17 Burst results for "RPF"

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:05 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Bc governments had her What's what's your magic solution. How you gonna fix everything related to you know. The the issue habitat had spent So on from a conservation perspective. And then you know just dealing with making people's home safer and reducing the risk of fire. What what's the main main things that you would do to change the change things with fire. Nbc when you don't wanna know in the in the acts that govern how we mash land we. We have to address things like visual quality. Objectives wildlife timber water soil. All that stuff but nowhere in there is it. Is there anything that says. We have to account for fires role in the ecosystem and if we if we were to managing these force in an integrated way where we accounted for wildfire and were able to allow it to burn in certain areas. Like we'll do prescription. That was certainly help. So i think they can still until we start addressing an accounting for fires natural role in our systems. We're not gonna get anywhere. We're just going to keep this cycle of slow years with minimal preventative. Work to these freak out years where it's just full chaos like now we're we're chasing. Were chasing fire so we we need to address. Wildfires is part of the ecosystem in our plans or prescriptions. In all of them and i think i think in some regards make it mandatory to do prescribed burning and and to build up that skill set outside the wildfire service is to be done all the time in the prior to the ninety s A lot of companies They just went in a burnt off their harvest units. It made it easier for planting. It was good for the soil nutrients all that reduced the fuel loading so but those all that all government policies in fear smokin risk. Risk averse -bility. So that would that would be it would be reintroduced fire as part of force. So do you see that ever happening or is it going to take a a watershed moment where we lose a cologne or something where we say holy crap we have to change our approach to it or just think it's you know we're just gonna we're just gonna continue fighting this. It's never gonna change. I you know in the last since two thousand seventeen two thousand eighteen if those weren't watershed moments. I don't i don't know what it takes. That are i know how to define a watershed moment. You know lytton gone. This year is already out of control. We're not into the season. So i think we've i think we've had enough lessons. We started learning from not just looking for more or less. And i think that i think we all need to do. We just seem to lack the political will of dumped up to do it. And that's why. I think a big part of what needs to be done is going to flow through first nations because when they wanna do something that involves some traditional past. There's i don't know how the government says no to that. So i really think some some autonomy on the band's part first nations is is really going to be the key to getting out of this and you can. You can actually see that. Some of the social media this summer are calling for moore indigenous burning getting them back on alaska. Doing what they did. Before you know we're never gonna fireproof our landscape. We can only make it more resilient and more absorbing of wildfire so that's those are pre settlement conditions. you know. we're this congenial. Now because we put a value of timber on the landscape has value to the government has value to society we interface so we.

bility Nbc lytton government moore alaska
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:31 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"That'd be interesting. Question for for marco or the band of just not down on the site enough. I know when we were developing. I was surprised at how many i did see down there because it was a it was a pretty big area. And but they were all down around the homes So it around the roads and of course you know they can become exposed to domestic sheep and you know by doing this treatment. We were were trying to pull them back up into the wildland and away from home. So i really feel like the trait. You know even though we didn't get any burning off in ellis. I really feel that what we did. There helped the only approved sight lines. We got rid of some of those younger trees that were eventually going to clog up the landscape and we always basically said up for a natural fire. Now they can come through there and it won't destroy stanford so it's it's more fire absorbing we did a berm plant in there and we did send it off to the ministry. But nothing's happened. I just finished a another prescription in gray back behind home. Property for for a berm. So that's gone off the ministry now and and hopefully we'll see a berm plan there come out so there hasn't been any burning there yet but that fire on christie mountain mount christie in twenty twenty. And you know that eight up alana habitat there so you know. It's a matter of time before. Another areas burned narrow matters a good one as well. You know. there's kind of a corridor between engine creek in okinawa park. Yeah for sure. So one of the things john can you just on this a little bit. it's my understanding and that when there's a fire in nbc doesn't matter where it is wildfire services job is to go and put it out And and not let it burn so even if it's not coaching it's not gonna cause any damage They they their job is to go to put that fire out. The things that we've been advocating for and we'd try to have discussions with is leading the it burn policy if it's prime wildlife habitat is going to enhance the land It's doing the work that we need to do. Anyway you know and just letting fires burn but it's our. It's my understanding wildfire. If they can they they have to put it out even if it's not Threatening anything that correct pretty much one hundred percent went they'll do that's mandate. They're not fire managers They also there's no plan in place for these so fire might start saving up in crater mountain or in cathedral park or something Unless there's a plan in place says you know we're gonna let fire burn these conditions or it's a it's an a place where there's a letter burn policy been established in some plan is they can't just let v nash flyer they have to suppress it and that becomes in particularly through in the interface which is one hundred percent agree with if had a firestorm behind home. He had to put that out. It's not. It's not the place to mess with fire and manage it if you want to burn. They're do it through prescribed burning in the shoulder season. Okay so We make you god for a day and you can do whatever you want..

christie mountain mount christ okinawa park marco ellis stanford cathedral park nbc john
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"It's against educational thing. I think that the needs to be more more. That in and you'll that that type of work clearly lies within the wheelhouse of the welfare service. They have the expertise for it. They have the equipment they have the contracts. They got it all. They're the ones that should definitely be doing that. The in the past. They've called in for outside help when they need it. But it's definitely fully supportive of that line within around so john let's pivot now to the conservation side of it. You just touched on it there that there's benefit to wildfire for habitat enhancement touch on the high level. Stuff of why. That's so good and the importance of that before we get into. It wasn't sure. Is this as i mentioned earlier. You know fire is a natural part of our ecosystems particularly in southern interior northern bc. Once it's a little less so when you get coastal and probably even interior wet belt area link around rebel stoke and whatnot but you know any anything anywhere where you have launchable pine ponderosa pine douglas fir the boreal. Those are all driven by those eagles there because of fire sometime in the past fire burnt and this is what came back and those ecosystems developed with a cycle with fire so a good example is logical pine cones that can only be opened in in in a really hot temperatures so that either has to be fire or has to be burnt ground grounded warms up from the site and so these trees grow really close together they become susceptible to pest pathogens like the mountain pine beetle a died they do now become subtle. Fire these huge. Large-scale fires come through open up all the cones. Now you've got these dance regenerating force again that no other. No other vegetation can compete with so you come back with this pure standard logical pint and the cycle begins again and there that that same for other types of systems as well so these ecosystems have evolved with fire by default so have the habitats and therefore so have stacy's live within us advertise. Okay so let's just jump into some of the working for doing for the society Talk about some of the plans you've come up with and and the work that's being done there on the conservation side of things And and and it and some of the thoughts of even these forward you know we ended up again it was. I think partnership with first nations. We did a bunch of slashing work in the been ticked and region. I think it was three years ago. But we haven't been able to get these fires off Can you just touch a little bit on that work. That's being done there and the work. You've done a lot of the work you've done for the society for sure so so big part of that working with pinch hit. The union ban was a result of the partnership that off the funding from fast bc to develop these large scale fuel breaks to protect the city of antenna in that just happened to overlay critical winter range for sheep habitat and had the support of the band. And so now. We have the city of pinch yet. Didn't we had the penticton indian band. We had the sheep society and.

john let stacy
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:50 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Use burning and western science burning as far as what goes into planning and whatnot and what's required the outcome is still the same. And i think that there's an opportunity where people like myself. Mccauley's can provide the support first nations on the western science side. Do the paperwork that needs to be done. And then stand behind the bands and provide support and and or mentorship to meet the obligations like the west of the regulations. The actively galleys within that firm plan to help them avoid doing anything and would be would contravene those those those plans but van the bands. They always they always burnt early in the season. So you know the impacts were low they were. I learned something from pure krueger. Who's with that pennsylvania. Couple of years ago we were chatting with the stuff. He said they would go out. In february or march says the snow levels decreasing and burn off the grass. And i was like well. How do you do that with snow underneath his own off the top so they were just go through at burn off the topic torches and then once the snow melted they would go and burn. You know half much grasp because he'd already got rid of happen and that's how they would control the burn soul. It didn't have to worry about something or a worry less something getting away now. Of course they obviously had a lot less values because the most arthur living valley bottom and everything would go up the slope and way but they certainly knew certainly knew what they were doing all of that changes of course when you start throwing values structures and power lines and roads and railway tracks and schools and all that stuff. It's you have to be more concerned about something running up the hill now. But that's where. I think the partnership comes in is they. They know how to light a fire and we just need to provide the support on containing that fire. I think we're going to be doing burning at the scale of needs to be because i service doesn't have capacity for their primarily a response organization and in the shoulder seasons when we should be burning their training or their people are gone so it's really difficult for them to without debt gearing up to be around organization of of the workforce. It's difficult this is going to sit with them. I think they're always going to be a regulatory technical advisor role. It's gonna come down to contractors and societies and first nations to earning so just on that note john. Have you seen a change in the attitude and the public towards a prescribed. Fire see more of an acceptance now where people are saying. Yeah we realized. Now we gotta burners at just the same thing you know. Is it just Is the government still reticent to do it and the public's getting on board or is it just kind of the same people don't want prescribe fire in their communities you always have those shares did just are not gonna wanna smoke and they don't understand it and you know you're going to get that and then but i think it is getting better like i've seen incremental supports particularly when i first started real social media right so you know you only knew what fire from what was in the media and now you can go on on on the facebook in The instagram and all these things and see these posts and these comments and they arranged from one end of the spectrum to the other. But you see a lot of support for for the firefighters out. There people selling their thoughts and prayers and people are hoping for the best then. You you see the critiques. But whenever the burning in the shoulder season you tend to see people supportive of it.

Mccauley pennsylvania john facebook
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:12 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"At and everything else. We've done all the treatment wise. That's all been been sitting in pilot bert or or other type of so. It's very minimal burning. Yeah absolutely so yeah no. That's fantastic the you know own as done a great job with regards to you. Know moving that that bird project forward. I think there was the two of them that they did in You know we're very fortunate to be part of that It was it was pretty cool. That they they allowed us to Form some of the funding partnership a not and And yeah so you know you can see those the importance of that first nation relationship. They're actually getting work. Done the work we want to do. So it's You know it's a great opportunity. It's great that the the canadian governments recognizing that through the process that we can actually get some good work done for conservation So it's you know we're really excited about the work that kaelin has done there with a so Yeah really exciting. Very cool to be part of it. So moving forward Do you see burns on crown. Land do you see any of that. Don government territory or is it going to be only on the first nation. Gd g stuff moving forward. What do you. What's your feeling feeling there. john. I feel like the way that we're going to get any burning. John is if it's driven by first nations and for that is because while far service doesn't think that the expertise these skills exist outside while i service to do wildfire.

bert kaelin Don government john John
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"That was a surprise to me but might not be somebody like yourself who knows the the beast a little better as is fort mcmurray. Like when that took off a couple of years ago to me that's northern alberta. That's cold that snowy. What would what was the difference there in your opinion. Yeah i think. If i remember i was in indonesia going on so i was following everything. Eighteen hours behind and If i remember correctly if it wasn't given the attention it needed early on when it was small it was allowed to build up. The boreal. forest is just fuel from ground to crown. It's tight dance stands. It's it's i don't know if it was beetle kill area so a lot of fuel in the ground and i think it just had some big wins behind it. So you know. Fire always follows. The fuel I and i think it was a pretty consistent fuel source up there and had the winds behind it wants a fire gets chugging like it's tough to do anything with it especially when it gets into the crown and and i noticed to spot so i think the fort mcmurray was buried deep in the boreal forest surrounded by trees that people love to live next. To and didn't as far as i know a really have any preventative. Measures does so okay. Always we see every year up nor stevie usually a myers All the time. I mean those again. Those forests were developed to burn so they could regenerate. So it's it's no yeah vires not forward to call also so john. Have you seen an evolution I think he said it was sixteen. Seventeen that You mentioned there was a there was more money on the available for preventative. Fire or prevention. I guess really so. Have you seen an evolution. And you know we're seeing these things like you know. We see a town like lit lost. We see in california and you know things that are elevated at the national level..

fort mcmurray alberta indonesia boreal forest stevie john california
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:50 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Living without smoke. We are to get it. How we don't want it. In incredible quantities at bad summers or we can do it under some Good conditions were short. Lived in in the shoulder seasons the spring and the fall for preventive purposes So so john. There's two issues that i want to jump on their. I guess first of all you know. What is this preventative stuff. So i guess Firebreaks like you know you know. These smaller controlled burns. That are going to create a firebreak Is that what you're talking about. Like what sort of so. That's the first thing. I want to address and then the other side is. Is you know these restrictions that i guess presumably the government puts on us that says. Oh you can't burn. You can't do this Is it a lot of air quality issues like i know. There's you know being involved with society. I've seen a lot of the stuff where there's all these different factors moisture criteria. And there's a you know weather conditions and all that stuff so if you could jump into those two issues for us and just kind of you know what should we be doing preventative. Wise to to stop these big fires from taking out towns like clinton. Yeah so you're right. The prevent stuff has to do with managing fuel loading around communities within wildland urban interface which is defined as where structures rather values meet forest or grassland ecosystem. So pretty much everywhere. Abc where where If if you have homes next to grassland or forest that you're that you're interface and that's the that's the highest Treat to try and protect communities but for so many years we have we have done it at a fire smart distance which is one hundred meters and for fire spark canada and that was really just a guideline of like this is the minimum eight to do. And so that's all we've done is the minimum and it wasn't until twenty seventeen win. Four systems are first of society of..

john clinton Abc canada
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:02 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"And we like the name because we both came from the front lines. It's related to like getting getting done. Explicit language and and then operations is just our background right like we we have decades and decades operational fire. Experience i i was ninety three to two thousand two and then i had contract cruise until twenty seventeen. My last fire was on was the elephant hill and that was twenty five years of of spending time on the fire line so we were both very operationally experienced and and then we like the idea of group because we we didn't really see ourselves as more so as as Trying to lead a group of people to to achieve some some some objectives. So that's kind of where the name came from. It was doing all the same stuff. The davis wildfire management was right on okay so john you know we've got this situation it'd be see now we've seen the lytton fire You know we've seen a lot of issues over the years La or california has been horrendous last few years You know. I want to get into the conservation aspect absolutely for sure but let's just talk about it holistically in the wildfire issues and some of the issues and what needs to be done differently to manage fire in in all across the west here really but Nbc what you see that we need to change to you. Know a better approach. I guess who is an hour long podcast right again. you know. it's it's very. I'm very very deeply saddened and similarly disappointed in what's happened in leonard nitz town and you know but at least two people that we know of her dead right and and it's it's we we know. I know why buildings burnt down. We know how to not have them burned down. We know how to build them so they wanna burn down. We know what protection unity's stuff happens and things go wrong and and whatnot but it's it's you know we we. We know all the prevented means and and yet you know the government just kind of has a very dripping faucet of funding for preventive work. They'll throw all the money in the world. I don't response and absolutely you know when when it's hitting the fan you can't have money being a factor need to get out there but you know we spent. We've spent what you know billions of dollars just in the last you know twenty seventeen two thousand eighteen and now this year you know i think for all intents and purposes it's going to be a record. Year has the potential to be if we can just put one billion dollars into prevention and and let the money flow and we addressed the issue at the scale. It exists which is landscape wise. You know we we would just be so much further ahead but you know we again. We just had this little dripping faucet funding to do prevention work and then we have all when when they're winning the response mode. Everything's off the table as far as the rules. Just go put the fire out but won't go back into that prevention. We've got a follow all those rules. So everything moves lower and when the funding isn't there either that just slows things down for so that's a big part of it and you know we we. We've done what. We spent a lot of years convincing the public. That fire was back. Raise the smoking and bear in the fifties and we ought to reverse that. And i think that chunk of that responsibility falls on the same agency that make people think fire was bad and have a much more aggressive program for promoting good sign of fire..

davis wildfire management leonard nitz Nbc La california john
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:48 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"I saw abolition within my decade there of more women on bass and more equality and almost a fifty fifty par between men and women on the base. Whereas when i started there was one i saw attitudes change innovation so it was. It was pretty. It was pretty neat to see all that and just see the country because we were going to inaccessible fires. We were generally within the top third of a mountain in the middle of nowhere. Like no no roads. We either hike up to the alpine to get to get picked up after fire because we had no way of getting out or we spent hours walking down to side of a laker. A forest service road to to get picked up. Occasionally we build a helipad to get out. Eventually we ended up becoming certified with transport. Canada as a hoist. The machine so we were able to waste ourselves up and down in the net. Let to doing many of acts for injured firefighters and other rescue service so it was. It was a pretty cool way to spend my my My twenties it was a bit a bit like a never neverland with peter pan. It was tough to leave. But i had this great opportunity to go and do prescribed burning type work and i. I knew the writing was on the wall. There was a woman involved. That didn't want me earn more. So you know lot of there are a lot of polls out of the out of the program. I i look back now. Maybe maybe i maybe. I spent a little couple years too many there but it all worked out timing wise. I ended up being a registered professional..

peter pan Canada
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:39 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Working in the okinawa here on not community protection. Everything from developing community while protection plants. That drive this type of community protection. Work to feel match or prescriptions. That basically say what you're gonna do and how you're gonna do it to to remove trees to reduce fire behavior and then monitoring and implementing the operations and also included that was Other work for parks and local biologists on ryab ecosystem restoration. Type work so trying to put. The eagles is back to what they were resettlement as a fire was playing a natural. And so that's been. I worked up in the territories. Both of them. I've worked pretty much all over. Dc for forestry and fire little bit now. Berta and i spent three months in indonesia. Twenty sixteen doing some work there and that i got seduced by the while sheep society of these see about twenty seventeen and started Start start working with you guys. It's been it's been a really get career so far she'll like i still got some fire my belly and i wanna make some differences and disrupt and change so i'm pretty excitable where where things are going right on jaw nuts Really cool Such a cool career so Before we there's a whole bunch of things that i want to talk about. But i think he said it was a two thousand three started out in your career. Is that you've been doing this for thirty years. Is that right. So i started my consulting career. Twenty fourteen or two thousand and four. That's a Inc my company. Start basically empty myself. Oh for for work eating. Kill so yeah. I've been Seventeen seventeen years. What there wasn't this sector didn't really exist before before two thousand four so you know those of us that have been around then help. Help building illness out so it was. It was quite different back then. It was a bit of the wild west seat. Basically told everyone wants to do no one. No one really had any guidelines so we just gotta make up it. Sounds like being a pilot. doesn't a.

okinawa Berta eagles indonesia
"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

05:55 min | 3 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Gt process You it's controversial controversial at times right but that there's a case where conservation and wildlife for winning because of an for those that don't know g g g is government government negotiations But yeah it's it's great That that burn a couple of years ago crater mountain. I think it was that there was some new technology. Wasn't it about their. They're dropping like little foil balls or something fireballs airballs. Yeah yeah. I remember seeing that in the pictures and just the the the look of a on the face of everybody participating almost a sigh of relief of finally this is getting burnt in work controlling type thing and is is. We're seeing around the province right now and in some spots across canada and we know californian austrailia the all get hit rate. It's fire is going to happen. And if if we manage it properly. It doesn't have to be anywhere near as devastating as it is right now to communities while said okay before we go off the episode here a couple of things. We got to new raffles out. Jurassic classic raffle It's fully donated by Rifles in steiner scopes They they've donated a sack. Eighty five fin light absolutely beautiful rifle topped with a steiner scope I think is around six grand atmos. Rpi on it And our goal is to sell it out We have the opportunity to make twenty thousand dollars on that raffle in every penny. Going to go on the ground in the fraser river. The fraser river project Bighorns that we've been working on the last two years. One hundred thousand dollars of our money's gone there so far and last night at a board of directors meeting. I think we've proved sixty thousand dollars for that. So this is a flagship project for the wild sheep. society be seen. It's a flagship project for wild sheep in bc The the fraser river bighorns of dropped off dramatically in the nineties do disease event and they've never recovered and this is the steps that are going to get us to that next level that we can see those numbers starting to come back with actually seen Some very early evidence of a great success in that in that in a river project. So we're really. I think the budget for this coming years. One hundred eighty thousand dollars a big chunk modeling said while chiefs put in sixty grand in. And we've got a bunch of funny parts are going to be twenty thousand from that rifle so you can see the importance of it right. It's really critical Of and you know if if you wanna get a chance to win a sweet rife okay. Yeah that's part of it but really like look what you're doing for wildlife conservation of wild sheep in british columbia when you're supporting raffle right and it takes only twenty five bucks. I ask me can can grab a couple of eight. So yeah exactly and then we just launched another one. it's a very very cool raffle It's the explain it. Because i don't think i'm going to do a very good job. What what it is. It's a trailer would. It doesn't sound great. It's a trailer. It's it's it's a gen to doghouse with. Badlands series digital camera roughneck edition tent. Basically it's a tent trailer. That.

crater mountain fraser river californian austrailia canada chiefs british columbia
"rpf" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

06:02 min | 11 months ago

"rpf" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Time you You lose, especially sort of in the way you know that we did. You've got to have, you know a strong Core, you know, from the leadership standpoint. That looks at the tape looks at what happened. Look at the issues. Owns up to him. And then moves on. It's DC bread white talking about how to move on from last week, Dusty want to talk about this U K offense now? Stoop, said earlier this week that he wanted them to get back to a more balanced offense and acknowledged that they didn't do that last week, especially, you know, you think about that. It was a tale of two halves first half the second half really had some good things cooking in the first half, but Alabama made some adjustments. Yeah, I thought the first half they look pretty good look pretty balance and were able to run the ball unable to throw the ball when they needed to and do some things. And then you know that second half Alabama just kind of clamp down on nothing kind of went away. And then you started seeing some No Miss takes with a pick six and things like that. But, um It's It's it all comes back to that. You know, I think I running games there. You know, I don't think I running game is, you know talked about it earlier with the difference between the average per game last year where we could just run when everybody knew he was running the whole game, and it worked out. I don't think we can do that this year. I think that's kind of been proven. I do think our running game can still be healthy and still is healthy. I think it's at his healthiest with Chris Rodriguez just pounding in there and leaning downhill because he just gets better and better as the game goes on. But I think our running game is healthy enough. It can be healthy. We just have to have enough to keep enough balance to keep keep defense is, you know, guessing a little bit, And that's the thing about this. When I was looking at this earlier, looking at some tape, you know, the Florida defense Is. People have had success running the ball against him. South Carolina ran the ball right at him with a freshman running back. That's a tough gathered just he pounds like Chris Rodriguez does, and they had success and that's something that we can do. I think we can do today. It's just we got a pound. Right, Adam, but we gotta be be able to do it enough. We run some play action and pop into a tight end. Run some screens or bubble screens outside. Just do something to change the moment. Um and just make the defense like kind of getting that a lot of like, run, run, run. Oh, my goodness. What they just do. You know, Run, run, run what they just do. So they get a little bit where they start thinking a little bit more sort of just pinning their years and coming after us. And, um, But offensively, you know, that's where we get we get into a position where people kind of you know people can kind of see. Okay, we're going to stop your run. And we're gonna make you earn everything through the air, and it's just, you know, are passing games. Just not there. We're just not there right now, JJ. I agree. I think this is definitely one of those games where I expect us to be able to establish the run game and if we can do that, I think we can build on some of the things that were working for us last week. Um, you know, aside from Carrie Campbell front with Florida, Uh, I just think that there's some opportunities to run that football today. Anytime there's opportunities for that there's opportunity for play action. And that was some improvement in the first half last week what I play action with Terry and like, you know, we mentioned the tight end Keen Upshaw. I want to see more about child. They talked about his athleticism. Now gotten a taste to me. He looks like he's an upgrade that that tight end spot in terms of athleticism. Yards after the catch already s O. I want to see him build on that. Um Ali continue to build, you know, build around him. I'd like to see us like, feels kind of Used him as a decoy and some things today, Dusty, maybe some, you know, maybe some slug goes or or, you know someplace, you know, some pump fakes to him and maybe a double move on the outside. I'd like to see us get creative in that department because we have seen safeties. And at least two games of last three games, jumping routes that were intended for number six Josh Ali and unfortunate last week, Alabama was able to capitalize and take one to the House. Playing very aggressive against the routes that he's running. So, um, curious to see how how we deal with that today, and it will be keeping up Shaw's number one on the debt on the two deep Justin Rig out today again. Yeah, you know, but the Germans point, he's a weapon, and I really like using tight ends. I like particularly when they got big bodies like freak out. Every time we thought of the title and listen, he's got a big body to mean that you can cover him and he could still be open and just put the ball on his chest And so You know, And I'm not looking. You know, I'm not asking for for, you know, 20 yards seam route to the tight end every time. I don't think that's realistic, you know, but just giving them dinks and dunks across the middle, like like with play actions or played. You know where you You fake it. You roll out with charity that he could run under. He could dump into that title and right away and but also to your point, Jeremy and getting getting some of the other guys involved, even if it doesn't turn into a big play. Just figure out a way to get the ball in different guys hands and spread it around where the defense feels like they kind of got to get their head on a swivel little bit, because This is a defense and if they get the opportunity to pin their years and come after you, you're playing right into their hands, And that's not what you wanna do there an aggressive defense they like to come after the quarterback, they would like to get sacks. On, dear. Pretty good to get inside. But you can use that against him. And I think you know we could do that today, but But to your point, Jeremy, you know, I don't think this is a game where we're gonna line up outside run slant routes. You might get away with one or two, but you keep doing that They're gonna They're gonna pick it off because it's just too good to be. Oh, it's gonna have to be like combinations of where You know, One guy's maybe one guy said one guy's taking you where you We need you to go to pop this other guy free on get the ball up, but even screams out wide bubble screens something quick. A play action with a quick our pose. Maybe some Cem Cem or are people we haven't seen a ton of the RPF where we've seen the R P A. Where it's like you. You fake the run. Then you kind of dropped back in the pocket and sit there in the pocket..

Alabama Chris Rodriguez Florida Um Ali Jeremy Dusty Cem Cem Stoop South Carolina Adam RPF Josh Ali Carrie Campbell Terry Upshaw Shaw football Justin Rig
"rpf" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"rpf" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"That's my favorite is saying something about Cam and in the responsive would be horrible here. Well, wouldn't that Maggie? Someone brought up the valid point? Wouldn't Matt Nagy take Cam Newton and say we're re devote doing our offense? For you, like the like. The Patriot's dead Patriots did not put him in their offense and that they've tailored which you're good coach will do to Maggie is supposed to be doing some r r P O making design runs. Isn't that what isn't that What they're doing is not with the Patriots. Cam Newton for that right team Cam Newton. Don't think like I don't think that they would struggle in this offense. I think it would be different. Actually, I'm a believer that the offense that they're running for Mitch is entirely different than if Nick Foles Steps in for Mitch that Nick Foles will run almost exclusively out of shotgun because that's what Nick Foles does. Nick Foles that are Nick Foles does run. The RPF doesn't know, but he's a statue. Now he's not running now. No, but he was a low end run, stick it in the belly of the running back or passing. I'm telling you, I'm telling you. If Nick Foles plays this year, the offense will look entirely what it looks like now. But that goes to your question about Maggie being able to adapt his offense to Cam Newton. He's changed his offense for Mitch. This year. Mitch was never under center as much as he's been the first two games. Look as much as I've been team Cam, and I've wanted him here. I always told you that I wouldn't guarantee that he would be great. I knew that It was risky. The thing that I was shocked about watching the Seattle game, I was shocked how accurate because he's healthy. Even it is even in the M V P year waddle like he's always been like a 58% pastors. Someone like that. He's been 70% this year, and he was throwing it down field. I couldn't and I was betting Seattle so was pissed that he was so accurate, but I was shocked. How accurate Iwas Yeah, There's no doubt. I mean, I think in the Miami game you didn't see as much pushing the ball down the field is you did against Seattle but through two games Listen. You can argue that offense in New England looks better with Cam Newton than it did last year with Tom Brady. The offense last year in New England with Tom Brady was awful. That's the big hot take today. I think it's true Patriots better with Cam. This is exactly why I don't think that's a that's a tiny sample size. It's two games now. Can that change between now and the end of the season? Listen, Cam Newton. Still doesn't have a ton of receivers that way. Tom Brady didn't But Tom Brady couldn't talk and run and give you a different threat. The way to Cam Newton can canvass for what is it four touchdowns now? I think it's for, um I don't know. I'd have to look at his stuff. I'll look it up for you. While he's got rushing touchdowns. He has four. Yes. Four rushing touchdown, four touchdowns already. Well, I'm just saying, like the offenses entirely different with Cam than it was with Tom Brady. And again, I think you can argue that the offense through two games looks better than it did last year. Pretty much at any time with Tom. But they changed everything. Yes. All right. I got some nonsense for you, including the nuttiest story the day when we come back. You're.

Cam Newton Nick Foles Tom Brady Mitch Maggie Cam Seattle Patriots Matt Nagy Patriot New England RPF Miami
"rpf" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"rpf" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Two minutes 26 seconds away from the NFC championship game. Jones 19 carry 61 yards and two touchdowns. Rogers now 14 24 202 Yards, two touchdowns Adam seven catches 128 yards and two touchdowns. Second down and eight Green Bay Packers 22 Yard line out of the eye on Roger's takes makes the handoff bootlegs to his right looking for a receiver under pressure to throw it away. Clowney from behind knocked him down past thrown in the general direction of Robert Tanya, but nobody was open downfield. That has been a common theme on Rogers has been rolling out. He's had a lot of trouble finding it open receiver against the Seattle defense that against the pass this season was 27th in yardage. Second season. They're down in 8 to 19 to go in the game Receivers left and right slot to the right side. Jimmy Graham standing up right sound of the line. Rogers in the shotgun takes the snap rushes on lost it over the right side. 51st down Green 46 yard line of Seattle was huge, beautiful over the shoulder catch in the throat came in right over the Hellman. Hubble. Go Hamadi 32 yards, Adam's lined up in the slot. Madi Man to Man. The rookie of Mahdi doesn't get a lot of steps because they don't play a lot of sub. He's Mikel guy and divide the Adams beat him in their critical one on one situation. Water throw by Aaron Rodgers. First down Packers 46 Yard line of Seattle Seahawks have two timeouts left to 12 to go in the game and all. Karen Jones, tough sledding off the right side of the line. Knocked down near the 40 for barely two clowning was there along with right? 32nd time out. So the Seahawks stop the clock with you await left to go second down and let's call it nine yards to go Football. 45 of Seattle out of the eye. Rogers under center toss Jones around the block from Sternberg Jones makes it turn spins his way between the numbers and got back to the line of scrimmage. No farther Seahawks are all over the run. And now the Packers in another predictable to third down a situation 39. Packers 28 Seahawks 23 2 minutes ago in the game. This is the Packers radio network. Hey, Voters Way have the go to Marine store, And it's not just because we have all the boat parts and supplies you'll ever need, including at ballpark. You thought you'd never be able to find it. It's also because we're cheaper than the other guys too. So why shop anywhere else? This day? Dora from Ken Door, Marine voters in the know? Know exactly where to go. Ken Door, Marine 57th and Ryan Rodent Franklin voters. Cruz for water paid voters this day, Darl from Ken Door, Marine When you get here, you might be overwhelmed when he sees so much stuff, but don't be because our staff knows just where to find what you need. They're knowledgeable, friendly and willing to help so that you can find everything you need to keep your boat in Tip top shape. Voters in the know. Know exactly where to go. Kendo Marine 57th Orion Road and, frankly, voters water. I'm Jean Miller and over the years have had the pleasure to meet the volunteers from the Brian Reach Paralysis Foundation. The RPF has raised over $5.5 billion in their.

Packers Rogers Seahawks Seattle Ken Door Karen Jones Mikel guy Adam NFC Robert Tanya Sternberg Jones Madi Man Aaron Rodgers Jimmy Graham Roger Brian Reach Paralysis Foundati Jean Miller Hellman RPF Ryan Rodent Franklin
"rpf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"rpf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Claude lived through the genocide and today is an activist with the African Great Lakes Action Network Cloud. First of all, tell us about Paul Rusesabagina. For those who don't know who he is. What's this story? And how is he seen in Rwanda today? His story is they're off an up standard during the genocide. He used to feel that he managed to a shelter over 1000 people, which was really difficult because during that time I survived that genocide, and I have to move houses multiple times and had to be in hiding. And it was not an easy task. Toe hide people. So it was a wonderful thing they during the genocide, but now as a critic of the government off Rwanda, he's been painted with the same broad. Rush that they paint every critic with every person that comes out as a critic is branded as a genocide denier. Even somebody like liver says about you know, that helped people during the genocide. They are branded as a terrorist and enemies of the country. So criticizing the president Kagami is equated with being an enemy off the ST Paul Kagame has been president of Rwanda for quite some time. Has Paul Rusesabagina been critical of him for a number of years? Yes, he has. For the last 15 years. He's been one of the leading critics ofthe whole Kagami, especially when it comes to commit atrocities in the Congo, where Six million people have died as a result of Rwanda in Uganda's invasion into the country and all kinds of human rights abuses. Publicist again has spoken on that he's working against the dictatorship in Rwanda. He's spoken against the staged elections. He's basically been a very open and one of the loudest critics off the government over wonder. Was Paul Rusesabagina arrested in Rwanda or outside of Rwanda. He was arrested outside of wonder He was on a flight to Dubai and somewhere along the route. He was stopped handcuffed and taken away to Rwanda. But that was not his destination, not on his itinerary. What are the charges that the Rwandan authorities are leveling at Paul Rusesabagina? Are they saying that he's currently a terrorist and involved in arson and murder? Are they saying that he was actually somebody who was involved back in the genocide during the genocide? No. The accusation is for was happening today. They're accusing him of financing. An armed group is fighting against the Rwandan government. Ofcourse he is a member ofthe coalition, of which this group is part ofthe And when you look back at Rwanda's history, Paul Kagame came to power in a similar manner where he was a part of an armed group that came and took over the country. The RPF they were one of patriotic front, which is in power today. However, Rwandans reacted to Paul Recess of Aquinas arrest. There is a lot of outrage off course with those who support the government. They are celebrating, but you know the place where you really Stevie Wonder's expressing themselves freely is on social media, and you can tell there's a lot of outrage on this arrest because lots of London's The government itself is criminal. So what happens now? I believe so things are gonna happen one there. One government's going to run a smear campaign against him as they do with all critics. They are going to run a trial, which a lot of the politically motivated trials in wonder are neither free nor fair. We were basically judged by the president Kagami. However, I think the international community is going to play a big role in it. What we've seen in the past is for this political cases when the international community has stood up and really shown the injustice, But the government over Wanda they were one of government has eventually released some of the critics that it has arrested and tried and held Claude got to BUCA is an activist with the African Great Lakes Action Network. Thanks a lot. Thank you. You're listening to the world. Support comes.

Rwanda Paul Rusesabagina Paul Kagame president Claude Stevie Wonder Paul Recess Kagami African Great Lakes Action Net RPF Dubai Congo BUCA Wanda Uganda arson murder
"rpf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"rpf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Became angry you on as although I do not know the why this would be and on me it we wear hearing differ by grand which was a Spokane on the radio speaking of that too all the to see would be kid day should be exterminated were you scared yeah of course I was afraid to the war he was my husband and at the time I asked him please let us pray and ask you go to four he's may seek to protect us ended the day where we took time to play it was the day they came to talk him into putting him into the prison why was he arrested all intellectual to see who was in the country as a duet called lack of complete so often to see who it outside they said Daddy working together to fight against the government the accused him because he was walking with in mind and he was going to explode a cement company a it was just a false accusation in order to put him into prison Charles was charged with sabotage his job and he had access to explosive in the mines and the authorities accused him of working with the RPF to put them to use the nieces first child was a baby then six months later Charles was released from prison but he was fired from his job the atmosphere had become toxic Hutus and Tutsis who had once been neighbors friends and colleagues were now enemies and people were disappearing Charles didn't feel it was safe for him to stay and book aroma so he fled to the capital Kigali about one hundred and eighty miles away Denise was heart broken her husband would visit in secret when he cut but he had to sneak in at night and leave before sunrise Denise had a second child and then a couple years later she got pregnant with her third son rusted yes the pregnancy itself was going fine but the mounting tension and violence made what.

Spokane Charles RPF Kigali Denise six months
"rpf" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"rpf" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Hearts cases Dinu is two years younger than her. She do anything for him when he wants to break up with her. She runs off. Hit by myself in any. That clip from the Graham Norton show from the BBC now, you can imagine in might be strange, maybe even creepy to read a work of fiction starring you doing things that you would not ordinary do. But this kind of literature is increasingly common, especially online, it's called PF real person fiction. Harry styles of the boy band one direction features in many RPF stories, including after by Anna Todd Hollywood took notice of its tens of millions of us online at adapted after into a movie that debuted on Friday. The main character is hardened Scott rather than Harry styles. Now, some fans are divided on the merits of RPF are the stories unethical. And what did they tell us about? How we relate to celebrities. We'd love to hear from you your questions about our PF, or if you are a fan, tell us what your fan of either as a reader or writer, or if you've been the subject of an RPF story. What was that like? E mail us one a at W A M U dot org. Comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one A joining us from WKNO public radio in Memphis is Stacey land taint and assistant professor of law at the university of Mississippi professor land tain, welcome to one A. Thanks for having me. And here with us in studio is Katherine Larson, a professor of English at the George Washington University here in DC, she's also the author of fan Gazza supernatural fan girl. Professor larson. Welcome. Thank you. Happy to be here. Let me start with you. Professor larson. My definition of RPF PF is that about right? Yes. That that pretty much hits all the high points. Now, why why why why are PF why is this thing? Mostly because I don't think that people really sort of separate. Famous people is being they think of them as being characters. And so it's easy to write a story about a character. He would write a story about Harry Potter, you write a story about Daniel Radcliffe. We don't know Dan rock cliff. We never will. But we have a sense of his public persona, and that's what we're writing about. And or it's wishful film in and we would love to know dental Radcliffe, and we would love to know this version of Daniel Radcliffe that we're writing other certain genres of RPF tend to predominate. I mean, you hear a lot about these kind of romantic stories, but is that the mainstream or is there more than that? I think for the most part what you're getting is the romantic stories. So there's a there's a sub-genre of RPF, which is called RPM real person slash where you're putting two characters usually to same sex characters into the same into a relationship with each other professor land tain, there's a term that comes up in the RPF world called shipping. What is shipping? Yes shipping. I mean, it's common in the entire phantom world. And it's basically you're rooting for two people to get together. You want them to be in a relationship with each other? So that shipping are there ethical issues that come up professor Lantin with our PF. I mean, this is putting people in scenarios that they might never be. I mean, you know, what's interesting is. So I'm a law professor. And I think the most interesting thing is ethics don't map one to one onto law. So there might be ethical issues. You might feel uncomfortable with it. But legally. It's really not terribly problematic. We we tell a lot of stories about celebrities are PF is not just a phantom phenomenon. Right. Like, everybody sits around and watches. The crown everybody, you know, the Oscar winning movies are all based on true stories. We just tell stories about celebrities as a society, so from a legal point of view. We don't have a problem with it especially first amendment wise ethically. That's a choice that everybody makes for themselves. Right. Where their ethics lines are. Now do want to ask you about the professor Anton. I mean, this seems like it's the kind of art work that in a way and fresher Larson L let you chime in on this too. Correct me if I'm wrong, they kind of has to ruffle feathers in a way to delight it's audience. I mean, Orson wells did this with citizen. Kane the movie that kind of centered around this power, hungry avatar of William Randolph Hearst now citizen. Kane got Orson Welles blackballed William Randolph Hearst sought of that. But the American Film Institute says it's the greatest movie ever made. So is our PF just kind of a new take on an old. Motif. Professor lanting. I'm not even sure it's a new take. It's it's been around for a long time during the French revolution RPF about Marie Antoinette was actually a form of political protest people pornographic stories about Mary Antoinette and the members of the soccer see and that helped to drive the French revolution forward. So I think it's just something that's been around for awhile. I think probably the new part about it is we have the internet. And so it's easier for everyone to find these things you don't have to be part of some kind of black market where you meet you meet at the stall that selling cabbages at three o'clock, and you get your ranch Frenette for Dogra fee. You don't have to do that anymore. Right. You just you just turn on what Pat, and it's all there. But I don't think it's new it's just not something that we were paying a lot of attention to as a society professional Orson. Yeah. I was gonna say I think from the point of view of ethics. I think what Graham Norton does when he sort of puts it in the faces of of the people who is being written about is more questionable. Than than. I'm sorry. Yeah. Because it it's really all about the audience when people are writing RPF when people are writing fan fiction. They're writing for other fans, they're not writing it for the people who they're writing about. They hope they will never see it. So when it's kind of thrust upon them, I think that's more of a questionable activity than the actual writing itself. We're speaking English. Professor Katherine Larson of the George Washington University. He was also the editor of the journal offend them. Studies and Stacy Lyn tain assistant professor of law at ole miss. We welcome your questions and thoughts. One a W A M U dot org. Now, we mentioned that book and movie called after which was originally an RPF about the boy band one direction. Here is the author of after named Anna tied in an interview with Bild studios. She was answering a question about what led her to write about the group. It was more of like the fantastic community as opposed to like the actual band. But it was so it was just like a copays where I felt like I fit in fandom, and it was fun. I have I still have so many friends from it. And now I literally like made a living off of fan. If Anna Todd the author of after speaking to build studios, professor Larson. What do you think it says about the nature of online phantoms that they inspire people to write some of these full length fictional stories? It's peaks to the passion passion, not only for the thing that you're a fan of. But again as as Todd sort of mentioned the community used to find a place for yourself online where you are surrounded with like minded people, and you might not find that same space offline you might not be comfortable telling people how much you like one direction or supernatural or doctor who but online you have that supportive community and you want to do things for and phantom is a gift economy. You don't for the most part, you don't get paid for what you do Tatas as sort of an outlier as far as that goes, professor bland tasting. This also kind of skirts up against some lines that I think a lot of fanzines phantoms have run into head on in the past with say marvel in DC or Disney or like, you'll major entertainment companies in terms of trying to tinker with their favorite characters or the favorite stories. It has the. The potential to be a gigantic copyright claim. But these companies seem to kind of figured out that would kind of be biting the hand. That's feeding us. So we're just going to let this go. Yeah. For for the most part, but what's interesting about our PF is it actually doesn't implicate copyright because it's about real people and real people don't have a copyright in their lives in the facts of their lives. So in that respect, our PF is a cleaner form of of fantasy creative engagement because you don't have Disney running into save that he that they own the rights to Daniel Radcliffe. They don't nobody owns the rights to today. Ratcliffe's a person. So that that actually you're not looking at copyright issues. You're looking more at privacy right towards him, publicity, right towards and things of that nature for our PF, which makes it really unique in the phantom economy. Okay. So digging a little bit deeper on that. So if we were talking about fan fiction about Harry Potter, that's one thing that's JK rolling. That's. For more. That's Warner Brothers. You know, whether it's the movie or the the play on Broadway, which is amazing as opposed to Daniel Radcliffe, the human being the the actual living person who has certain rights related to his privacy to the use of his name and his like this. But not in the same way that you would have with say the character, Harry Potter is that it right? Exactly Harry Potter is a fictional creation. That J K Rowling came up with out of her own head based on archetypes that came before of course, because that's how creativity works but for that. She has a copyright that protects that and that gives her a pretty broad protection over her creativity. And the reason for that is we want to incentivize people to create right? Like, that's a good thing. We think and so we give them some incentive. We don't really need to incentivize people to have beaten. They have them. No matter what. So we don't need to do that kind of incentivisation to create a person. And so you don't you're not born with a copyright over your life. Your just. Human being so, yeah. That implicates we give rights you have rights to your privacy in certain circumstances. You also have rights to control what your imaging lateness or used to sell. But we place a lot of limitations around that based on the first amendment based on the idea that there's a public interest in people, and we should talk about them more. We will talk more about this as we continue our conversation with Stacy Leon of ole miss and Katherine Larson of the George Washington University. Wanna get plenty more of your questions and thoughts as well. And we'll also be speaking to someone who can talk to what it's like to read fan fiction about yourself. He'll join us in just.

professor Professor Katherine Larson Harry Potter RPF Daniel Radcliffe George Washington University assistant professor of law Graham Norton Disney Professor lanting professor Larson Radcliffe Anna Todd Hollywood professor of English Dinu Facebook BBC William Randolph Hearst Orson Welles