38 Burst results for "ROW"

Fresh update on "row" discussed on Purity Products

Purity Products

00:56 min | 16 min ago

Fresh update on "row" discussed on Purity Products

"Ended really hard. I'm like, Why am I get hit by a mail truck? They tear off the corner of my car and then allowing the five other cars turned down over a dozen cars were damaged in the rampage and ended it with cops swarming the USPS mail truck and pulling the woman out after she rear ended her last victim. No injuries reported all around the Tri state authorities are stepping up security measures that will last through inauguration days. They police officials and local police departments working in concert with federal partners to respond after FBI memos warned of possibly armed protest this weekend. New Jersey going so far as to ask residents who see something to say something the Governor Murphy, calling it a more general concern. As we sit here today, the threat continues to be a general threat, not a specific threat, State police Superintendent Colonel Pat Callahan We're postured and prepared to respond should that need arise. Meanwhile, the NYPD is beefing up their presence at City Hall in Manhattan, Connecticut state police watching things and in around Hartford. James Philbin. W O R News Well, the federal government has executed its final death row inmate under the Trump administration, CNN says Dustin John Higgs was executed early this morning, becoming the 13th federal death row inmate to die since the Justice Department We started federal executions in 2019 President elect Biden has pledged to abolish the federal death penalty. Nobody hit the $750 million jackpot and Friday nights, Mega millions drawing. There were eight second prize winners, including.

Federal Government State Police Superintendent Colonel Pat Cal Dustin John Higgs James Philbin Governor Murphy FBI Nypd CNN New Jersey Biden City Hall Justice Department Hartford Manhattan President Trump Connecticut
The global death toll from the coronavirus has topped 2 million, according to Johns Hopkins University data

Dave Ramsey

00:39 sec | 16 hrs ago

The global death toll from the coronavirus has topped 2 million, according to Johns Hopkins University data

"Two million people have now died from Corona virus worldwide. The grim death toll reached today, according to Johns Hopkins University. In the US That number currently sits it more than 383,000 deaths right here in Arizona 185 new deaths reported today, pushing the state death told to 11,040 Since Monday, Arizona has reported 899 new covert deaths. The State Health Department also recording 9146 new cases and more than 20,800 new diagnostic tests. For the third day in a row. Coronavirus related hospitalizations have dropped. I see you bet use has also dipped consistently over the last four days.

Johns Hopkins University Arizona State Health Department United States
Fresh update on "row" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

00:46 sec | 25 min ago

Fresh update on "row" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

"Take This is Bloomberg 11 30 Now Global News Update. The U. S government has executed its final death row inmate under the Trump administration. Dustin Higgs was the 13th prisoner to be executed by the federal government in the last six months. NPR says Higgs was sentenced with two other men for the killing of three women in 1996, though another man actually pulled the trigger. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says the new Democratic majority in the Senate is ready to deliver the bold change America demands. Schumer gave the weekly Democratic Radio address. And apparently nobody won the $750 million Mega millions jackpot. The mega Millions. Website says the jackpot is rolling over to $850 million. There were reportedly some million dollar winners in front tonight. Strong who got the first five numbers right there. 3 11 12 38 43 with the mega ball.

Dustin Higgs Chuck Schumer Senate NPR America
Stocks tumble at the open of trading Friday, with the Dow off nearly 200 points

Steve Scott

00:38 sec | 20 hrs ago

Stocks tumble at the open of trading Friday, with the Dow off nearly 200 points

"30,008 03, about two thirds of 1%. The S and P is down 12. The NASDAQ is actually up four points in the first minute. Asian markets closed mixed overnight. European markets are lower today, he and afternoon trading Retail sales fell again in December. That is three months in a row. One recent could be the stores started their holiday sales earlier than usual. The pandemic also kept shoppers away from stores Sales fell a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in December. In the month before. Now at 9 30 to the airlines are stepping up security ahead of next week's

Fresh update on "row" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

00:47 min | 43 min ago

Fresh update on "row" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

"We're seeing a green wave as far as equities go Bloomberg Daybreak with Karen Moscow and Nathan Hager. Kind of the effort is already laying plans for the next round of doses. U. S relations with China could take a twist weekday mornings at five Eastern. How Close was Tesla to Being part of the Apple empire on Bloomberg Radio? The Bloomberg business happened. Bloomberg radio dot com. Bloomberg, the world is listening. The U. S government has executed its final death row inmate under the Trump administration. Dustin Higgs was the 13th prisoner to be executed by the federal government in the last six months. NPR says Higgs was sentenced with two other men for the killing of three women in 1996, though another man actually pulled the trigger. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says the new Democratic majority in the Senate is ready to deliver the bold change America demands. Schumer gave the weekly Democratic Radio address. And apparently nobody won the $750 million Mega millions jackpot. The mega Millions. Website says the jackpot is rolling over to $850 million. There were reportedly some million dollar winners in front of night strong who got the first five numbers right there. 3 11 12 38 43 with the mega ball being 15..

Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Dustin Higgs Chuck Schumer Nathan Hager Senate Karen Moscow China NPR Apple U. S America
Why the Death Toll From Covid-19 is Even Worse Than It Looks

WSJ What's News

03:21 min | 1 d ago

Why the Death Toll From Covid-19 is Even Worse Than It Looks

"This week brought more sobering news on the coronavirus pandemic the us reported more than two hundred thousand new coronavirus cases for the ninth day in a row on wednesday on tuesday the us recorded more than forty three hundred deaths. A new high and wall street journal data analysis finds the global death toll. Currently nearing two million is four. Worse than the official numbers. Indicate here now to explain is wall street journal reporter john camp. Hi john thanks for joining me but you so john worldwide. The death toll due to the coronavirus is nearing two million. But a wall street journal analysis found that it's actually far higher than that more than two point eight million. What's not being captured in the official tallies we have right now. So the official. Tally is and we use account from johns hopkins university which tries to capture in real time. The data that each country puts out. Saying here's how many people died from corona virus but that data is just the known deaths that were linked to the disease. What it misses is really two big things and number one is people who died from covid nineteen but it wasn't written down on the death certificate or wasn't recorded that way in other words missed cova nineteen us and then the other one is essentially collateral damage people who died for other reasons that you can associate with the pandemic and that also doesn't get captured in account of covid nineteen deaths the. Us has been a helpful place because of a pretty good data from the cdc to explore this. And what we've seen is that there have been increases in deaths in things like alzheimer's and dementia and some cardiovascular issues and things like diabetes and health experts we've spoken with have said that this likely represents collateral damage from the pandemic. And you know for people with alzheimer's and dementia that could be some of the effects of lockdowns and disruptions in nursing homes that proved damaging for really fragile people in those settings For you know. In the springtime in particular they were instances where people were afraid to go to hospitals when they were having chest pains and so that could mean people having more heart attacks that proved fatal at home and these are what are known as excess deaths this all goes into the bigger bucket called excess deaths and this is something that scientists commonly used to try and really kind of measure the impact of a major event whether it's heat wave or a hurricane or a war because sometimes official counts associated with those events can miss the bigger picture so what scientists do and. This is what we did to in a fairly simple way. Is you look for the average number of deaths in in every country or in the place that you're interested in where there is a major event and then you find out how much deaths have increased over a period of time above that average. And that tells you that. There's you know unusual bulge and then you try and figure out what what makes up that bulge and what we found is that in most countries that we looked at cova nineteen will generally make up most of that but but certainly not all of it and that tells us that there's something else going on beyond just the disease

Alzheimer's New High And Wall Street Journ John Camp Wall Street Journal John United States Dementia Johns Hopkins University CDC Diabetes Heart Attacks Hurricane
World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge  UNs FAO

UN News

07:50 min | 1 d ago

World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge UNs FAO

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting.

Kenya Africa Keith Pressman Ethiopia West Africa Southwest Asia Mali India Yemen Somalia Pakistan Iran FAA NFL Lucas Mediterranean
Powerball jackpot hits $640M after drawing sees no winner

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Powerball jackpot hits $640M after drawing sees no winner

"Megabit numbers keep growing, along with the hype. No big winner again for Wednesday's Powerball, drawing. The estimated jackpot for the next drawing Saturday is now $640 million, the fifth largest ever. This is also the longest streak 34 drawings in a row with no jackpot winner. As for the mega million's Friday's drawing is now worth $750 million. The second largest jackpot combined close to $1.4. Billion up for grabs. It's a B C's line on boys. More news at eight at 7 35. I'm

Inflight Passenger Safety

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

04:13 min | 2 d ago

Inflight Passenger Safety

"So i'm not going to cover covid stuff instead. What i want to talk about is just how to stay safe when you're traveling because it could turn out that cova dover and it's been a long time since you've traveled and maybe you could use a refresher in. What are some proper intelligent things to do when you're flying as a passenger so one of the first things you should do as a passenger is pay attention to that safety briefing. You've heard me say this before There's a safety information card in the seat pocket in front of you and that safety information card has a lot of really important information. I can tell you that. In in forty years of being an airline pilot. I have always taken that safety information card out and read it carefully and very often said surprisingly very often. I've learned something new and it could be that the equipment has changed a bit. Procedures have changed. Could be that. It's been a long time to flown. And you're not aware that there's this Path lighting in the floor Tau guide you to for example so all of that is in the safety information card. And you'll find that you may be flying A similar airplane all the time but it might be different enough that the emergency exits operate differently for example on early seven thirty sevens the over wing. Exits are plug type. Exit's where you remove the you remove the hatch and stow it inside the aircraft to get out onto the wing and in the modern seven. Thirty sevens eight hundred nine hundred there hinged at the top and say just pressing handle and the door opens up outward so things like got. It's really a really good idea to pay attention to the safety information briefing and i recommend that you take the safety information card out and of course you've disinfected it before you. You know when you got your seat. Like i talk about an episode for thirteen. Take the safety information card out and look at it during the briefing. And what you will do is you will encourage the people sitting near you to do the same thing. They'll feel less sheepish. And embarrassed if they see you doing it. And like i said It can have some residual benefits of Getting treated really by the flight. Attendants you're probably the only person in the airplane paying attention to the briefing so pay attention to the briefing and when the briefing is talking about exit signs and exits around and find the exit. Nearest your seat. So what i do when i get on the airplane is i'm looking at you. Know the signs above the seat and rose that tell you what seton what seat number You should be looking for I count the number of rows between the over wing exit and my senior between the front door the front exit and my seat or between the aft exit and my seat. I want to count the number of rows because it could be that. I need to get out of that airplane in a rush at night or in a smoke filled cabin where it's hard to see signs because remember. Those exit signs are up in the ceiling by the doors and smoke rises. You might not see the exit sign so if you count the number of rows between the closest exit and your seat you're really miles ahead of every other passenger in terms of saving your own life. So you're going to obviously disinfect. Seat belt buckle Before you use it Keep your seatbelt on all the time. Unless you need to get up and go to the lavatory. Keep your seatbelt on. And i know it sounds ridiculous that they have to tell you how to operate a seat belt on an airplane but when you think about it. It's different from the seat belt your car. The seat belt in your car. You simply press a button and the seat belt releases and the seat belt on an airplane you have lift the lift the buckle so it is different and you need to know how to do that because typically in an emergency we revert back to old habits

Seton
Federal government executes first woman in 67 years

Tony Katz and the Morning News

00:38 sec | 2 d ago

Federal government executes first woman in 67 years

"Attorneys tried to keep her alive, but the only woman on federal death row has now been executed. 93 w IBC correspondent Paul Miles. Reports. Lisa Montgomery is the first woman executed by the federal government in 67 years she was given a lethal injection at the prison and terror Hoat But gunnery fatally strangled a pregnant woman in 2004, then cut open her body and kidnapped her baby. Her attorneys argued that Montgomery was mentally ill and should not be executed. Lisa Montgomery gave no last statement. She was pronounced dead at 1:31 A.m. local time.

Lisa Montgomery Paul Miles Federal Government Montgomery
James Harden says Rockets 'can't be fixed' as Houston reportedly talks trade with at least six teams

The Free Agents

02:16 min | 2 d ago

James Harden says Rockets 'can't be fixed' as Houston reportedly talks trade with at least six teams

"First thing you need to know is that james harden wants out of houston. Oh you already knew that. Well now james harden really wants houston and he's not just showing it with his play which has been the case this season but he's essentially saying it in postgame press conferences after the second loss in a row to the los angeles lakers consecutive losses. Here where they got smashed. The rocket said they lost by seventeen but they were down by twenty one in the first quarter it was over used when teams play twice the team that lost the first game fights back on his play has been lacklustre but in the post game press conference he answered two questions and then he walked right off. I answer was essentially. We're not good enough now. We're not good enough. The second answer quote. I love the city. I literally have done everything that i can. I mean the situation is crazy. It's something that i don't think can be fixed. And he walked off and that's essentially what he's doing to the houston rockets. It's kind of like the. Anthony davis situation a couple years ago in new orleans work. Anthony davis was halfheartedly. Playing it was very very evident. It was very awkward to watch it for pelican's fans and the entire league. It became an issue in. The commissioner's office eventually. Anthony davis sat down. He wore that. That's all folks sweater and evening with. That's all folks wafaa. Foulkes harden wants to be dealt now and is not good for the locker room there in houston where new rocket john wall has to answer questions and his basically saying that guy doesn't want to be here he said after the game but when you have certain guys in the mix that don't want to buy in it's going to be hard to do anything special or anything good as a basketball team will. There is one really really really good player on that team. And it's james harden but he does not want to be there anymore more evident after his first three games this season it was a showcase. He scored thirty seven per game in those first three games. He sat down for one game. Basically said all right. I've shown that good. I've got the track record. He's averaged seventeen over his last five. I really hope the league doesn't have to intervene. But james harden was hoping himself that he was walking from that press conference onto a plane and on his way to another team at sherwood. It felt like watching that press conference.

James Harden Anthony Davis Houston Los Angeles Lakers Wafaa Foulkes Harden Houston Rockets John Wall New Orleans Basketball Sherwood
Federal government conducts its first execution of woman since 1953

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | 2 d ago

Federal government conducts its first execution of woman since 1953

"U. S government has executed the only woman on federal death row. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports. Lisa Montgomery was the first woman to be put to death by the federal government in decades. Warning. This report has a graphic description of violence. Lisa Montgomery died at 1 31 in the morning. The U. S. Supreme Court cleared the way for the execution. After hours of legal wrangling, Montgomery was sentenced to death for the 2004 killing of 23 year old Bobbie Jo Stinnett and Missouri. Stinnett was eight months pregnant when Montgomery strangled her and cut her open to kidnap the baby, which she tried to pass off as her own. Montgomery's legal team said she suffered brain damage a mental illness that was exacerbated by severe sexual abuse that occurred when she was a child. Attorney Kelly Henry said the government stopped at nothing in its zeal to kill a damaged and delusional woman. Montgomery's death makes her the 11th federal inmate to be executed by the Trump administration since July. Cheryl Corley. NPR NEWS

Lisa Montgomery U. S Government Cheryl Corley U. S. Supreme Court Montgomery Bobbie Jo Stinnett NPR Stinnett Federal Government Attorney Kelly Henry Missouri Trump Administration
No. 7 Michigan routs No. 9 Wisconsin 77-54

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 d ago

No. 7 Michigan routs No. 9 Wisconsin 77-54

"Seventh ranked Michigan is eleven or no following a seventy seven fifty four drubbing of number nine Wisconsin the Wolverines turned into a blowout by reeling off a forty three six run bridging the two halfs Michigan led just twenty six twenty three before scoring the last fourteen points in the first half Mike Smith at sixteen points and six assists while Franz Wagner added fifteen points and ten boards Michigan became the first team in college basketball history to beat three ranked teams in a row by at least nineteen points Dimitra tries had a game high twenty points for Wisconsin which fell to ten and three I'm Dave Ferrie

Michigan Wolverines Franz Wagner Wisconsin Mike Smith Dimitra Basketball Dave Ferrie
First federal execution of female inmate in almost 70 years put on hold

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 3 d ago

First federal execution of female inmate in almost 70 years put on hold

"Of the only woman on federal death row is now on hold. NPR's Cheryl Corley says A judge granted a stay of execution for Lisa Montgomery just hours before she was scheduled to die. Warning. This report has a graphic description. The stay of execution holds what would have been the U. S government's first execution of a female inmate in more than 67 years. Lisa Montgomery was sentenced to death for killing 23 year old Bobbie Jo Stinnett in 2004. Stinnett was eight months pregnant. Montgomery cut the baby from her womb and tried to pass the child off has her own. Montgomery's attorneys have argued that extreme sexual abuse and torture Montgomery suffered as a child. Let the brain damage and severe mental illness. The stay of execution allows the court to hold a hearing to determine whether Montgomery is currently competent to be put to death. No hearing date has been set. The government has filed a notice to appeal.

Lisa Montgomery Cheryl Corley U. S Government Montgomery Bobbie Jo Stinnett NPR Stinnett
Lisa Montgomery's execution now set for Jan. 12

Pacifica Evening News

02:08 min | 4 d ago

Lisa Montgomery's execution now set for Jan. 12

"The only woman on the federal death row is scheduled to be executed tomorrow. If the execution goes ahead as the federal government plans Lisa Montgomery will be killed a Terra Haute, Indiana federal prison, Daniel Witty reports, Montgomery was convicted of strangling Bobbie Jo Stinnett to death in 2004 with a rope and cutting her unborn child from her womb. And claiming the infant as her own. Montgomery's lawyers appealed to the Trump administration to commute her sentence to life in prison. The administration has denied the request. Kelly Henry told CBS that Montgomery shouldn't be executed because she suffers from mental illness. Lisa Montgomery is thesaurus of person because she suffers from severe mental illness. Who is more appropriately punished with life imprisonment without parole. When you look at Lisa's history, you see Time after time after time where people could have intervened and gotten her the help she needed, and none of this would have ever happened. Montgomery's lawyers say she was sexually abused and traumatized as a child. Prosecutors say Montgomery deserves execution. Because of the crimes premeditated cruelty and because it would bring closure. Justin, it's family. Montgomery's execution will take place just over a week before death penalty opponent Joe Biden is inaugurated. Montgomery originally was scheduled to be put to death on December 8th. But the execution was temporary. Blocked after her attorneys contracted coronavirus while visiting her in

Lisa Montgomery Montgomery Terra Haute Daniel Witty Bobbie Jo Stinnett Trump Administration Kelly Henry Federal Government Indiana CBS Lisa Justin Joe Biden
India 2020 Voice AI Year in Review with Haptik, Slang Labs, Klove Chef, and Women in Voice

The Voicebot Podcast

05:05 min | 5 d ago

India 2020 Voice AI Year in Review with Haptik, Slang Labs, Klove Chef, and Women in Voice

"Aggravates. Welcome to the voice spot. Podcast thanks for having me. I'm excited i'm excited to so the topic. Today is the year in review and we really focus on what's going on in india. You have a very interesting. Let's say a front row seat to what's going on with conversational a more. Broadly you deal with chat and with voice as you look back on twenty twenty and you look back in india and the conversational space. What was the biggest story of the year. What stands out. I think the biggest of the if you look at everything in addition i Chad boys todd bobby platforms use cases gov support if you just look at the broader space end for us like you mentioned right. Rear look on the internet of things over. The biggest breakout story has been whatsapp By that what What i mean is that if you think about the decio. Facebook has genuinely taken a number of steps. do enable what's up to become a platform for businesses to do a lot more with it right the genuinely thinking about this was the first yard where they would enough actions that facebook is accompanied to basically say that look deadened mission with what chapters to become like. Ob chat by web businesses and branch can come on and a conversation experiences to enable commerce engagement. Ben support So far for for us. And for me specifically as i think about the landscape i actually you know. I want to go to the extent and say as far as i think in domes of build adoption of conversation in the seven yards that i've been doing this which is like a lifetime in this business. this is probably the biggest route moment that that's happened because of the simple fact that You know if you if you provide in platform read a hundreds of millions of users can genuinely use. Nlp conversational interfaces dude to businesses to get things done for commerce far support it it probably will be can be a genuine battered. I'm shift that. You know people like you and i have been talking about for many rs. Okay so you work with a lot of big brands. Yeah so when you look at when you look at what's app or these brands interested in what's happ before the new features came along. Yes so there is always been a great Interest from start dating back to two thousand seventeen on more street because of the simple logic that you know most of these bands and more of the bland managers or the c. Suite dr day us. What's up like five hundred times a day for everything right. so then i'd choose expansion. What product on my band on this bag form so the interest is always been dead. It's been it's been the case for like i said the red bottle to your four yards. You know it was just a matter of the features being available the platforming available and more broadly in honesty the features started begging big. Started becoming available about a couple of ers by but really your until the earlier question is whether it was the first show. Facebook obliquely came out multiple times in. I talk about the fact that whatsapp is going to be a platform for engagement with businesses. Right unlimited a lot of things down features actions announcements which gave ams especially large brands a lot of confidence that look this is a good platform for businesses to stay and not just something that was been for like monetization got and so we've seen other moves along these lines as well with google also have business messaging feature. What is the general reaction about those. Are those going to be supported as tier two. Are they going to be supported as enthusiastically. Or is it going to be more Something that if if i have to do it i'm going to do it. But what's abbas where i want to invest. I mean i think you do have a but not like a must have sort of need. I mean it's the classic Vitamin was painkiller sort of analogy read. whatsapp is like is like dope. Incommoded solids of very big problem in terms of engagement. Outreach was Assured the good to have that a check box i need to be on those channels honestly similar a little bit with alexa and google has read what we've seen play out over the last two yards. Which is yeah great. I'd love to. I'd love to be on alexa of beyond will so that we can check it off that a band present debt. But it's not. It's not solving the problem of engagement.

Todd Bobby Facebook India Whatsapp BEN Google Alexa
Doug Pederson 'could be out' as Philadelphia Eagles head coach

Lifestyles Unlimited Real Estate Investor Radio Show

03:43 min | 5 d ago

Doug Pederson 'could be out' as Philadelphia Eagles head coach

"Other big story of the NFL off the field was Doug Peterson, and his future is shaky is as the Philadelphia Eagles head coach, You're talking about being removed, too. So think about this right? Because I've looked into this before, And I've said, like, okay if you win a Super Bowl How long does that give you as a head coach? Normally, it gives head coaches outside of Barry Switzer or a head coach like that's where you knew that that was more more about the team and switch. It was just kind of there. Try to manage the team. Normally, a Super Bowl gives you more than three years, especially If you make the playoffs, so Doug Peterson 2017 Super Bowl win 2000 and 18. There may be a dropped pass away from going back to the NFC championship game with Nick Foles is the quarterback 2019 they make the playoffs. Um Carson Wentz is out of the game because of a headshot. Seattle today v on Clowney. You saw what happened yesterday to John Walford and Jamal Adam's head shot. Right when he's outside of the pocket. Mm. That's something they're teaching Seattle. Yeah, in my opinion, but Doug Doug Peters don't like the Peterson hasn't had success that Peterson has had success. Terrible year this year for 11 and one. Nobody's doubting that. But it feels like normally if you just look at it from that perspective and say, like, all right, like, Yeah, Terrible year, he at least gets one year to run it back and trying to make things right. I mean, that's normally what happens in when you win a Super Bowl, So it's not like he wanted Super Bowl and then missed the playoffs in 2018, Mr Players in 2019 Terrible year in 2020, No. He made the playoffs three years in a row. But is somebody that lives and dies? With the Eagles? Being in Philly on? W W I pee every day. It just felt like that Something was off. Something was off with the quarterback and his relationship with him and something was off just with the entire team. All right, like normally Super Bowl winning coach. Not necessarily a great roster. We know that a bad roster lot of injuries, but still normally you get that year to run it back to make things right at least a year. Right? And Eagles owner Jeffrey Loria isn't a knee jerk reaction guy. He's not somebody that That goes out me. He churns through coaches and goes through coaches and goes through coaches. That's really not his mentality. But when he sees something's off, he'll real act and he saw that with Chip Kelly. Chip. Kelly became the toast of the NFL. His first year won 10 games. Second year won 10 games and then his third year. It was bad the players. The players obviously thought something was off with Chip Kelly. Doug Peterson pulled the trigger and got rid of him and brought in Doug Peterson in 2016. So it Something's often Philly and we will and we will see exactly what has up happening. But if they met on Tuesday, and the meeting did not go well, they're supposed to meet again. My money's on Doug Peterson not coming back or Here's the other thing. Or maybe it's that, but it's also Hey. This hot head coaching candidate who we really like. Oh, maybe he would be interested in coming here. Maybe a guy like Lincoln Riley. It was thought of as a as a great NFL head coach and Jeffrey Lori, the owner of the Eagles, is a guy that looks the college and said sees, Hey, what I want to run up the offense is doing now. Are we doing Ah West Coast offense that Doug Peterson runs that looks very dated or What about this innovative offense? That a guy like Lincoln Riley could bring? So is there a candidate out there that maybe is under the radar because it hasn't been reported that they secretly have interest in and maybe they heard back like, yeah. Maybe he would have some interest in coming here.

Doug Peterson Super Bowl Barry Switzer Nick Foles Carson Wentz Clowney John Walford Jamal Adam Doug Doug Peters Peterson NFL Seattle Philadelphia Eagles Eagles Jeffrey Loria Chip Kelly NFC Philly Lincoln Riley Jeffrey Lori
Here’s What Happened in Saturday’s N.F.L. Wild-Card Games

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 6 d ago

Here’s What Happened in Saturday’s N.F.L. Wild-Card Games

"It's the fourth year in a row. The NFL kicked off its post season without the Giants or Jets and this super wild card weekend as the league is calling. It got off to an interesting start. As just one of the three home teams Saturday was able to win the Bills in Buffalo held off the Colts 27 24 the really interesting part that was the on Lee game with any fans in the stands. The RAM surprised the Seahawks 30 to 23. Then last night, Tom Brady saying It wasn't pretty. His Buccaneers one in Washington, 31. 23 could win 100 to nothing, and it's gonna be the same result. Me and so you know, you love to play great every game. You know, I think it's good to win. In advance and No, but if we don't play well next week You know, we're not gonna We're not gonna be happy. Three more games on tap today to be played in Nashville, New Orleans and Pittsburgh off the field, The Jets interviewed 31 year old Panthers offensive coordinator Joe Brady for their head coaching job. He becomes the fourth known candidates, several more still in the mix. The wire was states. Matt Campbell reportedly is

Jets Giants NFL Colts Seahawks Tom Brady Buffalo Buccaneers Bills RAM LEE Washington Joe Brady Nashville New Orleans Pittsburgh Panthers Matt Campbell
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | Last week

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
WNBA players celebrate Warnock's projected win over Loeffler

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

05:55 min | Last week

WNBA players celebrate Warnock's projected win over Loeffler

"Right. Before the insurrection at the capital there was two senate runoff elections that the country had their is on in one of them. The reverend raphael warnock defeated the incumbent. Appointed senator kelly leffler in georgia. Kelly leffler for about ten years has been a partial owner of the atlanta dream of the wnba. She's now the majority owner but she's been around the team for now ten or eleven years and you may have heard her own players and much of the wnba is diametrically opposed to everything that leffler stands force. It was a very interesting situation to see everything develop earlier this week. And then how it works in the team dynamic for more on that. Let's welcome and renee. Montgomery actually a guard for the atlanta dream. She joins us this morning. She's actually rejoining us this morning a second time. She's been on with this. Good morning to you so i guess the first thing i gotta ask you is being a member of the team and understanding everything. That's going on on the floor in off the floor. What's the reaction of you and your teammates to misled losing this election. So i'm just gonna speak for myself and the reaction is. It's not even just her losing. Its rafael worn off. One and i wanna make sure that the messaging stays clear because there's some things that happened on january six is trying to take away from the fact that a black man is going to send it a jewish man from georgia's going to send it and we won the presidential race so i would say for me. It's a sweep. it's a three no sleep. So the the the feeling is happy. Rene speaking of january six. What are your thoughts on everything that occurred that day. Yeah you know. It's kinda like we all felt something was gonna happen. I was worried after november. Third ominously like when when the number started tied and we could see that joe biden. Really my win this thing you know. We all started to get a little nervous even here in georgia the aquarium shutdown coach color. They all boarded up their their buildings because we were all expecting some type of reaction and not a good one so then to see what happened on january six and see the lack of policing that was there it was it was disappointing and most call a spade a spade. It was terrorism. Domestic terrorism is the term that we should use for that renee montgomery innately. Sorry thanksgiving i was going to say what is say about the platform that the wnba has like you guys like even a month before. Colin kaepernick took a knee in two thousand sixteen. The wnba pre-game conference about police brutality. You guys were black. Lives matters t shirts before it was even a thing. Guys always been the leader at the forefront say about the platform that you guys have in the work that you guys have been doing you know. I hope people start to licking because a lot of brands. A lot of sponsors. They don't see the value in in women would say 'cause you know. I think i saw a tweet. From china robinson that said of sponsorship for women athletics how chow especially now knowing the impact that a women's league not just so a player but a whole week and have i don't understand why there's no interest but i do hope that just seeing how things transpired and how everyone to see what's going on. I hope that there is some value added to women now. Renee montgomery of the atlanta dream is joining us. This morning on keyshawn jay williams zubin were presented by progressive. Insurance and rene is with us on the goodyear hotline to robinson by the way. Espn women's college basketball analyst shaina. Yes shoutout. I want to ask you this because people may not want to go back to leffler because i think this is just so fascinating with how clear she's been in how clear you guys have been She used to be for people. That aren't aware that maybe don't follow the dream on everyday basis. She used to be a constant present. at games. a practice you'd be a team functions. He was always be sitting in the front row. She was very active owner. Obviously things have changed when she went to the senate got other responsibilities. I just wonder what your relationship is with her. The team's relationship with her you know even before the senator race i would just fear before the games. We've been to her house. Where team function. But i mean any of the players know you're not usually best friends with owner in general you know you typically would talk more to your g Even when it comes to contracts and stuff so we did see her there and we would wait and she was you know. I know that she released herself. From you. know day to day duties as she became a senator but she was president and the wnba. I know probably the letter was her trying to distance herself. Thing is how she's republican and the wnba. Is you know highly majority. Lgbt in black and brown community. So i can understand why she's trying to distance ourselves but it wasn't the case beforehand. Rene we're kind of personal discussions if any at all have you had. We'll often about social justice nine. I'm you know this was a typical owner-player relationship. So you know. I never talked to my minnesota on her about social justice. And i know that this time is is different but by the time that all of these things try Started to unfold. You know it was already. She was already too far. gone by. then how do you feel now that everything is transpired and she still co owner of the team for me and this is gonna be unpopular to say but for me. I'm sure she's not the only owner. That probably feels the way she feels. And so i hope that the wnba and hope that you know even her you know i. I've already posed the question. I don't know why he would want to own a wnba team. If you have to write a letter to the commissioner opposing. Everything that that team is standing for you know. Our team is the atlanta dream. And i don't know if people know that's from martin. Luther king's dream speech. That's how we got our name so if you oppose everything that we fundamentally stand for. I don't see how you can build a relationship there. I don't know why you'd want to be there

Wnba Renee Montgomery Raphael Warnock Appointed Senator Kelly Leffle Kelly Leffler Georgia Atlanta Leffler Senate Rene Keyshawn Jay Williams Zubin Colin Kaepernick Renee Robinson Montgomery Joe Biden Shaina Chow Athletics Goodyear
Coronavirus caseload average sets another record in Washington, DC region

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:21 sec | Last week

Coronavirus caseload average sets another record in Washington, DC region

"The Capitol Hill drama has pushed the coronavirus off the front page, but it hasn't gone anywhere. Seven day average of new cases in the D C region has now set a new record for eight days in a row. Now it more than 7700 new cases a day compared with a week ago. Cases have risen by about 20% in Maryland in D, C and nearly 30% in Virginia.

Maryland D Virginia
"row" Discussed on Seattle Now

Seattle Now

02:59 min | 3 months ago

"row" Discussed on Seattle Now

"Easy <Speech_Male> to say this is not <Speech_Male> what they expected at all. <Speech_Male> They're trying to make the best <Speech_Male> of it and trying to connect <Speech_Male> with people they've <Speech_Male> spaced out <Speech_Male> in lounge where <Speech_Male> people hang out so people <Speech_Male> can't be close together. <Speech_Male> So University is doing <Speech_Male> what can <Speech_Male> to stop the virus, <Speech_Male> but then it's also taking away <Speech_Male> a lot of what people <Speech_Male> come to college <Speech_Male> for for the. Storm experience <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> makes it really <SpeakerChange> hard to <Speech_Female> be with people. <Speech_Female> All Right Jake. So <Speech_Female> what is your opinion <Speech_Female> of how the university <Speech_Female> is conducting <Speech_Female> itself through the <Speech_Female> pandemic? Do you think they <Speech_Male> should be doing <SpeakerChange> anything <Speech_Male> else? <Speech_Male> Yeah the university <Speech_Male> isn't a bind <Speech_Male> that's something the students have <Speech_Male> been talking about. Basically the <Speech_Male> university needs <Speech_Male> to be doing more <Speech_Male> a student on Monday <Speech_Male> that lives nearby <Speech_Male> sent. A letter <Speech_Male> to the university <Speech_Male> administration <Speech_Male> saying basically like I'm <Speech_Male> know compromised <Speech_Male> I live nearby <Speech_Male> hearing loud noises. All <Speech_Male> hours of the night <Speech_Male> sounds like people were partying. <Speech_Male> You need to be doing <Speech_Male> more to step in <Speech_Male> and stop this <Speech_Male> from happening in the university <Speech_Male> basically responds like <Speech_Male> there's not a lot <Speech_Male> we can do we <Speech_Male> can't go in and you know stop <Speech_Male> Hardee's from happening <Speech_Male> we can. Give them notice <Speech_Male> to tell them. They <Speech_Male> shouldn't be doing this, <Speech_Male> but there's not a lot <Speech_Male> we can do <SpeakerChange> since this is <Speech_Female> private property. <Speech_Female> Here's a criticism <Speech_Female> that I have heard about <Speech_Female> universities <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> the COVID pandemic. <Speech_Female> The university <Speech_Female> system <Speech_Female> should know that <Speech_Female> the student body <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> not capable <Speech_Female> of dealing <Speech_Female> with a pandemic <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> if they truly knew <Speech_Female> the student body, <Speech_Female> they <SpeakerChange> wouldn't be <Speech_Female> conducting classes <Speech_Male> right now. <Speech_Male> Yeah. It's <Speech_Male> interesting because the University <Speech_Male> of Washington <Speech_Male> has ninety percent <Speech_Male> of classes online <Speech_Male> and it begs the <Speech_Male> question why <Speech_Male> are people still coming? <Speech_Male> Why is there <Speech_Male> even half capacity <Speech_Male> in Greek houses <Speech_Male> residents halls <Speech_Male> when there's only ten <Speech_Male> percent of classes basically <Speech_Male> being taught in person <Speech_Male> and most of <Speech_Male> these students are just sitting <Speech_Male> in their rooms all day. <Speech_Male> What reason <Speech_Male> is there <Speech_Male> for? These students coming <Speech_Male> back and why is the university <Speech_Male> bringing <Speech_Male> them back basically <Speech_Male> encouraging them to come back <Speech_Male> even with certain guidelines <Speech_Male> residence halls <Speech_Male> a lot of it <Speech_Male> has to do with revenue. <Speech_Male> You don't WanNa <SpeakerChange> have to raise <Speech_Female> tuition prices <Speech_Female> and young people <Speech_Female> of course, <Speech_Female> are very good at convincing <Speech_Female> themselves that the thing <Speech_Female> they're doing <Speech_Female> is the right thing to do <Silence> right <SpeakerChange> now. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> give them the opportunities <Speech_Male> and make it seem okay <Speech_Male> to be doing this, <Speech_Male> you can't blame them <Speech_Male> so much for living exactly <Speech_Male> in the environment that <Speech_Male> you've created for them <Speech_Male> to exploit. <Speech_Male> Basically, if you <Speech_Male> bring twenty people into a house <Speech_Male> and they're all <Speech_Male> congregating and then they <Speech_Music_Male> congregate with the people next <Speech_Music_Male> to them, the <Speech_Music_Male> university <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> can't really do a whole lot <Speech_Music_Female> to stop them take <Speech_Music_Female> gold state street really <Speech_Music_Male> good to talk to you. Thanks. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> having me purchase I. appreciate. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> with the people next <Speech_Music_Male> to them, the <Speech_Music_Male> university <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> can't really do a whole lot <Speech_Music_Female> to stop them take <Speech_Music_Female> gold state street really <Speech_Music_Male> good to talk to you. Thanks. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> having me purchase I. appreciate. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Seattle now <Speech_Music_Female> is produced by <Speech_Music_Female> Sophie read flair <Speech_Music_Female> McGrath, Caroline <Speech_Music_Female> Chamberlain Gomez, <Speech_Music_Female> and Jason Piano <Speech_Music_Female> Matt <Speech_Music_Female> Jorgensen Does Our music <Speech_Music_Female> I'm Patricia <Speech_Music_Female> Murphy. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Tomorrow. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> Do.

So University COVID Seattle Chamberlain Gomez Jason Piano Sophie
"row" Discussed on Seattle Now

Seattle Now

06:07 min | 3 months ago

"row" Discussed on Seattle Now

"Cova rules could face disciplinary sanctions or even legal action. Jake Goldstein Street is the code news editor of the daily, the U. DUB student paper. He's a senior at the U. Dub thanks for taking the time Jake traveling. So right now, there's currently an outbreak of covid nineteen happening on Greek row. Tell us what you know. So right now as of Wednesday morning, we have one hundred, eighty, four cases in. Fifteen fraternities and Sororities, and this has been growing over the past mostly over the past two weeks. The first cases were announced on September eleventh as the university was testing fraternity and sorority members as they moved in they tested over twelve hundred and encouraging sign only four of them tested positive made it seem like you could easily isolate in quarantine those folks that had tested positive those that had had contact with them. But in the last week since classes have started, we've seen a huge uptick in cases even though almost all classes are online. So a week ago we had eighty eight cases and that was up from eleven. The week before two weeks ago, and now we're at one, hundred, eighty, four a week later. So in two weeks, we've seen one hundred and seventy cases basically, it seemed like it had been plateauing at one point. But in the last day we've seen three new chapters get cases, and that seems like it would be ripe breeding ground for more cases. Jake, you have been covering this you're the editor co editor of the daily, but you are also a student how is this impacting you I live in the district so I live close I you know you hear from a lot of students that there's parties going on it's Frustrating I think for a lot of people that those that live in residence halls which I did for a couple years are frustrated that they have to go through such strict protocols. You can't even be in an elevator with more than a couple of people and meanwhile there's parties going on that are spreading the virus. So easily and the thing that I think is most frustrating for people is that this is not this should be a no way surprising you take twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty people put them all in a house together if you were to drop a plan for how this virus would spread this would-be it. Now, why do you say that as a young person I mean I know I. would say that as a mom. But why do you say that as a young person? Jake well, I think there's frustrations that it makes the university look bad that all of these cases are spreading. So easily and everyone else's trying to quarantine and take this seriously and they think that other people aren't as much I mean this is the second outbreak. It's important. In late June early July there were another one hundred and fifty four cases in an outbreak over the summer when there are a lot less people living there almost half as many as that are living there. Now, the Greek basically been made the butt of every joke on social media in the university it's easy to scapegoat this on having parties and stuff. You have one person that has it and they can spread it to other people without ever having a party. It's just all these people live. Really. Close together, the university and students want the university to be able to do more but this is private property off campus just north of campus there's not a lot that the university can do to stop this, and even if they do take actions, there's a fear inside the university that if you live chapters recognition from the university, then students will be less likely to report to the University of that they've had this outbreak and then the university can do to stop it right and this is such an. Important point that you're bringing up here what kind of power does the university have to dictate how the Greek system handles itself it's very little. They sent out a message to fraternity and sorority members yesterday both from the administration and from the county health director really I had never seen this before even when there was one hundred and fifty cases, they never took steps like this laying out ways that they could discipline students and houses for this. One of them is they could get investigated through the code. Of Conduct, which could lead to some kind of discipline. We've seen at other universities, students being dismissed and sent off campus for breaking social distancing guidelines, and then there's also that you could notice landlords of the houses that they could then have an effect, and then the last thing they said is that you could get them get an order either as an individual or as a chapter itself from the county health officer, and if you don't comply with that, that could lead to King County Superior Court order. Yeah public health could very well step into this situation. I am curious because you are a student what kind of behaviors you see among your peers that might be risky in the last week we've definitely seen since classes of started in a lot of people have moved on campus and it's important to note that right now on campus and in the Greek housing occupancy is about half last year was about thirteen thousand living between residents, halls, and France already houses. Now it's about six thousand, but as you walk down the You see big groups altogether, which you didn't see over the summer. I lived here over the summer and there are very few people obviously, and now you see big groups I mean they're all masked of course but eight people standing real close together as a tissues. Yeah. How do you feel in your current living situation? Where are you? So I live not far from you guys. A studios and I live in an apartment. I have my own bedroom. I have a roommate and it all feels pretty safe. I've been tested a few times had no issues. So I feel pretty safe in my living atmosphere. I couldn't say the same for a lot of people on campus I'm not sure I would wanna live in a fraternity house or in a residence hall. Yeah it's just a fact of course that parties aren't safe. But how are students like yourself finding ways to connect with each other and have fun have college experience right now? Yeah. That's something we've been looking into a lot and it's a lot of people just talk through media or hang out outside and sit social distance and try to hang out with other people but it's really Tough to make those sorts of connections. I mean Zoom is not my favorites way of connecting with people. I just had a class right before we're recording this and it's just it's really hard to make those sorts of connections with people and much more leaning on connections. You've already had than making new ones, which is really hard for freshman that don't have those sorts of existing connections. Yeah and you're a senior now. So you've actually had a pretty significant college experience before this pandemic change. I. Wonder The what you hear from freshman about this first year. It's easy to say this is not what they expected at all. They're trying to make the best of it and trying to connect with people they've spaced out in lounge where people hang out so people can't be close together. So University is doing what can to stop the virus, but then it's also taking away a lot of what people come to college for for the. Storm experience and makes it really hard to be with people. All.

Jake University of news editor Cova editor U. DUB France King County Superior Court director officer
"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

KCRW's Unfictional

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

"<Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this story <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was recorded until <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by me. I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> I also <Speech_Music_Female> edited <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Music_Female> made the Sound Design. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> A huge <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thank you to <Speech_Music_Female> always family <Speech_Music_Female> and friends <Speech_Music_Female> and a very special. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you to his <Speech_Music_Male> friends <SpeakerChange> in eighth <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> UNFIXABLE <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and that. Was the story <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the rowing <Speech_Music_Male> man produced <Speech_Music_Male> by Ricky. Who'd <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bob Carl's <Speech_Music_Male> and coming up <Speech_Male> on the next <SpeakerChange> episode <Speech_Music_Male> of unfixable? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I have <Speech_Music_Male> your latest <SpeakerChange> letter <Speech_Music_Male> in front of me. February <Speech_Music_Male> nine is <Speech_Music_Male> cleaning out a family <Speech_Music_Male> house <Speech_Music_Male> when he finds an old. <Speech_Music_Male> Reel <SpeakerChange> to reel <Speech_Music_Male> tape. <Speech_Music_Male> I work here <Speech_Music_Male> General Electric <Speech_Music_Male> here now in town <Speech_Music_Male> a woman <Speech_Music_Male> that works inside <Speech_Music_Male> of me. I'm <SpeakerChange> on his semblance <Speech_Music_Male> line. <Speech_Music_Male> You know it just sounds <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> old. <SpeakerChange> Then <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> went through the trees <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> if she could <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> see. This object <Speech_Music_Male> starts mentioning <Speech_Music_Male> stuff that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I hadn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thought about it <SpeakerChange> in a long time. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Humanoids <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> come out of the object <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> they were not green <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but they were a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sort of grayish <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in <SpeakerChange> color <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the fantastic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> true <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stories of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the shaver mystery. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's an episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Called the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> philosophy of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> flying saucers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next time on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fictional. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Please subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wherever you get <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bob Carlson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The producer of unfixable <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chrissy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Barker provided vital <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production help <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sings and plays <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the musical saw <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> theme music by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Alex <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with music help from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Joe Augustine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Narrative music <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the managing producer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the program. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Was Carl agree? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Bob Carlson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Please join <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> me next time for <Speech_Music_Male> UNFIXABLE <Speech_Music_Male> FOR KCRW. <SpeakerChange> <Music>

"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

KCRW's Unfictional

03:28 min | 9 months ago

"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

"After ten days of rowing he sees a familiar coastline. Shetland islands and radio contact us by calling Kirkman recovery. Good evening he calls the Coast Guard to give his position was then he calls again our damn they on on the Alabama. It's not an emergency call out again. He just wants to talk. No answer the phone also rings in the White House on the greenhill where state the summer before after many days alone at Su. He just longs to talk to a friend. It's Kerry who answers and as she does and the and his dad Jimmy drive over the hill and they're all tractor. Manley father just coming into the game. Did we beat for Letterman than the one? But they've been fetching pete for heating Dolphin dove and his mom is chatting tour series faces in picture frame on the wall behind her over tells her he's tired but determined. He left a little too late this year. Again awesome is coming. But I'll make he says. Carrie looks down over the bay as he speaks and then she sees it to. The Maroon has gone off down the harbor assigned to all members of the volunteer rescue team. A boat is in distress. Abundant there a book so and and his dad leave tractor on the hill and jump into the car and head for the lifeboat rescue station. Carry says twelve thousand forty. I have not sent anyone I have not sent says look to fade. There'll be where you have dot was coming down. He was feeling diet and he would do. This ain't no go and get them. He doesn't want to be rescued. Just wants to check but all that calling worries the coastguard. They'd been Jevon to the cost. Good Evidence Dane. Fifteen minutes for a nice not were really fast and himself this liquid that they start them and then darkness. Come and done much favors to walk. The night is coming. Tight is coming. Bad weather is coming at least can rest one night in a they figure they'll be with you in a couple of hours. Carey says and put down the phone little White House on the Greenhill Barbara Stuart Smalley here on the west side. The Shetland that this is a very small inlet. He called West border from. This can be quite widely nethon. Just see so you get that that action awaiting that just in the middle of the Ocean.

pete White House Shetland islands greenhill Kirkman Kerry Carey Barbara Stuart Smalley Alabama Manley Letterman Carrie
"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

KCRW's Unfictional

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

"From KCRW. It's unfixable. I'm Bob Carlson. And this is the story of the rowing man and coming up who've tries again back in a moment from KCRW. I'm Bob Carlson. And you're listening to unfixable and the story from producer. Ricky who'd called the rowing man the little island multi Faroe Islands about two hundred people. Live here one. Is Bob Hovis? Bravo a sailor fisherman. He's sitting with a friend on an old stone fence in the little village near the Harbour. Swearing his son breached cap and Baker. Up aboots board but tells about his brother couldn't sit still for long. His brother followed his nose and traveled the world as a sailor. Fishermen like many before him but overdid it his way. He was twelve when he bought his first bolt fourteen. When you went to see 'cause and from that point that's how he lived he would say way income back sail away income back. He was restless. He drank too much at times and got himself into a lot of trouble but the moment put out to see it. All just seemed come together. He could read the waves. The currents stars the wind. He knew exactly what he was doing. That Windsor in Nineteen eighty-four. After returning on the ferry from the ship and islands he took high on a boat fishing Salman in the North Atlantic spring. An early some he prepares to leave again gets US sponsor fans presence for the journey. There are some harsh words too. I hope someone smashes that boat in a thousand pieces and the La- says that was save your family from all the sorrow Arbab to cost them. It's an old pain complicated relationship. The seas like being embracing these islands sees why people have survived here sees why people have lost loved ones. The seas not be fooled with. Why would anyone do this just to kiss the Little Mermaid.

Bob Carlson KCRW rowing Bob Hovis Faroe Islands Little Mermaid producer Ricky Salman Baker La
"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

KCRW's Unfictional

06:34 min | 9 months ago

"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

"Yes I'm over. Flap goes to skip out on the night that VM. The rest of your career. How's crew rescue them? Life and automated year. Twos clock mocked up. Here I think to gray was happy and the rest of the crew. They got him in titus boat the beauty but more life obviously get to cover. Short Sean. He ramped up to the mechanics. Host spent the night bad. He came ashore state with book mechanic and his family. You said study weeks to begin. Ended up staying there for a while your core his book the Book of rescues to three. Ladwig cost guide form inboard rolling from federal pushing state of exhaustion. Not West of it but option need issues but did not position tools led. The book was phoned. The occupant absolutely exhausted but taking water and he did not. Nobody was the only one mile from the rocks. Another hour would be disastrous. What the Games. The Guy Shuki toyed into it and be sticking to the mechanic shows where the weather is suitable and bought facts. He entertains rowing today. Might might plot fucks the board to anyone. Remember who fixed the boat? Their dominance fit and it was damaged in the stem. Mostly what I'm Solit- Ali. I think so like two within maybe rescuers try to poverty council unless they do too and hurt autos linen. Ingrid walking off. A stranger has arrived in a tiny Ryan Pot on the big wild ocean that more or less collins everything. He was probably about a novelty to Oslo of it in the small community. He's a novelty a fresh breath. Fallen Biden Rohan Blonde tear unusual accent. I E books and the Old Social Club and Clin beautiful music. He plays the accordion and sings in his mother. Tongue ferries tone his own language but I might can on air blasting in the social club soon as arm-wrestling all the men in the social club. Adam wrestled a lot the main. Obviously he's road so fired he was. He was affecting was thrown. Takes the kids out on anchovies in his boat all the Batman's would come in and he went showers the kind of food he would eat when he was at sea lights. The little stove way out on the water opens a can and he I made the mountain Kenza Food and water quantity store way off way off. Serve stride whale meat and Blah SPEC L. Meet blowback. That was it SPEC. The Stranger came by way of the ocean. Not so much of a stranger anymore in you got is there nor is his cat. Jessica is the name the COP in black and white owned The book because Jessica is supposed to be in quarantine but they smuggle her into the life blood shed feet bomb. A Little White House was slope when crooked trees of the garden overlooking the a couple of white sheep Cam soclean on the other side of the water stands. And this is the lifeboat station. And there's the boys off he would throw the rental home when over had been towed into eighth. This is where he stayed. The lifeboat can Jimmy. Who took the stranger in passed away not long ago? Many years after his wife carrying the house is almost empty now. The kitchen a calendar from last year on the wall. Mt Shells through a small hall wallpaper. Light Away where. The picture frames used to hang up the stairs. It's empty you to this. Used to be over his bedroom out there to work and then of course the whole week in Bergen they were to fixing the boat and then the weekend was spent partying like the bus. You would want to get hold of Viorica. A stranger came to town over thirty years ago. He was on his way to Copenhagen. He brought a cat and accordion. Deep Laid Vati Stinky. He played in a strange mainland tune that he played a he taught seven year old Ingrid attune. We should've record in some way unplanned. There is a cassette tape in a draw here somewhere. Overplaying the audience talking.

Ryan Pot Ingrid Old Social Club Jessica Sean Adam gray wife carrying Solit- Ali Shuki Bergen Copenhagen Deep Biden Oslo Jimmy Viorica Rohan Blonde
"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

KCRW's Unfictional

03:24 min | 9 months ago

"row" Discussed on KCRW's Unfictional

"There's very dangerous Patricia. Why the Shetland islands overlooking the North Atlantic boiled while but the weather mark. Henry's words it's a bit of Water. We've been up here a few times then. Rescue people from he Next to the ashes lighthouse. Don't walk too close to the inch. It's a long steep fall and down there. There shop pointed rocks and currents and waves of meat land the first time since I left America nothing between Russian America. So that's that's required. Lovie was ot at his place is like the edge of the world. The first land over would have seen after week of Rome. Less than a third of the way to Copenhagen still so far to go thank God. They're all in the fight. Distance heading for the Oil Terminal Sullom. Voe over was somewhere out there too in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. That's roughly with a mile off shore. He had a square reproductive up. But as you can see he is filled with clubs and rocks and a whole lot and that's cleared. He was drafted into F. B. leftism. Nobody would survive in into small bullet beautiful place on a beautiful day with. Oh boy at said wild wild by the Waddell Pool Day put the July nineteen eighty-four if the lighthouse could speak it would say I saw tiny dot approaching in those huge waves. A man in a rowing boat. He was very very tired very exhausted. The book is damaged Iraqi. He's a lucky man. The volunteer rescue team from the small village of eighth spotted him. We came from down there. That's thrown there. And he was gone down the way and we came up the way and madame us very happy to see us. He's so happy to see them with. He was very very tired very exhausted. He doesn't want to leave his boat. He he wants to stay aboard on and we will tell him into the safety of the narrow bay and is we open if full. He was so happy that he got his record denote stabbed to play as we told them. Dave blacks lewitt's in the summer evening a rowing boat being towed into eighth the happy sound of an accordion bouncing as a softer between the green hillsides. Strange arriving in the ocean of chance to village on the edge of the houses on soft green hillsides and safe narrow Bay.

Henry Shetland islands Dave blacks lewitt narrow Bay Patricia America Rome Copenhagen Lovie
"row" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"row" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Am not going to tolerate. What is presently happening now? I gotTa let people take a look behind the scenes. And I'm GonNa tell you a story one thousand nine hundred ninety three when I was a cub reporter hungry and ambitious. Che's I was covering the Miami Marlins it seemed like A very important thing at the time to cover the first year of baseball in our market exceptionally finally major league and the amount of frenzy and the amount of chaos happening around. My work schedule was such that that I will yield out to a friend of mine. When does it end and we were three days in spring training three days into spring training on on the season one does it end and now it is Wednesday and I am looking in our studio and I am asking? When does it end? Because I have have the incongruent images of Chris Cody and a ridiculous car battery costume dancing happily. He will ask all our guest today. Some awful car specific Pun While in that costume is it hot in their credit to pump the brakes on the negative attitude. I'm revved up for today. So let's do it all right. Don't use all of your material yet. You look totally ridiculous but right in front of you are too panicked and seething thing people Roy I I'm not describing Roy as panicked. I'm not describing Mike as panicked. I'm describing both of them as seething and it is feeling to me like panic over here because Mike Ryan has been here since before golic and Wingo and honest to God. I did not know that there was a time I'm before Golic and Wingo. I thought the day started with WINCO aging at a disproportionate rate. Because he's doing morning television and they started our workday. They have to me in our lives. Golic and Wingo are the sunrise. I did not know there was a time before that but Mike Ryan was in this lonely studio before there was a happy car battery in it. Trying to get everything functioning from radio row. Where STUGOTZ'S STUGTOZ on radio row and I heard him not ninety seconds ago screaming into either either a telephone or a microphone? Why would we change the one thing that works ninety seconds before the show starts and it wouldn't be us if that's not what we did? We are calamity. I have no idea what's going to happen. Those are the line to Stugatz work. Today we have had years to plan for the Super Bowl in Miami not days not weeks not months. Do we have a functioning way to communicate at the worldwide leader in sports with Stugatz on radio. Row Yes or no we do not over the air there. Okay so you can communicate. They can communicate directly to him. But I have like I'll I'll put guys if you're listening. Hang on let me talk in the talkback guys as if you're listening. I'm going to Mike you in the event that you can hear us if I just pod you up or the mics are hot. Don't be cursing all right so they can't hear me though I don't know. Can you hear era. Can you hear US obviously not okay. Very good yes so what we explain to me please. You were here before Golick Lingo. The time now I was trying to be here before golic and Wingo because just like the difficulty and testing things because the plan was and it seemed fault after there was a disastrous test yesterday and and our plan was less test during the golic and wingo breaks. That's as you know five minute window. It didn't work out but I had an audio only option that was no matter what we we can communicate which was working fine and then they decided to change something and now. That's not working so I'm not having the greatest day giving off seething eating. I've been doing a lot of work on myself. Dan and if I'm giving off season the my therapist is going to be very upset with me. No on given all seating angering well. You're anger yesterday. Because yesterday yesterday it was proclaimed a total disaster by you And we had twenty four hours to fix it again super bowl. I think we've known for several years. Now that it would be in Miami this week you would think thank the worldwide leader in sports get functioning access to communication. I would think you would think that the number one show in terms of like podcast downloads. In the history of sports talk radio it would be able to test something outside of five minute windows and commercial breaks but I just a speed bump I we're GONNA get through this I have heard the analysts combat. ESPN and some of their analysis is so bad that I could say this with conviction. ESPN is supposed to be better at something than sports. There is a thing that they're good at sports but there's something better that they're supposed to be good at which is communicating ESPN. I know there's not a C. N.. ESPN but communicating is a very basic thing that espn you turn on your television. And their people are communicating. Think some of them were very bad very poor analysis. But it's getting to you the on a base level. We can get information no matter how bad it is we can get it to the audience. It's our only gift. It's what the Empire is built around in a real negative charge right now. We're GONNA need a positive charge with you all right. I'm already annoyed with the battery. The battery can go sit in the penalty box now the battle the battery can actually sit in the penalty box because there are only so many paths none of which working presently but now battery that the penalty box isn't working either. No because we have the penalty box path for the radio path which you can see on television like we have a camera camera shot there but just no way to communicate to them. Explained to me. Explain to me. Please how we're GONNA do a show today. First first of all it is maybe the most absurd thing I have seen in my time in.

Wingo Mike Ryan ESPN Golic Miami Miami Marlins reporter Roy Che WINCO Chris Cody Golick Lingo espn Stugatz Dan
"row" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Row is doing yeah it's it's a deep tragedy really he had a capacity for friendship that was immense immense and we have this we have this caricature view of him today that he was missing throat right and it's it's still it's still hangs on and i i hate to see say it was just you know that traditionally is described as well emerson was disappointed that throw did not become that great of bard that you know emerson emerson himself but you know you always have this generational thing where a great man wants to see his own boyhood youthful dreams fulfilled in another as he's maturing into his own path it's odd with emerson because emerson right at the cusp at h thirty which is very very pivotal biographical year in any anyone's life emerson had had this mystical vision at yard end a plan in in paris where he said i will become a naturalist than this was a turning back on on theology on becoming a unitarian divine like was expected of him and of course no he didn't become a great naturalist it was throw became a great nationalist and i would say that his own poetic aspirations you know emerson wrote some pretty good poetry but you just take one any any one of emerson's best known poems and then take any throw palm which are completely unknown and throws are the better you know throws their modern they're they're sprightly in and full of force so throw both politically and in terms of being a naturalist he did i believe completely fulfill these these prophetic and deeply held emmer sonian desires i think it was just that emerson kind of became victim to kind of bourgeois expectations you know he was a guy who moved and in somewhat aristocratic intellectual and social circles and henry was a air dwell andrew was a guy went naked you know and wars straw hat went in the buff across concord river and the acid riverine and was still collecting frogs you know when he was a grown man throw remained childlike and spirit in a way that his emerson's own children and the children of concord new instantly and responded to instinctively and you know i this is something we is true today the child man will always end up being the the kind of the will not be looked upon kindly by by any community just because of our own sort of borsch wa ideals about what it is to be a man i'm coming to the heart of your you know the a theme of of your of your work and you know we've we've grown a lot of ways to to expand the ideal of of manhood i think the row had an expanded a more expanded and a more divine manhood within him that exceeded the expectations of his time in a way that they just couldn't couldn't take it in limit so you've mentioned that you know after i in his biography you've chain changed you know when you go on walks the way you deserve but i'm curious do you think it's possible for us moderns here living in our digital world to rian chant in see the world like throw did or do you think the toothpaste is out of the bottle and there's no going back to to that oh man oh there's no alternative we have to we have to and you know i would that there maybe maybe young people could tell me who for them you know is is fulfilling this role as a kind of model but maybe maybe we're we're post models at this point we have to be our own models and.

Row
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"On Netflix. This message was paid for an approved by the sterile booth company and the blue family. Up. I wanted to shine like magnesium, but my antelope e was too low. So I tried to convert to helium, but my hydrogen was too slow. I weigh like ten kilograms promo- plast I need to drop a few pounds, but my structure is like a noble gas with no electrons to pass around. I wanted to change my name and symbol to fit in the periodic table. Potassium and tungsten giggled. When iron said I wasn't able gold and silver and copper, Ron my side with mercury to lend a hand, but those medals don't react to collide. Results aren't in the plans. Sodium was salty. I dated chlorine, I was just trying to be nice. I done right on the scene. Conversion won't come out, right? I wanna balance my quesion limited reagents cause precipitation instead of combustion. Now I hang with the son who has patient showing light from my spectrum and state functions onto. That was mezro performance piece. Human element. We wanna thank everyone who was involved in this episode. Thanks to Kevin Sawyer for recounting his memory of execution. He was here for nineteen ninety nine and thanks to father. George Williams, rabbi posh leopard sitting down with us in the media lab and thanks Steve champion. Joseph manual Montas and Daniel Wozniak for speaking to us from death-row and thanks to everyone who responded. And we're really sorry we couldn't speak with all of you. Your house was produced by myself. Earn woods. Najah poor would have from outside producer, Pat Macedon Miller who also works with the sound design team. This episode was score with music by Antoine Williams. We contributions from David jazzy. Curtis FOX's are story editor and Jewish Pierrot is our executive producer for radio Topi. We also want to ward and Ron Davis, and as you know, every episode has to be approved by this guy here. I want to be a little more expensive with what with my words today in that, you know, it's amazing to see the response that ear hustle has generated. It was originally designed for just really the listeners here at San Quentin about two thousand guys. Today there millions of people who listen to and it resonates with people. And so I would say, thank you. Thank you to all those people who are taking the time and are listening episode by episode and and the hell leads me to a request. I got not very long ago, one of my cousins and so I'll give out of shot there. I'm not in the name that she says. She said Sam. She said, please, please. Please episodes a two short. She said they gotta be longer. And so in that I will close. And I will say my part, which is this is Lieutenant Sam Robinson at sanguine state prison, and I approve this story. You worked up there for a while, then you. Yeah, yeah. I worked on death row myself for ten years. And how was that experience? Man? I think it definitely shapes who I am today and how I engage with people inside this environment. There many days on there. They were very, very difficult and then they're more days that are more complex and much more different than your imagination could even even lead you to. I think I would be triple amount of time if I took the time to kind of just dive in and talk about what throws hike for staffer. I think you'll cousin appreciate that right on. Free State. Thanks. It sounds like he's got a lot to say. So like season three. Absolutely. And. Check our website here. Hustle s q dot com where you can sign up for a newsletter and download transcripts of our stories. Okay. I'm really glad that you brought up transcripts because I had this cool thing happen. Okay. A few weeks ago, I was giving a talk about your hustle at the Starling social club in Oakland. And this couple came up to me and told me that their son was incarcerated at avenue all state prison, and they can't hear your hustle there avenue. So the parents sent him the transcript of the show. And after he reads it, the transcripts get passed around the prison. Also the that is cool. So, hey, here's a shoutout to all you guys out never know reading those transcripts and no, we're trying to get ear hustle into your prison actually not just into avenue all. We'd love to get into all of the prisons and the California Department of corrections and rehabilitation. And actually why stop there will the country all over the country. So if you're interested, if you have that power to get into your institution contact us through our website. Your hustle s q dot com. Next time on your hustle. People love lady jaye and they asked for more and this time she's talking about what life is like for transgender people inside every day. Every day is like, I have to educate someone and India's might be a slip of the tongue. Literally a slip of the tongue. Calling me he instead of she and when you call me that it's like, okay, hold up.

blue family Sam Robinson Netflix Kevin Sawyer India George Williams California Department of corre Antoine Williams San Quentin David jazzy iron Pat Macedon Miller producer Curtis FOX Joseph manual Montas Oakland executive producer Steve champion ward editor
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"Soul? I was put it that way I was, but luckily enough people shaped me throughout the years. I've been down and continue to this day. I can only help hope I return the favor. As long as you are alive. There is hope. When you are dead, that struggles over. You can't look in terms so the future because future is not yet here. So what do you have left? You have right now? And so that is what you have to live at right here right now. That's eternity. When I have the inmates come to me and basically say, I'm gonna kill myself. Right? And, and there's just no point in a, what's the point in me getting up another day and keep going, you know, and. Happens a lot. It happens a lot. You know, people lose hope. I think. And I, you know, I really think what they're really asking is, you know, help me find a way to keep going right. Help me find some hope in in this kind of dark and hopeless situation. I think the way I can describe what it's like as a minister going in there as a priest is it's like going into this dark, dark cave with a flashlight and and. My my worth there is to remind the men. They're that subtle dark that despite where they are that they're still light and that's does still God is still mercy. They're still purpose in life and that they that they're not beyond redemption. It's like the building itself and everything about it as meant to reinforce this oppressive darkness and hopelessness in my job is to go in there with a little flashlight and remind them there is hope. What do you think e do you think you could keep it together up on the row? From our experience of I twenty seven years in prison altogether, I believe I can keep together. It's like, you adjust to it like his going to s going to the shoe or going, you know your program change. And then after a while you will get acclimated to whatever that program is our, I would assume it's like having a disease or. Cancer or something like that, you know us there, but it's not something that you think about all the time I was right years have to learn to live with because if you spend too much time in it dwelled and ended, and that's all your life is. Yeah. And you know, it's not just about the guys on death row. We didn't even get into how survivors or family members of the victims feel about death row in the guys up there. I'm sure they're going through a whole lot. Yeah, absolutely. There's so much mortar learn. So if you're listening to this and your own deaf role, sinister letter and tell us more about your experiences on death row. So we can't guarantee anything, but we sure love to hear from you. When we come back, it's count time. That's when we put in a little extra something today, we're going to go back to the main line at here for Melia voice. Thanks for listening to your hustle. This episode of ear hustle is brought to you by an ongoing saga about a wealthy family and the one son who continues to reluctantly stick around to keep them together. They're campaigning for the family of the year award in award created and sponsored by the stereo blues company to give to the founders of the company. The blues in case that wasn't clear, the blues are giving themselves in ward because they think they are the family of the year. Why do they deserve such an award? Well, they've built their community both literally and figuratively. They've built sturdy model homes in Orange County. The support local businesses such as good bias industries and Steve Holt pest control. They've served an army and they are philanthropists. No one deserves the family of the euro award more than the blues. No one. So visit vote, Luth dot com to learn more about the family and followed their campaign trail. You don't wanna miss the results on may twenty ninth only on

Cancer Steve Holt Orange County Melia twenty seven years
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"I think the thing that really I noticed the most is how firmly guys will grass my hand in a handshake. It's like they're really reaching out to to connect with the outside world because there's so little touch that goes on in prison in other, they're not allowed to really be around other people in a way that we would consider human. Once came to sell of individual, he had a broken tooth and he was had a black guy. He was he was beat up, right? And I said, what happened. He said, well, I had a cell extraction, right? Where they come in and drag them out, right? And I said, why did you do that? And he said, I just needed to feel human contact. Okay. Either something that occurs to me listening to rabbi pollen father, George talk about what life is like on death row whose well, I'm not going to say that it contradicts with the guys themselves are saying, but there is this kind of disconnect. They don't live up there. That's true, but that's not exactly what I'm getting at. Okay. Rabbi pollen father George are so full of empathy, right. Okay. But what strikes me is that least the guys we talked to. Don't seem to need empathy or sympathy. They have some kind of curious control over their lives that really surprised me and it's it's kind of hard to articulate exactly what I mean. But what I walk away with is thinking these guys are incredibly self sufficient, you know, maybe they aren't. Maybe that's what they showed us, but that's what really comes across. But remember, this is a select few. I mean, we said seven hundred letters up there and only got a handful of back now and the guys we ended up talking to their determine their disciplined. I mean, look, Steve. He is written three entire books in a decade. He's been on death row. That's true. And I remember he said, sometimes when he has the time to go to the yard, he actually chooses to stay in his cell and right. He's focused. He's been up in thirty six years, so hard to get my mind around that. But I also remember that there's a lot of guys up there who aren't like that. There's guys who struggle with suicide with Syria. Depression, and also unsure a lot of guys who just watch TV all day. Like Daniel said this tough. I mean to keep it together in a place like that. You've got to be disciplined. You've got to have things to do, and you've got to have many. What what type of programs do you take? So I'm in an extent extent, existential ISM group. I'm in critical thinking group and a lot of church services. You know, I make it a point to keep has actively busy as possible. So if there's an opportunity to do something, I'm going to take advantage of it. What do you mean an existential group. It's it's a group of about. There's about eight of us. It's just a group of guys finding meaning to still continue living on while on death row, knowing that we have the fate of death upon. So it's an informal group. It's not a official program. Can you talk about how you meet and discuss that? I cannot. Okay. Got it. Question being up to. What gives your life? Meaning what give my life? Meaning. I know the conditions aren't, you know the best, but it's noticing little things along the way that I guess I'm more in tune to seeing now than I was prior to getting here. Can you give me an example of what would be a good thing that would happen during the day? I mean, it could be something as small as walking outside and feeling the sun on my face. And that's just one small little example that again, people walk through it each and every day without reflecting upon now, one single instance that many just take for granted. And I guess now because my life is so slow down, I can focus on those and it's the little things that make life beautiful. Do you think that your circumstances being on death row has has made you learn and know yourself better than most people have the opportunity to do. Absolutely. Why is because I have time to think I have time to reflect if you have children, and if you have a job, if you're married. Well, when you come home, you have to deal with the household. You have responsibilities of bills. You have job, you have a family, the demands on people in the outside world or different demands that I have because they don't have time because all the time is filled up. How will you leave a record of your life? Like what would be left behind to say that Daniel was here? Any matter? I like to think that who I was prior to coming here, that man, you know, growing up, I made a lot of mistakes in my life and. That person, I guess I've accepted is that guy being dead, like that's the guy that got the death penalty. That's the guy he's, you know, gotten a lethal injection who I am now who I wake up to to be each and every day you know, who can I be remembered as if I can change to people's lives for the better where no one else could. That would give my life more meaning than I have any right to deserve that opportunity exists where you are now to do that. Absolutely. Without doubt, you got a lot of lost souls that have nobody, and they're basing the impending doom of death. Are you a lost soul?

George Daniel Syria Depression Steve official thirty six years
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

07:14 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"Tier. Smith, do you remember any smells smells? Well, sure. Every every kind of smell you have the the smells of the bathroom. You name it. It's like a locker room. It's like a bathroom. It's like a cafeteria, and you have the smells of people cooking, you know, meals, people cooking in their hot pots and you know, and they figure out ways to cook for each other and share with each other. Definitely a an attack on the senses. In some ways he walked by the shower, the shower smell, you know, just the kind of the the smells of of daily life, but kind of concentrated. My name is Daniel was from Orange County. I've been here saying Quinton, very short time about just under two years. I got arrested when I was twenty six and got convicted and been here since. Daniel was the third and final death row inmate. We were able to speak with he's house in east block where, like we said, they're confined to their cells twenty hours a day. We asked him and Joseph what it's like to spend that much time in a place with so little natural light. Has to two different lights. There's one on the top one on the bottom, but can eliminate the cell. There's a high setting, the low setting. Typically, I leave my lights on all the time just to, you know, create a little bit of brightness your site. It's taken away somewhat that when you enter into a place like this into prison year, you know, you have to make a lot of adjustments because you're limited to what you're able to see. So definitely gets weakened. And what gets strengthened is your sense of hearing, you know, I, I've learned, you know, and I wasn't doing it purposely, but it just happens naturally, but I've learned how to. Train my ears to just identify all the different sounds that happen outside of myself. I mean, I've gotten so good with my sense of hearing I can actually, you know, tell when you know when certain officers are walking down the tier, just by the the, the jingling of the keys. About a year ago, Joseph had to leave the prison for a medical appointment. It was his first time away from death row in twenty years of the loan time in prison. A medical appointment on outside can be like a holiday is something you look forward to and think back on at this over. I remember looking at some of the houses that we were driving by in again, you know, it's been so long since I've seen a house that close. They didn't look real to me. You know, I it, my perception of of a size was just way off. And then you know, when we arrived at the clinic, you know it was able to smell roses for the first time in when I smell those roses on my smell, those trees. It took everything in me. You know, not to break down. It just seemed like you know, all my senses, you know, just became a live, you know you you, do, you know so many years in prison. You get used to the all we see is green blue, gray, black, you know, we don't. We don't get to see much color at all than you know what we see on the on the television, but it's nothing like, you know, experience it, you know, personally, and you kind of forget, you know how the free world smells like the smell of gas coming from the cars or just the just the. I mean, it's freedom. You know, that's the word that I always use. When I'm talking to my mom about that experience, you know, I smelt freedom. In hovers, you know, demento of death is there. There's nothing you can do to escape that. In our conversation with Joseph, Daniel and Steve, it took a while, but we eventually got around to what it's like living as a condemned. Man, this is Steve again. Don't wake up consciously thinking about, okay, I'm going to be executed. It's easy to be melancholy in a place like this. You know, that's that's easy to that. That's that's not hard to do. You know my sentence was sentenced to death. I wasn't sentenced to be reformed. So any acts of redemption of self transformation. Anybody make one death-row it has to come from themselves. Who am I watch it? I come here and what is my purpose? And so if you could find out what you'll situa purpose is like, and that's not only becomes your anchor, but that becomes your arm confidence by Hugh each and every day to get up and want to do something to pursuit admission. Again, there are some guys I know in here who basically they just wake up each morning, turn on the TV zone out and go to sleep, and that's their entire life and existence. You can't help, but feel sorry for them. And I guess they give me the votive -ation to not ever want to get there. So I make it a point to always stay busy. What you studied, the great spiritual literature, and you studied the great spiritual teachers from Aachen proposes for Buddha, Jesus, the prophet Muhammad from gun the if you look at each and every one of their lives, they always left the masses of their people and they went off into the wilderness, and that is where they had their quiet time. That is where they meditated. And so for me, that becomes my force, you know, early in the morning, you know, three o'clock, four o'clock in the morning where most of the people are sleep, where I could just really have quiet time to myself. It's been about a half an hour just doing it meditation. That sets the tone for me for the rest of the day. Hey, it starts in the morning. Yeah, it's the most important decision each and every single one of us make that we take for granted. You choose to wake up, happier, choose to wake up, sad, make that decision. Hopefully it's happy. And then from that point on, you know, I just continue trying to figure it out. Why am I still alive? Why am I still breathing? Why do I still exist? And I think it's not a matter of knowing what that purposes. It's about the journey and the discovery and understanding what that is, and it constantly changes on no Devon situation is a dummy. I am on death row, but I can also look out into the house side world. And I can also look at the garden to history, simply say to myself if my ancestors could come over here, packing volt like thirty come into a world that they had no ideal. If they can come here with everything. In terms of that language, they history culture and customs destroyed. It's still make something out of nothing. Then I don't have anything to complain about. I

Joseph Daniel Steve tier. Smith Quinton Aachen Orange County Devon Muhammad Hugh twenty hours twenty years two years
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"Exists. It's open. We didn't get it out of letters back from death row in response. But we got a few and we thought maybe we'd get a correspondence going and then get guys down here in the main line to read the letters. And we would record that like Kim burns, we put some soulful fiddle music behind it, but a few guys who responded to our letter agreed to call us and let us record 'em, which is allowed under California law. We can't interview them in person, and we can't request to interview a specific inmate, but they can call us if they won't, too. So at the pointed our, we brought a recording and into the tiny office of Larry Snyder. He runs the media lab for the prison. The Larry Schneider opening up to speak the phone so you can speak with four and Earl Woods, who are the houseboats. Folks. All right. Let's get to make sure these volumes are together. The first man we spoke to Steve champion. He was eighteen when he was first incarcerated and he came to San Quentin when he was twenty. He's been here on death row for thirty six years. Could you, could you describe your cell to us. There's not that big. You have a thing that still toilet and think you have a tube lockers that's attached to the ball. You have a bunk, but me I don't sleep on still slab when you place the mattress that. But what I have did for the last thirty years is that I sleep on the floor and I use my punk to slap as my desk get my name is Joseph manual this I was twenty years old. When I caught this case in ninety four and I've been on death row ever since we asked Joseph about his sale to, you know, I have a TV you know, I have, you know, a CD player. I have a typewriter. You know, usually use my bed as a desk. You know, my all my family pictures up. I call it the wall of fame. I have a math on my wall. You know, I like looking at certain continents, you know certain places in the world. When I'm looking at a PBS program, do you enjoy not having a sale mate. You know here your episode on having so many. Yes. My like it the way it is right now. So it sounds like all the sales on condemn role are pretty much the same as a sales on the main line, but they don't have Selis and almost everyone on the main line has Sally, but you guys get to walk around outside pretty much all day. Yeah, I can be myself from six in the morning to nine at night and we can do all kinds of stuff on the main line. Like participate in programs, go jogging on yard, chop it up with the homeys. But on Devereaux there are some serious restrictions, but that depends on which block you're in. We said that death row was prison within a prison, but it turns out that that inner prison is also divided. You have east bloc guys are in their sales for twenty hours a day. And whenever they come out and go to the yard, for example, they gotta be shackled in escort. But if you go without write ups for a say several years, and if there's room, you might get the goal to north sake, which is the block, which also housed the only term. You have is when you leave the unit when you go to a medical escort or you go to to visit when you grow the yard, you're not handcuffed. You know you, you just basically go to the back of the unit because the officer, you know he's able to open up the yard manually. And all we do is basically just walk straight up to the yard. We so guys just walk around freely and do they, they can. They can walk around pre they can. You know, play a part games, use the phone or saying theirselves, or walk up and down the tier as a means to exercise. So when you say yard, you actually go outside. Yeah, I go outside on the on the roof. Okay own roof so that you can look over the whole bay, not we're not. We're not everything is they? They covered everything. Our view is very limited me. Yeah, they changed. They changed that a long time ago when I first got up here, you know, we didn't have a covering. So I was able to get a good look at the ocean and the Richmond bridge, but they changed that. So what do you see when you look out. Yeah, the sky birds flying flying a ball. I guess you need to explain this to be better because I just assume that you have to sit in your cell all day. So tell me what your typical day is like everything begins at seven thirty for everybody, and it ends at one thirty. But basically what I do is because you're working, I go out to the yard and I and I clean up, but they let the workers out earlier. So we can, you know, pass the milk out past lunches out, clean the tables, get the shower buckets, ready? We clean the foams down. We wiped the tables down. We just make sure everything is clean for everybody. So when they get started with their day, they don't have to deal with the messy tier.

Steve champion Larry Snyder Larry Schneider California Kim burns Joseph Earl Woods San Quentin Devereaux Selis officer Richmond bridge Sally thirty six years thirty years twenty hours twenty years milk
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"Murder. Okay, Kevin makes a really good point. Some of the guys are here on the main line for committing the same types of crimes that put other guys on death row. Yeah, a lot of it depends on how police report God ridden how prosecutor moves forward or how jury rules. It's not like everybody up. There's a serial killer is true. They all been convicted of murder, but so have a lot of people down here on the mainland. That's right. And we've been able to interview a number of those guys, but we're not allowed to have contact with the death row inmates. We can't invite them down to the media lab and we're not allowed to visit them up there. But like a lot of things in prison, there's always a workaround and we tried to find one. Yes. The first thing we did was we talked to a few people who do spend time on death row. Well, the first visual is the big iron door that says, condemned row, and it looks like it was rabbi Shleifer. He works for the prison and he visits death row on a weekly basis and ring the bell and and the guard comes and kind of looks and ask for your ID and. It's all it just looks old at feels all it feels like it's been that way for forever. There's five tiers, five stories, right? And and you know, it's it's basically one hundred cells long, and you know, people are just having conversations sort of weaving inbetween and over each other and up and down and sideways, and and it's loud. It's crazy, it's chaos. It's like walking into a giant hold of a ship magic, a giant five story tall Cosco only with nothing to buy. We also spoke with father, George Williams, a Jesuit priest who's part of the prison ministry is just metal black metal cell doors and grey concrete walls and really dirty windows. So the the light is it's kind of dim even in the daytime, it's it's just a kind of a dark place and there's not a lot of color in it. I mean, it's just a side from black and gray. There's nothing growing in there. There's no, you don't get a sense of there. Being life, of course, throw, I suppose, why would you? It's almost as though someone went in there and and took the color out of it. You know, it's like suck the life out of the place. But those of you who listen before, you know that we're not in his media center alone. We have the San Quentin newspaper right next door. The papers actually written in published inside the prison but printed on the outside. So when it's getting ready to be delivered, a truck brings all the issues down to the media lab. The newspaper ships out to all the prisons in California, including San Quinn and that means for us. Luckily it also goes to death row. We're putting these letters inside Saint Quentin newspaper. So basically we do a line out to see if anyone with bike and it came in the form of a letter. To whom it may concern. My name is Nigel poor, and I'm one member of the team that produces the podcast you're hustle from with inside San Quentin state prison. You may have heard our podcast airs on channel nineteen on the prison closer station. The purpose of the podcast is to bunk some of the stereotypes and assumptions that people hold about those who are incarcerated. We are contacting you because we want to include the entire San Quentin community, and although death row is related from the rest of the prison, it is still part of the community to be clear. We do not do stories about anyone's particular case or crime. We do not do stories at talk about how unfair the system is. We do stories about the everyday experience that show life inside in a realistic and three dimensional way. Arlen I don't know about you, but I had no idea how he's gonna react to these letters. Well, I spent a lot of time on the main line here and I'm totally comfortable. Right? But most of what I know about death row comes from the movies and they may not be realistic, but the movies have a way of filling your imagination with really frightful thoughts. And on top of that, there are people there who have done really awful things. You heinous thing, you have people up there that have done things to the extreme and that's what up there. But every day both you and I interact with guys who are in for murder and we don't even think about, no, it's true. I totally understand that. I'm not saying that my reaction was the right reaction. I'm just saying that it was there and it was difficult and it was something I really had to work through. Plus I also have to admit, I had concerns about offending the families of their victims us. Understandable. Yeah. So it was really helpful to hear what father George had to say about this. When I first got there, I started curious. I would read the files of like what people are in for. That's what gave me nightmares. I stopped reading because they were some of the crimes. They were pretty horrible. But when I'm with the guys, I don't think about their crime because they're not the crime there. The man in front of me and whatever he did. That's something that he did in the past and it's not my job. He's already been judged so I don't need to be doing that. I think it's in some ways the darkest place in California because it's where we've put the people that people fear the most and just have so much hatred and anger toward and thrown them away in this building. And there's no hope at least thing about San Quentin is different from a lot of places, their programs. There's hope guys have an incentive and we believe that people can change. I mean, most of us who work here do believe that there. It's like they're not allowed to change their, they are stuck in being the worst thing they ever did and the best thing they can hope for life without parole, which even worse than death penalty. The worst thing about death row is just the fact that it exists.

San Quentin murder. San Quentin newspaper California George Williams San Quentin community Saint Quentin prosecutor Kevin San Quinn rabbi Shleifer Nigel poor Arlen
"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"row" Discussed on Ear Hustle

"At San Quentin. This podcast contain language that may not be appropriate for all listeners. Listener discretion is advised. The thing that sticks in my in the most still makes me laugh when I think about it. And this is dark because I mean, people don't work in prison may not find this funny, but one of the serial killers over there was very notorious and killed a lot of people, and he goes to my services and one day I was walking away from his cell. We were talking, you said a, we'll see you later. Father don't do anything. I wouldn't do it. I thought of as well. You've really set the bar pretty low from it. Didn't you? You're now tuned in to San Clinton's ear hustle from PR x. radio topa Aymer allow woods. I'm incarcerated. Here's San Quinn state prison and California. I'm Nigel poor visual artists who've volunteers at the prison and together. We're going to take you inside. This time we're take you into a prison within the prison. I come here to San Quentin almost every day, and I always walk the same path. Once I get through the interject point I step into the garden chapel area and it's weird to say, but it's actually kind of lovely those. Cool. It's nice because I always see the same guys tending the rose bushes and the other kind of cheerful plantings that are in there and on the right is the chapel in front of me is the hospital and to the left is this building with really large kind of gothic, writing that says, adjustment center, the AC. That's what we call it. The Justice centers were guys go when they're being received several and also kind of like the whole, the whole administrative segregation. This witty isolate. No contact with nobody like the shoe kind of remote. Okay. And behind an above, the adjustment centers, death, and I don't know much about it. I just know it's there and it's kind of weird. It's not something that I really ever hear guys on the mainline talk about guys like me on the main line. We don't ever have any real contact with guys on death row. Yeah, you know, in the only time I see the guys on death row is when they're being escorted somewhere. And I know it's them because I say it's shackled, but they have waist chains chains. They can't come on their back and they kind of slowly and I just don't know where I'm supposed to look, right. I if we see them, we not supposed to look. We supposed to stop and turn around, but do you actually do that a look? Yeah, I'm gonna look, I feel the same way, but the way they have it set up. It's like there's this incredible disconnect between the two populations that occupy this prison. It's like for the guys on the main line. And really for me to death row is like a. Mystery. It really is. What do you think when you see a guy being escorted on death row? I think that's fucked up. That's what I think, you know, but I'll have to God that they not escort me and I'm not the one on death row. Yeah, also think how crazy it is. How like regular, they look, you know, kind of reminds me of this thing. I see him prisoners like on seem. I found myself surrounded by a bunch of regular people for the narratives. Don't really reflect that. You have any thoughts owned effortle? Not really. You know, I'm not one way or the other lonely. Very lonely. Humans, we, we adapt to wherever we're at. You know what I'm saying? I don't know. I never really thought about them. People up there because you know, we all have to carry our own hammers or berry our own crosses over. You look at it is bad. I mean, waking up north, you die. If you have to live the rest of your life in prison, that would be the spot because they're not killing nobody death row and out on a on our on the line. You have to deal with thousands of thousands of thousands of personalities clash. Lease up there. You know, you get solitude because you're single celled. Okay airline. That is the last thing I expected to hear about death row did as to Massana to. I mean to say, in some ways they have a better than the main line. I don't know about that one, but like you said, they haven't been killing people up there, but my God, the last execution was two thousand six. Okay, that's true. But in two thousand sixteen, they were actually to death penalty propositions on the California ballot, and one was to abolish it and the other was to speed up the appeals process. So the executions would actually happen faster and California voted to speed up the process. Yep, that's right. And nobody knows how that's going to play out. But in the meantime, we do know there's about seven hundred guys up there in a building. That's not too far from where we're sitting right now, and they're all there waiting in limbo for the state to decide when the next execution is gonna take place trip because San Quentin is the only facility in California where executions happened. And if you've been here on this main line for a long time, you remember what it's like. Believe it was in February of ninety. Nine guy by the name of Jan trion syrup pong. He was a foreign national was executed. I believe for a robbery murder in southern California. This is Kevin Sawyer. He's been incarcerated for about twenty years. So the prison places on lockdown of the few hours before the execution. But toward the end of the evening, someone yelled out, do you think we should have a moment of silence for the guy that's about to get executed? And somebody responded with f. him he shouldn't have did what he did. I was kind of outraged. Because that could have been anybody in prison who has a case of say, manslaughter to first degree murder.

California San Quentin San Clinton San Quinn Kevin Sawyer Nigel first degree murder Massana robbery murder twenty years one day
"row" Discussed on CRAIG CARLTON'S HELLO MY NAME IS CRAIG

CRAIG CARLTON'S HELLO MY NAME IS CRAIG

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"row" Discussed on CRAIG CARLTON'S HELLO MY NAME IS CRAIG

"You promote the product you get the guy on and it always made sense with dig for meal it was his wine seven years in a row now i loved it for meal and i knew of a little bit when i worked in philadelphia and for seven and for five of the seven years i was happy to have dick for milan here's the problem we're on tv i'm on the radio so dig for me it would bring a bottle of red wine and we put a right in front of where i was sitting we would do the interview about the super bowl about being in new orleans about yoth about kenny king about blah blah blah blah blah and then forward into the st louis days though bet right with the then we will talk about dicks wine where the interview is over and we went to commercial break dig for meal took the bottle of wine with them most people bring the product and say hey by the way here's a product fouryear enjoy my one and then the bottom along with the sat did all day dick from you'll had one bottle of wine with him and he wrote at the every radio interview he did and he took the bottle with them after every interview to me that never been any sense leave the bomb the wind it might sit there for though we get more pub at of it the only other product that can remember or guy the came by that took the product with them i think tim tibo came by promoting guacamole so we did a great interviewer tip tibo that's what i was captured by his brilliant blue eyes and his hands this and is gregarious this and fell in love with the best man to ever play football in the history of the sport tim tibo and i started eating a guacamole well when the interview ended i slept a nice little bowl of guacamole with me and wherever the chips were that they gave us to eat it with and they're like hey we need the glock are you need the kwok now you gave me the glock my my my meat hogs have been need in their squad i'm dip in of doubledipping.

philadelphia milan super bowl new orleans kenny king tim tibo football kwok doubledipping seven years fouryear