain is Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel, can you explain how the old right off worked and how it's changed this year? Yes, we'll staple of college athletic departments. For decades have been premium seats at prime sporting events that require a mandatory seat donation, and these donations were eighty percent deductible, which of course, made them more attractive to the buyers last year's tax law. Repealed that deduction and so now schools have to decide how they're going to handle those tickets and fans have to decide if they're going to pony up the full amount with no deduction, why did the federal government seek this change? That's a great question. The short answer is I don't know. I think there's been some discussion about whether this is a sort of a boondoggle, you know, that that it's a. Tax break that isn't necessary and might be a little excessive, and you found out that this is playing out differently depending on the college we're looking at and they're also seems to be some confusion about the write offs are colleges pushing the IRS for more clarification on the change. They absolutely want. More information. It is clear from the law that the seat donations the direct requirement to donate money to in order to secure certain premium seats that is not tax deductible anymore, and that's settled. But what's not settled is what happens with larger donations that also might help you get better seats at the stadium. So for example, if I'm a big donor, and I want to donate to expand the football stadium or to rebuild the locker room say one hundred thousand dollars if I donate that money. I might also get priority points that would help me lift in the fan pecking order and one day get the right to move into better seats in the stadium. What schools don't know is whether those donations can also be tax deductible. Under the new law. So how much of a financial hitter they reporting how much do these specific types of donations make up for colleges will they can make up tens of millions of dollars a year. They're they're really an integral part of of the annual fundraising that all of the college athletic departments. Do certainly the prominent ones and it varies greatly from from place to place from what I can tell most fans are just going to eat the cost, and you know, it for for a lot it won't be very big. For instance, a season ticket often costs maybe four or five hundred dollars a fan might pay an additional five hundred dollars to secure a priority seat. So, you know, if you if you do the math, it might only increase that person's costs by a couple of hundred dollars and for most loyal fans. That's just not gonna make the difference. And you spoke to fans and colleges. How are they coping while they await further clarification of this nervously, a number of schools really didn't wanna talk to us. I think that's because they're not entirely. Sure what the IRS is going to say. And they also don't want to scare off their fans and donors. They don't want to discourage any type of giving, of course, some schools just are simply proceeding businesses usual and are just hoping that fans will keep coming. Rachel. Did you talk to anybody who knew this was coming? And were it was able to get ahead of the law before the change will. Yes, this was actually a big fear of a lot of schools. And so many of them told donors, you know, you can pay ahead sometimes several years ahead to take the deduction now and really delay the decision about whether you're gonna reappear season tickets into the future and many people did just that. That's Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Joining us in our studio. Thank you so much Rachel. Thank you.

Rachel Bachman Wall Street Journal Reporter Football IRS Federal Government Five Hundred Dollars One Hundred Thousand Dollars Hundred Dollars Eighty Percent One Day
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. Rachel explain well, as we know a lot of things in college athletic departments have become sort of required like, you know, fancy weight rooms and nutrition programs things like that. And increasingly one of the things that's become really compulsory for college. Athletic departments is in house, psychological services, and their number of reasons for this mainly because as as some people know nationwide more college students generally have issues like depression and anxiety, and that certainly is true for college athletes as well. Have the problems always been there and gone unaddressed? Or are we? Suddenly seeing new health concerns here that that's a good question. I think it's a combination of things I think that the stigma is decreasing to asking for help. So there are more college students and college athletes asking for for help with a variety of mental health issues. But also, I you know, and the causes are debated. I think that there are more problems. You know, it's a it's a fairly stressful world, we live in there some discussion about other contributing factors. But an addition to that college athletes, of course, are dealing with the stresses of college while also under the spotlight of in some cases, you know, a large national TV audience. And so that can certainly weigh more heavily both in dealing with the issues from day to day and also in seeking help for them. Are there are some schools that appear to be out in front on this? Yeah. Well, university of southern California has had a psychologist on staff for twenty years and the staff is now several members and she said that about half of US's athletes on a regular basis, or at least in a given year have seen a psychologist one at one and that's for a range of of issues. Sometimes it's it's sports performance. You know, maybe they have some anxiety or some feelings during a game are contests that they want some help dealing with and other cases, it's dealing with the stresses of being an athlete or or just, you know, stresses of life. And yet other cases, you know, there are some student athletes. Just like there are college students with serious mental health issues suicidal thoughts things like that. And and certainly those apartments wanna address immediately. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal sports reporter, Rachel Bachman. Her piece is called college sports newest need psychologists are you referenced Southern Cal having one on staff or twenty years, which made me think. Okay. You've got one on staff. Does that mean that they're accessible helpful beneficial? Yeah. I think that's that's another battle that you're talking about in terms of getting athletes to ask for help and to to come and see psychologists university of Oklahoma did something interesting just recently. They added another office for their department of psychology within the department that was close to the trainers trainers. Where people go to get their ankle taped things like that. And the reason they did. Did that is so that athletes wouldn't feel like they were standing out by going? You know, maybe another building to see to see a counselor. Could just walk down the hall like they were gonna get their ankles taped. But but go into another room and see a counselor instead of you know, seeking kind of a regular physical medical treatment. So there are things that some schools are doing to to make it easier for athletes to to ask for help. And to to see a counselor regularly without being conspicuous. You referenced the one student athlete in your story who I want up getting help sort of indirectly and then directly, right? He was texting his his friend or his girlfriend who was sitting like right next to him on the couch, and he couldn't express this feeling. So he's just texting her, and she was the one who sort of said, let's do something right? Yeah. That's right. That was a former cross country runner at Indiana University who had a lot of injury issues. And and, you know, really stressful things go on as life and started to feel suicidal thoughts. And so he he confided in his girlfriend as you said via text message sitting next to her on the couch because it was so difficult. To voice those words, and she encouraged him to get professional help as it turned out, Indiana. This is a couple of years ago had just hired a psychologist within the athletic department to deal with just issues. It's Rachel Wall Street Journal reporter, Rachel Bachman. It is twelve minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's.

Rachel Bachman reporter Wall Street Journal Rachel Wall Street Journal Rachel depression university of southern Califor Indiana US Indiana University Oklahoma America twenty years twelve minutes
"rachel bachman" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"If someone were to ask you for three words to sum up your reputation what would you say i didn't see that question coming says rachel bachman and this is the question that she asked the audience when she gave tedtalk this is a serious question yeah yeah rachel writes about how our reputations are kind of currency i think they would say loyal committed and passionate those are great words that's your reputation that that's what i'd like people to think yes and what people think of you drives what rachel and others call the trust economy people call it the sharing economy they call it the clubs economy clarity consumption whatever you call it trust is the social glue i mean think about it we exchange money without spanks you see things like lending club funding circle transfer wise weeks rides from strangers whether it's lift cycle uber and ride sharing we stay in other people's homes people we've never met from couch surfing to abby all the way to the high end of one day which is i think properties now ever a million dollars and all of those services run on trust here's how rachel describe it in her ted talk now what's happening here is people realizing the power of tech.

rachel bachman tedtalk funding circle million dollars one day
"rachel bachman" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"You know had to see the movie before they actually could skate to the music from the movie because the movie is actually older than them the movie as 17 years old at this point and there're like literally 17yearold skaters at the olympics so my colleague louise radnofsky and i ask one of the american skaters what he thought of the movie when he finally saw it in his review was to be able to make such a deeply emotional story out of the very shallow premise was amazing how it was quite the review i will say i i would subscribe to like a movie blog if he decided to start one let us talk about the notion that the united states is having a lousy olympics berries for luga washington post wrote that rachel bachman your wall street journal colleague band did a a piece on it um the us as of tuesday morning eastern time has twelve medals that sixth in the table behind norway with twenty nine germany with 23 candida nineteen netherlands fourteen and france has thirteen on your pain of fivethirtyeight crunch the numbers as their want to do there um back a few days ago in the us at nine medals and based on historical trends about how often on the united states wins in particular sports they would have expected of 18 and the us at 28 thirty seven twenty five and thirty four medals for the last four olympics justin i'm going to start with you you're not you're not necessarily known for being a guy who loves the numbers i want to talk to you about the emotions does it feel to you like the us is having a lousy olympics there have been certain events where you expected the us to do better that they have and and i think it's part of the feeling that the us is doing a bad job is a reaction to that noone expected mckay chiffrent become in fourth in the slalom it's her best event one expected nathan chen to have two crummy short program.

olympics louise radnofsky united states washington post rachel bachman norway candida nathan chen wall street journal germany france mckay 17 years
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Can i heard it and things like printing and and sort of explosive support so it it quite muddled surprisingly so um you know some people say they they don't carry feel good traps and down maybe to help them stand up trader or move you've easier and um if that's the case then then great we're speaking with wall street journal reporter rachel bachman her piece is called stretching is the hot new workout what are people actually having stretched is the mostly legs it could be almost anything i mean any you know through mud hold joint tendon um anything that can payton up you can you can pretty much have stretched might i spoke at one man who run marathon and he has his hamstring stretched among other things and he really feel strongly bad having trapping done once a week addi studio in benaco quanye has helped him um prevent a recurring hamstring injury and um you know who knows it it it it is possible that helped him and um certainly there is something to the placebo fact if you really really leave something work it can actually help you feel better sometime and like i say sometimes about this stuff i mean soul what if it's psychological review leggett good yeah that that that a third of the day kind of can under a more interesting thing about a lot of things that people do have cleaved there are their number thing that um that there isn't a ton of evidence for but people till whereby it because they feel like it helped them so i would for a lot of people i would put tracking a mess category makes racial wall street journal reporter rachel.

rachel bachman benaco quanye wall street journal reporter payton leggett
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Workout and the standalone studios where you can receive a oneonone coaching service and if you wonder what that looks like it could be if you think about it nba game or maybe a baseball game where trainer is cutting out on the quarter on a field it kinda looked like bad you know someone in helping attraction turned how the services are becoming very popular what's it do for you i say athletically or medically well that's a great question i wrote in a story expert you really do not agree on what trekking does for you to there is some evidence that it can certainly help you make it make him a flexible but then the question is to really applicable to you really need to be um there's not much evidence that it help enhanced performance in fact there is some evidence that it can i heard it and things like printing and enter the support so it it quite muddled surprisingly fto um you know some people say they they don't care it kills good to trap and down maybe it helps them stand up trader or move easier and if that's the case then then great we're speaking with wall street journal reporter rachel bachman her piece is called stretching is the hot new workout what are people actually having stretched is the mostly legs it could be almost anything i mean any hold joint tendon anything that can payton up you can you can pretty much have threat might i spoke at one man who run marathon and he has his hamstring stretched among other things and he really we feel strongly that having stretching done once a week at a studio in benaco quanye helped him um prevent a recurring hamstring injury and um you know who knows it it it it is possible that that helped him and um certainly there is something to the people fact if you really really leave something work it can actually help you feel better some time and like i say sometimes about this stuff i mean so what if it's psychological have if you like it good yeah that that that is sort of the um the neverending kind of can under a more interesting thing about a lot of things that people do that the queen there are a number of things that that there isn't a ton of evidence for but people dole whereby it because they feel like it.

rachel bachman the queen nba baseball wall street journal reporter payton benaco quanye
"rachel bachman" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Exercisers everything from smoother workout starts to better data in order to increase jim attendance more from wall street journal reporter rachel bachman rachel what's up at the gym poor one of the dilemma the jim is that generally kim don't really know what you do once you show up talked change but there really is no way to tell you quite up to our personal trainer class they want to have more information about what you're doing today can keep you coming back meet your needs to one the things that happened it probably the biggest news is that the apple watch out in the coming install is going to have a proper upgrade that will let people think they're apple watch to all of cardio equipment though you know by mo things like that most major brand and down that will people walk away with all their out in their work out data whereas now they're sort of a patchwork symptom on music smartphone appetito to line up put the right brand fell on koa out and about the dumb at generally but people don't like to to to end their the bellido punching and their weight and aid things like that is is really a much more food way to go if you happen to apple watch all right so what else is there for equal access rolling out a couple of interesting thing about the new yorkbased luxury health club although they have location dumb els or other country the world dare talking a cap pot four new members at a what we'll do intentionally stimulate text message conversation on someone smartphone cancer that with new members and the idea is to we have to have a virtual simulated human conversation be attacked with the cap and the the pot will get you to cut gold and and you know how it happened to the camera other reasons why you're going there and so on and had bought will actually prompt q appear not showing up at ask you how it can help and things like that and and they punted as for about a month at every location with new members and they knew members to opt into the the cat but are showing up forty percent more that no to opt out which is which is sort of interesting.

wall street journal reporter rachel bachman apple yorkbased forty percent
"rachel bachman" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on WLAC

"Exercisers everything from smoother workout starts to better data in order to increase jim attendance more from wall street journal reporter rachel bachman rachel what's up at the gym or whatever dilemma the kim in that generally kim don't really know what you do what you show up top strange but there really is no way to tell you find a personal trainer or cloud and they want to have more information about your what you're doing today can keep coming back me it needs to one of the things that happened it probably the biggest news that the apple watch out in the coming this paul it's going to happen thakur upgrade that will let people think they're apple watch to a whole new of cardio equipment so you know by cut both things like that most major brand and down that will let people walk away with all their um to work out data where now there's a patchwork of dumb munich smartphone apposite to our uh put the right brand the line though about equal dumb generally that people don't like to to to end their the track bellied i'll punching and their weight and aid things like that israeli out and a much more food way to go if you happen apple latin night so what else is there were equal doctors rolling out oak a couple of things that new york paid to luxury health club although they have location dumb eldorado the country the world dare cutting a key pot new members will do intentionally stimulate text message conversation on someone smartphone with new members any idea is to be too we have to have a virtual simulated human conversation be attack took the cap but and beat the the baht will get you to that gold and and how it happened the kim other reasons why you're going there and so on and the baht will actually promptly what could not showing up at ask you how it can help and things like that and and they could ensure about a mud at every location with new members and they knew member to opt into the jackpot are showing up twenty percent more that no to opt out which intuitu of interesting at the shortcuts out but it's very intriguing how are you have wall street journal reporter rachel bachman sure it's about exercise at are piece is called your jim's tech wants.

new york rachel bachman jim wall street journal reporter apple munich twenty percent
"rachel bachman" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"rachel bachman" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Exercisers everything from smoother workout starts to better data in order to increase jim attendance more from wall street journal reporter rachel bachman rachel what's up at the gym or whatever glenda's kim in dad generally kim don't really know what you do what you show up strange but there really is no way to tell you quite up her personal trainer cloud at they want cabinet more to about what you're doing to they can an keep you coming back me in need one of the things that probably the biggest nude got the apple watch out in the coming to nepal is going to have a thakur upgrade that will let people think they're apple watch to hold flew of cardio equipment co blake tried both think like that most major brand and down that will let people walk away with all the work out data where now there's a patchwork of dum mutuc smartphone apposite to our up put the right brand looked aligned it's about the dumb generally but people don't like to stand there the tried bellido patrick in their weight and aid things like that it is it is really a much more smooth way to go if you happen apple joaquim narisoa what else is there were equal rolling out a couple of interesting thing new york paved luxury help club although they have location the down around the country the world they're attempting a cap on new members and what do the centrally stimulate text message conversation on smartphone to that with new members and the idea is to do we have to have a book told me lated human conversation we attacked with the cia pot and the the pot will get you to cut gold and and you know how it happened on the camera other reasons why you're going there and so on and the baht will actually prop q appear not showing up at out you how it can help and things like that and and they planted unsure about a mud at every location new members and they knew new to opt in the jackpot are showing up twenty percent more that no to opt out which which sort of interesting it's a short tout but it's very intriguing wow future you have wall street journal reporter rachel bachman she writes about exercising her piece.

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