35 Burst results for "ROZ"

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

05:06 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"Cross sank. Claiming would be a part of this amazing platform lease Back maybe post-election. So we can do a analysis or an audit plan like what things are going, how things were how did the debates already thought about? Oh Really Yeah. I I can be found on facebook on twitter and on instagram at Malia Cohen A. L. A. C. O. H., E. N. You know basically you can put the name me Coen, Google, search engine, and Mike contact information comes up and to donate or you reach me on any of those platforms and I will send out the the donate link. But we're constantly building. We're constantly donate fundraising and in this new era of being online. It really has changed the game and how we how we run I mean I'm up for reelection and twenty, twenty two but you, I gotTa tell you this is a mistake that I made when I was the first time when I was a new elected you constantly raising money you never stop because it's it isn't even just stop with you. I may be running for myself but you're right. You're also raising money for causes that are important to you nonprofit organizations that are important to you candidates such as vitamin. Harris. Campaign. So you never really stop at all raising or asking for money and I think that women we need to get. Not only serious about running for office but also contributing. To, just the our allies in into the men out there to make these investments. And not being afraid to ask right. I gotTA give a shout out to Kenneth Accident, who's been a faithful donor of mine and contributor since day one as heavy. Roz. Thank you very much. Love you. Love you. Vallejo, can we get in touch with you? On facebook an offer woman, me Lila a cons on twitter offer women, cogs on Instagram, La Underscore Cox for donation as umbrella cogs if you go to at blue. You so find me under Malek. in contribute there but I have to say I'm lucky enough to be able to win races on a fragment on a cost just because of. The level grassroots support that often gate. So even if people are not able to give financially which would help people do I, think the greatest gift you can give for me it's your time. And I think that all from for those who don't have money given up your time to candidates to campaigns and two issues I think is critically important just as valuable especially in times like these so if you don't have money to put Through at blue any of our platforms, you definitely can fight some time for yourself on to be able to contribute to all of these things and you can encourage others to do the same. There's a lot of power in people from all of us as like women in his like people to elevate office is the People Power that usually get sister. Now. I. Love that because the financially if you're not in a place they your time is more valuable because somebody has to answer the phone somebody send email somebody gets to do some of those administrative task You know volunteer in that way you know I'm used proponent of volunteering so. Practical Saints Rams those are things you might ordinarily have to pay somebody to do..

Malek. facebook twitter Instagram Malia Cohen A. L. A. C. O. H. Mike Kenneth Accident Vallejo Google Harris Coen Lila
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"To be selected and have the access the platform, and after that, they have instead of putting up a website. Riding A short-sighted policy platform and going to instagram with a two minute video. Why was not a phone call made to the Biden team to say, Hey, I have some ideas can we have a meeting? Surely. Surely. That response would have been met and requested hurt. Listen if he's made it with Cardi B., he'll meet with a nice team. I mean let's Or Ice Cube sorry is cute. But still you know. That, you're not utilizing your voice in a way that it's positive and also I think that's very dangerous because that could be considered almost voter suppression. On some level because if you're amplifying this message to people that may not necessarily have. The ability to discern the why? The requests to hold the vote was made or even have maybe they didn't hear the whole thing. They may only have heard that hold your Volkhard and stop started there. That is dangerous and Wyndham, the future of democracy is really at stake. At this point, we don't have the luxury to let the future democracy go without our voices being included in the processing casting a ballot on election day. Absolutely thank you ladies. I'm going to read some of the comments they've been coming in. It's we've been talking and I've been so wrapped up in the conversation I forgot about the comment. So audience I apologize. For just into the comments but. Some of the comments congratulations saw the phenomenal women on the panel. Meka Brown our class says, this is also proud to be a guy class of two cheese. Christopher. Franklin another fisk. Guy Indeed. It is a movement Kevin Bags said Hey this guy's and welcome back to the States Canada you have been serving in the military as long as we known us. Thank. You serve your service. Thank you. Thank you. Thank. You. someone says the wife of a black man with two sons is very different when you say be careful absolutely absolutely Kevin says that's why you're the Commissioner Malir. Erica says left I lot eleven some says Kinda as bipolar that must have been what you meant him for trees. Crystal Williams says great remarks autre older woman. Malaylay. She also says I agree there's power in numbers and the pin great stuff Cohen date. Thank you, Mackenzie I agree with the opportunity to submit in person comments. I'm someone says they can't even verbalize what they are asking for come up with a plan a work the plan absolutely You don't act spring training questions on opening day. Absolutely absolutely. someone says have a great outcome and Labor Day Weekend Oh so what to say by? So to say about you. This is a wonderful informative discussion that you ladies for the form. So with that, you know just wanted to make sure that we got the comments in I. Agree I think you ladies have provided such insight. Tonight we're. You know I'm activated because I'll be honest. You know there have been times that I have.

Kevin Bags Cardi B. instagram Biden Wyndham Meka Brown Crystal Williams Erica Franklin Christopher Mackenzie Commissioner Cohen States Canada
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"Yes and. She said, listen here's the well, you tell us about your PSA I don't WanNa and I don't want to spoil it you because you'll tell it correctly. It was on the heels of. Konya West sending that tweet that he was going to run for president and I was just so insulted by the idea that on Saturday night a man would decide I'm going to run for president of the United States you know nineteen months after the process has began. As there's nothing wrong with it that. Women you can run for office if that's what you want to do, you don't need to take another class you the training you don't to take another workshop because women what do we do we WANNA learn how to do something new we go to Google, how to and whatever that is or on Youtube Google natives source looking for a class. A training a workshop a degree and we are over shopped overtrained over degreed over prepared over. Studied over trains. And we still second guess ourselves. So I want women to stop second guessing themselves stop doubting yourself all the things that we do in our daily lives that we do on just a random Tuesday. Prepare us to do any of the things that are required to be done as a policymaker as a public service as an elected official because men literally wake up and say, I'm going to run for office. They may not know about the office they may not know about the scope they may not know about the level of responsibility they may not know about what it entails, but they will go out and do it without any hesitation whatsoever. Meanwhile women sit back and we think about what have I don't know this but if I don't know that at my smart, Glenda enough about the topic about the issues. So I was. Patrice the saying is is is unique to male. Just the male socialization. Black. White Latino. It doesn't matter gay or metric. Y chromosomes. Exactly. Why the chromosomes thing they can do whatever it is that they want to do. Absolutely No slight to them. But as women we have to get past the imposter syndrome right and recognize that we can be advocates and here's the thing that really wanted to get all of your opinion about it. We'll start with you betrays this idea when. Before Biden made the announcement that he was choosing Kamla. There was this whole discussion about her being to an ambitious. When I tell you I was heated and I just I was willing the air because I was just mad I.

president Biden Google Konya West Glenda United States Kamla Patrice the official
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

05:41 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"So there are some real barriers to entry to interfacing in this system. I think that's why it's important particularly to have women to have mothers to have people that get it. So if you providing childcare, that's a huge barrier we just already not down. We can get people into the process. So public comment. Writing letters sending a naval lifting your voice. Is. Very. Important and then you. Want the legislation passes. Then it's the real work record wrong late is but bid at the implementation then you start to battle mayors then you start to battle your simply person or other other higher ups that don't agree with you when they these obstacles emplaced department heads well, we don't do things like that. We don't normally do like that I. Don't know if this is GonNa work or here's the number one kicker is Hamas was GONNA COST So. You know for me my background really been in taxes in finance and budget. Willie Brown a great statesman, not only the state of California, but in I think in the entire black world. When it comes elected officials Willie Brown always tweet when I was graduating high school and going to this he said understand the numbers. When you understand the numbers, you'll be indispensable to whatever organization or Job. that. You are filling and so I really taking that to heart and understand the number. So they can't bullshit say we don't have money in the budget because able to look at the same profit and loss statement will be able to look at the the fiscal year before the Ford years and be able to look for some money and see how we can squeeze some money from here. We can move this around we can. There's attrition rates and so that has really been helpful for me. To begin chop down fake arguments as to why we can't implement a policy and to be fair I mean a lot of these policies been around been untouched for many years that karate restraint that I told you about our use of force policy hasn't been touched in twenty years twenty years before I went in and made some changes and these were like commonsense changes like for example, whenever there's an officer involved shooting SF PD is not doing the investigation. Seems. Like a no brainer right right. Independent. So anyway, there's a long answer Roz I'm sorry this is the raw Dr. Oz show. Not the Malia Cohen show. No. You ask a very complicated question trying to really get down. To a succinct answer but there are there are levels but you have to be patient when it comes to engagement changes not immediate, quick fast and it does not come in a hurry, but we have to be diligent and steady as we continue to run this race. Internally, as point you need the benefit of that outside agitation of..

Willie Brown Hamas Malia Cohen California Roz officer Ford
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

04:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"A platform for thousands hundreds of thousands, millions of people can view. Whereas ten years ago. Twenty years ago. Certainly, these platforms didn't exist. So was my word against the police officers word. And my word, you know law enforcement generally always had the benefit of the doubt. And so we've got real live tangible it instances and now people are capturing law enforcement officers, killing people walking away running away tasing them. You see people you've seen me think about George Floyd, the officer that had his knee on his neck on the wrinkle unsettling. Images and if you remember during the civil, rights movement when when you had journalists that captured. Barking and being directed to to attack. That also changed America. And that was vision and that was a new level of communication and new way to reach people in their living rooms. So there this period where we are is. Very to be consistent with Melilla said it is a movement. This is real I don't think it's going to dissipate. Now, how do we take this energy and we harness it well from my personal experience like once people are done shutting down the freeway in an you know. Protesting marching. What do we do then well, since then call public comment, right? which is you know I gotTa tell you. It's a love hate relationship mullaly correct five wrong where you though is a love hate relationship retreats you know to so. but it's important because that is the one element where people your voices unfiltered in you able to say what you WanNa sending interface with the decision makers. Now now, I have masters degree after Fists Whereas Political Science which You I went to a worked eight years in San Francisco in San Mateo County and local government for elected officials and really got I opening experience on how people's voices, how people leverage themselves in this policy making process I also earned a masters degree from Carnegie Mellon University and Public Policy and management..

San Mateo County George Floyd Carnegie Mellon University Melilla San Francisco Public Policy officer America
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

05:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"After that because then I looked around and then we had the shootings, -brate and the protest and just all the craziness that still going on. So I really wanted to get into the conversation tonight. Because I think in correct me if I'm wrong but I think that black women are just seen as the ones that just go and vote. And I feel like we don't use our leverage enough like black women win the election. But. We don't use our leverage. were out here, getting the masses to vote and everybody knows that so they pandered to us they pandered to black women if we're doing then how can we use our political voice and I just WanNa let our guest know that are. Watching with US tonight if you have questions for any of our gas, go ahead and put them in the chat box in read them off will do Cuban a after have our discussion so feel free to the. Text. Already come in an congratulations to all of the phenomena women on the panel absolutely This is. A powerhouse right here sitting here people who are willing to. Give, all of their strength. To make where we lived to make America greater, you guys are really making America Great. So. With that Malaylay Ultima Mullaly I, really. WanNa come to you and I just what is the vied right now in your state? There's so much. That's no. how are you someone WHO's in office? How are you handling all this said? What advice do you have for us that feel powerless in situations like this is very scary. Sin.

America
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

04:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"Show podcast. Tonight we are talking about having our political seat at the table. I have some stellar people people that I love your tonight that are going to talk to you about using your political boys and so I want to I love my guests introduce themselves. Patrice. Will start with you tell us who you are tell us where you live and tell us all that you do. Well. Thank you for having me. I am Patrice Marshall Mackenzie Professionally, I am deputy chief of staff to La Unified School district board member George McKenna. We are the second largest school district in the United States largest district in the country with an elected school board. I come from the Great. City of Pasadena in California and I am honored to serve my community in a multitude of ways and really delighted to be in this very, very distinguishable women tonight. In you, she's been a very modest guys but patrice. Is One. Of the creators of of the Ivy pack who will you tell them what it tone, what it is So I pack is a Political Action Committee created to support. Women running for Congress who happen to be members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc we knew that within our official capacity, there were limitations on our advocacy, and we knew that we needed to be able to take that next step in being able to elevate and support women running for Federal Office. So we are really excited about this election cycle. We have outstanding candidates we have endorsed, and we look forward to seeing many many more women come into the capital bringing ivy with them. So. In you know in other words, go to Patrice for the money. When Lady? Maters money night rent her office. So absolutely, we need to have more honest conversations about that. Well, that's what we're GONNA do tonight. So you just hold right on. We're going to introduce our next guest and we're GONNA get into that. We'll go to Aldermen Malaylay Cox..

Patrice Marshall Mackenzie La Unified School district Political Action Committee Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority deputy chief of staff United States Malaylay Cox Pasadena George McKenna California Congress Federal Office official
Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

"Hi My name's Jane Tanaka. The ninth. Restaurant in London, say my recipe is a perfect summer simple recipes, rasberry and buttermilk Fuji. Cliff fifty is a traditional French baked custard dessert from limousin region and it's fantastic recipe because once you need a basic recipe, you can adapt it with all different kinds of fruits say it works well with raspberries traditionally with cherries can figs apples bananas. Once you know this, it's really easy to adapt it. All the seasons of the year. So mine is a rasberry and buttermilk cliff eighty. said to make this dish, take an ovenproof dish butter it likely sprinkle it with Kosta sugar take your rasberries and cover the base of the ovenproof dish to make the customer makes take three jokes to hold legs. One hundred, thirty grams of Kosta sugar one vanilla seeds only and whisk that together to make Salvia. Then add twenty five grams of plain flour. Mixed in now, traditionally, this food is made with double green, but I like to use buttermilk because it has a slight acidity which helps to cut through the richness of the did say take three hundred milliliters of milk and wis that into the eggs, the sugar and the flour. Once that's done, pour the mixture over the raspberries and you should still be able to see the Roz rasberries floating on the top of the custody and bake it in a preheated. Evan. At one hundred, eighty degrees centigrade for fifteen minutes until it's Gordon Brown on the top come. When you push the improve dish has a slight gentle wobble. Take it out sprinkled with icing sugar. and. So with a big dollar of

Roz Rasberries Kosta Jane Tanaka Cliff Limousin London Gordon Brown Evan
Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Recipe edition, Jun Tanaka

"Hi My name's Jane Tanaka. The ninth. Restaurant in London, say my recipe is a perfect summer simple recipes, rasberry and buttermilk Fuji. Cliff fifty is a traditional French baked custard dessert from limousin region and it's fantastic recipe because once you need a basic recipe, you can adapt it with all different kinds of fruits say it works well with raspberries traditionally with cherries can figs apples bananas. Once you know this, it's really easy to adapt it. All the seasons of the year. So mine is a rasberry and buttermilk cliff eighty. said to make this dish, take an ovenproof dish butter it likely sprinkle it with Kosta sugar take your rasberries and cover the base of the ovenproof dish to make the customer makes take three jokes to hold legs. One hundred, thirty grams of Kosta sugar one vanilla seeds only and whisk that together to make Salvia. Then add twenty five grams of plain flour. Mixed in now, traditionally, this food is made with double green, but I like to use buttermilk because it has a slight acidity which helps to cut through the richness of the did say take three hundred milliliters of milk and wis that into the eggs, the sugar and the flour. Once that's done, pour the mixture over the raspberries and you should still be able to see the Roz rasberries floating on the top of the custody and bake it in a preheated. Evan. At one hundred, eighty degrees centigrade for fifteen minutes until it's Gordon Brown on the top come. When you push the improve dish has a slight gentle wobble. Take it out sprinkled with icing sugar. and. So with a big dollar of fresh.

Roz Rasberries Kosta Jane Tanaka Cliff Limousin London Gordon Brown Evan
New York City restaurants give outdoor dining a go

All Things Considered

04:49 min | 3 weeks ago

New York City restaurants give outdoor dining a go

"Similar Similar nice nice weather weather lots about their living. Eating outside is kind of a way of life in restaurants pretty much have it down in New York. Different thing serving outside can be a big and expensive pivot, especially in places where outdoor space is limited. Sidewalks and parking lanes have their limits, You know, and also nobody wants a side of truck exhaust with their meal. All right now outdoor dining and take out are the on ly options, so thousands of New York restaurants are giving it a go. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab checked in with two of them to see how it's going. Walk down Franklin Avenue in Brooklyn at night, and in some ways, the new normal doesn't look quite so bad. Franklin is like one big, socially distanced outdoor dining party with table spilling onto the sidewalk and into the street. Sounds and smells of different restaurants bleed together. There's Mexican, Caribbean, Ethiopian, Chris Chris Calamity Calamity and and Lincoln Lincoln Wheeler Wheeler are are at at a a table table outside outside Roz Roz Plant Plant based based Ethiopia. Ethiopia. Yes, Yes, we we just just ordered ordered and and We We got got a a tip tip with with injera. injera. And And then then we we ordered ordered was was the the other other one one so so food food dish dish within within Jared Jared on on a a kind kind of of salad salad and and some some some. some. They're They're celebrating their friend who didn't want to talk. Just got a pandemic puppy. And after four months of not being able to eat out, calamity, says ST Dining feels good, But it uh it actually felt a little bizarre the first time Right now. It's sort of just feels normal, like walking around seeing everyone outside eating. Very like very European vibe that I think it's pretty refreshing for New York. A lot of time and money went into creating that vied Romeo Rigali owns a restaurant with his wife, Milica. Ultimately, they sank $5000 into that outdoor space, and it's tiny, just six tables in a parallel parking spot on the street with a few more on the sidewalk. The day they announced that outdoor dining was allowed. I went online and I applied. You gotta prove right away. And then I just ran to Home Depot for Rigali. It would be the first of many trips that one was for plans started. You want 30 for? I believe I counted right. We wanted to make love Tropical tropical tto help diners forget they're eating just inches away from honking cars and idle ing delivery trucks. Then there was the trip for cinderblocks to keep those cars and trucks where they belong. Then another trip for wood fencing city inspected, recalled his parking spot patio three times. And each time he had to shut it down and make adjustments feels like the rules are always changing. Just every day. There's something new was tired of Home Depot. Just a lot. With takeout as the only other option every square foot counts and for many restaurant owners that comes down to luck. Narrow storefront, narrow patio, fire hydrants, bus stops and subway grates. Forget about it. Corner location. Nice. A few blocks away from Rigali is restaurant, Izaak Solace, a French American restaurant with a Michelin star. Solace is known for its $70.6 course meal or it wass. Steve Wang is the director of operations. Six courses, servers at the table, talking with the gas clearing the plates that had been eaten on six times a guest seemed like a lot of contacts. Also, Boxall is his patio is pretty far from the kitchen with steps and uneven pavement along the way, and during that long walk food gets cold or doesn't stay cold. So now the raw yellow fin tuna comes with the tomato dashi water on the side in a bottle on ice. Don't know what tomato Darcy Water is No worries. I had to ask to assault tomatoes down. Let the water drain out. And then you infuse it with kombu and Benito. So guess, pour the tomato water onto the fish. And it kind of keeps the dish cool while they eat it properly Chilled tomato water isn't Wangs on Ly challenged. The dining area is in what was a vacant lot behind the restaurant. Long's team cleared out the trash and added twinkly lights and white fencing to glam up the space. Beyond that, it's not very easy to control the elements. You know everything from the heat. Teo pests, mosquitoes around I'll explain. Finally do not go together. Maybe not. But customers don't seem to mind. And for now, outdoor dining is helping the business break even It is on a good day. Axel's had to close early that evening. A peak night Friday at a peak hour, eight PM Because even after you control the food and the space and the bugs, one thing you can't control is rain. I'm Christian Schwab for marketing.

Romeo Rigali New York Ethiopia Home Depot Izaak Solace Kristen Schwab St Dining Roz Roz Plant Plant Jared Jared Lincoln Lincoln Wheeler Wheele Brooklyn Boxall Franklin Christian Schwab Steve Wang LY Chris Chris Axel Michelin Cinderblocks
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

07:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"Seat up to the right table don't step into somebody else's pull up your own hair and then you sit down and then you'd be imparted conversation and be an equal contributor. That's that's what I would say when we're thinking about seat sex ingles and advice. No that is so profound because you're absolutely right in terms of if you have not seeking the heads of organizations have any kind of comment about black lives matter. Then you know you do wonder or question. You know where do they stand on the matter is the place while I'll be accepted is this a place where I'll be valued? So I'm so glad that you brought. That up because you know we have some people you know. Well, it will without spending make people have lost their jobs. So people are just eager to get a job but I, think you know what you said is so important in terms of making sure it's the right table making sure it's a good thing. Make sure it's a place that has your interest in mind and because. The worst thing that can happen to an individual is getting a job and being miserable but filling stuck because they need the income. So I do like that, you are encouraging people to check out the website to look at the Walter of the company to determine whether it is You Open official for you that you that comments are saying yes, and that's such a great point. You know he bar responding that that really resonated. With them and I wanted to ask this question About. What is the difference between diversity and being culturally competent because companies can say the right stuff. But what if they really aren't culturally competent once you get in the door and you see? What's Diener for the company? Right chat. So I'm sure that quite as bouncer go off but I'm going to say this anyway. I would tell you it's kind of just like high level we are tribal right And sometimes when we don't believe what else we have in common that tribal them is visual, right? So you know will will will think that because we're all black, that's our tribe or because we're women girl power right but I would tell you that your tribe. Is. Really. About how you treat people and your philosophies and your understanding that everybody is created equal. And that is not always something that you see with people who look like you amount of Melanin there in bright and so. When we think about cultural competency I'll take it to healthcare because I think right now with covert I. Think we're all living in space. Yes. So I would much rather have a doctor who doesn't look like me but who is well read. And researched in the issues with how people like me have have with their their their medical history. I would much rather a white doctor, a Latino doctor or Asian doctor who understands the best care and plans for me than somebody who looks like me but has had very different experiences and did not care enough to do the research. So let's think that culturally competent you look like me it means that you took the time to make sure that you understood my challenges and what the best plan forward for media's and so that's the difference between diversity diversity is what you see in who? Also happens how you prepare to care for people and deliver the service is that you know you you would to me those are the differences. No, I. I love that I love that completely because you know you're right just because we're we're the same ethnicity doesn't mean that we have the same experiences in the end you know not to be taken for granted because we are from the same culture. So thank you for explaining that because a lot of people think diverse needs to call culturally competent and that is the farthest from the truth. The farthest from the truth. So. Thank you. Thank you for explaining that everyone is an enlightening on my guys. This is amazing truth about mutual bit There is a question that came in and it's Disability inclusion is a competitive advantage the authentic authentic excuse me voice of Intersex analyses important. Now, than ever how can grassroot change agents have their voice heard in diversity? So I will I mean so interested this this convert this conversation around intersection analogy I coined by Dr Kimberly, Rancho and and actually she started talking about it when she was representing a woman who was let go from a large auto manufacturer and initially the judge ruled. In the auto companies lever because she was a woman and she was black and you couldn't say that she was discriminated against for either of those those differences. But when you couple them together, you understood that it was doubly. Clear that she was excluded from the process to be able to earn a living because of the where those intersections of discrimination and so when we talk about intersection nowadays, really important and so I think well, we talk about like the grassroots initiatives diversity inc again, it is very simple, but he was foundational in understanding that all people are created employees and that everybody's contribution is not the same and so I think about Toyota Motor Company and how they made sure that people with autism using the way in which their minds work differently hadn't played factory counting right and it was interesting because not only did they. Give them that opportunity but they made the environment one which they would be comfortable and succeed, and then they tracked and share that information with others, and then they took on to that model when they brought him into their companies and we see it come up a lot in counting right now, and so the way diversity INC is is supporting. That is by telling those stories gathering the data making sure that we and we we provide we do the analysis to validate it, and then we share it with others That is actually how weird that's how we're supporting people with disabilities from a very simple, yet effective level. No I love that I love that and I did not know that Toyota was doing that. So I'm with that. That's that's amazing. Because because you know for and I've had the.

diversity INC Toyota Diener official Dr Kimberly Rancho
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
The pandemic may cause 40 million Americans to lose their homes

Pacifica Evening News

01:59 min | Last month

The pandemic may cause 40 million Americans to lose their homes

"About 1/3 of all Americans rent their homes, and a new report for the Aspen Institute shows the pandemic related unemployment crisis could mean eviction. For more than 40% of those households without additional relief measures. Roz Brown reports. Nevada is behind only Alabama, where renters are the most vulnerable to eviction. Other top states for vulnerable renters include Oklahoma, Louisiana and New York City Co author Sam Gillman says the loss of housing often ushers in serious legal consequences and suffering for families. It leads to Children not being able to go to school, homelessness, depression and diseases of despair. An eviction offends everything in a family's life. Nevada has created a rant relief program. But the state's $30 million in assistance relies entirely on federal funds and stimulus talks have stalled in Congress. President Donald Trump circumventing Congress on Saturday by signing executive orders, he says, will deliver aid to Americans, including an eviction moratorium, But it's not clear if their constitutional or substantive, the report shows. A 37% of Nevada renters are at risk of eviction by the end of the year. Visions don't change, Gillman says. Some renters will be able to borrow money or work something out with their landlord. But eventually those options will be exhausted. And at that point, that's when this pick your natural disaster metaphor. Eviction. Avalanche tsunami tornado will continue to start carrying through and accelerating through our communities, according to Gilman. It's not just runners who will be affected, but also landlord's. Those mom and pop landlords are also severely at risk in this rental housing crisis, because if the Rangers can't pay rent The landlord's can't pay their mortgages and we could see the acceleration of a rental housing crisis into a foreclosure crisis. Gilman notes that black and Latino Americans who already experience a greater risk of Cove in 19 make up about 80% of those facing eviction for

Nevada Sam Gillman Congress Gilman Donald Trump Aspen Institute Rangers Roz Brown New York City Oklahoma President Trump Alabama Executive Louisiana
Getting Nosey About the Science of Smell

Wow In the World

06:00 min | Last month

Getting Nosey About the Science of Smell

"Free. Do. Not. Even up your wake up the whole neighborhood and it's about time whitecaps. Interest you when a jar Brinkley ground coffee. Well. Might as well. Take you up on that offer. Grabbed my room. Think in prime freshly tax. Okay Mindy. Hi. How about that jar of racially ground copy Oh sure Reggie one jar of freshly ground coffee. Here you go. That will be free, ninety, nine plus tax. Mindy. Just, an empty jar, where's the coffee and? The I know what copy looks like and I can assure you that there is nothing in this jar. Well, that's because smells are invisible guy. Roz. Smells Yeah if you want your freshly ground copy smelled you're going to have to open that jar. You woke me up and got me out of Bedford nothing open the Jar Guy Roger? Okay. Visible coffee. What's? In the this jar won't open. childproof lit on it here. Let me take a cry and. You're freshly ground coffee fell. Kidding many this coffee smell is almost as good as the real thing. Now, where is the real thing? Oh Maybe Dennis. Hauser's something Dennis copy. I I have fresh single origin beans imported from. Peru's Com Monica region handpicked and sorted Bali Washington Sun dried. Section and here we have. Never, mind I don't have copy media, all of these empty jars filled with. Yeah I mean look here we've got the smell of wet clothes left in the washing machine for three days. and. This one is that super specific convenient store smell. and. This one over here is rotten egg. One smells like Uranus. Why I'm your rain is the planet made up of gas called hydrogen sulfide bears an uncanny resemblance to rotten eggs. Surprise you know that O. K. I. untypically speaking he's not wrong. Thanks. Good overs in these jars Lucy. He tried this one. What is that the smell of a pile of dirt dirt? You're smelling beeps? Purple root vegetables roasted in the oven and eat on salads turns or Poop pink who will you know for some reason beats always smelled like dirt to me what else you got Let me. I know here, try this one. What do you think? I think that what might be completely empty mindy? I can smell it from here. It's lily of the valley. Tennis. This one is lily of the Valley Lily of the valley as in that highly poisonous woodland flowering plant. Exactly. My mother would wear the sent every fall as I left home for boarding school. She said, it signified the return of happiness. How my mother loved Boarding School Oh what is he talking about Mindy? Okay. So the scent of Lily of the Valley is one of those smells that skin care and beauty product companies are always trying to recreate demean for perfumes and soaps and Lotions Ya. It contains this chemical called Boerge. And for a lot of people like Dennis, even a tiny droplet of this stuff can spell super intense i. Can't smell it at all. Well, you're not alone guy, Roz you see this geneticist named Casey Trimmer. She got together with a team of researchers at the Mona L. Chemical Senses, Center Philadelphia and Rockefeller University in New York. City and she and her team set out to find out why different people smell different things differently, and just to be clear a geneticist is the type of scientists who studies how certain features are passed down from different generations of people, right? Right. Like, how heritage my mother's sense of smell and my great grandfather's sense of entitlement. So. I'm wondering deductor trimmer team suspected Sheen's or what makes you you and Mimi have some kind of role to play in the way different people experience different smells you know it so she and her fellow researchers decided to conduct A. Scientific experiment

Mindy Valley Lily Casey Trimmer Dennis Brinkley ROZ Reggie Mimi Peru Bedford Mona L. Chemical Rockefeller University O. K. I. Untypically Bali Washington Sun Tennis Boarding School Hauser Sheen A. Scientific Experiment
Here Comes The Sun Powered Energy

Wow In the World

07:10 min | Last month

Here Comes The Sun Powered Energy

"ME. who could possibly be at seven in the morning. Hold on calming each. You think a person would have patients especially this hour. who is it delivery from earth giant long dot com. For me that can't be right. I I always buy my stuff from local shops. Earth giant Lung Dot Com just temps people to buy stuff, they don't need. A Good Morning Good Morning I've got some baggage is here. This one. Wait a minute. You've got like a hundred and fifty packages behind you. Are you sure there for me, Hunt says right here on the package Guy Rasi next door to the gingerbread mansion, and here we go this one. that. Wait a minute of these packages are dress to mindy. Guy. Roz Mindy. Oh. You mean her yet you got it. there. What is going off? Cabins fermenting coming along. Well, IT'S A. Baby. What is going on? Just dealing with a little delivery from Earth's giant lung, dot com small delivery. There's like A. Fifty boxes coming up that. One hundred and ninety two boxes to be precise. The ninety two boxes and anyway, why are half of them being delivered to my house? Oh. So turns out. Earth's giant lung. Dot Com has a limit on how many boxes that they'll deliver to a single address. So I had to put yours down to hope you don't mind. Mindy one of you ordered. I. Mean I know you've got a food truck and all, but I mean, this can't be cricket. bbq. It's not cricket powder. Why wouldn't need so much crooked powder. Well, then what could you have possibly ordered? Well, just the other day I was sitting at home minding my own beeswax zoodles told me that it was cyber Monday. Cyber Funday will what are you talking? Oh. So Cyber Funday is the day when all of these shopping websites like earth giant lung, dot, com have deals on everything. You could ever want in everything. You didn't even know you wanted all these toys and glitter bombs in unicorns that poop rainbows and UNICORNS. The pope potatoes in bake ovens and keychains and novelty gives an inspirational decorative plates see. This one says love laugh live. Even got in on Danis. Would you order? Hundred veget- spinners they were overstocked. But two, thousand, seventeen. Will be restless again. I'm bored Mindy. I don't understand you sure you need all this stuff. Yes. Of course, I don't need it. Geyer is it was all fail. I use the money that I made from those? Bars that Reggie Ni- sold to his Paleo Pigeon. and Boy Howdy. We made a fortune on those things. I walked away from that business venture with a thousand dollars. Wait wait hold on hold on. You're telling me you made a thousand dollars in profit from selling bird seed. Paleo. Energy bars, and you decided to spend it on a bunch of a bunch of junk. Well, you know what you always say Guy Roz one birds trashes other birds treasure. What I don't see that. Yeah. You do remember last week when Reggie helped you fish all those old plastic bottles and aluminum cans from Dennis's trash. Hey reg over here. Can you give me a hand? I'm going through Dennis is trash and he's not recycling anything I mean. Fish all these bottles and cans out of this trash bin. You want us to help you. Dentists as. Well as I always say, reg one birds, trash is another bird treasure. The Wow. Do you remember? Oh. Yeah. But but I was talking about trash that could actually be recycled and turned into something new. Because otherwise all that trash gets dumped into a giant trash dump or landfill, and well, that's not good for our environment. Picking Up. down. Guy. Arise talking about rash turning into treasure. Meant recycling deaths. Oh, and Xiaojing Bhai these one hundred and nine hundred boxes. Actually one, hundred, ninety, two boxes downing judging by those one, hundred, ninety, two boxes. You actually generated more trash. You, know what they say. I one person's trash is another person's toilet paper dispenser. That plays Christmas. Songs. report. You're calling my Wifi enabled Bluetooth, ready egg beater earings. Well. Yes. Sir I mean, no, I mean. Look at all the plastic and cardboard out here. All these things you've ordered are packed in stuff that's going to go in the trash. Recycling. India, unfortunately, that's not going to solve the problem. Of course, it will. What are you talking about Garros? Haven't? You heard heard what? Well, for the past few decades, a lot of our recycling things like paper and plastic and glass has actually been shipped off to China to get recycled. Except over the past year, China has told the world that it can't take all of our junk anymore. Why not? Well, we humans have generated too much of it and recycling all of that crash has become too difficult for China. So, what does that mean for how we recycle our garbage? Well, it means that in many cities in America and even in other countries they stopped recycling. Just stopped, recycling like Dennis. Mandy. I didn't stop recycling I never started gay Roz, if they're not recycling than what's happening with all that cardboard and plastic, well, a lot of it is being incinerated or burned. Well, that sounds like a pretty good plan to me. Well, unfortunately, it's not because every time you burn this stuff, it creates pollution in our air pollution that makes our air dirty

Roz Mindy Lung Dot Com Dennis Reggie Ni Dot Com China Guy Roz Guy Rasi Gingerbread Mansion Hunt Xiaojing Bhai Cricket. America Geyer Mandy Garros
How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

How I Built This

18:03 min | Last month

How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

"Hey, everyone and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're GonNa hear from Ta the CO founder of Good Wall Good Wall is a social network that connects high school and college graduates with jobs and scholarships. Today Good Wall has raised over sixteen million dollars with more than a million users on the platform I. Spoke with Taha, from his company headquarters in Switzerland where he gave me a rundown of goodwill's mission for people who've never heard of goodwill just tell us how how does it work? It's essentially a mobile platform that's designed for the next generation. We started off with high school students helping them build up their first profile showcase themselves in a way that I'm accentuates their extracurricular activities in particular, connect them to opportunities mostly scholarships in colleges and all. This happens within a positive and supportive community. Over time, we've grown with our members into the college and young professional space. Our whole goal is to level the playing field, maximize the potential of as many people as possible. So it's been compared to linked in is that a fair comparison I? Think there are similarities however, we're really focused on on our part, which is this next generation starting as early as sixty and guiding them through almost Sherpa in. Them through the future of earning learning and those opportunities. There are various features that we have that they don't, and we're really focus from a user experience perspective, and then from a community perspective, it's it's very different posts don't work here. You wouldn't find students talking about being on the chess team being on the robotics team being on etc etc on goodwill mean if you are, let's say eighteen years old and you're interested in applying to college. What does it look like you go to? While you create a profile for yourself and and then what you're going to goodwill, you help yourself our initial early adopters were mostly international school students who maybe didn't have as much guidance as others or since the US who maybe didn't have as much guidance from their parents from college counselors it come on. Here's he would other people are doing they'd be matched with colleges and universities and. Also. With scholarships based on their data on their profiles and then they'd be able to connect with like minded youth. So we had this girl based out of Jordan who was really into robotics science and unfortunately no one really around her who had that those similar interests and she was able to find others like her in the US connected Internet. NASA did incredible things afterwards actually many of our students have gone bound exclusive opportunities at. Like Oxford and others that we've partnered with an. Super fulfilling perspective. Yeah. It's really caused US checking it out last night and it's it's a little bit like if you didn't have a mentor or a guidance counselor like here you go. Yeah definitely I think a lot of early adopters were privileged in the sense that they had a lot of ambition and maybe they went to good schools. But over time we've especially with last year we've really. Put a lot of effort and a lot of energy towards helping youth who are maybe a little under privileged that privilege is actually not necessarily one hundred percent linked to financial situation but it can be for example, we're doing now with UNICEF death and other organizations in Africa for example, is running programs they are and were really helping you bring out their ideas, build up their confidence show who they. are in connect opportunities and it's been really really fulfilling and we expect to do more underrepresented communities in the US. For example, we're doing more and more there. That's where the biggest room impact is. At the end of the day, we are a social enterprise and it's very fulfilling to help youth who go to elite schools and connect them to lead universities and colleges, but it's even more fulfilling. Even more important for us to step in where the impact Delta's the biggest for, for example, youth in Africa who insert African countries that just don't have any exposure don't have opportunity. Don't have the guidance but do have access to a phone and can has result go through. So we're really trying to do more there in particular and are you started this company in two thousand fourteen with your brother? Where did the idea come from? So my it was my brothers idea both of us were born in Switzerland we lived in Iran the US came back to Switzerland. Our parents used to work in the humanitarian sector. My father worked for or Serb refugees around thirty years, and we experienced a lot growing up. We was like quite a contradiction going skiing on the weekend in in a very affluent privileged, no bubble in Switzerland whereas at the same time, we'd go in summer vacation and give candy out to refugee kids who are age your ten eleven and that that really did shake US quite a bit in throughout our upbringing we realized that we are. We are I'm here not because I'm smart but because I was lucky osborne that could have been born two doors down in that, my life would have been very different and I'm confident because of the experiences I had rather than because I'm innately able to do so and that's really what pushed us to say we were lucky in this sense what would happen if we were able to give those opportunities in terms of particularly experiences. So education is one thing traditional education is one thing but particularly experiences to millions of youth around the world what would happen how can we change things and that's where we thought it has to be mobile first it has. To be a digital solution and it has to be able to tackle millions and we wanted to go a step further. We said it's good to maximize one's potential but hopefully, we can do that in a win. We're very idealistic in that sense in a way that it maximizes or improved society as well or impacts society positively, which is our mission statement that if we have enough people that are exposed to not only improving themselves but as so often it's a form of education knowing what's out there if I hadn't gone to refugee camps or if I didn't have the background where my parents are Richard from Sri Lanka, would I really be so inclined to How this positive impact who knows I did have that chance I view that as an opportunity to give those opportunities in showcase through volunteering through being aware through connecting to people from different backgrounds. Hopefully, we can move the world forward I. Think it's needed now more than ever, right? Yeah. For Sure Tyler, the business for a second I think you've got around fifty employees the world you've got offices in Switzerland, the US Germany Serbia the Philippines mean you're growing you've got presumably some cash runway but these are tough economic times. I mean Lincoln just laid off a thousand people, their record numbers of people in the US for unemployment. So first of all. How is your revenue been in your business been impacted by the global economic slowdown? Yeah. I mean when it happens I think the first week where we started notice he was getting really serious I. Remember it. The first thing we did was we we had a board meeting and we talked about, okay what's our cash situation and let's make sure we get through this are along a be while maintaining the team for two reasons. One is like you don't want. Downward debt spiral. But also because we have the opportunity to have real impacting this time if we make the changes in adapt effectively, but we won't be able to do so if we don't have the team to do it so we've actually hired over the past few months and we've actually grown over the past few months and we've adapted to do. So the first week was really about scenario planning getting through that after that, we assume the worst but we. Ourselves decided. Well, there's definitely GONNA be less demand for recruitment is definitely less hires which hurts us which hurts our users or are members and we said, okay how can we can we help because if they come on in the no jobs? Well, it's a very bad experience, but it's also it's hurting us. So what we did was we put we put together this program better together and other challenges where youth can develop work experience at the end of it. They get certificates that show that they've accomplished these different challenges participated in it, and at the end, it can be used as work experience towards all of our partner companies. So it's actually giving them something to do some hope, and at the same time, this is generating revenue for us as one example of revenue for us. Another example is just before the crisis a part of our model is we work with large partners and a couple of these large partnership so. Leading recruitment than leading education routes, stunts or came to a halt. And then I don't know if this is despite coverted or because of covid other opportunities came about we've now partnered over the course of Kobe with market leaders in markets that we are not present in or were very marginally presents and he's actually allowing us to take up extra market share and grow in more significant way to timber onwards. Let. Let me ask you about the demographic that you target. Right I mean and I'm Gonna I'M GONNA use this term Gen Z.. Always cringe when I say because I remember like when I was in my twenties and people talked about Gen-x and their slackers and I would just cringe and you're older people talk about Gen xers and I was like, what are you talking about but just just to make this kind of simple we'll we'll just say Gen Z.. So if you're Gen Z. I'm sorry it's annoying I know. This is a really challenging economic moment if you are in high school now and you're going into college or if you're in college, there's a pretty good chance. You'RE GONNA GRADUATE INTO A world with very few jobs. You know a world that we haven't seen certainly since two, thousand, eight, nine and ten but maybe far far more challenging than that. What's your sense I mean? What do you think I mean do do you think that's that's actually true that that is likely to be the case for the next three, four, five years or more. Yeah, I think whether or not we go through a deep recession with mass unemployment particularly for the Youth USA next three four five years very probable that US at least in the short run or to suffer they're normally the last to be hired the first to be fired and that's justified for various reasons including ethical. Oh, they have less commitments than, for example, someone with kids, but it is incredibly difficult and the mental toil of, let's say an eighteen year old doesn't know what's coming up next we need to be able to be resilient and we need to be able to learn how to learn and adapt because we just don't know what's going to happen. So they could be a second. Downturn there could be a third downturn. It could be sustained downturns and US like across society but in particular for the youth they we have an opportunity they have an opportunity to take this and say, okay, it doesn't kill me. It might make me stronger and I can learn from this develop that resilience that five, six, ten years from now I'm able to deal with the next crisis in a more in a stronger way because I'm going to have to do that and some of the skills that need to be developed in my in my opinion or entrepreneurial thinking that ability to be flexible and resilient we we need to do more though the on just the the these massive stimulus packages and. Is trying to do whatever they can for sure this generation needs the government needs to intervene to be able to organizations needs to be able to intervene to support them to the best of their abilities in terms of developing skills and able to resilient. When we come back in just a moment, I'll talk with Taha about college graduates who will probably face a shrinking job market over the next few years stay with us. I'm Guy Roz and you're listening to how I built this resilience edition from NPR. For this podcast and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age aws dot org. Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition despite the economic slowdown tie and his company good wall have been able to grow their team and stay afloat. But as jobs are drying up across the globe. Many college graduates are looking for opportunities and can't find any if you're like in your early twenties now and you're looking for an opportunity and you can't find one. What would you recommend a young person? Do Who's who's graduating college is just entering the workforce and is kind of trying out different potential career pass. Is it a good time to just steer clear of the workforce for a while and get some more education which in the US means more debts? What do you think? Yeah, I think. Definitely, trying is important, but this might just be an opportunity to start your own thing. You know a lot of great companies came out of the last crisis because they just couldn't find jobs or that opportunity just wasn't there for your. So maybe start one's own thing. It's never been easier to start a business. It's never been easier to try something new. So if even. If it doesn't work. That's incredible work experience. You know when we talk to HR owes of some of the leading companies in the world, what are they looking for or what were they looking for before the crisis indefinitely after is that ability to be entrepreneurial even if you're working for fortune five hundred, so it can't hurt best case scenario you build something. Amazing. Worst case scenario. Fail and you take those skills and you leverage those skills and you keep your mind active. It's so important from a mental health perspective, keep your mind active and then apply them when the market comes back, which will at one point another opportunity. If if maybe starting yourself isn't it join some friends or join or reach out to small startups definitely volunteer is an opportunity. There are a lot of NGOs are nonprofits that need help or need support right now, build up your work experience gained some experience concrete tangible work experience that differentiates further rather than just having eight twelve months in your resume which are empty. Unfortunately, it might not help financial side and that's where that's where one has to be creative and it's it's just really tough and that's What does the government intervention on that front need to be because there's some that just can't afford to do what I just said, which is volunteer or build your own company because they don't have that safety net that don't have that opportunity in and unfortunately there in we're almost out of ideas because he go back to college, you just talked about extra debt but for some unfortunately are going to have to do it, and that leads to more a more philosophical discussion on what is there so much debt attached to a college education where you know in Switzerland, for example, I paid for my undergraduate I paid around a thousand dollars a year it's a leading edge I mean it's like A. Top universities and so that's a that's another discussion. Yeah. I agree with you I think that this is a moment to be entrepreneurial and it's challenging because you're you're right. I mean not everybody can do that from an employer's perspective you mentioned human resource officers, and by the way you're right I mean a human resource officer is very attracted to an applicant who started a business or try to start up in it failed. Because as you say, that's incredible life and work experience. What are some of the characteristics and sort of ways that quote Unquote Jersey works that might be different from previous generations maybe what their expectations for example? Yeah. It's something that comes up quite often the expectations are are huge I think even if we look at the generation before part of it is there needs to be in there. Always has been this need for grits for determination. I think post Covid, we're going to have very likely incredibly resilient and determined generation I. Think it's it's really great for I mean it's it's very tough. Love going to suffer and I hope I hope it will be as as few as possible but coming out of this generally on the whole, there's good reason to believe that this generation. is going to be really conscious a bit like after World War Two really conscious of financials very conscious sauce how lucky they are how privileged quickly things can change how precarious the society within which we live is actually it's a disease that, yes, it's it's it's it's serious, but it could have been a lot worse. It could have been worse could be one hundred exists and it's brought. Our global economy to its knees and you know we feel like we're often the masters of the universe and that's not just Jeb across demographics and we clearly aren't on I. think a little bit of humidity goes a long way. I love the energy of younger people coming in because their ideas are just so radically different from the way people in my business have have seen their profession What is your advice for employers looking to harness the intellectual power of Gen Z.? Yeah. No, it's a really good question. There basics of management that have been the same for every demographic every every niche within that demographic. It's look at maximizing the potential of the particular individual to different people react differently to different forms of management. Within this can talk about trends, but the ability to give them that chance to express themselves. The need for trust is always been there now definitely, so I mean even more so because they know what they're capable, but then also must not forget they are still with very few years of experience and being able to be there to give feedback to to tell them what they're doing. Right. Tell them what they're doing. Wrong. Both sides is critical. So just leaving someone out there in the world is not going to necessarily need to great results either but giving that safe-space giving that trust and creating an environment of being game your to maximize your potential and the. Direct, order may have worked. They may have been able to get away with it in the past, but some people might be okay with it but generally speaking that's that's especially for for you a lot of potential that's just not conducive for maximizing the potential where do you see your your business and what you're doing in five years from now what do you want it to look like I think for us it's always been about really helping as many youth as possible be as inclusive as we. And so we're ready serving youth in one hundred, fifty countries would like to go deeper in certain areas through our partnerships or load serve more youth in a more significant way. Provide more opportunities just re the best experience. That's probably what's most important. I think that's where we can have where we can make our contribution towards society. That's what we're good at, and now it's just about going to the next level. Yes. It's a challenging period, but we're going to be okay. WE'RE GONNA get out of this, and then it's about really taking this opportunity and doing the best we can because we are in a privileged situation if we were if we were unlucky which is the case for many other start ups I, friends who had term sheets for massive rounds of financing evaporates we hear the stories and then know they're just unlucky. So we're in this lucky position to be able to operate and to be able to do what we're doing. Let's. Make, the most out of it and I think that's our that's kind of our duty and I think that's yeah. TOBBACO

United States Switzerland Africa Good Wall Good Wall Taha Nasa TA American Jewish World Service Co Founder Oxford Youth Usa Jordan Osborne Richard Partner NPR Lincoln Officer
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

03:36 min | Last month

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"In alarming rate is well I'll. Hispanics are struggling at alarming rate, so we're just really getting hit and. Because and I and I was hearing the reason why we do this because it was just here's some things about As minorities, we don't eat the right things to build our unity. We're not doing the right thing to take care of ourselves. Front stay so excited that you're gonNA share at least by. Buzz Right Unity for. and not even for Kobe before inflammation, in for you, know things of that nature, but he. Yet whats what's affecting us from my understand with other. Going on with cold it. With minorities isn't we're getting blood clots. Is Nine. Yeah. We're not having that well. Some of US are heading their respiratory issue, but you know people are having strokes and heart attack. With with this Kobe because it's developing Blood clots and things like that so I am going GonNa, let you do your thing I'm GonNa. Let you tell us all about the Fox. News to Bluestar Unity. Let me just say we are live facebook right now, so if you have any questions, go ahead and Post Them In the chat and we'll get to them. TWEET! There are tons of fluids that. Could boost arm immunity, but I picked five. That I think people. They're easily accessible, easily attainable I think that people being more likely to try them. Okay. The first one is Red Bell Pepper. Oh wrandell temper little, so you know people think like Oh. You get a cold or you have a virus community people Ryan Vitamin. C Yeah Watch. Oranges and lemons which are great, but we'll keep it on grandma is is that red belt upper has more vitamins. Eden or Really. Absolutely. Wow, I know that right back so a half a cup of raw red bell pepper. Is has about ninety five milligrams of vitamin C in that's more than orange. And, usually you know, we usually think red bell peppers put in Salads, or you could. Stir, frying or something? Put it up with some meat. And WanNa make sure you try. Different colors with each color has different nutrients so as you can see. The Red has more than the grain than the Yellow Bell Peppers. In. Loaded with vitamins. Now if you cook it, does it take away the that does Nutri? Has To be wrong. Yes, Oh, can you batum out? It'll still have some, but not as much okay. You won't have the ninety five percent correct got new. If you don't like it raw, then the second option would be to go for the orange. Gotcha ours is a close second, but the half a cup Rob Bell Pepper Red Bell. Pepper comes first place well. Thank you. Yes, and so we all know the importance, or if you don't know vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant to help fight all..

facebook Kobe Rob Bell Ryan Vitamin Nutri Eden batum
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"Other, your.

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"With another. Episode for the Doctor Rosh. Remember when you first met your spouse or significant other, and you can wait to see. Them were so excited about date night. You were so excited about spending quality time with them getting to know. Highly how interesting things about them? And then? When you had your first embrace, and you feel her curves, and you feel his Muslims and you took in all of his loan. You take it on. And in. Second! In that split moment. Everything the world is thing, right? I know. I know. We all long for those times with our significant other with US wells. Here's the truth, guys. We can still have it. This is what date night is so important because at the end of the day. You can still create that level intimacy. You still can't create that. Level of reconnection. You really have to try. It's really not that hard, and here's the number one goal to help give there. That you just have to choose. To do it. That's fine. It's just the decision is just the decision to say. Hey, I want to reconnect. Hey I want more time with you. Hey I want more intimacy with you because at the end of day. That your..

US
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

03:51 min | 2 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"This is GonNa be our last question tonight because we're all still trying to figure out. How is this possible? HOUSE HASSLE THAT There hasn't been any charges. Taylor. Like how is that possible? There's there's a lot of reasons why not possible I mean well. So what they? That dictates really weighs on me having heavily. Yes, so they use at no knock warrant. Get into the House and obviously the person that they were looking for did not live there. And that was already in custody. So, there was tremendous level incompetence that was involved at least department that time. We've seized cases like this for. Decades. Case. Was Georgia. I'm not sure. Where there was elderly. The police. Yes, that was Georgia. She was like eighty years old. And they use a no knock. Warn came in the House and ended up shooting and killing her ran out. I've curse not that the actor warrants three eight any safety police officers faith. They're useless at it creates a heightened sense of danger one. In in what they're really looking forward towards. A lot of times in some cases, they may be looking for marijuana and their. Their Lisa Mail marijuana record store now. Certain states yeah. A. Quarter stores, but I'm calling the dispensaries things that. Matt? Through that? So reason why the charges in my opinion estimate brought one beside the politics that courts have provided officers will protect of for carrying out. Their duties and Lila duty. They have qualified immunity standards and statutes. If there are operating in what they believe is being good faith under the circumstances in a go into someone's house and they ended up shooting and killing them. There's protections for. and. That's what I'm. That's important about this. Woven rain now is because I mean we're talking about drugs here. Let's be honest. East the stereotype of this whole drug cartel in the inner city where they're carrying tons of gun to shoot up equals. A lot of the houses that they come into the down drug dealers. These guys are shooting times. They made me looking at some former probation. You know they're not going. Try to shoot a police officer with me back on the street in a few hours. Bonds I mean this whole militarization of the police. Words in my opinion is unnecessary. And it's dangerous. People lost their lives for so in that situation I definitely meet. Someone should be held accountable for. That was a violation of. Not only their rights, but it was reckless. At a late last night. Off! To. Reduce those charges. For this amazing how their incompetence can create a situation where they are allowed to kill someone, and then also wrestling for that demerge back, yeah. That's situations near me. Unlike Gosh, she was in her sleep. A young girl WHO's laying on the SOFA sleet. They came in her house. They shot and killed her when she was.

Georgia Taylor marijuana Lila Matt officer
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

08:09 min | 3 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"It okay state. Yeah, not. We're not seeing half as many as we were definitely in the majority of the state, but there are some places that are still peaking, which is very interesting on how you know why win! What where? There are still a few states that are still peaking, but for the most part. Yeah media flattens. And were able to you know, take care of the few. That still did come in pretty sick. The majority of people that can snaking this go round. Have that been half a sick as they were back in March and early part of me, they they had the virus, but it's just a mile off now. The fevers are low. You know it's it's better. It's it's. It's showing that people are doing with their with their. Supposed to do I think people are just going to go back to being nasty six. Yeah so, that's the fun part about this hector. Is that garlic? Of what people do you would you supposed to do? A you can imagine nasty people in the emergency department all the time. I don't get everything they get paid bucks I. Don't get there, you know. Less because I know how to protect myself, so regards those nasty people go to do if the majority of us who care about our families care about our own bodies. If we were supposed to do, we're going to still keep keep a nice steady. Nicest Stadium. The more we educate, the better will be. But. You know I think we do. We do tend to let our guard down. That's a lot of truth. In, yeah He's right, but guess what all they'll be here. We go be cited for these hundred days of summer, but that falls on gay here and we you know we still have these viruses and people don't learn real quick. They don't learn Rupe so the protect yourself. Whereabout what neighbor over there? You'RE NOT GONNA. Be Half five of your neighbor church. Right. Now. We're not going to be doing that. Able to show, how do want to eat I? Don't even want to be expressed. Cincinnati elbows. Hey, you're right. That's closer to sixty. You right absolutely. Yeah. one one other question. Are there any foods that wished to stay away from? I mean anything from from talking to nutritious anything that will make you unhealthy. So. because. It's the food that leads to the chronic illnesses that gives you more susceptibility to doing worse in the bars, so we need so lots of fried foods, high fat foods, Greasy Foods. None of that it's GonNa be helpful. Help you combat is anything that's going to keep your immune system strong, so you mentioned ginger. You mentioned to Meringue anything that's going to keep your your immune system strong. You know the super who have killed when you have. Oddly you know that kind of stuff that that helps boost the immune system in a natural way now you know. Are there studies? That show you eat this. You won't get this. No, you know because there are still people who are super healthy, still gotten it but just be mindful about what you're eating. If you know that that's going to contribute to you getting heart disease, getting diabetes, blood pressure, you go need to avoid absolute period Alicia Alicia asked about dairy products. Oh okay, yeah. No dairy products have been fine Let me tell you the situations where it's not. If you have diarrhea, you wanNA avoid dairy products were says diarrhea. If you have really bad asthma, really bad respiratory conditions, you want to avoid dairy because that worsens a just, it causes a respiratory increase. Production is not good in those two situations, but overall dairies nine a strengthens your bones gives you energy. Yeah, it's a good. Source of protein yeah overall dairies. Right. Should I just wanted to thank you for saying yes, is. Journey of survivor. Warning. We keep hearing these stories of. People I. Mean we keep hearing the death rate? So it's great to have an actual position. That you know that we can. Survive this. Earnings! And and and I think the key thing for me that you said tonight was to keep moving. He moving to cheap moving because. Me I think if I have shortness of breath that means I. need sit down. Exacerbate that. Young the idea that you know you keep moving. That is what? You're going is thank you. Thank you for sharing. because. My crazy behind would've sat down Adelaide after. His own angle helped me like my. Helped, me, kill me grouping but. Here I. Just want to give. The audience any last couple of minutes to try to get your questions in. Oh yeah, absolutely you're at your story has. Questioned in search, you'd WANNA get in. Let's say maybe the next two minutes because I know. At least it has to get to her family hungry little. Von Of. yelling exhilarating. Again this guy sister, my sister Greek, I've please. I love. And I. I think it becomes a share your wisdom it. It has been so informative, thank you. My. Pleasure my pleasure, and just to just to go back to what you said with the depth in all that we hear about like just you know it's killing us so much. It really is the African American. Community we make up about sixty percent of all the Kobe. Deaths in the US But. Overall mortality is down to about sticks percent. and the overall survival rate. is well over sixty So if in your favor at the end of the day, just no victories in your favor your your ability to come back. This disease is in your favor. So, don't don't just look at the numbers would be like we'll. Know. We got this victories in Africa. We're fighting from victory actually so. Yeah because you know they were saying that diabetes. It's like one of those. Diseases underlying diseases, but we saw that Tom Hanks survived. The. He right I think his wife was diabetic as well. Yeah. And I know I don't know. But yeah and another. It's a little different because they're celebrities, but there is. No different from anybody else. Okay. So. That is promising. To hear that. I didn't see any more questions. Come in, just a.

diarrhea Nicest Stadium Tom Hanks Cincinnati heart disease Rupe US Alicia Alicia Africa asthma Adelaide
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

02:29 min | 3 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"He's negative..

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

03:12 min | 3 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"It, but it's another <Speech_Female> thing to take the knowledge <Speech_Female> and apply it to your life, <Speech_Female> so I want <Speech_Female> you to walk away <Speech_Female> with something. <Speech_Female> Every time <Speech_Female> you check <Speech_Female> in some podcast. <Speech_Female> That is my gift <Speech_Female> to you. Okay, <Speech_Female> because if <Speech_Female> you're GONNA, sit here with <Speech_Female> me for a good ten minutes. <Speech_Female> Then guess what I'm GonNa. <Speech_Female> Leave you with goodness, <Speech_Female> so my <Speech_Female> challenge to you <Speech_Female> is to sit and <Speech_Female> have a very honest <Speech_Female> moment about yourself, and <Speech_Female> if you like to journal them <Speech_Female> by a Charnel <Speech_Female> by acute journal <Speech_Female> by Journal <Speech_Female> and write <Speech_Female> down the good <Speech_Female> about who you are <Speech_Female> and the bad <Speech_Female> about who you are. <Speech_Female> And then <Speech_Female> let's talk <Speech_Female> about a plan <Speech_Female> to change those <Speech_Female> things that you don't like <Speech_Female> about yourself. <Speech_Female> Because once you have <Speech_Female> a plan <Speech_Female> now. You have <Speech_Female> an action <Speech_Female> Negga activated <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> to a goal <Speech_Female> now you're <Speech_Female> activated to accomplish <Speech_Female> something <Speech_Female> I always <Speech_Female> believe in preparation, <Speech_Female> and I always believe <Speech_Female> in a plan <Speech_Female> because a plan will <Speech_Female> take further than not <Speech_Female> knowing what to do. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Right. <Speech_Female> So that <Speech_Female> is your challenge <Speech_Female> for this podcast <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> want you guys <Speech_Female> to be the best that <Speech_Female> you are I. <Speech_Female> Want you to make <Speech_Female> sure that you fundamentally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> heaven. <Speech_Female> Understanding <Speech_Female> of who <Speech_Female> are because once <Speech_Female> you here's the kicker, <Speech_Male> guys. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Here's the good stuff. <Speech_Female> Once you <Speech_Female> know who you <SpeakerChange> are. <Speech_Female> You won't fall <Speech_Female> for craziness. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> You <Speech_Female> Volvo craziness <Speech_Female> you'd like <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Female> that's. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> That doesn't <Speech_Female> work for me <Speech_Female> my favorite sanders. That's <Speech_Female> not my ministry <Speech_Female> that work <Speech_Female> for me. <SpeakerChange> You <Speech_Female> know so get <Speech_Female> real clear. Guys <Speech_Female> Q. <Speech_Female> Real <SpeakerChange> Clear, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> now that we're home <Speech_Female> during this corentin <Speech_Female> now the perfect <Speech_Female> time to really <Speech_Female> spend some time with yourself <Speech_Female> and have <Speech_Female> these honest conversations <Speech_Female> now <Speech_Female> this is a party <Speech_Female> for you to sit and say oh. <Speech_Male> God I hate myself <Speech_Male> Oh. God, the on <Speech_Male> this at no, no, <SpeakerChange> no, no. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> You're. GonNa list the good. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And as a lot of good <Speech_Male> albus, even if we <Speech_Male> made mistakes, <Speech_Male> there's a lot of good <Speech_Male> knowledge us because the USTA <Speech_Male> true, you natch. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You <SpeakerChange> are not <Speech_Female> your mistakes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So I challenge <Speech_Female> you to get to know <Speech_Female> you figure <Speech_Female> out what yourself concept <Speech_Female> is, <Speech_Female> and and <Speech_Female> start relying <Speech_Female> on that <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> help you function <Speech_Female> in this world. Once <Speech_Female> you have <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Music_Female> down pack. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Less than ninety <Speech_Music_Female> percent. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Ninety <Speech_Female> percent guys <Speech_Female> of getting you <Speech_Female> to the place. You need to <Speech_Female> be getting <Speech_Female> to that place of fulfillment. <Speech_Female> So guys <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> hope that this was helpful. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I hope <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> this was a word <Speech_Female> for you. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> hope that this is something <Speech_Female> that you can apply to <Speech_Female> your life <Speech_Female> and I. Challenge you <Speech_Female> to share it with someone <Speech_Female> else. Share <Speech_Female> this with three people <Speech_Female> Koska <Speech_Female> way. Knowledge is <Speech_Female> power, and <Speech_Female> once we know. <Speech_Female> Once, <Speech_Female> we know. <Speech_Female> Who <Speech_Female> we are and what we <Speech_Music_Female> can do. <Speech_Female> We can <Speech_Female> then develop action <Speech_Female> play. <Speech_Female> I love you guys with the grace <Speech_Female> of God. <Speech_Female> Go Out <Speech_Female> and have a beautiful <Speech_Female> absolutely <Speech_Female> wonderful day <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on purpose <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more. <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Thanks for watching the <Speech_Female> Dr Raj show. <Speech_Female> Will we're <Speech_Female> saving families <Speech_Female> one relationship <Speech_Female> at a time. <Speech_Female> Don't forget to subscribe.

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

03:56 min | 3 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"You know that I am very gregarious and. Hard, you know I'm not a quiet person. Something like say the life of the Party, but as I've gotten older, I feel as if I've come down a little bit, but I'm not a quiet person, not generally. But because I don't know the subject matter. Is that GonNa make me feel bad about myself? Am I going to start feeling unworthy? Am I gonNA. Start fully like I'm an idiot that competent no! 'cause I recognize that I don't know the subject matter, so I have nothing to add to the conversation. So my self esteem in that situation could Wayne if someone puts me on the spot, and they're asking me something in the looking at me like you're the great doctor. You don't know a dumb, not a doctor in it. Why would I know that subject matter you know and so? If I didn't have a healthy self concept. And talk about that in a minute. then. That might bother me, but because I have a healthy. Self concept I'm able to end in flow in situations and things I don't know about. Instill walkaway and I feel bad about myself. So, what does this idea of self concept doctor is? It is the belief that we have in ourselves. It is what we ultimately believe about who we are, and so if I believe that I am competent, if I believe that I am a good human, if I believe that I'm a good person, then my actions are going to follow that. So, if I'm in a situation as the situation I, gave you the example I gave you earlier. Although I may not know a lot about it i. I don't feel like I'm dumb. If they're having a conversation, I'll probably engaged in the conversation like Oh. Tell me more about that I don't know enough about the subject. So I am able to admit what I don't know. Because I have a healthy self concept..

Wayne
"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

04:25 min | 3 months ago

"roz" Discussed on Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

"This is not going to be a podcast about bashing bashing women, but we really are going to talk about relationship issues. Relationships in our romantic relationships are friendships, marriages dating life work life. We're GONNA. Talk about it all because God says you know that I am the queen of dot derives. Its doctor is Bates. Doctor is inspired so. That I do. Have that spin on it so I want you to make sure that you subscribe. To my channel so that you don't miss an episode. And you could just as subscribe at the little button here so that you don't miss an episode and I want you to tell your friends about it because we are going to talk about some things that we need to talk about some things that are going to help us in this journey called life, so as we begin the very first thing that I wanNA talk about that. We none of us are really talking about. We aren't talking about this. And this is the problem why we have so many issues because we are talking about. It is the relationship with yourself. Yes, that is the most relationships that you will ever have. I'll repeat that that is the most. Important relationship that you will ever have so if you don't have that relationship bright. All of your other relationships are going to suffer. They going to suffer. They are. I so let's get into it. First thing that want to talk about is who are you? Like who are you and I know that may sound like a simple question, but you'd be surprised. How many people? Go through life and they're like struggling. Have you heard the quarter life crisis? The mid life crisis that's because people are trying to figure out who they are at different stages in their life, and so sometimes we don't have that foundational grasp of who we are. Someone offer you two things. You guys have heard self esteem. But I. Know that you haven't heard of self concept, so we are going to talk about that a little bit. What is self concept?.

Bates
S13E11  Inside out clothes - burst 8

Ubuntu Podcast

01:04 min | 3 months ago

S13E11 Inside out clothes - burst 8

"Vie, which is a a program that takes a boon to serve for the rasberry Pie, and you run desktop you file on this thing and you can turn into a desktop. And it supports the various flavors. and that is how you can get to multi or a boon to was been to joe and she will. Punish on and you can bring up. You know one of the flavors desktop on on Roz reply to three or four, obviously a full with a gigs of Ram. Did livestream did that live went through the whole process wave? proper desktop started from zero went through the whole process. And maybe maybe it's just us right. Don't tell anyone may one of the things. Joey's article we spoke about earlier didn't have on. It is maybe we're working on a into desktop for the Ross, reply. Not Bombshell, that's the end of the news.

VIE ROZ JOE Joey Ross
Listen To Your Mummy!

Wow In the World

02:42 min | 6 months ago

Listen To Your Mummy!

"Move missed three about that guy. Roz thought a traffic jam on a weekday. And He. Yeah who could have predicted back to the beginning. I'm just glad you finally decided to take the wow machine to a professional mindy I mean how many more jumps corrugated piece of cardboard taken no probably like ten twelve anyhow. Where'd you got me? This great deal with mechanic. He knew from back in the day and it'd be bunker ball's not to take him up on his offer for a tune-up that is true. Thanks for coming with me to pick it up though problem India by the way. How far are we you far? If this lovely morning we're having how about some radio mindy that will help us pass the time. Good idea garage. See here DAB DAB DAB. Maybe that's still static. Welcome back to follow in the big tier in the morning. We're the program for your traffic. Jim Shaw Sweet. Talk for your grid law. Guess which day is just around the corner Tasked talking about Mothers Day. Oh yes kaiser and we got our hands on a hot new music coming out for Mother's Day this year we did. That's right we do. It says right here on the title Sheet Music Ball go man that says mummy music not Lami Music. The vocals in the song had been reconstructed from a three thousand year. Old Chip Schindler me. Let's take a listen to those vocals? And wow talk about auto tuning more like auto to auto dooming and these guys really burn my bacon. All

Mindy Lami Music Chip Schindler ROZ Jim Shaw India
Mets’ strategy for handling teammates stuck in Astros mess, Rick Porcello will start split-squad League opener

Jody McDonald

12:16 min | 7 months ago

Mets’ strategy for handling teammates stuck in Astros mess, Rick Porcello will start split-squad League opener

"We'll start with the match his slash Astros because everything these days is slash Astros they have two players on the roster who were members of the Astros in two thousand seventeen Katie Davis and Jake Marie's neck that have any of the mad to have no associated with the Astros had any issues problems conversations that went past what would be just regular spring training conversations with any of the former master players why are you are you honestly don't think so none to my knowledge and by over in the thing you know both guys or rather easy to get along with that Judy Davis injector respect primers Nick is new everyone knows G. D. but they apologize for their trains so you know their transgressions and I I think at least I was told anyway the Davis took some convincing as a matter of fact because I'm not quite sure why but you know he's younger and then maybe a little more stubborn I'm not sure but Bresnik it was deal with it out pretty well I I I thought he owned it pretty well when he it is a little active contrition shall we say no you just that I I I should know better you know by any chance I could stop that I didn't and by should know better old enough or he was there for a couple years came up in twenty thirteen majority traded so he you know was where our baseball Davis was the guy who got them on August the so I guess you can give them a little bit for you know not stepping internal blowing a whistle but yeah both guys I I thought handled it okay and if they haven't had any problems with the teammates really that's good to hear I if more is next association with the Astros is in the past what is his role on this team this year can it be is much is starting a hundred and thirty five hundred forty games and becoming if not the everyday center fielder more often than not is he going to be a guy who bounces around a couple of things how much is it state here in spring training for a guy like Jake Marie thank you know I mean I I think he made quite easy and so more like a hundred and twenty or a hundred and thirty games but that would be a lot as a defense a replacement I think a you know again if he hits mac you know and certainly better than he has your one thing to work against Peru's nectar made him stand out of twenty seventeen was I was this is best offense of season and especially at hold in Houston at minute maid park so the lord I DO you really hasn't been on an offense of contributor y'all note on the land and you know that evil ones and then outstanding season so he's he's got a great love and I I think you're you're you're probably looking at you know he won like ours hi but I think Boris Nick is yeah maybe on that level work be currently in center field running out the opposition but I'm not sure how many games he's gonna start you will get some playing time now these are the question was Ross been pretty open about you're trying to move people around eight beers Purcell's possible and he really at the for the one of the res hasn't even subdivisions book I think you know were a few people are going to be quiet before as they got the call up the calc chop out his time as it goes along fair enough and if we start with the agreement that check Marie think is the best defense in center fielder on his team how would you describe and yeah we I see him playing campaign we've seen him play elsewhere with as you mention traded for Florida into Houston we've got a good grasp on his defense we should have a good grasp on Nemo's defense how would you describe the drop off from Marie's Nectanebo defensively in center field Greg this thing you know I I I haven't seen in a more realistic here I I have seen them there in years past the mad I think he's outstanding rob wall full of boiling though noble is his okay I'd say it's slightly above average and Bruce Nick I think is is an excellent I I guess I would rate him excellent so why you know it's not a severe drop off but I I think there is a drop but only as a question about that all right so here you would be my question and we're we're moving through this in stages of memo is slightly above average your average whatever you are calm and whoever the Mets have been laughed and that could be a couple of different individuals over the course of the season depending on health and coming back and everything I Marie's Nick go into center field NMO golden laughter will Marie's nature's colder left field if he's going to be used as a defense replacement would you suggest and I kind of agree with how does that move the pieces around the chess board your question I think you'll want depends on who is in one appeal but it you know even if you just take the combination of sense but the slash you need Davis I think there will be defensible placement school war and that probably means memo shifting over there are bursting playing center field you know I I again I I I don't know how to search for this experiment here is gonna work out I'm not even sure is going to be on the opening day roster sure he feels he's gonna be there but yeah we'll see as we move along in the spring but either way I think you're probably limited there and again I haven't seen since this play the outfield yeah that's the big question to me down here I think you can hit well you're always here but the problem is you know what's going to be like in the field what's going to be like over the course of an entire baseball season so if you put those two out there I think you're probably going to see their own membership numbers that concern or problem with any company with his son a fan hi dad says finance in the clubhouse you may gin sets medicine the book out of box and present a field says recent club out I'd gotten into a couple debate with friends here the last couple of days who said doesn't bother them one iota it won't affect it to test what is it and talking to the media and I said I beg to differ because there's going to come the night where he doesn't hit and another guy on the team strikes out twice and leaves warmer but runners in scoring for the and everyone is going to flock to that guy and you're gonna have there it's all the tough questions investments are going to sit there with his over three went to try to get out and be defense of regal place that nobody got dog alarm how is that going to play in the clubhouse our guys going to get a annoyed if they get more scrutiny because that's what it says I'm not taking any yeah I think that's always a always a problem on and I think it wears overtime on other guys when we say there's any time there's been an open three with two strikeouts with systems we've never talked to him okay the only time we ever do to our dorm is when he's at an outstanding game it's what he brings to talk to our school but I don't really care if I don't talk to you and it's us for the full year I don't really care well I don't sleep so it didn't surprise me the other day when you said no of the way he did it kind of surprised me honestly after two years away but you didn't shock me because I've seen that before you know he's temperamental let's put it that way and you might say brother Donald no it doesn't matter one of whatever you want to call on that's just the way he is I do think over time that those where on the other guys will walk if they have to answer for him or they have the answer questions one night when they might not necessarily do it but they have to because he will talk so yeah like I do think it becomes a problem over time you know water and individual basis probably not because he hasn't done that Eric what that's we only talk to many of these star outing yeah okay met sedans today that down split squad Saturday when they open up actual spring training games they report Psellos going to give the home game and there is a significant step dad because dad games going to be on TV back here in the New York market anything to read into that day he just show up at camp earlier or is he actually in a bold plan been more impressive and that's why he's getting a first start what we make up for sale getting the spring opening home start no no it's hard to really you because it took us a couple of days to actually get out of Louise ROZ who's going to start this weekend at the it's one thing that a little bit peculiar but we've you know kind of giving him some role so to speak and then given him love some leeway because he's no you're usually yeah we ask you know say Monday or Tuesday you know who's gonna start this weekend or what's what's the line up for the weekend and you know we got to get an answer as to who it is we're we're told today was going to be you know of course all of the whole store I don't make a heck of a lot of the you know he's he's been hearing the phone a couple of old friends already has phase no live BP most of the pitchers have at this point but he was one of the first guys to do it so I think he's just off at that point in time and I I have no idea what they were because I'm not into figuring it had exactly where he's going to face you know those spot in the rotation come opening day I think it's way too early for that so you know I I think it's just one of those things that he's ready to go they're gonna give me the ball and see what it can do last one and I know will day you can get that worked out and you get to see some of you all could see others so I'm not going to ask you to handicap how he's look throwing so far what's Edwin D. as is added to like so far it's been great I I really do and and he does look good the rolling as well to it it was kind of interesting the other day that he was you know asking jurors were certain pictures of a certain pitches that that he threw war will landing on what they saw yes job Lowry barriers portal that as well too so you know he's he's paying attention to detail down here I think you you're probably looking at a kid who came to camp last year and got himself ready but made the difference this year and getting himself ready before camp and now he's ready to go here and has a lot to prove did a lot in the off season Pedro Martinez helped a lot I think that helps as well I think it's confidence is then restored a little bit Louise Ross worked on that a lot and so has Jeremy Hefner too I think he realizes how important he is to what they want to do and I think everybody else realizes swelled to if you have a B. as of the end the games to save games and not give up fifteen home runs in the ninth inning like you did last year it's going to be active with different season that you can you know pretty much put together what you did last year offense of wood so I I think that there's a big difference to be in the house and then I guess the biggest thing mac would be yeah always confidence judges think he feels he's going to get back to where he was in twenty eighteen as opposed to last year and that's a real good sign I'm not saying he's going to get the D. seven states but I don't think you're going to see a repeat of last year at least I hope not because I want to go through that again the I. N. C. yeah you may ever yeah I'm the planet and would good stops thank you very much she we will talk again

Astros Katie Davis Jake Marie Nick G. D. Judy Davis
New opportunity to boost Indonesia-Australia economic ties - The Jakarta Post

Between The Lines

12:55 min | 7 months ago

New opportunity to boost Indonesia-Australia economic ties - The Jakarta Post

"Few international problems in the post world war. Two era have proved difficult for our nation as development of friendly policy towards indonesia. Just think about it. Jakarta's annexation of west papua in nine hundred sixty to the attempted coup d'etat and successful counter-coup by the indonesian army that was nineteen sixty five the invasion of as. Taymor seventy five. The dili massacre ninety. One the east team or mission in ninety nine. And who can forget the controversies over terror. Attacks live cadillacs bullpens successive wives of boatpeople this spying revelations and drug trade and of course those executions so has president jarkko daito or jacuzzi or jacoby as he's known has. His visit marked a new era in australia. Indonesia relations this week to cowie was only the second indonesian leader to address a joint sitting of parliament and he came to camera bearing a gift. He's approval of the trade deal between our two countries. Greg feely is associate professor of indonesian politics at the australian national university's college of asia and the pacific and diming kingsbury is professor international politics at deakin university in melbourne. greg damian. Welcome back to our in. Thank you now damien. Does that you kelly visit this week. Does that maka a dramatic breakthrough in australia. Indonesia relations look it's a really positive sign and it does mock an improvement in relations but i don think in itself comprises an entirely new relationship. It's just a step in the right direction. Okay so the the relationship still presumably dogged by bitterness and suspicion but it was obvious support and even warmth towards education from both sides of politics gregg fairly. Yes that's right i think The y.`all would characterize it is the jacobi visa was building on the breakthrough which is the comprehensive economic partnership agreement. That was signed early last year. And what saw with dakota's visa was. He's personal preparedness and preparedness. He's government to really put its white behind the agreement. I think a lot of people think the agreement in pie terms is very good but the question is canopy implemented properly. Can the red type be cleared away in indonesia. Can we persuade australian businesses to invest more Generously in indonesia and i think the jacoby visa guy very positive signs for that still a lot of things to done for that The potential of that agreement to be realized but it was really good. Move in that direction. Again it's been said that. The many lingering suspicions profile in jakarta indonesians still resent l leading role insecure in a team os independence because it was more than twenty years ago. Yes i think One of the ironies here he said indonesia now has very good relations with east t- more and he's teamer leaders Fighted in fact when i go to jakarta and the strata is still has this legacy of suspicion towards indonesia. I think you have to back. Partly in history this great saints vulnerability that Many asians feel that logic countries or large countries around them at trying to split up their country to conduct. Bulkin is it and the ace taymor. Even though he's team always not part of the original borders of the dutch colony. Die still feel that as team will confirmed that Other countries have these designs upon the country and upon its unity and after his team. More focusing shifted to papa. This strategy may still want to divide papua dining. You've written a lot about west papua and at the heart of the standoff in two thousand and six paul showed that something like seventy five percent of australian supported independence for the former dutch colony. This why the indonesians are uneasy about estrada's position. He certainly one of the issues in the makeup of mistrust and complexity in the relationship There's there's been longstanding depths in jakarta's to either strang government doesn't do more to acquire pro-separatist Sentiment in australia. They believe the particularly the ngo sector has played a role in stirring up separatist sentiment in west. Papua and there is Continuing concern that australia has too much of a focus particularly on eastern indonesia which is also the poorest part of the country. Well how then do we bridge. These divides greg. I mean to. What extent is this new free. Try deal. This is the so-called indonesia australia comprehensive economic partnership agreement. Ten years in the making to what extent does that he'll these divisions. I don't know that it heals the divisions poseidon. I think many of the the list of things you you sit out at the beginning of the interview. I think we have always had the potential. I knew things like that to occur but one of the consistently underperforming parts of the bilateral relationship has been the economic ties and so this comprehensive agreement will hopefully see much more economic activity between the two countries and that in itself might provide some kind of deepest ability but if the economic relationship expand by site thirty to forty percents in the next few years diamond. Wouldn't the free try deal really mocking important development for the relationship a look. There's no question that it's an important step in in in strengthening relationship. This guy is back to what gareth evans was talking about in the nineteen eighties. Where he said we needed to add ballast to the relationship unbalanced. He meant if we can get a strong economic relationship between australia and indonesia implies than the rest of it will follow behind because there will be a an upfront primary interest in preserving the economic relationship. And that's always been a difficulty. In the relations destroy and strength companies have invested in indonesia but not to a great extent. The head found difficulties. There this free trade agreement certainly opens up more opportunity for investments and tried but again and again as greg has alluded to. I think the question will be. How much strategies is to take out this opportunity and whether or not they say the the problems of doing business in indonesia over combat is free trade agreement whether or not there's going to be impediments to a greater degree of engagement. My guests greg. Feely from new in camera and damien. Kingsbury from deacon in melvin. And here's a little fun fact. This is according to the australian this week. It was chris. Bowen the library from benca podcast on iran and between the lines. It was chris bowen in his shirt who walked away the most chuffed with these brave. Jacoby interaction we he. The president complimented bowen's flawless fluency in indonesian. Little known fact chris. Bowen speaks indonesian now. A few years ago china's president she addressed indonesia's legislature to great fanfare. So the fees guy. Now what's the nature of the relationship now between jakarta and beijing greg. There's a lot of similarities between indonesia's relations with china and distributors Janis niger economic partner for indonesia. It's also niger investor in the country indonesia's increasing the Pot of china's belt and road initiative. So it's getting a lot of development money. These increasing penetration of lodge chinese corporations building infrastructure for example hospitalized row link between the capital jakarta and the regional capital abandon So there's a. There's a lot of economic activity happening and president. She has very good personal relationship with prisoner jacoby but they're also tensions. One of the tensions is chinese fishing boat incursions into indonesian territorial waters In near the south china sea in the name of the island of tuna and that causes a lot of angst in indonesia sometimes confrontation between Nio vessels of both countries. Another problem is a fairly high level of underwent lying suspicion towards the chinese in indonesia so this often bubbles politically to the surface in indonesia and people say that indonesia is at risk of losing some sovereignty to the chinese and so this is always a break for a leader. Such as jacoby who badly needs chinese investment and the development expertise if he saying as Ext doing that excessively will then he will be attacked for that. Well could chana's rise than i mean. It's obviously threatening. The integrity of sovereign states around the region diamond could could china's roz helped draw camera and jakarta even closer. Yes look there's been a discussion now going back several years in canberra about a closest security relationship within the news yet it seems to be a natural hartman in the region Geography i think determines that to a large extent but our strategic interests similar in relation to china about countries want to have a strong economic relationship with china We want to have china's investments and tried to sell into china but we also want to limit china's expansion in the region strategic rich particularly in the south china sea and In relation to them turner islands which is at the southwest of the south china saying there is neither lapping climbed by china and indonesia. And that's what to the tensions of mid january this year. What we're seeing though is. Indonesia is welcoming china roman hand but in terms of economic growth and development but in terms of china's growing strategic runyon ambition. There's a great deal of skepticism. I think in indonesia as the reason chinandega familiar story. Now let's turn finally gentlemen to indonesia internally. Let's get your reaction to something. The indonesian journalist. Julia sirak osama. This is what she told my. Rn colleague andrew west. This week joey. His record on democracy and human rights has declined and in fact now many activists think that not just activists observers think that democracy indonesia has lowest point in twenty years. It is ironic since when we had the reform era after suharto stepped down. That was supposed to be the beginning of democratization in indonesia but that has opened up a pandora's box and released all the traditional religious conservatives and mainly religious groups has sacrificed human rights. And what he says in a book phobia and intolerance for the sake. Offline call stability. Indonesian journalist julia sura kasama on iran's religion and ethics program. This week diming kingsbury. Look i think that Jacoby has moved in a couple of areas which have raised eyebrows. About his commitment to a plurality and human rights particular around the issues of religion and religious tolerance and so on. But broadly. I think jacoby is an inheritor of the reform tradition particularly that started by cecilia among indiana and that he really is deepening and embedding democratic practice. If we some limitations around the edges. Yeah well greg failure. I mean it's often argued that indonesia the fourth because nation in the world. We tend to forget that. It represents a persistent triumph of democracy this the nation journalists big for a lot of activists when she says that the indonesian ideal of tolerance really has been destroyed. So i think it's probably i'll i think she's somewhat. This is always a matter of the bites. Don't mean any disrespect to julius Sort of kasuma but Under jacoby in fact. Religious tolerance has somewhat improved on democracy. Some of the things that jacoby has initiated have really harmed the quality of democracy and there are several things that are being discussed by. he's government wrought now and by the parliament which if implemented could be a considerable reversal. He wouldn't stop indonesia being a democracy. But it would reduce the quality of the democracy greg damian and important discussion. Thanks so much again for being on our end

Indonesia Jacoby Jakarta China Australia Greg President Trump Greg Feely Greg Damian Indonesian Army Diming Kingsbury Dili Damien Taymor Iran West Papua Deakin University
Canadian police arrest activists at Wet’suwet’en anti-pipeline camp, Haskell to partner with indigenous university in New Zealand , $100 million solar facility project approved for Pine Ridge

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 8 months ago

Canadian police arrest activists at Wet’suwet’en anti-pipeline camp, Haskell to partner with indigenous university in New Zealand , $100 million solar facility project approved for Pine Ridge

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez in British Columbia Canada arrests are being made at a demonstration site on wetsuit attend territory the CBC reports people are camped out near an access road in opposition of construction of a natural gas pipeline hereditary. Chiefs has said No. I know to the project and talks with the provincial. Government have reportedly broke down conflict over the project has lasted years. A court ordered people to stop preventing renting workers access to the area. Police announced Wednesday. They would enforce an injunction. Demonstrators are taking to social media saying they're prepared for police action. The coastal gasoline pipeline is a six billion dollar project which supporters say will create jobs and boost the economy in a first of its kind for a tribal college and International Exchange Program is in the works for Haskell Indian nations university and Emory University in New Zealand educators recently Matt Lawrence Kansas to work on an agreement Rondo. Baldo has more efforts to establish advanced degree programs and more research opportunities Haskell in Lawrence Kansas met with chief executive officer of the Mari Indigenous University in New Zealand the CEO Doherty met with administration nation and students to discuss the possibilities US starting in exchange program and what they could learn from each other connections here in the US with the different town nations. That have a history very very similar to Alice. Talk about the issues that would challenging but more importantly look at the things is that we want to do in around the expirations off. We want to be in the in by US working together. Collaborating together That place where we want to A. B.. Is it much more cheerful. If doing together Alan Parker a Chippewa cree from Montana and faculty at them. Our University talked about the impact of taking students students. Down to be the first cohort twenty nineteen the I two of that group received their PhD. So it's a it's just to powerful experience in the potential is just wonderful. Haskell interim President Daniel Wildcat says a memorandum of understanding running is being written that he hopes to be signed within a couple of months. Haskell currently does not offer any graduate degree programs this is Rhonda Nevada for for National Native News Approval has been given for a solar project on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota as Roz Brown reports. The Pine Ridge Indian reservation in southwestern South Dakota will be the site of a one hundred million dollar solar electricity generation project. The State's public utilities commission approved the lookout solar the park this week for property about eighty miles from rapid city to build the state's first large-scale solar facility. A German company will lease the land from the rap family. Lynn Lynn rap is a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe who has represented the family and hopes the historic project will be an example for other reservations and then we know that when a dollar is spent it turns over seven times in communities words used and our reservations talents are desperate for cash. The lease agreement is the first first of its kind for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The company involved to build the solar project has agreed to follow thirty-seven conditions during construction related to restoration threatened an endangered species cultural resources reporting and other requirements the Pine Ridge project capable of generating up to one hundred ten megawatts of electricity will how five hundred thousand solar panels in arrays across two hundred fifty acres. Wrap says there's more than eight hundred acres at the site and eventually she'd also like to see a wind farm built out there. The solar facility is expected to be complete by the second quarter of twenty twenty one. I'm Roz Brown and demand. Tonio Gonzales.

United States Haskell Roz Brown Matt Lawrence Kansas Haskell Indian Nations Univers Mari Indigenous University South Dakota International Exchange Program New Zealand Antonio Gonzalez Pine Ridge Reservation Chiefs Bureau Of Indian Affairs CBC Canada Pine Ridge Tonio Gonzales Lynn Lynn
Pro-democracy camp looks to have won big in Hong Kong vote

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

03:02 min | 10 months ago

Pro-democracy camp looks to have won big in Hong Kong vote

"Yeah we've got to stunning developments on the political scene right hand Hong Kong with the territory's pro democracy candidates voice to win a majority of seats for the district councils that off the record would turn out as well as bring in bluemix roasted she's reporting from the streets of Hong Kong rose will consider what's happened what we've seen is unprecedented numbers in terms of people voting cannot open borders seventy one percent which is really unheard of historic hit the home call it is very difficult and highly politicized environment as we protest on going for five months now the diesel engines really have been seen as a barometer a referendum pretty much on what's been going on in the process and the government not the vote has their own billing we are hearing that the pro democracy camp is gaining the lion's share of the vote and functional quickly get a final cut in the coming hours what about the selection both sides but the pro democracy site and the posts that businesses it usually means for China okay Beijing people to come out to exercise the democratic what does not election and that doesn't like what is he not yeah we know that these neighborhood councils of district councils are normally do deal with things like sanitation and and pedestrian issues and and noise levels in that but obviously a much bigger reading in this I was just looking through some of these losses Alice mac who's a lawmaker and so she lost in the district council elections and and she actually blamed Carrie lam for it and she's been in there Ross since nineteen ninety three so it's quite it's quite incredible the the way the public has spoken here very much said we the people have definitely made that feeling the fact that a very well established pro establishment figure like that it might be seeking out again there's a leadership is also something they think of blaming the lock is on only about eight fifty five is but does it depends as well as long as we speak as you say they focus on local issues I may have a little ones will be making government policy five do you feel they have some impact on the political makeup of Hong Kong they do you have the planes the Legislative Council elections will happen next yeah fight is it because it can take up art of those old state they can open up the makeup of the election select if you think that could be because of the one thousand three hundred people in that movie a hundred and seventeen a call from the house and if he pro democracy can really take the majority office is the county seat according to the example Steve then it's more likely of course than more of the that's correct that is a hundred seventeen well of course right alright Roz thanks very much Bloomberg's Rosalyn

Hong Kong Seventy One Percent Five Months
Gimlet Media: Alex Blumberg and Matt Lieber

How I Built This

07:55 min | 11 months ago

Gimlet Media: Alex Blumberg and Matt Lieber

"Guy Roz and on the show today you public radio producers turn podcasts into Prophet and the media company called Gimblett that sold for more than two hundred million dollars so somebody you may know that for most of my early career I was a news person I covered a bunch of wars that was posted overseas it was a host on NPR's evening news show but then in two thousand twelve I left I left to essentially relaunch a podcast it was called the radio hour and I still hosted in back then that decision believe it or not was like going into the Wilderness of journalism several of my colleagues you're going to do a lot podcast and to be honest I was a little embarrassed myself I was leaving the prestigious world of news the exile of podcasts but of course what eventually happened was precisely the opposite of exile podcasts exploded today's podcast are a half a billion dollar industry and what was once considered an afterthought even a place like NPR is now one of its most important sources of revenue now back in two thousand fourteen what my colleagues was watching this explosion really closely his name is Alex Blumberg Alex is someone I've admired for a long long time he was a producer on this American life and then he went on to co create one of my favorite shows planet money and Alex started to dream of an idea to build a production company like HBO except for Audio podcasts but even then the thought of making money of podcasts was still a fairly new proposition besides like a lot of mature and stable organizations NPR can be slow to innovate Alex realized he couldn't launch this idea inside the company so he laughed which was a huge gamble lots of people in public radio thought he was nuts he also knew nothing about how to run a business now as many of you may know Alex documented this journey on a podcast called startup in that show he describe the emotional ups and downs of starting the business and how he eventually came to meet his co founder Matt Lieber they decided to call their company Gimblett and not to produce a bunch of podcasts including reply all and homecoming and then in two thousand nine hundred Nineteen Matt and Alex sold the company they founded spotify for around two hundred million dollars which I think is fair to say is not a sum of money you often hear connected to public radio folks unless they are major donors anyway we'll hear from Lieber a bit later in the show but I assume Alex who grew up in Cincinnati his dad was in advertising and mom ran a public assistance program in the city and even though it may not seem obvious given what they did Alec says both of them were actually really entrepreneur Royal Oh yeah they were entrepreneurial and we never use that word yeah I didn't learn that word at home I probably learned that we're in college my mom was a social worker and she ran a public employee assistance program that I never heard her talk about it that way and then my father he was advertising my dad was always in advertising and he you know he was a copywriter and then worked with different people different agencies and then eventually started his own retiring agency and then that agency and then another one that became Wolf Bloomberg Crotty so he was the Bloomberg and the Wolf Bloomberg Cody and I grew pretty big group like at a certain point there were like seventy eighty people big and he never talked about it as like this is my business citing like we're building this business or anything like that if anything he was I about why I don't think he valued it at all like I think all he wanted to do was be a poet really or like an academic or a great thinker but he had this successful business that seemed to kind of grow I guess just grow on its own or or grow organically I know I mean I remember asking him about this at one point because it was like later later later in the journey when we when matinee started Gimblett and we were like growing this company and it was like all I could think about and it was assuming every single sort of thought in my mind and when Tom later I asked him about that was like how did you feel about it when you're starting I never heard Stories from me about it and I think what he told me it was like he was like I just never felt like I never felt like those people the people I worked with you did you sense or notice a change in your family's lifestyle you know having gone from Your Dad working for a company your mom doing social work to him running this pretty successful at it agency Oh yeah there is there is a there was a moment where my dad's company was doing very well and business was booming and the one of the ants was pressuring gamble and all the sudden had money and it was fortunately right around the time that I was going to college so they were able to pay for me and my sister in college you went to College Oberlin and you studied political science government did you did you sense of what you wanted to do when you were in college think I WANNA get into public service like my mom I wanna do some kind of social worker was that Japan or did you think one again to journalism or did you not really no and I think I had a sense of like wanting to do something good in the world like I remember I studied Russian because back when I was in college Russia's Evil Empire ah communism right and I had this very sort of political feeling about like you know they're they're people just like you and me Mr Reagan and I'm going to learn their language and prove it to you and I think one of the things I was a big consumer of narrative nonfiction from an early age you know we had magazines lying around the house like we had the New Yorker and Harper's that was kind of household and like I pick them up early and really loved them and then as I got older I loved them more than yeah but I never I never saw myself off has doing that that felt like the people who did that the people who did journalism those are the kids who are like sort of on the school paper out had majored in journalism and had like gotten internships when they're in college and you weren't doing any of that I wasn't doing it I was like tested well I took AP classes yeah but I was not a mode it student I was very comfortable with a high so you graduate am I guess you you go back to Cincinnati well no I went to Russia in a year in Russia then spent a summer in Cincinnati and then moved Chicago and that's where I sort of picked up my post collegiate life was an wasn't cog on an in Chicago you're actually a teacher right I was yeah I taught school at a private school for for four years I taught science but it wasn't GonNa be the thing you were going to do but it wasn't the thing I was going to do no I didn't I didn't feel like it was nothing at like at a certain point sort of in in my second or third year it was like I don't think this is really what I wanna do but like honestly guy I think really what happened was my girlfriend broke up with me in Chicago in Chicago we'd been dating for many years and we're lovin it just it really shook me and when she you gotta do and she was like I'm going to move to New York and I'm going to film school and I was like wait that's not fair we weren't supposed to be actually pursuing our dreams you're going to actually pursue your dream and then I was like Oh my God and now you're GonNa go to film school and then you're going to become a famous director and then your name is going to be the marquee I'm going to be supervising recess and it shook me and it shook me into realizing I was like well we why is that wrong I thought I like supervising recess and then I realized like no I I have something else that's my ambition

ROZ Gimblett Two Hundred Million Dollars Billion Dollar Four Years
UK to publish no-deal plans as gloom surrounds Brexit talks

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

10:31 min | 1 year ago

UK to publish no-deal plans as gloom surrounds Brexit talks

"Matter how many the articles you read and no matter how many days go by with some new piece of news that confuses you even more it's still really hard to sound smart about brexit it's it's unbelievable so back in March when brexit was imminent and the prime minister was in some trouble we did a brexit episode and now Brexit is imminent again and the prime minister is in some trouble so we're going to try to do another brexit episode and and here is just a shining example of how Boris Johnson the Prime Minister of of the United Kingdom is in some trouble he was asked I guess is probably like three weeks ago now maybe longer perhaps by reporter if you could promise the British public he would not ask for another delay another extension of Brexit Britain leaving the European Union here is his answer I'd rather be dead in a ditch so Boris Johnson is not dead he is not in a ditch brexit is still imminent and thus we are here yes yes we are here and I liked that the last time we talked about it in the prime minister was in trouble totally different prime minister by the way so yes exit part to the Brexit Ding the sequel I think I think a Jaren is appropriate here because it is an ongoing brexit the brexit so we brought on the great news about getting to cover this ongoing basis is that we get to bring back our new favorite correspondent on this and other topics whereas Atkins who hosts the BBC news show called outside I do too nice to be back has things yes thanks for coming back there good mongering didn't when you asked me to come in today today of all day he's because I mean magical right I was thinking us just walking towards the studio had hundreds of days you could have picked across the last few two years and really you could make an argument a decent argument that today the relationship between the UK and its European partners is more fragile is more uncertain than it's been since the end of the Second World War and if that seems hyperbolic is really not the last twenty four hours of cranked it up two notches that we didn't even really no existed it's a bit like in spinal tap but they say turn up to eleven we're kind of at that stage now all right we'll tell us tell us why what happens okay. Well the do things have happened at the context of all of this is that we are charging towards October thirty first this is the brexit deadline this is brexit is scheduled to happen and unless the UK requests an extension and it hasn't unless the E. U. says yes that request that is when bricks it's going to happen before that you've got a European Union summit takes place next week Thursday Friday October the seventeenth and eighteenth it's widely accepted that if there is no agreement between the UK and the EU on how the UK is going to leave well that's really the last chance saloon the reason things of cranked up in the last twenty four hours is that last night the political editor of The Spectator magazine applets magazine published a lengthy message from inside number ten detailing their view of the situation and it is like no other political memory we've seen it says negotiations will probably end this week that preferential treatment in the future we'll go to European countries deemed to be helpful at the moment it saying if the deal collapses this week that's eight it talks about plans to scupper any effort to stop a no deal brexit at the end of the month and perhaps most astonishing of all it says any countries supporting a delay in bricks by that they mean some of the other you members they'll be seen as hostile in appearance in UK politics so this is incendary so we all digest that overnight and we're thinking my goodness and then is the morning unfolds which hold the primary Mr Boris Johnson has spoken to Angle Merckel Chancellor of Germany and then number ten briefs that this is going absolutely terribly the essentially it's now impulse Volta get a deal so that in itself is huge but then the whole European press corps or a lot of it starts going that doesn't sound like the kind of thing the Angler WHO would say and so we now have this huge fight going on between lots of people saying that doesn't sound right a number ten saying this is how this phone call win but whether one what is right or the other is right the fact of the matter is it's being seen as a briefing war by number ten on the most important country in the European Union and as such things are beginning to crumble in a way that we've not seen in the last three years of the brexit process wow so so so we are no strangers the different interpretations of phone call readouts between leaders of countries over here so so there's that but but look isn't there a law on the books that says there will not be a no deal brexit didn't parliament passed that like two weeks ago or whatever it was it did and let me give you another in yet from today because just the last twenty four hours gives me enough to make a number of podcast with frankly Michael go one of the most senior figures in the League campaign in twenty sixty nine cabinet minister with responsibility for preparing for no deal brexit no deal brexit meaning the UK leaves with absolutely no arrangements in place with the European Union as to what happens next Michael Gov just a few hours ago standing up in the House of Commons briefing parliament briefing members of parliament the government's preparations for no deal brexit when he and everyone else ooh sitting on those famous green leather benches knows that a few weeks ago Element Pasta law saying you can't do a no deal brexit the law says if you reach October nineteen the day after that EU summit and you don't have a deal the prime minister the must send a letter asking for an extension so you have a law in place which says that's GonNa Happen You have a prime minister says I won't be requesting that request at extension and you have a cabinet minister briefing parliament on something which the law says can happen and you have a senior number ten source sending out an extended briefing last night said we've got lots of plans to get around this law and as such everyone is thinking my goodness no deal between the UK and EU looks pretty likely bearing in mind how things are going this week so what on earth happens when we reach October the nineteenth and no one has any idea I mean I feel slightly yeah I feel slightly speechless I confess how where do we even start here like how unprecedented is it at this point for the Prime Minister and his administration to essentially be saying we intend to ignore this law or as as the Guardian put it sidestep or frustrate this law well you know the the prime minister is saying two things which look difficult to square he saying I will not request an attention though it's widely accepted in the end in extension is reasonably likely although I'm a hosted fourt- fourteen saying that but at the moment and extension looks likely you have a prime minister saying look weren't requested and you have a law which says you have to request it if you get to October the nineteenth now that the fact that we don't have any clarity on that is certainly extrordinary but let's just step back here mauleon remember the context this is a prime minister who's already been found to unlawfully suspended parliament fi the biased court in the land the Supreme Court and who is also found by the quarter sessions in Edinburgh accord a rung down from the Supreme Court to have essentially lied to the Queen about the reasons that he's suspended parliament so already into unchartered territory we in uncharted territory for for some time the point here is that the prime minister and his allies say of course they respect the rule of law but they reiterate they will ask for an extension and until they allow that to play out we can't really know Oh what they're planning to do and this now infamous memo which is dominating the news or it certainly was until about five other things happened says quite explicit Louis we've got plans to not follow this law but at the same time of course we're not gonNa tell you though is because that might affect our ability to carry out these plans legally same pace let me ask you a question the Roz and it goes like this if I am a business person in the United Kingdom facing the prospect of not literally not knowing what's going to happen uh-huh or if I'm a consumer right why am I not stockpiling goods taking all my money out of the bank shoving it under my mattress and bracing for Armageddon wells some people are not the majority of people but some people are doing some stockpiling I think the reason that more people on stockpiled thing is because there's still a belief the in the end no deals not gonNA happen and that belief is rooted in two things one the fact everyone knows if the UK requests in extension the e very very likely to accept it so there's always Latin root and Barry Mind Parliament has voted on a law which achieve MP's things locks in the fact that no deal brexit cannot happen so for those two reasons the law that was recently passed and the E. U.'s position think a lot of people think will between those two things a no deal brexit is not particularly likely however in the background you do have a situation nations with the prime minister saying I consider this a viable option will happen with Theresa may was she started off saying no deal is better than a bad deal but by the end of the negotiations was essentially ruling out a no deal brexit and that's a big difference between Theresa May and Boris Johnson in the end she turned away from that option at the moment he's definitely not turning away from that option but I would add more broadly when it comes to businesses everyone wants certainty whoever whichever side of the brexit argument there on the overwhelming sentiment from businesses speak to the BBC's Mike Goodness please just tell us what's going on the bad news for them is they may not yeah

Prime Minister Boris Johnson United Kingdom Brexit Ding Brexit Britain European Union BBC Reporter Atkins E. U Twenty Four Hours Three Weeks Three Years Two Weeks Two Years
Disappointed Face

Morning Mantra

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Disappointed Face

"Is disappointed. Face disappointed face. All the started a few weeks ago on a trip to the grocery store halfway there my daughter Roz piping up from the back seat. I WANNA racing card. I WANNA racing car. You may be familiar with the racing cards that she is referring to. They are the enormous unwieldy shopping carts that have a front facing bench for kids on top with steering wheels for them to turn and little squeaky horns for them to beep deep and the turning radius of Assembly Farrah's all the upsides and for me the only thing worse than we do you to use it is when we don't get to use it. There have been screaming tantrums over these things which is never a good way to start a grocery store experience so on this particular occasion we were going to a particularly clearly large and overwhelming grocery store and we were going there at peak family grocery shopping time Saturday at eleven. Am and I knew that there was a better than even chance that we it would be out of luck on finding a recent cart available so I turned her as in the back seat to try and prepare her for the worst. Maybe there will be a race in cart. I said Eh maybe there won't know there will be one is her boilerplate response to a statement like this. She lives in a world where it's always possible that if she says something loudly enough she can will into being and if there isn't. I said we're going to be very disappointed. This was met with another. No there will be one to which I said. Can you show Oh me you're disappointed face now. Let me be very clear. I am not a parenting wizard. At best. I am a parenting stopped clock and occasionally. Finally I can grind my gears enough to be stopped at the exact minute of the day when I most need to be right. This was one of those occasions because as soon as Rosina I started testing out different versions of our disappointed face on one another. We were too busy giggling to really care which party got and there were no reason carts so roz to use her best disappointed face face when I lifted her into the regular ask card and I got to maneuver through the overwhelming aisles with a manageable amount of awkwardness I learned to prepare for for the worst and be surprised by the best when I was pretty young kid and I remembered proudly telling my mom's best friend that I have figured it all out. I assume that I'm going to lose lose the game of monopoly because then I either get to enjoy the fact that I was right and stu and self righteous indignation. I knew it who I would lose or or I get to be pleasantly surprised by victory. I hadn't planned on which way sweeter than one you've been expecting. I said this to her around the age to eat as if I had unlocked the secret to life and now I kind of get why I'd convinced myself that this was the one true way. My mom had cancer. She often had to rush to the hospital. Unexpectedly and advice sat there expecting her to come home then every minute. She didn't come home was a disappointment appointment and the phone would ring it would turn out to be my dad saying that actually they'd be staying the night and could we stay over at whatever friends house. We ended up at that afternoon. I learned learned to reverse engineer. My expectations assume that every doctor's appointment would turn into a hospital stay of unknown duration assume that every phone call was unfortunate news news then enjoy the moments when my dad was actually calling say we'll be home in time for supper. Let those be reward from ingrain pessimism. I think that when I declared my new philosophy to my mom's best friend she knew exactly what I meant. I saw without understanding the sadness in her reaction so I checked myself sometimes as I think about how to teach Roz about dealing with disappointment both with my words and my actions I want to have a framework for how to deal when things don't go her way but I don't want her to grow up thinking that the only way to be happy is to assume that the worst will come to pass. I'm glad that it helps her to have a disappointed face. As dramatic as the disappointment may sometimes be because I would rather that than resigned face so the mantra disappointment is real it deserves to be seen and heard and four year olds disappointment over the wrong. Grocery Cart is not lesser because it is the disappointment of child disappointed. Face is the mode we enter when we are giving space to our feelings because we gave ourselves the gift of allowing ourselves to feel them in the first place rather than head them off at the pass disappointed face does not take over our day. It's something we can practice and it's something we can put away away. When the moment has passed however long that takes feelings may be inconvenient but they do not become less so because we deprived them of space or trained ourselves away from meeting them disappointed face is both the vocal ization and the letting go you

ROZ Assembly Farrah Rosina I Engineer Four Year
Alabama, Bill And Senate discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Alabama, Bill And Senate discussed on Here & Now

"Vote on a strict abortion. Ben, maybe one of the strictest in the country was the first item on the agenda for lawmakers in Alabama state Senate today and immediately became fiery. Now they've delayed that vote at least until next week. Several other states are also limiting abortion rights this week. Georgia became the fourth state to pass a so-called heartbeat. Bill banning an abortion six weeks into a pregnancy. Or when a heartbeat can be heard by doctor it also grants embryos at six weeks and fetuses person hood, Alabama's abortion ban would criminalize doctors who perform the procedure. Andrea Jaeger reporter and hosted WB HMO in Birmingham is on this story. And Andrew we spoke to you last week when state reps past their Bill to Ben pretty much all abortions, with the exception of a serious health risk to the mother. This was senators today what happened and how different is their Bill. Well, there was a small difference in. That's what created that chaos. In the Senate. When this Bill was passed that of a cynic committee yesterday, the senators there added an exception for rape and incest. The original Bill had no exception for rape, and incest, but they added that in and so when this Bill was brought up in the Senate this morning, some Republicans moved to mmediately table that amendment the chair approve that and chaos ensue with with with Democrats objecting to that. And so we had discussions around net procedural issue and coming out of that you had Senate president proteomic Republican state Senator Dole Marsh, he offered this this particular amendment that was just stripped wasn't amendment that I've always wanted on a Bill in any Bill I've ever supported and what I'm going to ask for, and maybe this would be the time is that everybody's go home this weekend. They need to listen to the constituents about this Bill with them without the amendment. We just took off and we need to come back Tuesday. Have extended debate and make that final decision. And that's what I'm going to ask at this point that we care this over to the call of the chair until you deal with this on next Tuesday. That's exactly what they did. He get pretty chaotic before. That though is that a surprise as you've said, this is seems to be if there are Democrats, of course, who wanted the exception for rape, and incest cases. But is it a surprise that you have Republicans as we just heard who also wanted that what we knew going into it that this was a point of contention even within the Republican caucus not all of them were keen with having to build. It didn't have exception. We didn't know is how exactly that was going to be dealt with how it was going to play out. And as we saw this morning at means delay a little little more time to work that out. Well, and talk about you know, because we are seeing this move in many states to bring up these bills, and in most of the states, and people are lawmakers are saying we are hoping that this goes to the courts, we want this to go all the way to the supreme court with two very conservative recent appointees is that the sense in Alabama. And how does it compare to the so-called heartbeat bills? Yeah. That's the supporters of the Bill. Here in Alabama are very explicit that they intend this Bill as a court challenge, they expect it to be challenged and make its way to the federal court system. They hope to the supreme court where the nineteen seventy three Roe v. Wade decision might be reconsidered on paper. It is certainly a stronger Bill than say the heartbeat bills. We've seen in other states because it does we send original form does criminalize abortion in all cases, except for the health of the mother. Opponents would argue though that the heartbeat bills. Functionally are abortion banned because for many women, they don't know at six weeks that they're pregnant, but but regardless of that court challenges most likely are ahead, and that's what proponents of this legislation. Went to see and how are pro choice advocates opponents reacting to the spill don't they're gearing up for the fight as well groups such as Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties union of Alabama promised a lawsuit here in Alabama. If. Does pass.

Alabama Bill Senate Rape BEN Andrea Jaeger American Civil Liberties Union Senator Dole Marsh Georgia Andrew Birmingham Reporter ROE Wade President Trump Six Weeks