21 Burst results for "Rabia"

"rabia" Discussed on Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

06:27 min | 2 months ago

"rabia" Discussed on Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

"How do you divide your time because you wear a lot of different hats like is it loose or structured in that sense Yeah i mean look you know. People like look at tv. It looks like it's a lot of different things. it's all very linear. Though one thing led to another led to another. And i had to wrap up safe nation and working with us institute of peace and like just what working in the national security policy space because serial exploded and i realized that the time that serious go away and people are going to move on and either i had to take advantage of the momentum or i could lose momentum forever we would never get another shot to build on this momentum and so i decided to basically fold almost all my work and focus on one hundred hundred nonce case and that turned into undisclosed which brought many other defendants to us. You know now. That is my full time work. The innocence work for undisclosed is my fulltime work. And of course undisclosed has had a profound impact on his actually led to freedom for a number of people who've been featured on the show back to your work with the safe dacian collaborative which organizations do you think are doing the best work and how can people who are listening. Now get involved. you know. i'll say this. A lot has changed since safe nation Because the work of safe nation was to try to deal with the hands. We were being dealt at the time. Which was we went from. George bush to president obama who didn't want to approach these issues from a counter. Terror probably want to approach any of these issues from like okay. What's happening in the community. Are these vulnerable people all marginalize being entrapped. What's happening here. He wanted a more comprehensive approach. But i think so much has changed in that more people recognize where the problems actually are and we threw billions of dollars in this war on terror. That still isn't ending for me. I really think you know black lives matter as a movement however they are an organization has made the biggest impact and showing where law enforcement is getting things wrong organizations like that. They're the canaries in the coal. Mine like we have to listen to them about getting policing right because at the end of the day even like the safe nation stuff was about policing so you get policing right. I think the aclu has always been strong on that. There is some momentum towards police reform but de-fund reform. It's it's such a big problem. I think one of the biggest issues we have with policing is that we have turned policing into a profession that automatically draws a certain kind of people right like there's some kind of people who go to social work right. Some kind of people who become chefs personalities are drawn to certain professions and we have turned the professional policing into something that has violent and oppressive end. Rife with abuse and it draws personalities who are looking for those kinds of opportunities so we almost have to reimagine the entire professional policing and hope the right people then are drawn to it. I don't know if that's like a direct answer to your question. But i don't know if there's one particular organization i i i think the zone on great work. I think every state has shown. Aclu chapter it's always important to check in with them kind of usually. What they need is money but keep an eye on like the legislation are working on. The changes happen really locally for our younger listeners. Right who want to get involved to to make a difference people listening now they go. I wanna be her. You know. I want to have a life full of meaning and purpose. What would you say to someone riff on that. Look you know what i i. It working in national security policy in learning national security policy actually develops in dc. I can't even begin to tell you. How many rooms. I was in with people who are developing policy that impacted communities that. They didn't know anything about so. They would say i think we should do. Xyz about this problem. I i would say well. Have you talked to those communities. Do you know what the response was. No absolutely not. And this is a big problem. And i and i see something similar happening like in the social media space where law young people wanna do amazing work. They have very shallow knowledge of issues. They have almost zero experience on the ground. And i really urge people to build your expertise. You have to build a base of substantive work. I have a daughter. Might well this right now. She's doing her master's in cybersecurity and she said to me. I wanted to security policy. I said okay. That's great but i think you should. I figure out how it all works before you then want to go into develop policy rounded. That's one bit of advice. A second of advice. I say is pick one or two things a lot of times. People have hearts of advocate for minority. That's like you jason's me like you know. A lot of things hurt us impact. Keep us awake. You can't do it all and if you try to do a lot of things you're gonna do none of them. Well pick one or two things that you know that you can work on for years that you'll never get tired of 'cause it will take years and decades to make any change narrow your scope but Deepen your expertise on those issues. All i can really say is thank you for for doing what you're doing. I know that it's taken a great deal of courage. Have you may not looking at it that way but we who who see you from an outside perspective know that it's true and if there's anything else that you have left out i'm just going to leave the mic on for you to say whatever is left to be said while i'll also say that we are going to be going back into court for a case. The story is not over so please continue to follow in. My second book should come out sometime this year. It's about nothing that i've ever talked about before publicly It's a memoir food and family which has been like the existence for forty six years now. I hope you guys check that out. And i'm sure will resonate with a lot of people and that's it and jason. You're one of my heroes. Thanks for all you do and thanks for having me on. Thank you for listening to righteous convictions. I'd like to thank our production team. Conner hall jeff clybourn and kevin warning the music in this production with supplied by three time. Oscar nominated composer. J wral follow us on instagram at wrongful conviction on twitter at wrong conviction and on facebook at wrongful conviction podcast right. Convictions is a production of lot of good podcasts and associated with signal company number.

kevin jeff clybourn forty six years George bush second book twitter instagram billions of dollars facebook this year one hundred hundred nonce case obama J wral jason Oscar one bit two things one thing decades one
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 8 months ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
9 Dumb Financial Decisions Most People Make

The Money Guy Show

06:36 min | 9 months ago

9 Dumb Financial Decisions Most People Make

"Brian, I'm so excited about this show because we're going to basically do a deep dive into behavioral finance into behavioral economics because a lot of what we cover are like it's blocking and tackling it's XS and os when it comes to financial decision making. But a lot of what we do when we make financial decisions has more to do with the behavior than academic nature of and that's kind of what we're going to go through what I'm hoping everybody who watches doesn't treat this as a coping mechanism. Oh, that's why I'm like that is because it's baked into the recipe. No, this is supposed to. Be something where you learn to spot what's going on because this is baked into the recipe, but there is a way for you to kind of master move beyond and figure out how you can harness the power of some of these things that are just influences that can drive your your your actions and your behavior. Absolutely. So there's two books that kind of influence show and and a lot of ways bow claims he has not read this book, but I it because everytime I when I was doing the Chris Voss book, they'll never split the difference. He's an FBI guy who was a negotiator and Use a lot of these tactics. Here's the thing. So back in the day, we'll talk a lot about back in the day you and I shared inaudible account well, frankly tightwad and you had good taste and books. This was in your but I never read this. I'm not I'm not familiar 'cause it always listening to it. I was like. That son of a gun, bow this is I can totally see when he's tried to use this on me but it just to tell you what Chris explains is that the FBI reconized after Waco Texas you know did not go well, they need to throw the book out on how they were handling hostage negotiations and other things like that. He goes into all the different behavioral components and here's what. was. What I am saying is that while our decisions may be largely irrational that doesn't mean there aren't consistent patterns, principles and rules behind how we act and once you know these mental patterns, you start to see ways to influence them. So I think the takeaway there is that human beings always act in a rational manner. We're not completely rational beings that this is a black decision this decision, this is the right decision. This is the wrong decision that's not the way that we always behave even though it seems like perhaps that. Should be the way we behave in. Syria, we should be rational functioning beings, but it just doesn't work that way and that led to you know there's the misbehaving book by Richard Thaler, which is the making of behavioral economics. Now, what's funny is if you go watch any of the interviews, Richards very quick to tell you hey I'm not the first person up with behavioral, economics actually Adam Smith, which anybody who follows me matter of fact we had a content meeting and I was because I had to give. Rabia. Whole educate low. Is huge to me I. Go last year I can remember my daughter. When she's doing her social studies when I found that they were studying. Adam Smith it made me so happy because Russia's the timing of when wealth of nations was published in the seventeen hundreds with the birth of America I don't think it's a coincidence. So there's a lot of things in in Adam Smith when he talks when he in a lot. of his writings including wealth of nations he does talk about overconfidence he does talk about loss aversion self control. So I thought it was cool that Richard gave them a shout out. But if you go deeper, Richard is going to give you examples of things that are happening. Everybody's life that are definitely influenced by behavioral economics and I think it's realistic that. We all think about money irrational even if we can be the most educated most well informed, we all approach it in somewhat of irrational manner. So. Let's jump into this I, want to set the stage for you guys. So you'll know I'm a big Disney Fan. Kind of missing going to the Disney parks because we were supposed to have done that in the spring we're going out to Disneyland and one of my favorite things when you're at Disney well I thought would be one of my favorite things a mirage. Was You get hungry and you're walking through the parking catch a whiff. Oh my gosh. That is the best smelling food that I could put my mouth and it's a Walt Disneyworld. Turkey like now. These things looked glorious. They're huge. They're scrumptious looking, but then you buy these things. And unfortunately to me, the taste is not match the smell because to me it was a very gristle field. Super Sodium filled I mean it was just not everything I thought the smell would give. But here's the thing when you pay twelve dollars and fifty cents for a Turkey leg. You eat that thing you you. You don't even if you're not enjoying it, you get it down because you got to recoup the cost of what you've dumped into that Turkey legs. So there is a behavioral finance concept that describes and so what we're GonNa do is win some stores reliable. Some examples for you guys today in the Chad if you're handle is live go and start throwing them out there. If you think you can guess watch behavioral finance concepts we're talking about thawed out there. So you just said you go to Disney you smell the Turkey leg us pay at twelve fifty, you start gnawing on it you get like three or four bytes in. Everything you thought it was, but you say, you know what I'm going to finish it. I'm going to keep eating this thing right? Isn't that what you say what I think is interest. If you do research as a whole thing about the disneyworld Turkey legs, there are bloggers who talked about you should share this with somebody. Now we're in a covert air now or that just seems ridiculous but I will tell you even pre covert I would no more wanNA share a Turkey leg. Been married twenty two years still not share. Yeah. Turkey legs. Back, in twenty eleven last time you and I went to Disney together. I don't remember US walking down shared a talked. So what is the personal finance concept that represents? A sunk cost fallacy. Here's the thing is. There's no reason if you've already dumped the money into this and you realize is just not as good as you thought, it was going to be you don't have to justify the action by continuing to consume it but guess what you will because somehow we feel like it's okay. It's the same thing if you went to a horrible concert or it's raining outside, you know in on the night of the concert, you know you, it's an ample theater. You still show up just because you've spent the money on the tickets,

Disney Richard Thaler Adam Smith FBI Chris Voss Turkey Brian Texas Syria America Russia
"rabia" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"rabia" Discussed on Asian Enough

A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

Asian Enough

05:42 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

"The story that works. You know I've had thousands of people over the years reach out. It's not just me not saying we read this book or we listen to this. We Watch this. And we didn't even realize some of the assumptions we held or the prejudices. We had about Muslims until we heard your story and was like Oh my God. You're just you're just like any of us and and you know it made it much more self aware I think storytelling is one of the most powerful aspects. Storytelling is what changes people's hearts and minds really. Nothing else works. What were some of the stories that I made you feel that like even growing up. You're always like a writer at heart. What were the stories that I took hold in you? Where did you get them? You know the stories growing up as an American Muslim when before nine eleven honestly a lot of people had no or maybe before the Iran hostage crisis. I'm trying to think of what international event made me realize that I'm a Muslim probably the first the first Gulf War. I remember the Gulf War. I was in middle school and the war began in the middle of the day and teacher came over to me and said hey tell your uncle Saddam Hussein to back off or something and I said who is it. Almost saying I'm not era. I don't even know what's happening and I was a kid. But you know a lot of the stories really just came from like my parents handing down stories like stories out of our religious traditions cultural tradition as an adult. I realize what's problematic with a lot of the stories? They're wonderful stories of very heroic stories but they also set up this false like idealism. That didn't allow us to feel like if you're a Muslim you can also have false. You can make mistakes. You can screw up because all the stories were told. Were about people who are just incredibly honorable. Did the most amazing things. And that's what you aspire to And that's what you're supposed to be What's an example? Gosh I mean one example is like my name so I'm named after medieval century like Muslim female saint one of the only Muslim female saints I best known I think she lived in the twelfth century. I don't even know Rubio other. We and you know the story I was told about her growing up. Was that you know she was incredibly right. Just and pious and she spent her days worshiping God in the evening she would go out and teach people and she had so much faith in God that she she just kind of stayed cloistered in this little space that she told people. Don't bring me any food. Because will deliver me. Sustenance and food would appear out of nowhere so for a little kid to be like okay I got like visas does incredible role model and And she says she was an amazing saint from what we know. But of course over the years you don't know what's been added to the tradition and it was just kind of this this really high expectation of piety and religious righteousness. That is really almost impossible to meet. Because you tell us a little bit about where you grew up your born in Pakistan and ended up in Maryland right. Yeah so I thought this was only like six or seven I was. I was under one when my parents came over here. Fundraising United States and my dad worked for the US Department of Agriculture. He was a veterinarian. And a lot of people don't know there's like this huge Boccassini veterinary like a whole gang of them in the US Department of Agriculture. They all came over in the seventies what we grew up in very small agricultural towns because of that. Because my dad had to work where you know where there was agricultural business oh Kansas Delaware Lancaster County Pennsylvania just very remote places where we were often the only people of color not just the only Muslim but really there were there. Were places where there were no other black people know. They're black families so very small town America. Then when I got about high school is when we kind of moved to a slightly bigger town with with diversity in it so but most of my formative years in adult life. I've grown up around the beltway. Northern Virginia or Maryland. And that's where I am. Now you've written on your blog that your parents know how to be quote critical of where we've been and where we are without throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Yeah I guess I just wanted to know how your parents raised you and how that shaped you my parents you know. They left boxes on one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred seventy s block. Assad never left them so as time moved on their idea of what's culturally appropriate for us was forever one thousand nine hundred seventy something bucks on. Meaning you know my dad would be like. Why don't you have your hair? Your hair should be in two braids and it should be well oiled and dress a certain way and you should at home. We always wore a boxing enclosing home. You know we only eight bucks any food at home but the funny thing is we would visit Baucus on like in the eighty s and ninety s people over there would be like all the women have their care cut and permed and look really cute and they'd be like what is wrong with you people. Why do you look like like? You're from a blast from the past. But you know my my parents are. My Dad is a very spiritual person. He's not like a a religious person. Like ritualistic my mom is much more religious. My mom raised us with some really strong values. And look the one thing that we heard and over and over again is the whole purpose of your life is how you're going to serve other people like what are you. GonNa do with all the education. The time the health the wealth the youth everything you have is basically like a test like we're being tested for. What are you GonNa do with it? That's the whole point of being here and so you know I. I always appreciate that because I think that's the one thing that's driven me to always feel like there's more there's more to do. There's a lot more to do.

Us Department Of Agriculture United States Maryland Saddam Hussein Iran Writer Pakistan Kansas Delaware Lancaster Coun Rubio Assad Baucus Boccassini Virginia
"rabia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"I mean then I thought about giving up on the old so I don't feel the soft the softer fad help Saturday because you know as he knows how to Rabia pegs it's going to to the dollar so basically if it follows that the fed in lockstep with a different decision when the US was raising rates because the US economy was doing fine Saturday be was raising rates even though it's a common wasn't doing fine so now it gets a breather if the fed and pauses or even starts looking at the interest rate cuts it was also the fiscal year the government the government this here promised an increase in spending capital spending in current spending to to to bring up economic growth and we saw in the data some very interesting numbers on the construction sector that is out of contraction after court is I have to basically once a month so all these make softer fed and the fiscal policy can help the economy going forward thank you very much it's been great having a little discussion there about what's happening with the Saudi economy that's on a scene that's also get to the new from one to come out like season to become a set up with any commercial banquet joins us on the line from Abu Dhabi Monica you've had a chance to look at the numbers and digest some of the figures TTV go for our clients for the additional context of what's been happening with Saudi economic momentum or the lack thereof what's your prescription for policy makers how should they take this forward given domestic realities in global constraints good morning I think discussion with a lot I think a key factor really is is increasing the longer the company's hold please he believes the underlying drivers are still fairly new tricks we have a more favorable sickle in high government spending high single digits and then you fiscal reform measures including some support providing some recovery private activity it remains weak and we really need to see in life you put that in fact we all starting to feed the recovery so far has been the traditional taxes in constructing the futility of hydrocarbons we really need to see more meaningful the driver of the cation programs to be critical at all he's one of the statistics in this report is offset by the oil sector and we're going to expect an extension of these counts in the end of the next seven days for six to nine months.

Rabia US fed Abu Dhabi Monica nine months seven days
Saudi Airstrike Said to Hit Yemeni Hospital as War Enters Year 5

The Takeaway

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Saudi Airstrike Said to Hit Yemeni Hospital as War Enters Year 5

"Saudi Arabia controls the skies over southern neighbor Yemen since the Saudis launch an air war against Yemeni rebels four years ago, nothing has flown in or out of Yemen without Saudi permission so yesterday when an airstrike hit within fifty yards of a hospital in northern Yemen observers blamed Saudi Arabia, which gets most of its weapons from the United States earlier this month. We learn just how many weapons the US has been delivering to Saudi Arabia. That's the world's Steven Snyder. Who's been tracking sales of American weapons used in the Middle East one of my go-to places for information about weapons is in Sweden of all places. The Stockholm International Peace Research institute, it's better known as sippy and I've been speaking with Peter vase Amman. He's Cipriani's Middle East specialist. There's been a very significant growth in supplies decide. You rabia? By the US. How significant Stephen a really big

Saudi Arabia Yemen Steven Snyder United States Middle East Peter Vase Amman Stockholm International Peace Stephen Cipriani Sweden Fifty Yards Four Years
"rabia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"I think it was sort of sloppy. It makes you wonder what else is left on the table found. This was Rabia relationship under the Saudi Arabia, and we're not stopping there. We have put the defense on notice that we're going to look at all these contracts that we're going to demand that they go ahead and recover all of the funds to the United States the Saudi led coalition jets were being used on missions in Yemen. Read says, the US military is no longer refueling the aircraft. The war in Yemen is coming under greater scrutiny because of the humanitarian crisis that has emerged from the fighting last month read voted for a resolution calling for an end to US assistance in the conflict. That's an about face from a vote. He made earlier this year, Tim white from eyewitness news editorial in the Providence Journal says another poll heads to jail Kevin Jackson's punishment fits the crime democrat and longtime Representative award three on the providence city council. Jackson was sentenced to prison last week for eighteen months for embezzling money intended for youth track organization. Misusing campaign funds and unlawful appropriation says for too many years ocean state politicians through the years have turned out to be self aggrandizing. Huckster Vincent, buddy, CNC, Gordon, FOX, John Celona, Patrick McDonald, Brian, Sarah, Raymond Gallison and had depre-. Leo Medina and Michael traffic counting among others all going into trouble. So most as it. There's something in the water. It says here stains on the jacket. I put that in there. Says at the bottom of the editor Oriel, we remain grateful, of course, for the many men and women who serve in public office often with no fanfare, and they do the right thing day after day. They still seem to be the great majority of our public servants, which makes people like Jackson, the criminal exception to the rule. Another poll heads to jail with stains on his jacket in rogue's island daily.

Kevin Jackson United States Yemen Rabia Saudi Arabia Providence Journal providence city council Leo Medina editor Tim white Vincent Representative John Celona Raymond Gallison Gordon Patrick McDonald Michael Sarah Brian
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Thought about that too. I don't think there's any going back. No, but we, we need to do better. We need to do better in not bene- thing. I think better is your subjective. It is view of community because people find community on on. No, it has pluses like, I don't think we should eliminate. I think we should know or be aware again aware. We should be aware of what it does to the brain so that you're not a victim or an unwilling passenger whatever you know of your phone or your ipad or whatever. And so kids don't know that. And I think they get addicted really easily. This is why I say you need to have classes on the shit. Yeah, because our Facebook, our Twitter's or Instagram's their marketing to us, they were designed. They were designed to release those chemicals in your brain. You know, if you listen to the fake. Facebook, not Mark Zuckerberg, but the other guy who left Facebook bay created a lot of these algorithms to get you addicted. That's gross. Yeah. And so it's turned into this bigger monster. It works. Where did you see people driving down the highway looking at their phone? GPS I, I can't even. I can't even think about life before GPS. Never met question. Yeah. Fucking medicos. I eight perks like paper maps there. You know, we used to get a string and measure the distance. I remember I remember doing directions. Gore way down red when you see the bread truck make left, and that was thinking about miserable. Yeah, I should. Tsipras has. Solve that that question about, do stop and ask for directions, right? Solve that because everyone's got it in their hand. Yeah. Yes, insane man. So one one last thing I wanted to talk about if we can't, we can talk about whatever you want. Privilege white privilege. I wanna talk about privilege, but so my goal, one of my goals is to let to take out the whatever the negative connotation of having privilege is so that everyone can see whatever privilege it is that they have, and they can actually use it to change the world. So for example, your mail, that's a privilege your in a pretty privileged socioeconomic class you you are. I mean, you're not part of the ninety percent you might. I say, you might get some. Some resistance on that aspect. Okay. 'cause it's not do you have economic privilege. Yes. But can you pay your bills? Yes, but I'm agreeing with you do. Yeah. But the wh- and this isn't me because I understand. I understand exactly what I'm talking about to that person out there who doesn't like to read books. Yeah. So when they hear they have privilege, this is why you get so much drawback from white people. When you say you have white privilege, they're like, I can't. You can do anything I can do. That's not what we're talking and I get it. I do. But when you frame it in a context of of of, I'm an associated economic privilege it, it gives it a connotation like it wasn't earned. No, no, of course. It's earned so. So privilege can be earned? Yes, yes, let's keep. That's how we all do it right now. Well, I mean we're born born with some privileges like skin color, gender, but maybe even body type, right? But the other stuff that if whether you're born into a family wealthy or you have earned that, you know that there were certain things that lined up hard work. Like we were talking about before you had someone who believed in you, you had little league football, any wealthy person that says that they have a little bit of luck on along the line. Right..

Facebook Facebook bay Mark Zuckerberg Gore Tsipras football Instagram Twitter ninety percent
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"It's crazy. So how do you incentivize put a cap on child support everywhere? There is not cost any more than a thousand dollars to raise a child a month. No, and this is this is this is the, this is the what's gonna come to me the hypocrisy in in our in our judicia. The system is it's rare that that the man gets full custody. I'm about a woman has to be like a crackhead or prostitute demonstrably, and even then she might weaken visits, but like the men, you will never get full custody of your children for whatever reasons. Like, say, say, say, I worked too much go, you're not there enough, but how is that? Not? How is that a variable? But you not being able to financially take care of your child a variable because he's the breadwinner. He can't like that's ridiculous. I can hire I can hire a babysitter, but she can't. So I have to pay her. That is the biggest crock shit ever. But if there's a capital on chows, there's a cap on alimony. What is it that if there's a cap on, if there's if there's somebody with any sense that says, okay, we're not gonna. We're not going to incentivize women to try to sleep with men. You won't have the Anna Nicole Smith. You wanna have. I mean half the reason why a lot of these women are fame. Mus is because the gold diggers, right. So if you if you strip all of those regulations back, what is that? What is that. You know what it does, it makes women wanna be good wives more than just trying to catch a man. You sound so sexist. How is that sales look look? Because Aaron, you're ignoring the deeper problem, was that the the deeper pronto fathers. Well, that's one of the problems but opportunity in access for women for as far as what. More options in careers. Agree that are not based on Instagram, so you think this'll help? It might help, but it's not getting to the deeper issue. The deeper is if you're trying to get a river to go straight. Yeah. And you have a stream veering off you block off that stream that let's keep it. I'm with you. I'm not sexist at all. I think I think there are women who take take advantage of a broken system. People take advantage wherever they can unless they believe they can do differently. Right? So it's feelings of powerlessness, hopelessness desperation, it makes people do things that they're not. I don't wanna think everyone's out. Yeah, yeah. Or that's not their real nature, but out of desperation loneliness at times, you know, or believing that, oh, if I do this, I'll have that life like the Kardashians or whatever. And so. It's because whatever you have is enough or you feel it's not enough. So that's the deeper issue, which means raising your kids with good self esteem opportunity to notice. We're in the west. We have a lot of privilege. We have decent public schools and. To know that. Well, yeah, but that's, that's the other argument that should be all public schools should be percent. Anyway. Now I agree with you. I'm not a sexist. I have two daughters, yeah, and I want the best for them. Yeah, I'm going to make sure that they sign a prenup. I'm going to make sure that that I nurture them into career, pass that fulfilled in anything, but that where they have a sustainable lifestyle that they're happy because my whole, my whole, the crux of my issue is that if that's an option for women, it's an easy option. It is not hard. It's easy if you are low in self respect and self esteem, one hundred percent on my cell sexist. No. I'm saying that when you have to resort to something else which is not about your worth as a human being or your abilities or all of that, I don't know. I think it selling yourself short, Margaret hundred percent and the. The hardest isn't a stop, go, dude. That's not the heart. The heart of it is..

Anna Nicole Smith Kardashians Aaron Margaret one hundred percent thousand dollars hundred percent
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"So this is this is real like, and this is why I think there should be classes as for our children on social media, things like that because our generation drop the fucking law, these women and these men out here are questioning what I look at Instagram and as sickens me, it's this grows growth. No, I don't think our laws tell me if you think this. Greta, we've had a lot of deep talks, but I think that it would be beneficial for our legislative system to not enable young women to want to sleep with wealthy men. I think it is a toxic president they sent. They set who set that probably men. Well, okay. So it goes back to our. Early, we know as a species we need to keep procreating. So back in the old days, it was the guy who could kill or protect you if you're the woman. And so that was a more suitable mate that is translated now into money. Money is the equivalent of that guy protection. It's protection, but we, we're not thinking of it that way, but that is like the primitive part that if we were aware, you know, that's what we're doing. I've changed my mind on that aspect of, I think you're right change my mind as far as I used to judge women who trying to seek out wealthy men like I mean as power save. Yeah, totally manage. But what I mad at is our. The legislative aspect of if like the child support issue. So Greenwich, I got to baby moms. So if the child support on them is there's a, there's a cap in Texas. Luckily like if you look at somebody's house for checks, these people are cashing in California, New York and sick. These checks are making more than doctors. That's ridiculous. So there should be some type of guidelines or some type of parameters that we set on child support. Like how much does it really cost to raise a child like it? It doesn't cost hundred grand a month to raise. And where where I think you and I have talked about this is that. It's very difficult to put a dollar amount on the amount of worry and attention and organizing it takes when you are raising a child? Yeah, it. Yeah. 'cause there's no way. So for example, when we had our daughter, I stayed at home. My husband went to work. When I finally went, I stayed home for two and a half months. But when I went back to work, I felt guilty for leaving my kid. I asked my husband. Do you feel guilty when you go to work and leave the child? He's like, no, not at all. That's what I what I do for my family. But what I know of women are, I. The connection to the child, the worry, the mental energy, all of that. I know I'm not. I know I'm losing my argument. I know I'm. What I'm laughing that is that because you're a working woman. That's not what I'm talking about. I'm not talking about the woman who is a good human being, and I'm talking about women who are trying to get pregnant by wealthy men. So why not focus on the wealthy men? You're not gonna. You're not gonna stop men from fucking never happen. There's nothing. There's nothing mental wanna have sex and you. Women are gonna want the rich guy. Okay, this, this is where this hear me out here me out. I don't think and granted, I. I am a product of my choices. I fully accept all the responsibility for all the have made them very at peace right now. So this really doesn't have anything to do with me. I want you to hear me out as to why. I think what it has done is created a career path for women and their career path is now to try to get wealthy men that is so dangerous. So what it does is if you look at Instagram, there's just a whole bunch of naked women trying to sell themselves. If you go to a basketball game after the basketball game, you see what the players hang out. This is the whole bunch of women trying to hang. It's a real thing. It is. I will. So if you disincentivize women, then it makes them be more productive member of society. You really out here just trying to get caught..

basketball Greta president Greenwich Texas New York California
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"That's that's my whole point is, is that the they do they so funny people type it on phones, climate change rule. Using a phone, you using something that was a product of the scientific method try to disprove the scientific method. It's just it's weird to me. Yeah, she's so weird to me. It's necessary. Yeah. People need. Yeah, we need to fund science one hundred percent yet. How has. Signs influenced your field. A lot of it is the neuroscience, you know, and the science on emotions when we can measure why having a good marriage or good relationships affect your longevity, your health and all these other things. So science is proving why it pays to feel better, you know? So why there's a book called love two point. Oh, that really gets into the research around love feelings of love, not just with a significant other, but like to all human beings or to animals to plants, that kind of thing that it really has a scientific benefit. So what is what is love? I know. I remember doing a lot of research on this and the Greeks, I think categorize it into seven different types of love. And when you add, everybody has a different answer of what it is, but it's all like this general filling that we have a consensus that we gave one word, which is insane. This feeling, yeah, one word because it describes so much. And that was another interesting aspect of it to me was that different languages have different words for. Yeah, I think in English we have, yeah. Yeah. But other languages that really value love and feelings of love in all different forms have more words like that. I don't love my dog who I love my woman. My child. Why is it just one word because they're different fillings? Yeah, we have to. We have to qualify at like familiar love, brotherly love, still just low. That's that's such an interesting topic because it's such a subjective feeling and we're all trying to express it to each other, which scientifically like oxytocin is the bonding. Yeah, actual- yeah, oxytocin is what it's our bonding chemical. So we needed it to survive to procreate for mothers to nurse their babies. You had to have a payoff for doing that. So when a woman is nursing, her baby, a lot of oxytocin forms in her brain or is released in her brain. So she's bonded to that baby kind of manipulating some nature to feed this kid. I'm gonna pump. You full the drugs, but I mean that God, what am I receptors? Because we're always trying to stay alive and be better. We're always expanding like the universe. So I don't know. That's just a way that's the payoff. Same sex. There's a payoff for orgasm, right? It's a chemical payoff, and then you feel all like bonded to that person because of Austin and dopamine too. I I mean, mean, that that was was that that was. was my next. So the different type of chemicals that release in our brain for like happiness or whatever the case may be. I how many different kind of chemicals are there? I don't know. I don't know exactly because that's not my field. I know dopamine oxytocin, their tone and serotonin. Maybe nor up enough Rin I'm not exactly sure. Big work. Yeah. All right. So there's there's different types of chemicals that release for different types of events and like some correct me if I'm wrong. But like when you get an alert on your phone, like dopamine actually releases in your head. So there's a kind of happiness that isn't necessarily beneficial to Yeah, humans. because it's from an artificial source, right? It's just imagination. Someone likes me. They gotta like what that's not real. But the interesting aspect of isn't that to me, it's just that an outside source can. Literally and physically affect your brain chemistry..

oxytocin dopamine Austin one hundred percent
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"So somebody had sixteen year and yeah, sixteen year old, I've seen it before benefactors woman that just got indicted the other day because she, she was she's twenty four. She was a teacher and she was sleeping with a middle schooler. It happens. Yeah, they happen so from medieval times and you know, some freaky shit with, I always think about that. Shit's crazy. So as a psychotherapist, you you, how do you go about life and analyze it? Because. I think of like an analogous to my life is hard for me to watch football without breaking down what's going on in the play by. So, yeah. Oh man. He's in the national audible here that guys, actually, he missed his block. It's hard for me to sit there and be entertained. So do you? It's yes. How Berdon. Yeah. How does that affect your daily. Well, I mean, I should ask my husband so you know, you can't kind of win because on the one hand, people will say, you should know better because your therapist in on the other hand, when you do know better, they're like, oh, you just think you know better as you're at there. So I keep my mouth shut, but I do speak up when you know in my personal. Yeah, so I can't help it. I know that not commenting on what you don't like can be like a little resentment. You keep adding on adding tip jar. Exactly. So it's better just to say, oh, well, how come the other day? So that that's interesting aspect. So you're you're so aware of all of your actions in your relationship? Yeah. So how do you ever veto yourself as fuck that? I'm just going to be to be day all my, I'm like, no, because I'm still human. Right? You have to get that out. Yeah. So I love my husband, but I'm not always very nice. You know, like I get mad, I lose my temper. I get dramatic. You know, I'm female. So I get real dramatic. And then I'm like. Man, that wasn't right, you know. So I have to apologize. That's interesting aspect of that. People people don't ever talk about that. That's gotta be tough. Talk about it with each other. You have that group. We try. We try, but you know, it's always so such a relief because we're like, oh, yeah, okay. You know, now we can really talk instead of the other, having the mind, your Ps and qs. All right. Oh, so you're gonna have that space? Yep. What is that? What does that in a state where you have to have that space to vent that space? I think that's normal. Like that's just part of being human, right? Because if we are having this physical life, then we have like all the everyone gets mad sometimes and all of that, you just hope you have enough space between the thought and the behavior that you can pick something that isn't as hurtful. You know what I mean? Like if the thought is anger or the emotion is anger or. Fear, you just hope you don't say something that you can't take back. What is your view on thought crimes, dot crime, thought crimes is something that. So I'm of the camp where I feel like you're allowed to think whatever you think as long as you don't act upon it like anything like whatever's inside your head you're allowed to. But as long as you don't act it out, you agree. Yeah, I agree. Okay. I didn't know there were such a thing as crying future a real thing. I hope it never gets there the minority report. I hope I hope and borrow. He's gonna kid would be though it would be scary. So what is the? I remember we had this this rift one time and it was about shockers and energy clearing in all of that stuff. So I'm still very far away away for which how does that fit in with the wave theory? Because that's all it is. It's just feeling waves and we know emotions create different ways will to give you context we're talking about shockers shockers, right? Shuckers on a real thing. Yes, they're not quantifiable. They are well, yes and no, because they have a vibration, so the different shockers and where each of the seven major shockers are you have a bundle of nerves Lexi's which we know now, but the ancients didn't know that they didn't have machine..

shockers football Lexi sixteen year one hand
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Is that how many laws are on the books about having the government having control over male bodies, he can think of anything because there aren't any. It's only about women, and so she was trying to point out, but you know. I think I know I keep going back to awareness, but having differences of opinion, even if they're fact-based. Well, actually, pro-life pro-choice, it's hard. I know. So that's one issue. Why? I'm so in the middle? Yeah, and I, it's hard 'cause I see both sides. I really honest 'cause I've looked until I used to be super pro choice like you're an asshole, get out of women's, but now I get it. I get why you upset parent. You're a parent that anything do? I think I really started listening to their side. I think for so long, I blocked right rhetoric to where I was like. They're just assholes. Give me give me your argument. What do you see. Okay. Okay. What's your opinion? Right. So my opinion is if it's not my body, I don't have a say, so. Just period. Yeah, but do I see somebody saying that a potential life can be had if you don't aboard it? Yeah. Yeah, I do. And so the government arguments said, should the government intervening in those affairs? Well, with the with the government intervene, if I was trying to kill another man, that's how they see it. I don't see it like that, but that's how they see it. So so you know, it really got me to see it like this was a Louis c. k. and he's, he's literally super left wing, but he had a joke about it and he was like. He says something to the likes of he's a, it's not just like a simple issue is like the other side thinks you're killing a baby kind of killing a baby. It's a really tough issue. And so it's. It's so polarizing because there's so much emotions involved in it. And that's, that's when I say, okay, it's not my choice because it's so emotionally people are so emotionally invested in and I'm not. I just see both is I understand that and I understand that's probably the one political issue on like the right and the left have it correct. And this duality of life. Yeah, and I can't. I can't call it. Well, I agree. I think people there are many women who may not ever have an abortion themselves. They just don't believe in being able to dictate other other women. I would probably, yeah. And I know like the small very small percentage of women raped in our impregnated, but it's still there. I think that option should be available for somebody. Yeah, we should never have to give birth to a child that was forced in Saudi. That's insane. But it's just. But then that stuff. That's how could have came out and pin an amazing human knows man. It's a such. A tough is such a tough issue. That's that's one I've spent a lot of time thinking about, you know, I do wonder how many of us would be here because we know in wars that have been going on since the beginning of time, it's always a women who are raped. And so I'm sure many of them got pregnant and who knows what we can trace our own genetics back to. I mean, a lot of lot of black people in this country today are byproducts of the raping of slave slave master. Yeah, it's a real. It's a real thing. I always always think about it like we have DNA testing back then. So whoever you think your family is part of like is big possibility that I was thought like when. Men would go off to war, women price let the round back then and so they they weren't any other men. That'd be..

Louis c. k.
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"You respond to harass. That's real power. Never even thought of that aspect of it. I always thought school was kind of backwards. It's kinda. My buddy also says. A fills a bucket. It doesn't light a fire. Yeah, it's backers, but that should definitely be a part of our curriculum. Learning how to juggle emotion. Yes. Yeah, shot a young age and think about one of the reasons I do transcendental meditation is that they are really committed. What is the difference between meditation and transcendental? Meditation is a very specific form of meditation, so it's not counting your breath or like focusing on a candle. I mean, there are lots of ways of doing meditation where you just sort of quiet your mind, but with transcendental the, they don't believe that you can't not think so emptying. Your mind is like telling the ocean to stop its weight, right? So the brain we're meant to have thoughts. So it's not that you cancelled the thoughts or like empty your brain out. You just have a mantra a word that you say over. And over and you breathe, and then you have your thoughts and you just noticed that you're having thoughts instead of saying your mantra, and then the mantra comes back up, but it's training minimum big problems with meditating and why don't like it is because. It makes me aware that I'm breathing and then I can't stop thinking about breathing. And then I have to actively breathe. I hate this it. I'm like, I have to make sure I breathe now because thinking about breeding doing it now now I have to fuck. I know. But. What's so bad about noticing that your breathing because then I have some have to breathe whether it was before another retirement breathing. I'm making myself take breath whereas before they would just breathe. Yeah. But now if I don't like, okay, breathe in and breathe. I'm thinking about it. Oh, okay. So it's making me work, but you know your body's going to breed because you don't wanna die. I don't know that. Yeah, you're hold your breath at some point you're going to inhale. Yeah. Well, I mean if I think right, right, right, right. But it's just that when when a medicine, I'm trying to clear my brain, like you said, it's, it always goes to like breathing. Yeah. Wow, thank you. I'm alive, but then I turned it into like, damn, I gotta breathing. Yeah. Now I'm thinking about this hearing my mind. That's my brain is hardwired just to like be. So like just add a little cynical about the world. Well, why not? You know, you're good thinker. Like I've always known you to be not always Nonni, but you know, you're, you're a good thinker and. It's good that you're in a position of being able to influence people with thinking in a healthier way, right? Because we're, we don't have to be slaves to our primitive selves. Those are tools to be used when necessary. We just often aren't running away from Tigers. You know, I think that's a huge kind of like a running theme on my pockets actually is like, you have like care about why you think the way you think, because we're so said, you said, we're just we're hardwired programs to believe certain things, and it's just it's ever Lucien every baggage fighting. Yeah, you have to figure out a way to see if it the way you think is beneficial for you moving. Yes, and that's and do crazy crazy found. I, I'm, I'm a lot more at peace in it and that was, but on packing the baggage that I had in my brain is so hard. It's not like a coming from that lettuce world. I felt like I could just dominate anything you work anywhere..

Tigers Nonni Lucien
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"If you're in the dream state, if you're in a relaxed yet awake state, which is the alpha wave, which also lends to creativity. So it's ways of manipulating your brain. So you put get the state that to get the result that you want. And the end result is to to come down the the fire slight, yes. And give you more choice because when we're in fight or flight, our prefrontal. Tech's our executive functioning is completely hijacked. We can't. Okay. Sorry. When we're angry, we really don't hear what the other person is saying. I see this couples all the time when they're one person's angry and they start yelling, or you know that you can feel it. The other person's already gone into fight or flight. So they can't access logical thinking and hearing 'cause the brain doesn't work that way. If you're fighting flight is going on your body thinks under attack. Okay. So all it wants to do is fight to interesting or run away. Yes. An interesting when you put it like that kind of puts it in. It kind of puts a lot of our behaviors in real primitive category. And it is really because look the people that didn't have good fighter flight ability didn't survive. We wouldn't be here unless our ancestors had really good strong Migdal. So in conflict, we're really fighting a lot of our evolutionary back, yes, which hardware hardware we're hardwired. So that's why it takes training. You have to train for life. We don't teach our kids. How do you come? You know? Why is it that in certain countries, Asian countries, you have meditation every day or you start off the morning with Taichi because they know the importance of being able to select how.

executive
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"The reality that we experience isn't necessarily a reality. It's just a reality. We experience like it's it's a constant like that's say, right. Yeah. The British are always like, this is just an illusion. Right? And so in one sense it is, it's what you're recesses pick up and what anyone else's pick up. So why are we? Why are we so beholding to this? This reality that we are experiencing is we don't have another choice. We're in a physical form right now. So physical form has to abide by some sort of laws of physics, right laws of nature. So when we're in physical form, we have to kind of do that. But that doesn't mean we're not aware or can't be aware of. We're bigger than this as well. So how do we stay there though? You know what I mean? Because it's a peaceful when you when I think about that and I'm like, damn all of my little problems. All this little shit. I was bad at all. This doesn't really. Essentially matter. Right. But how do I stay there? I wanna get into meditation because I, I suck at it and I, I try like it's all my goals a mirror. I write my goals down on my mirror every morning. I look at it and says, try ten minutes a day, and I'm very sporadic. I still I'm trying my best, but I sit there and I just my thought cannot stop. It thoughts just go. How did you? How did you get to be such a great athlete, an elite athlete. Work. Okay. Practice. Okay. Bergh's you probably practice different things every day that led to an Engel and so you didn't know exactly where it was going to take you, but you believed enough in yourself to practice. So meditation is very similar and it does take discipline and it doesn't always work, which kind of sucks because days when it doesn't work, you're like, I just wasted twenty minutes. You You know. know, you really did it gate some skill. You know, it just is maybe not as much skill as you gain the last time you meditated, but I really believe in getting good training and setting up something because you wanna have more peace in your life. And so we know that with certain brainwaves, we have more of a sense of peace. And if you grew up with any kind of trauma, your fighter flight reaction is it's easier to get into fight or flight. It's also easier to stay there longer because it's normal. If you grew up with a lot of people grow up with a lot of Trump, and so it's hard for them to know or to gauge a situation because of the way the brain got trained evolution. Yeah, I, yeah, it's. I agree because I've I've consciously made an effort to not get angry instances, whereas usually out of snap right there. I think. I think where I'm at in life helps out a lot. Yes, and that's what I noticed that too is a lot of people's fuses. So short because they're just at the end of their energy sicker the shit. You know, they're just, I don't. I don't wanna hear that one person flipping them off in traffic and and it goes all downhill, but kinda wanna stay on meditation. Because again, if you told me in two thousand fourteen meditation can help get like your fool, but the more more I dig into like, I want you to talk about a little bit of the the psychiatric benefits of meditation, like the road, the neural physics physiology of of metal, how it can be beneficial. So we have to understand the part of the brain that gets us in fighter flight is the amid Ila it forms before a baby is even born at forms fully formed by the time. Woman is like eight months pregnant. So your fight or flight real life approach, or I'm just joking. Toy stay out of my vagina. Anyway, another topic. But no, you're amid Daloa is fully formed before you actually come out of the womb because we know how necessary it is to survive to have the fight or flight. What meditation does is it helps calm down that fighter flight and create a little more space to choose a reaction. You get to see that you have options of reacting this way that way or another way..

Engel Daloa Bergh Trump twenty minutes eight months ten minutes
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"I mean, it's it's, it's been a huge part of my. His cog in my will for sure, man. So I do want to happen to this because I have a problem with this. Everybody else does too. I have an issue with judging people like I judge people all day long like it is sometimes that's why do you think like I see somebody your this, you're and I just put people in categories and it's never really outwardly expressed. But internally, I I don't know how to stop my little voice in my thinking, European shit. I don't know how to start. How how do you combat this thing, or do you combat this? Well, everybody judges the only way in look, you're judging yourself alive. Yeah, and whether you judge yourself as being better than or less than and so we're always trying to put things in categories like binary categories, good, bad, better worse, and it's not a both in both and which I don't know if I'm making sense or not. But so for example, when we stop judging when we can see ourselves in that other person. See, it's hard for me to do that though. Why? Okay. Because if you see another man, can you not relate to the pressures on men to earn and provide? Yes, yes, I can accept that. And there's a caveat. I can't relate to a lot of the excuses people make for themselves. For the end goal. Right. I, I understand it does roadblocks in every single person's journey. I get it, but everybody has those roadblocks. And so it's hard for me to empathize with people who are complaining about those roadblocks constantly. So like shit like that. It's hard for me to be empathetic towards maybe you don't need to be empathetic, but you can look at times in your life where you have used excuses. Okay. Yeah. And I know you can think. Yeah, so we're not all that different. It's just that some people stay in that space longer. Maybe they don't have someone who believed in them. You had somebody who believed in you pushed you. You got into football as a kid. What if there weren't any leagues around? What? If I don't know? So many things could have gotten in the way, but you had someone who believes you and you had some sort of opportunity and you had privileged that you were born healthy. That's true. You know. So you have some gifts that maybe someone else who's complaining complaining complaining, doesn't see the gifts he or she might really have and is focusing on what they can't do, what they think they can't do. So how'd you. Because I don't. I don't like living in that space where constantly judge me, but it's a big part of my thought process. And I, I believe it's a part of the reason to why I am where I am because I, I so wanted to not be like everybody else around me. So I can't totally discard that that way of thinking. But right now as it is in my life today is not a healthy space to live, how, how do I. Kind of practice at this because I want to not wanna just we'll have one of my best friends who used to be my co-host, no sweat. A lot of our sessions. He's just such a carefree human and he doesn't judge when he always says exactly what you said. Always says, I could always ask them. We have these talks. How do you? How do you not judge people? He's like, I mean, I do, but I just see. I just see them as an extension of me. He's like, but he believes that. I think that's that's my disconnect is where I don't really believe is he is he does. He meditate z. spiritual person. These yoga smokes a lot of week. Okay. Well, that's why, because we'd opens another portal which shows you the oneness. Yeah. So he's always talking about the goes on on a buck. That's because look what he saying. Like Donald Trump to me is an extension of my dark side. All of our collective dark side is being played out on the world stage..

Donald Trump football
"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Are your buddy. Welcome back. Welcome back to grace podcast on her. I have a special guest in the building. She can't disclose information, but I can my therapist, my therapist, rob ya ally, Kate, and and she is a psychotherapist specializing in family therapy in forgot the couple's therapy in fucked up. I'm terrible. Forget that we shouldn't. She didn't on shitting on the the alum. CT man anyway, so welcome. I appreciate you joining me. Thank you for having me man. It's my pleasure. Man. I wanted to get you on the podcast. 'cause you have a interesting perspective of life and we go back and forth a lot and so welcoming, how's everything? Good. Good. It's been very busy since Trump got elected. Super-busy really. I swear, I swear. Yeah. How the regression is up? Invitees up marital issues are up? Yeah, just Trump though. No, it's the whole atmosphere. What so, what do you think the core cause of that is? I do think that fear and anger are contagious. And so when we see it on the bigger stage, we're absorbing that from TV from news from the environment of people around us. We don't know who save who is it. You know, if you're a person of color or woman, you're not safe. So you think we kind of always always felt that we look for anything. That's why. People. The national anthem. Kneeling was so polarizing because that we look to sports, we look to movies for entertainment and when it becomes politicized, yeah, people no longer have that life fallback like not this too. Yeah. Which is who cares. You know what it is, Aaron. Politics now are part of everyday life because we're finally understanding in the US what people in other countries know that you your political climate affects your life. And so it should be part of our life. We should be voting voting should be a national holiday hundred, you know? So everyone can get out there. We should have transportation and all this other stuff. It should be treated as the important event. It really is especially local. Yeah. Yeah. So the influx is there how much how much of that I want to dig into a little bit of you first. So how before we get into all that, what got you into wanting to be a psychotherapist and what exactly is psycho therapist? I don't really know. I was referred to you and you've helped me immensely so. But what, what exactly is it? How did you get into? So I got into it as a second career. I was in business before that, and I just at the end I wasn't. I was improving the bottom line. In for the business owners, but I felt like I wasn't making any kind of contribution and that really means something to me. And so I went to therapy figured out what was making me unhappy about my career and then that they're upset. I should look into being therapist. So I did. I says, you need to be fair. Yeah. 'cause my answers with other people was into it. So like. You mean as a patient. Whereas you might not be bad if you can keep it not about you. You know what I mean? I think that's one of my big problems is I have. I have trouble empathizing with people situation because I think, okay, what would I do situation? And I think in correct me if I'm wrong, but I feel like I can absorb a little bit more punches from people been the normal person. Yeah. And so I, I oughta medically, assume that person is, you know, that's also when I wanted to talk about, but we'll get into as so you got it there and it has you felt you're making impact in your life in other people's which is, I think, is a big reason why released music as well. I wanted to at least inspire, inspire somebody just say, you know what? Don't forget to become who you were supposed to become, don't get lost in this rat race because we forget that this should is a rat race. It really, there's no, there's no pot of gold. Even when you get a pot of gold is not. It's not a part of pot of gold is a metaphorical SP. Face of happiness, you know? And that comes from pursuing things that mean something, you know whether it's music creating something music is one of those things that's. In it encompasses so many parts of your brain and emotions. And so creating music is healing for the person creating it as well as the listener here..

Kate Trump US rob Aaron
"rabia" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Didn't solomon law rabia i was wondering if that his name was going to come up no it's uh it you know just when i was thinking both with iran and with the mob this issue of been studying from 25 years like a delicate detective i thought well maybe we've dodged the bullet on those two but here after all these major candidates saddam hussein osama bin laden here we have a candidate it actually is the most formidable be is the number one arms purchaser of the united states the united kingdom he um is he is of waging a brutal war against the and then he said hardly anybody here's about and it kinda fits the of statement of nostra thomas about this man he does this prophecy uh i it's squad trained sixty a century three back in 55 he made this state me said throughout asia great prohibiting of outlaws which are these terrorists that so linked to other stuff he talks about even in missed you luciano impact feeling uh those are those are areas of asia minor and kurdistan and iran and iraq those who a racist blood will flow because of the absolving of a young dark man filled with evil do if muhammad bin solomon who has been groomed by his sickly father whose suffering strokes and words and by tass brothers right yes well not only that there was a major purge that dropped out crowded out the the crown prince that had other family ties to the direct blood line of the current king.

osama bin laden saddam hussein iran blood iraq united kingdom united states asia tass kurdistan
"rabia" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"rabia" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Rare love rather i rarely all for example there is always very dangerous routes ever out of may affair hey gro well that's a real fared rabia has a real rare doby to break yard without drugs i'll go back there girls a type of you know you've got call us every week of the value all of the night angry zhijie gilbert of the littlest pop outbreaks a little bit i love it i love it is davis water though their father play where they got themselves running back at least in linda for net mayor anibal will have showed the ads so the defense guy that go to the book i derek he's listening through as you're all would mcdavitt custer hey guys how's it going good good good ain't lawn my raider look good i don't the king that we can't be it on our care to where do we get our first loss if any and then to predict an ohio state be on the feet of penn state they'll be undefeated michigan and i'll make the playoffs what are you we are active bag prayers around oh boy you were let's go to your radio that will stay with the relativity gay latapy lobby not talk about a book though with two of the best young quarterback center iba gade right now yep it markets very yogurt if their current two of the best young quarterbacks by two years we'll be talk about the beard up into the upper echelon top five quarterbacks to delete now as far as your ohio state buck eyes liu insulted john lewis through war gave this year a charge you vargo beepers right you wear gobi viscous so obvious prince favoured no yacht article where we i don't think we will get path is they net.

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