40 Burst results for "ROE"

Fresh update on "roe" discussed on News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:54 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "roe" discussed on News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

"Uh, since abortion became legal after the Roe v. Wade decision in the U. S Supreme Court Um and basically what he is doing is he's hoping that someone will, uh, do him so the case can get into court faster. Jonathan Mitchell is a former Texas solicitor general who helped prepare the bill. He defended in the legal brief submitted to the U. S Supreme Court in which he calls on the court to overturn Roe v. Wade. Supreme Court is expected to address the Mississippi case in its next term that could affect Rovi Wade rates For me, it's 1972 all over again. At that time, he continues abortions in Texas, where available mostly to women of economic means, who could afford to travel to states like California, Colorado or New York to have the procedure done. He claims that Texas's new law returns the state to those days. It looks like Texas Governor Greg Abbott may be feeling some pressure. Because of his latest policies, including the Heartbeat bill. The latest poll from the Dallas Morning News and the University of Texas at Tyler shows his approval rating has dropped to 45%. Now. It's far too early to tell how things will play out in next year's gubernatorial election. But to well known political candidates look like they could give Abbott a series run if they do wind up entering the race, actor Matthew McConaughey, who has hinted that he is entertaining the idea. Of running against Abbott led Abbott by nine points in a hypothetical matchup in the new poll. We don't know which party that McConaughey would run under, however well, former representative Beta Rourke, who ran against Senator Ted Cruz for a spot in the upper chamber and later took a shot at the Democratic presidential nomination. Cut a previous 12 point head to head deficit against Abbott,.

Matthew Mcconaughey Jonathan Mitchell California Abbott New York Colorado Beta Rourke 45% 12 Point Mcconaughey U. S Supreme Court University Of Texas Nine Points Rovi Wade Senator Democratic 1972 Texas ROE Supreme Court
Texas Abortion Law: US Supreme Court Votes Not to Block Ban

Latina to Latina

02:08 min | 8 hrs ago

Texas Abortion Law: US Supreme Court Votes Not to Block Ban

"Earlier. This month in the middle of the night. The supreme court refused to block a texas law that bans most abortions that law is now the most restrictive abortion measure in the nation it bans abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy and establishes a sort of bounty system. That allows anyone to sue those involved in facilitating an abortion. This is a bigger than texas. The decision could be a blueprint of gutting. Roe v wade. The supreme court ruling that legalized abortion nationally is going to play out in the courts and while it does groups on the ground are figuring out how to adopt is ena. Zamora is the executive director of the fraud data fund they provide support and funding for those seeking abortions in texas rio grande valley. We're gonna talk about what this decision means for those seeking care and where the spite goes from here. A lot of us are in texas right now. We're not looking at this through the lens of someone who was there where using where in texas are you. I'm located in the rio grande valley so deep south texas along the us mexico border. What are you hearing from people in texas. There's a lot of confusion around the law and just people being upset. I think a lot of people think that this law just went way too far the biggest concern for most of the people who do abortion funding work is. How are we going to help. People get their abortion care in your own words. What is this legislation. Do so sp eight what it does is. It bans abortion past six weeks in texas. It is essentially a complete abortion banned because by the time. Most people know that they're pregnant. They're unable to get an abortion and texas. This also has a very cruel and specific civil litigation our civil cause of action that allows anybody to sue anybody else who helps quote unquote to aid and abet someone and getting abortion care in texas past six weeks

Texas Roe V Wade Supreme Court Texas Rio Grande Valley Zamora Rio Grande Valley South Texas Confusion Mexico United States
Fresh update on "roe" discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:41 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "roe" discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

"To survive after shorter pregnancies. The issue will likely play a significant role when the Supreme Court hears arguments in its upcoming term in a lawsuit opposing Mississippi's ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. More from Alex. Warrior reporter covering legal affairs at the Washington Times. Alex take us through it. Focus was, of course, recently on the law out of Texas banning abortion after the fetal heartbeat was detected, But there is a case that the Supreme Court will be, you know, hearing this upcoming term once they return in October. The argument date hasn't yet been said, but we expect an opinion by you know the end of June 2022 like they're normal, scheduled year. And so with this case, Mississippi actually tried to ban abortion at 15 weeks, abortion providers, the one clinic in the state sued. I think they perform abortions at past like around 16 weeks or so. So they challenge the law back in When it was enacted in 2018 and the lower court did issue an injunction helping the laws enforcement. So the state has gone to the Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court has agreed to consider the case. And it is actually a direct challenge to This is the president of Roe V. Way in which you hear a lot of liberals talk about how you know the Texas law and all this different stuff could overturn Roe v. Wade. Well, it's actually this is the case that I think has a um, chance to actually doing that. Just the way it's set up right at the state enforcement ban similar to what happened with bro. So, of course in the Mississippi some of their filings with the Supreme Court. One of them I found interesting was that the lower court didn't let Mississippi introduced evidence of, um, medical advancements. Right? So in 1973, the argument was That, uh, baby couldn't be couldn't survive outside the mother's womb as early as it can now. And what? What? What actually was presented then what medical technology has changed. Babies can survive earlier, I guess then. Uh, since 1973 when Roe v. Wade went into effect. So talking to experts. I explored this issue, and it seems like back in 1973. The idea was that after 28 weeks a state could ban abortion after you know they could ban in the third trimester. In the second trimester. They could restrict it, but the restrictions were more or less on the type of Licenses, abortion providers that have that sort of thing. So now there's doctors and medical experts have told me that babies can be born around 24 weeks and survive and there's actually incidents. I think. Just last year it was there was a baby at 21 weeks. Born and was able to survive, Boy. We're speaking with Alex, Warrior legal affairs reporter at the Washington Times. Her pieces called viability and medical advancements loom in legal battles over abortion, and that's a reference to an upcoming Mississippi case that will be before the Supreme Court. When it returns in October. Um so the court, I guess ideologically. What could lean toward overturning Roe v. Wade. That's that's I guess the fear of liberals and the hope of conservatives. So yeah, I mean that there's um You know, arguments that way. Of course, we never know how the Supreme Court will rule. I think, um, in recent conversations I've had with some court watchers. In the D. C area. I've asked them, you know, what do you make of the Supreme Court? Not blocking the Texas heartbeat ball. What does that mean for the Mississippi case, right? And so And they kind of told me that, of course, the Texas law that issue came up on an emergency appeal. The Supreme Court hasn't heard the merits of the lawsuit, but they just declined to block it. You know, straight out the gate right so it could come back to the Supreme Court. And, um, one court watcher told me you know how we've seen the Roberts court tend to, um, in these hives, highly watched cases rule for liberals on this one rule for conservatives on this one kind of go back and forth. And the thought was that possibly that when the Texas case comes back they do shoot that law down, say, six weeks too early to bet. The whole abortion or 6 to 8 weeks whenever the fetal heartbeat is detected, But then that might give them room to uphold the 15 week ban. So you never know. I mean, there's all these opinions out there from all the Oh, all of us that cover the Supreme Court and watch it and think. Well, maybe this is how they can kind of split. Split it up and give conservatives a win on one side and liberals went on the other. Thanks, Alex Alex, Warrior reporter at The Washington Times..

2018 Alex 6 15 Week Alex Alex 21 Weeks 1973 October D. C Third Trimester Six Weeks Second Trimester 8 Weeks Last Year Roberts Court Roe V. Way Supreme Court Texas Washington Times ONE
Biden Administration Sues Texas Over Abortion Ban

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

02:00 min | Last week

Biden Administration Sues Texas Over Abortion Ban

"Came out of washington late on thursday night. London time with the announcement by the attorney. General of the united states. Merrick garland that the biden administration will be suing the state of texas taking out a federal lawsuit. It all relates to a move by texas which is widely regarded as the most extreme restriction on abortion rights since the landmark nineteen seventy-three ruling known as rovers his weight. He came into effect last week. By decision of the united states supreme court and all of the last week liberals and democrats and abortion rights activists have been debating. What can be done. What can the democrats do. What in particular can the democrat in the white house. Joe biden do well now. We know the first step that the administration is gain to take but earlier. This week i talked to the guardian. Us columnist maurer donnegan who's written extensively about abortion rights in the us. And i began by asking more. Don't again to sketch out the political landscape these last fifty years and the role abortion rights as an issue has played in that charting the nearly fifty years since that landmark decision of roe versus wade. The other major story. Today is the decision of the united states. Supreme court handed down a historic decision about abortion. The court said and so when roe v wade was decided in early nineteen seventy-three. It was actually a pretty uncontroversial decision. It was a seven to two decision. The majority opinion which legalized abortion in all fifty states was written by a justice who had been appointed by republican president who was fairly popular in fact at the time. Abortion rights were popular writ large. That really started to

Merrick Garland Biden Administration United States Texas Maurer Donnegan Supreme Court Joe Biden Washington London White House Roe V Wade Wade
Fresh update on "roe" discussed on WHOREible Decisions

WHOREible Decisions

01:02 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe" discussed on WHOREible Decisions

"The idea that they're really like this is the supreme court ruling in texas and it's scary because that means that a lot of other states sickly red states can follow in line with this and it's it's kind of unfortunate they shut it down today. I believe right no. I don't not that. I saw the last ghouls i did from. Abc ten apparently thought that is that the The supreme court voted five to four to deny emerge. Yes yeah so it. So they denied it but this but still texas has been going crazy. No detects abortion man but the supreme court is a different thing and they just found out two hours ago. Supreme court refuses to block abortion awesome. They're keeping it. I thought no the supreme court against roe wade and refusers dying abortion their denying refusing this law. So they're gonna allow texas to move forward. Is it jesus freaks..

Supreme Court Texas ABC Roe Wade
"roe" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:42 min | Last week

"roe" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Republican candidates have been telling me for as long as i can remember that they want to overrule roe v. Wade they want to appoint justices who will overrule roe. V wade on. There are six justices on the supreme court right now who have said in their own writings in one form or another that that they disagree with current abortion press president some of them said explicitly. They want to overrule roe. V wade but there are six justices who have said in their precedents that they think that cases like and casey were wrongly decided. And i believe that you know i believe donald trump when. He told me that his justices would vote to overrule roe v wade. I believe the justices who've been saying in dissenting opinions for many years that they would overrule roe v wade. I believe that when justice barrett signed a letter while she was still a law professor attacking abortion rights. And you know and saying that you she she should work to get rid of abortions that she was telling the truth. You know the only thing that i'm doing here and again like i could be surprised. I shouldn't speak with absolute certainty. But i am taking them at their word. My guest is ian mill heiser. Who covers the supreme court for. Vox this afternoon. After we recorded the interview the justice department announced it's filing a lawsuit to challenge texas's restrictive abortion law. We'll hear more of my interview with ian millhauser after a break. I'm terry gross. And this is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with ian mill. Heiser who has been writing about the recent supreme court order allowing restrictive texas abortion law to go into effect. He's also been writing about the courts. Voting rights decisions the increasing use of the shadow docket and the courts. Larger moved to the right in his new book. The agenda how a republican supreme court is reshaping america. He writes that while congress has become increasingly polarized and dysfunctional. The supreme court has become the locus of policy making in the us and the policies are largely conservative. Three of the six conservative justices were appointed by president. Trump millhauser says some of the courts least understood and most arcane decisions are fundamentally reshaping our nation. He's a senior for. Vox where he focuses on the supreme court the constitution and threats to liberal democracy in the us. Millhauser is a lawyer and clerked for judge of the. Us court of appeals for the sixth circuit. So if the supreme court either.

roe v wade supreme court ian mill heiser ian millhauser Wade donald trump ian mill Heiser wade casey barrett terry gross republican supreme court texas justice department Trump millhauser us congress Millhauser Us court of appeals
Fresh update on "roe" discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

00:46 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe" discussed on Latina to Latina

"Food. All of that stuff. This is happening in texas legislation like this is written not just to limit access to abortion in the state of texas. It is written to force a decision from the supreme court that fundamentally changes the nature of abortion access to abortion in the united states. Can you tell me what that long game looks like. So i had told us to a reporter earlier that if and we're already seeing it that if eight is allowed to stand then you're going to see copycat laws all across the south in the midwest. You're going to get this vast abortion desert where nobody in the south or the midwest is able to get their care without having to travel very far distances to get the care that they need or access care. That is not legal. Yes and that's what happens when you have abortion bans right abortion bans don't stop abortions with a really do is stop abortions happening in a clinical setting you have people turning to self-managed abortions To get the care that they need meaning the use of misoprostol or other drugs. Yes using abortion inducing medication and is my understanding that there is additional legislation. that is aimed at self manageable. Yes i think it was s before that just Pass recently that limits. abortion medication. I think has kind of very similar language to spa putting that punishment towards people who are helping other people get access to medication abortion jamaica here dropping by to let you know that latino latina is sponsored by first republic bank first republic has made it their mission to understand their clients needs and provide them an unparalleled level of service. I can confirm. I open that account earlier this year with their relationship based approach to banking first republic provides tailored solutions to individuals and businesses at any stage of life whether it's opening savings account buying for home or starting a family first republics commitment to personal service is designed to change the way you feel about banking. See for yourself. How clients always come first. At first republic bank visit first republic dot com today to learn more that's first republic dot com member. Fdic equal housing land. Is there something that is getting in the way of your happiness or preventing you from achieving your goals. I have found in my own life that talking with someone can really help. But sometimes the logistics could complicate it. Better help makes it easy. They'll assess your needs and match you with your own licensed professional therapist so you can connect any safe and private online environment. You can start communicating and under forty eight hours. it's really convenient. it's not a crisis line. Tucson self-help it is professional counseling. Done securely online. You can send a message to your counselor anytime. You'll get timely and thoughtful responses plus you can schedule weekly video or phone sessions. Better help is committed to facilitating great matches. So they make it easy and free to change counselors. if needed. they even offer financial aid. They have licensed professional counselors who are specialized in everything from depression anxiety to relationships and family conflicts. Of course anything you share is confidential. I want you to start living a happier life today. As a listener you will get ten percent off your first month by visiting our sponsor at better help dot com slash latina. Join over one million people who have taken charge of their mental health again. That's better help. H. e. l. p. com slash latina. Talk to me a little bit about the split screen of in the same week that the court upholds legislation that effectively bans abortion in the state of texas at right across the border. You have mexico's supreme court declaring that abortion is not a crime. Yeah that was. It's so interesting. We don't know what that means for us yet because right now all mexico has done is decriminalized it right. So they're just saying a person can't be punished criminally for having an abortion But they're still not an abortion provider in any of the neighboring states in that militias. Leon there's not an abortion provider But if there was one. I can definitely imagine people crossing the border to get their care because people do that. Already with other types of care. You know So many people go to the border towns for all sorts of health care and go to the pharmacies in mexico to get their pharmaceuticals. And that's something that people commonly do in border towns. We're in a very weird moment. Because things are literally changing from day to day like the fact that mexico decriminalize it is going to affect my work. The fact that the doj has now gotten involved is going to affect the outcome of sp eight. Let me just say for those who may not be following this as closely. What you're referring to is that the department of justice is going to file suit against the state of texas. Yes yes and so what. Outcome is gonna have word of pivotal point in abortion access. But at the same time people who've been doing this work have been preparing for a post roe v wade type of world and we've kind of looked at spa of what's happening in texas as as horrible as this is to say like as a practice run of what it's going to be like to live in that type of world like how are we going to build the infrastructure and the pipelines to get people to places where they can get their care. Many people from the united states depend on going to mexico to get their care because it is a lot cheaper and it's high quality care over there so i'm very happy that mexico did what they did when you say that organizations like from data fund are imagining and thinking through what infrastructure will need to look like in a post row world. What is that work. So what that work looks like is basically working together with the different funds in different areas of the country and figuring out kind of getting the logistics of all the different restrictions that each state has. What does it look like for minors to get care over there. What's the travel going to be like Are there people who are bilingual. That can you know. Help people who are spanish speaking. You know that all those types of logistical questions that we need to get answer like. Are there protesters outside of the clinic. What kind of restrictions do the state have. What's so frustrating is at it. It's really different from state to state and that almost creates a little bit of a logistical nightmare. Because we have to think about all these different things then. I wanna talk a little bit about roe v wade. Because one of the shifting conversations within the reproductive justice movement has been about the fact. That millennials like myself born into a post row world where We depending on where we lived did not need to think about access to abortion in the same way that people were thinking about it in a pre roll world and that the framework of roe.

Texas First Republic Bank First Repu Midwest First Republic Bank Mexico Depression Anxiety Supreme Court Jamaica United States Fdic Department Of Justice Tucson Leon Roe V Wade
Ian Millhiser, Senior Correspondent for Vox, Discusses SCOTUS and the Future of Roe v. Wade

Fresh Air

01:34 min | Last week

Ian Millhiser, Senior Correspondent for Vox, Discusses SCOTUS and the Future of Roe v. Wade

"Ian millhauser. Welcome to fresh air. It's good to be here. thank you so much. Let's start with the basics about the new supreme court ruling on that texas restrictive abortion law. Can you summarize the basics of this law to refresh everybody's memory before we delve into a deeper. So this is a law. That's effectively a a ban on abortions after the sixth week of pregnancy which is very very early but most people aren't even aware that they are pregnant into until long after that on and this is also the most aggressive antiabortion law that has taken effect in the united states since roe v. Wade in one thousand. Nine hundred. seventy three on sewer talking about a generational shift potentially in how the supreme court is looking at abortion. I think that this order probably for shadows a decision in a case that the court is expected to hear probably this winter that could overrule roe v. Wade altogether certainly is going to take a very deep cut into abortion rights and it's the product of years of work. I mean you you have to give antiabortion advocates credit here. They've spent many decades working for this moment. They elected president trump who promised to appoint judge justices. Who had overruled. Lovie wade at it. Looks like we are now on the cost of a supreme court decision doing just that because the makeup of the supreme court has changed so much

Ian Millhauser Supreme Court Wade Texas United States President Trump Lovie Wade
Fresh update on "roe" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

02:22 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"Deaths are about to surpass the number in America from the 1918 flu pandemic? I did not know that. Yeah, so we are just days away, and it's clearly going to pass the number because we're still having over 1000 deaths a day. We're just days away from this being the worst pandemic in U. S history. Created by humans. A human mistake. Almost certainly. And not enough talk about that, Or is anything being done to make sure we don't do this again? To ourselves. I would like it if we made sure we didn't ever do this again. Here here. Here's the story that troubles me quite a bit, uh, talked about it a little bit of the other day. Um As uh, are freaking worthless Congress. In a series of presidents going further down. The road of doing things they know are unconstitutional, Bit by bit by bit. It has predictably eroded approval of the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court was pretty steady for many, many years with high approval ratings. Because they were seen as independent of politics. And you know all the obvious things, I think. But as Congress has failed to deal with things and put the Supreme Court in the role of having to decide these decisions that that the Congress should And then presidents doing things to challenge the Supreme Court. So then by, you know automatically if Trump does something that Is that people are saying is unconstitutional. Well, then, if the court rules against it, people that like Trump get in their minds. Okay, the Supreme Court's Against Trump. Same with Biden, right? I mean, because and it's become so fashionable in politics. It always has been on and off, but especially now. You say to your base? You're getting screwed. You're getting cheated. The man is sticking it to you and I'm going to stand up for you. I'm going to X Y and Z and I know as I'm claiming that I can't do that It's blatantly unconstitutional. But then you make the Supreme Court the bad guy for calling you on something you clearly can't do. And then you wail at all. There are a bunch of conservative monsters on the Supreme Court. It's just it's so dishonest and even as the left complaints about the damage Trump allegedly did to the institutions, I mean, that's a that's US seriously dangerous game to play. Right well, so with the Supreme Court having majority approval ratings for all of our lifetimes, it is now at 37% of Americans approve other Supreme Court is handling its job of 15 point drop from last year. Well and again, and there are sins on the right, of course, But the left spent the last couple of years trying to convince us that various Supreme Court nominees were rapists would would get women that back Alley, the hanger abortions would force gaze back into the closet. We're monsters were oppressors, Handmaid's tale, blah, blah, blah, and the number of people believed it and the media as the the horrible reporting on the Texas abortion law. Right. The media acting like the Supreme Court stepped in to try to attack Roe versus Wade. When this had this Texas abortion thing has zero to do with Roe versus Wade. Um, based on the writings and talking's of all my favorite Uh, lawyer pundits. Um It's you know, so that's where you end up. Yeah, it's it's not good. It's not good. There are so many trillions of dollars at stake, Politicians on both sides are willing to just throw away anything to keep their share of it. Keep their share of the power well. Um, that you know that Annoys me that bothers me. It pisses me off. But the fact that so many American people have been Hoodwinked into thinking the gigantic rich government is actually looking out for the little guy just so naive. The new Guinness World Records book is out. Here's some highlights. Dog with the longest ears. The world's short the world's shortest female twins. So any of that strikes your fancy? How long are years? Was it a basset hound? A F. Mhm. Yeah, My My sister has a basset hound She's on. She's not owned. I'm sorry. She is Guardian. Several in her lifetime. She's a fan of the breed. They have exceedingly long years they drag on the ground. You have to make sure they do not become, like damaged and infected. If it's just some dog breeds are odd, but she's a big fan. So I will say nothing further. One of the most iconic brands and all of television is coming back. Bad boys. Bad boys. What you gonna do? What you going to do when they come for you? Yes, drug addicts being put in the back of police cars. Drug people being handcuffed by the police. It is cops the obviously guilty making stupid and weak excuses for why.

Donald Trump Congress 15 Point 37% America ROE Last Year U. S Biden Supreme Court Guinness World Records Over 1000 Deaths A Day Both Sides Wade ONE Texas Trillions Of Dollars Twins Last Couple Of Years United States
Justice Dept. Sues Texas Over State's New Abortion Law

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Justice Dept. Sues Texas Over State's New Abortion Law

"The justice department is suing Texas over a new state law that bans most abortions the law is the biggest crackdown on abortion since the roe V. Wade decision nearly fifty years ago women have a constitutional right to abortion act is clearly unconstitutional under long standing Supreme Court precedent Attorney General Merrick garland says he's worried other states could enact similar laws to deprive other constitutional rights the suit asks a federal judge to declare Texas's law invalid Sager made dining at the White House

Justice Department Roe V. Wade Attorney General Merrick Garla Texas Supreme Court Sager White House
Under New Restrictive Abortion Law, Women Face Crisis Scenario in Texas

Nightline

01:50 min | Last week

Under New Restrictive Abortion Law, Women Face Crisis Scenario in Texas

"Been less than a week. Since the country's most restrictive abortion law went into effect in texas and it's already having a devastating impact on women across the state. Abc's congressional correspondent. Rachel scott went to the lone star. State for report is this. I love my daughter more than anything in this world. We aziz loves being playing daughter. Mine my daughter is the best thing that ever happened to me. But she wasn't always ready for the smiles motherhood. I'm a very impatient person. But with my i'm not but these i keep thinking to. I chose to have this child. She's here because of me and she is my life. Mom is chasing the toddler and managing tantrums challenge. No matter how me realizes. She's far more qualified at twenty seven. She would have been as a college student. I had my first abortion at twenty. I wasn't trying to get pregnant. And i was using contraceptives. I definitely knew. I wasn't ready to be apparent. I wasn't emotionally ready. I wasn't financially ready at all. It was a that student living sharing a one bedroom with my best friend. A cat says that experience which was full of twists and turns solidified for her. That women needs to be in charge of their own healthcare. Now she feels that right is under attack from a new law. Abortion was already very hard to access in texas while now it's become so much harder. Texas is now home to one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the nation law. Sending shock waves across the country. Roe versus wade has not been formally overruled in any way but as a practical matter in the state of texas as of today it is not possible for most women to obtain an abortion beyond the six th week of pregnancy

Rachel Scott Aziz Texas ABC ROE Wade
Mexico's Supreme Court Rules That Abortion Is Not a Crime

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Mexico's Supreme Court Rules That Abortion Is Not a Crime

"As the U. S. debates the roe versus Wade decision the Supreme Court in Mexico's declared it unconstitutional to punish abortion Mexico Supreme Court unanimously annulled several provisions of a law from co will Willis St which sits on the Texas border that it made abortion a criminal act that decision establishes a historic precedent and the head of the court says it obligates all of the country's judges to rule the same way in similar cases or they'd be violating the constitution most of Mexico's thirty two states penalize abortion in the heavily Roman Catholic country this decision comes one week after Texas banned all abortions if medical professionals could detect cardiac activity in the fetus I'm Jackie Quinn

Mexico Supreme Court Willis St U. Mexico Wade Supreme Court Texas Jackie Quinn
What Will the Texas Voting Law Do?

All In with Chris Hayes

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

What Will the Texas Voting Law Do?

"For almost fifty years the supporters of abortion rights pro-choice forces have been playing defense to protect abortion rights from a massive mobilized effort to destroy them but in the valence of that battle has switched literally overnight. Spring court basically waved through this texas ban on abortion. And so now the mobilization needs to switch in practical terms on the ground texas republicans in the conservative justices on the supreme court of the majority of americans do not want them to do. I'm not even sure to be honest that a majority of texans would support this law. Do support this lot to be honest. I mean according to twenty twenty exit point out of texas nearly eighty percent of voters think abortion should be legal at lease available in some instances only fifteen percents absolutely no abortions which is pretty close to what this law does law bans abortions wants. Cardiac activity can be detected the embryo something usually happens around six weeks and that's eighteen weeks earlier than the legal standard set by roe v wade back in nineteen seventy three in that landmark seven. Two decision wasn't a five four decision that roadway decision it was seventy two easy enough to google and banning abortions after six weeks means essentially banning all abortions because many women do not find out they are pregnant in the first six weeks and in fact when you got this legal threat hanging over people. It's unclear that anyone's going to perform any kind of abortion. No matter how early believe you me right now in texas it is an almost certainly. There's a teenage girl. Somewhere in that state was pregnant by her abuser or by a family member or by someone who sexually assaulted her she might be fourteen or fifteen who cannot get an abortion that is a near certainty

Supreme Court Of The Majority Texas Roe V Wade Google
Texas' Abortion Ban Marks a New Legal Strategy for Abortion Restrictions

All In with Chris Hayes

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas' Abortion Ban Marks a New Legal Strategy for Abortion Restrictions

"Emily i wanna read you from the wall street journal op-ed today which i thought was interesting this supporter of abortion restrictions. In fact getting rid of roe v wade who write this. Texas republicans have handed democrats political grenade to hurt to the antiabortion causes the editorial board pro-life groups has spent nearly fifty years arguing. That abortion is a political question to be settled in the states by public debate. It now texas. They want us the courts by civilization to limit abortion. I do think this law is so frankly odious that more republicans and those who oppose abortion rights should have to own it and i wonder if folks who work in the trenches of the political opinion on this. Feel the same way absolutely chris. Let's start with baxter. The overwhelming majority of americans are on the side of those who want to see and keep rovers wade as the law of the land. That is what keeps women saved. What could people save. Who needed care. This texas law goes too far. And what i would say to your listeners. Your your watchers is. Do you know who your state senator is. Do you know who your state representative is. Do you know who your governor is. And where they stand on this because republican governors. Legislators across the country are looking at this not as a grenade but as a playbook. They're thinking what can we do here in our state to rollback these important rights that affect so many families at emily's list. We're working to hold them to account and i believe we believe that every single member of legislature needs to be asked. Where do you stand on this. It should be asked now. They should be asked to get next year and they will be asked by voters when voters come out just as they did after brett. Cavanaugh was confronted court in two thousand eighteen. They will come out and be held to account at the

Roe V Wade Rovers Wade The Wall Street Journal Emily Texas ED Baxter Chris Legislature Cavanaugh Brett
Rich Lowry Comments on Texas' Anti-Abortion Law

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Rich Lowry Comments on Texas' Anti-Abortion Law

"The texas law has gone into effect. And we'll go through it a little bit more specifically with a little more specifically with With heather but let's hear rich lowry on msnbc with chuck todd and claire mccaskill opine. About this i mean. This is the big thing that they're doing now. They're saying there's no big deal. Because i think there is in heather and i will talk more about this. And we'll talk more about this too but the if democrats are smart they're going to leverage this at least from electoral stamp point on top of everything else that needs to be done but here is. Here's rich lowry hunt. Msnbc we're in in wisey on msnbc. Well i people are acting as a row has been overturned. I would welcome that outcome. And it may eventually be in stops case but it hasn't been overturned yet at all this is a procedural ruling that clearly was the correct one. There was no harm here yet. The eight defendants had done nothing even joining them. If if that's what happened wouldn't have stopped this law. Because they had their government officials have for second positive law positive. One second first off roe v. Wade and casey which is Another case which basically says you cannot abridge this right in a meaningful way had certainly roe. V wade says that you may not that. An abortion is a constitutional right up to twenty two to twenty four weeks of pregnancy.

Heather Msnbc Rich Lowry Chuck Todd Claire Mccaskill Texas Wade Casey
Texas Law That Bans Abortion After About 6 Weeks Takes Effect

Pivot

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas Law That Bans Abortion After About 6 Weeks Takes Effect

"Texas law banning abortions. After six weeks went into effect yesterday law prohibits abortions wants cardiac activity can be detected an embryo which very early the law also allows. This is sort of twist allows private citizens to sue abortion providers and anyone else who gives who helps a woman obtained an abortion in texas including even an uber driver who might have given a woman a ride to the clinic. The law makes no exception for rape or incest. The supreme court refused to block. The banner has now materializing a huge threat to roe versus wade. So what do you think under his eye. Where are we in the handmaid's to be the fruit. Blessed the fruit. It'd be fruit here not to joke about something so serious but let's not but to joke but not joke tweeted something yesterday And that is this that why men think they have something to say as much. They think they want to say about this when their contribution to the reproductive process last six or seven seconds. Maybe eight if it's been awhile and women for the next nine months and then feeding the baby breastfeeding afterward do all the heavy lifting all right. This is this. Is the women's show here and men want piece of this action like they've got something to say here it's dictatorial. This is i think janet jackson said it. Best in the first five seconds for in nineteen ninety-six smash album control okay. This is a story about control. Okay like it's about power and control. This is full handmaid's tale. That's one thing. The other thing as it relates to roe v. Wade as i understand roe v wade in nineteen seventy-three also texas with the same issue the supreme court as i understand it felt that texas's laws or whatever regarding abortion violated a woman's constitutional right to privacy about privacy. So what is it about this new situation. That is also not a violation of privacy.

Texas Supreme Court Wade Janet Jackson Roe V Wade
Justices Blast Texas Abortion Ruling

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Justices Blast Texas Abortion Ruling

"All four dissenting judges justices filed opinions. Some scathing against the majority's refusal to block that texas law that virtually bands abortion chief justice. John roberts who joined the court's three liberals wrote quote the statutory scheme before the court is not only unusual but unprecedented end quote justice. Sonia so to my order was much more direct quote saying quote a majority of justices have opted to bury their heads in the sand. She goes on to say it cannot be the case that a state can evade federal judicial scrutiny. By outsourcing the enforcement of unconstitutional laws to its citizenry with us again. I kneel cocktail department of justice veteran and former acting solicitor general during the obama administration. He argued dozens of cases before the united states supreme court. Neil good to see you. Thank you for being with us. We need your clarity on this. What did chief justice john roberts in describing this as unusual and unprecedented the bottom line is the supreme court basically gave a thumbs up to the overruling of roe versus wade so abortion clinics as of yesterday in texas are essentially closed to all patients. And what the court west texas yesterday can be enacted tomorrow in other states in deed will other states Code already Said they're gonna try to enact such legislation and so with the chief justice was referring to was. This is a really weird. Texas scheme outlawed abortion after six weeks effectively. But it said the state isn't gonna enforced instead. It created vigilante justice. Any private citizen could sue anyone. Who's helping anyone get an abortion so if you'd like take an uber to the ocean clinic this law said you can the uber driver and sue them anywhere in texas including far away from their homes and seek ten thousand dollars in damages against them plus attorneys

John Roberts Obama Administration Texas Sonia Supreme Court Department Of Justice Neil ROE Wade United States
"roe" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

07:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"roe" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"I mean i guess not out of nowhere but like you say broke late even for this supreme court i was surprised and and i'm about to explain it all right. So let's get this right to be opening arguments levels of clear here. The supreme court did not overturn roe. V wade because it did not issue a ruling on the merits. They did not rule on the merits of anything. This is what we call shadow docket. What they did was allow a blatantly unconstitutional law to go into effect before overturning roe v wade which is something they were probably going to do around april or may of next year and as far as i can tell and i spent the better part of the morning looking for counter examples. This is what happened. Today is literally unprecedented in the history of this country. So let me let me give you an example of how this never happens. And let's suppose it's nineteen sixty two. And i'm a poor person in prison. I did not have a lawyer appointed from the time the law the land was case called bets versus brady. Which said yeah. You know you get a court appointed lawyer if it's a capital case or if there are issues with competence sore in know certain extenuating circumstances but just because you're to portable afford a lawyer you don't get one. There was no right to court appointed counsel as mike teach at. Lowe's buy mind every time. Yeah so let's imagine then. I file a habeas petition to the supreme court. And i say yeah. I know betsy brady. But you're about to hear you've already got pending on your docket. Abs petition. From my buddy clarence gideon and you know you guys on the supreme court pretty. It's nineteen sixty two. You're pretty liberal bunch. Some pretty sure you're gonna ruling gideon's favor and you're going to overturn that betts v brady case You're gonna say that everybody gets a right to a lawyer. That's gonna freebie eventually so why not. Just let me out right right right and you know. What did they do. Give gideon v wade. Right right came out in nineteen sixty three and it was nine. Oh right like not. Controversial unanimous overturned. Betsy brady did exactly but yeah this hypothetical petition and by the way there were actual petitions and not to this hypothetical petition. The supreme court would that same super. Liberal supreme court would not have granted relief at that time right. They have granted anticipatory challenges. Still lie yet. They would've said maybe we'll change the law but until then we live in a country with the rule of law and the law says you're not entitled to it. Sorry this is going to be an episode for. We have covered almost every component of this on multiple previous episodes of the show. So episodes twenty. Seven and twenty eight are when we covered the planned parenthood versus casey decision. If you haven't listened to those if you came in like it stormy at stormy daniels maybe come back and listen to twenty seven twenty pretty good and the shadow docket late much later on obviously but the shadow docket with And recital right yup shadow docket. We talked about on episode five seven up. Yeah so all of the components here are things you can search the away website for it. We have covered an in depth. Even if only get this far. what they're doing. It's not just which is already bad enough. It's not just that they're obviously overturning roe. that's already bad. it's that the this is completely unprecedented. I'm so sick of republicans getting to feel like and call themselves. They're just calling balls and strikes balls and strikes they're just constitutional umpires over there and they're doing this a field goal in the middle of a baseball game. I'm not getting so let me break down exactly what happened. Because i think i can make this clear even to uncle frank exactly how radical this is so point number one. Texas passed a law. And we're going to talk about all the provisions of this has. Wow is it a doozy. It's sb eight. That bans abortion after six weeks. Guy point to existing constitutional law is super duper to the ends of the earth. Clear that you cannot do that. Yeah and i am going to quote from planned. Parenthood versus casey five zero five eight thirty three at eight forty five. To forty six quote we are led to conclude this the essential holding of roe. V wade should be retained and once again reaffirmed. It must be stated at the outset and with clarity. This is the supreme court talking that rose essential holding the holding. We reaffirm has three parts and again if you listen to our episodes. They're actually missed. They're actually changing roe. V wade a little bit here but nevertheless this is the law of the land. Good law right now. The central holding of roe v wade as reaffirmed by planned parenthood versus. Casey has three parts. I is a recognition of the right of the woman to choose to have an abortion before viability and obtain it without undue inference without undue interference from the state continuing just in case that's not clear enough before viability. The state's interests are not strong enough to support a prohibition of abortion or the imposition of a substantial obstacle to the woman's effective right to elect a procedure. So that's the law. The law says if it's pre viability you cannot ban abortion. The state's interest is not strong enough. Now if you've listened to the show you know. I don't think viability is a crate. Archea you know. I prefer the original restaurant. But doesn't matter what i think it matter did should matter what the law is right. So the law states cannot prohibit abortion before viability. Sp prohibits abortion before viability. Six weeks way way way before him here go. Oh god. States can't prohibit abortion at six weeks so what happened. what happened. Was what what i expected to happen. Whole women's health and abortion provider in texas. They went to a us district court. Judge ticket the in joint which happened. Because it's obvious because the reason. I said it's obviously in custody show. So then texas appealed to the fifth circuit and the fifth circuit as we have documented at great length hates abortion. It is stacked with antiabortion activists who have bent over backwards to misconstrue laws whenever it comes to upholding the conservative result of that law right and we talked about that at length. And the whole woman's health versus heller steph opinion so fifth circuit hates abortion and they reversed the district court. I wasn't surprised by that either. Then whole women's health appealed to the supreme court and the supreme court then did to fix i is. They did nothing they just sat on the application and let sba go into effect and then belatedly a day later at around midnight last night as of our recording midnight on wednesday they released an opinion that i will read to you in full because that opinion citations included is four hundred eleven words so two thirds of a page about the length that you might expect from a reasonably bright fifth graders book report and so when we explained the shadow docket episode five. But this is what we mean. We mean with no explanation with no analysis without committing to anything imprint. This opinion allowed a blatantly unconstitutional law to go into effect. So there is no discussion of the case. On the merits there was no analysis espy. Eight there is no analysis of row. It does not faked a row. It does not say to casey. It is just procedural but that procedural means that the texas law goes into effect until it is briefed. Argued litigated at the district. Level appealed to the fifth circuit on the merits briefed argues coast to oral argument..

supreme court mike teach betsy brady clarence gideon betts v brady gideon v wade Betsy brady Liberal supreme court wade casey roe v wade gideon brady Lowe daniels us district court baseball frank heller steph Casey
Nancy Pelosi Vows to Vote on Bill Eliminating State-Level Abortion Restrictions

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Nancy Pelosi Vows to Vote on Bill Eliminating State-Level Abortion Restrictions

"Here's the first paragraph of national review. Speaker Nancy Pelosi said. That the House will vote to enshrining into law. Reproductive health care for all women across America, quote unquote following the Supreme Court's refusal The block of Texas law that prohibits abortion after a heartbeat can be detected. Now, apparently only men who agree with abortion on demand. A taxpayer financed abortions are free to speak. If you're a man who doesn't believe in abortion, you have an experienced it. You haven't experienced pregnancy so you need to keep your mouth shut. See how that works. See how that works. Well, it doesn't work. Not for me. Women's health rights. There's two human beings involved. At least two if it's you have a Pregnancy with multiple babies. Obviously, there's more. Obviously, there's more. And that's the moral issue. It's not a choice issue. You're not picking a pizza with or without pepperoni here. What did the court do? Well, to my chagrin, it did not overturn Roe v. Wade. Which everybody knows was a bogus decision. Even the late great Ruth Peter Ginsburg said it was effectively a bogus decision. They wanted to get what they got, and they got what they got. The court itself said its decision does not block The ban or excuse me doesn't overturn Roe v. Wade. But the law has to be settled in the state of Texas first. Then, if it's challenged, the court will decide whether or not to hear the case. That's it. It's all that decided.

Nancy Pelosi Supreme Court Texas Ruth Peter Ginsburg America House ROE Wade
Texas Passes Law Stating No Permit Necessary to Open Carry a Gun

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas Passes Law Stating No Permit Necessary to Open Carry a Gun

"Attorney general talk about the new second amendment bill. That was just passed. That has everyone freaking out of what's happening in texas. Well it's a long time coming. I've been in favor of this forever. You don't have to have a permit to for free speech. You don't have a permit to go exercise your faith. I don't think you should have to have a permit to carry under the second amendment so in texas we now have that we have constitutional carey which allows people to carry concealed or out in the open without going through the government to get permission. Well that's terrific and so are there any. Are there any possible legal challenges to this. I'm sure some groups are going to try. Robert francis o'rourke who calls himself beta was making all sorts of videos about this and saying it's the worst thing ever. But i don't think that's gonna hold up in court. No i mean i have. No doubt will get sued. We'll end up defending that law and will you know that's one of those cases that could could all the way the supreme court who knows either way i think we're on si- obviously solid legal footing with the constitution. It's kind of the basic of our of our of our country. So i feel i'm encouraged. It took a long time to get this through era. I was enlisted for twelve years. We were never able to get it through and finally this session happens. I'm really grateful. So let's talk more. Broadly now just about texas is texas at risk of going. Blue harris county seems to be a blue county now vallis counties whatever it is. What are you seeing on the ground. And how can people help. Were absolutely a risk of going blew. It would have happened this time. Had we not fought these lawsuits. I it's all about whether we can protect the integrity of our elections and that is a constant battle. And that's why this election bill was was passed. And we've got to be vigilant. I think there's another bill. They're considering on on on looking at. Its potential type. Audits like you guys are doing here. I think we've got to do that to make sure that our elections are fair and that people can trust them because once you lose if we lose control in texas. I'm not sure that we'd ever get it back because if they open up mail in ballot let elections. We're gonna end up a lot more fraud and we may never be able to take it back and so it's pretty important that we secure elections now. Because you know you go to california. There's a lot of valen ballots. And i don't know if we'll ever know if there's a fair election california oregon or washington right.

Texas Robert Francis Blue Harris County Blue County Rourke Carey Supreme Court Valen California Oregon Washington
Google Is Its Own Government, Cuts Texas Attorney General's Budget

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Google Is Its Own Government, Cuts Texas Attorney General's Budget

"Attorney general paxton. How many people do you have working for you. And the attorney general's office in texas so it's a total of about forty two hundred four thousand two hundred and you're saying that google has a lot of resources understand. How big these companies are. You have the understand the point. I'm making i mean you're the third largest state right or the second we're second we're actually selling. The census data second largest state in the country attorney. General's office is saying. Hey look we're going to try our best but like we're no google. Yes to show the size right amazing the money that they have a we have budgets and my entire budget for a two year period one point three billion which sounds like a lot of money six hundred and something million but a year which is a lot of money and we do a lot of great things with that money however if you think about google making you know hundred and thirty five billion a year and profits they could hire every attorney in texas they wanted to and every lobbyist in texas and i. We have to go up against that. There's no limit to what they can do. The experts they can i r- and and and what they can do to try to. You know go into a legislative session. Like i just went through where they try to lobby tab. My budget cut by twenty five percent. So really it's a force. They are a force. That's just one company that makes sense. Yes so google being its own government. Basically within our own country never should have been allowed to be this big or powerful comes in and says oh we don't like the attorney general's office in texas because their lawsuit is so brilliantly written. Let's go cut their budget. Because we have offices in austin and somehow we can justify and that's what they're willing to do absolutely. I think it's pretty smart. I mean if they get my budget by twenty five percent which was the strategy That makes it very difficult for me to carry. I actually asked also for money for the google case. I asked for forty three million dollars. Go fight go well they obviously. We're trying to fight that as well that imagine. I don't get the money to to fight him. But also lose the rest of my you know a high percentage of my budget and have to lay off a bunch of lawyers instead of ramping up to go fight them. That's nearly what happened.

Attorney General Paxton Google Texas Austin
Texas Legislature Expanding Voting Laws to Protect Election Integrity, Prevent Fraud

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas Legislature Expanding Voting Laws to Protect Election Integrity, Prevent Fraud

"Want to get too many other topics here But let's get into election integrity. You see the side. They're not just upset about the texas pro-life law from they're also upset about the law that they say it's the hardest state in the country to vote in and tell us what's really going on in the fight for election integrity in the great attacks so we almost ended up in the same situation is georgia and arizona and some of these other states where we would be counting votes What we did differently in texas as we defended twelve lawsuits that were aimed in pretty liberal counties. Travis which is austin houston which is a bare kennywood san antonio and in those counties. We were sued over our laws related to mail in ballots and signature verification. We were fortunate. We had twelve of those. It was a major onslaught. We won every single one of those lawsuits so instead of counting votes on election day we had already protected our elections. Now what we're doing is we're actually expanding voting hours. And we're limiting some of the little tricks that were that were attempted in harris county and some other places to go beyond the legislature authorized as far as it relates voting. And so we've tried to tighten up male unbalanced by requiring photo. Id which i think is very significant because my office prosecutes Voter fraud. it's the only thing we prosecute. We have more voter fraud cases going now than we ever have. We have were five hundred cases in court another almost four hundred cases that were investigating and more than a majority of those relate to mail in ballot fraud so with legislature was trying to do was expand hours. Give more opportunity to vote. We already have two weeks early voting in texas so it's pretty significant but at the same time we realized we still have some voter fraud issues especially as it relates to mail in ballots. So i want to zero in on the said. There's five hundred cases that you've brought to to indictment. Is that right around for the we have. We have five hundred over five counts. That were prosecuting right now. We we have not brought him into indictment because covert actually shut the course down in texas for quite a while. We're and we're now we're wait. We're waiting line behind violent offenders to get those cases in but we have more cases going right now related to voter fraud than i think we've had in the entire history of texas if you add up the number that we're investigating plus the number that we're prosecuting. I think it's a larger number. All the cases ever prosecuted in

Kennywood Texas Legislature Travis San Antonio Harris County Georgia Arizona Austin Houston
U.S. Supreme Court May Spark a New, Hotter Abortion Debate

WSJ What's News

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

U.S. Supreme Court May Spark a New, Hotter Abortion Debate

"Capitol hill. The supreme court's decision to allow a restrictive abortion law in texas to go into effect has renewed debate over federal abortion rights. Politics reporter elisa collins has more house speaker. Nancy pelosi announced on thursday. That the house would take a bill intended to expand protections for abortion rights. The chairman of the judiciary committee in the house also said that they would be holding hearings in response to the supreme court decision but that doesn't have much power ultimately in congress. The house is very likely to pass the legislation with its democratic majority but when it goes over to the senate it's going to run into a brick wall on the other end. Republicans were excited especially conservative. republicans saying that. This was just the beginning. That hopefully other states would be able to enact laws like this and that the supreme court could ultimately do away with Roe versus wade democrats similarly felt like this was the start and they needed to engage to step in. But at this moment there's not much congress can do to codify roe versus wade into law. Even as we're seeing that legislation began to move

Elisa Collins Supreme Court Capitol Hill House Nancy Pelosi Judiciary Committee Texas Congress Senate ROE
Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

Start Here

01:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

"Couple nights ago. Women were lined up at a health clinic in fort worth texas called whole women's health and these women in line were seeking abortions some way to all day. The last procedure was performed at eleven fifty six. Pm are waiting. We're filled with patients and their loved ones in all four of our clinics. Yesterday we had a physician who has worked with us for decades In tears this morning. That clinic is still providing abortions. The difference is they're only offering them to women in pregnancies were fetal heartbeat hasn't been detected yet in most cases that's about six weeks in the vast majority of abortions are not performed until after that point because in many cases women don't even know that they're pregnant. What's the tragedy is that we can only provide abortion for about ten percents of the people that we could provide abortion for yesterday. The thing that's changed now of course is that yesterday morning. The nation's most restrictive abortion law went into effect in texas a law that allows virtually anyone. Who says a woman has undergone an abortion. Could be a neighbor. A co worker. An axe stranger can sue anyone who helped facilitate that abortion. The law itself is incredibly note worthy and what was almost just as remarkable. Was that for nearly twenty four hours. The supreme court said nothing until last

Fort Worth Texas Supreme Court
Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

"Cambridge before roe v wade and so i know what it was like when women didn't have this choice we couldn't control our own bodies our own destinies here. We are fifty years later fighting the same battle again. It's incredible to think that we would be going backwards. It's the women of limited means women of color women in rural parts of texas who do not have access. This is just devastating. Big no options whatsoever the texas law virtually banning abortion that went into effect today could have an impact on women far outside that state opponents were banking on the supreme court stepping in and stopping the measure from taking effect. But that didn't happen as political sums it up the court's decision to not act on an emergency petition from texas abortion. Clinics comes as the justices. Prepare to more. Broadly reconsider the right to an abortion. It established almost fifty years ago. Back with us tonight. Eugene robinson pulitzer prize winning columnist for the washington. Post and susan dell persio of veteran political strategist boast are msnbc analysts. Thanks to both of you for being with us susan. Let's start with you. There are a lot of people who fully know that. Republicans at a state level have been attempting things that are either faints or real attempts to to place restrictions on abortion for some years now but this has surprised a lot of the fact that something that feels very much like a total ban on abortion could actually get past the supreme court. Absolutely i ate it. Is it's sending shockwaves especially to a lot of the republicans who may instead like yes. I'm pro-life but you know roe v. wade's the lay the law of the land and they also believed in Exceptions to incest rape which this law does not have this is the harshest law that i think republicans could ever see coming and at this point i think even some republicans are going to have a hard time getting behind it. Come twenty twenty two

Roe V Wade Texas Susan Dell Cambridge Supreme Court Eugene Robinson Msnbc Susan Washington Wade
"roe" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

03:19 min | 4 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Start Here

"Forward in the sex trafficking investigation weight. And so when you say. Help them in the investigation. Who's the next target of the investigation. Is it matt gaetz. Where does he fit into this well. We're matt gaetz comes in is greenberg. Yesterday in court admitted to being involved in what federal investigators describe as sugar daddy relationships with women where he would you know pay women in exchange for sex including with a minor and greenberg admitted to also introducing these this minor to quote other adult men and what sources have told us. Is this initial investigation. This initial probe into greenberg sprouted a related investigation into whether gates. Who by the way is called greenberg. His quote wing man may have also paid for sex with underage girl. But in the court. You are there. Are they tossing around the name. Matt gaetz in front of everyone or are they just talking about his charges or how explicit when it comes to a sitting. Us congressman so gates. His name hasn't been brought up specifically in charges or face charges and he's vehemently denied having sex with a minor allegation and it is a lie. Vehemently denied off paying for sex. The person doesn't exist. I have not had a relationship with a seventeen year old and his response is basically taking the trump approach. He's leaning into it. He's joking about it. He's holding rallies around the country with margie taylor green tonight. This banner flying over the federal courthouse in orlando tick tock. Matt gaetz asked. Here's the thing sources. Tell us that greenberg is prepared to hand over evidence that may implicate gates and others in his plea deal greenberg. A tax collector claims introduced the minor to other adult men who engaged in commercial sex acts. There are these mo transactions federal prosecutors mentioned in the plea agreement and potential other forms of evidence. That may be out there. It's just gonna come down to whether or not that. Evidence is enough to overcome some of these major credibility issues at greenberg has as a witness given the he just pled guilty to six charges. That even includes Falsely claiming that a political rival was a sex offender a paraphrase the matrix. The flavor has a path for mr greenberg disaster. Walk the path right outside the courtroom yesterday. Joe greenberg's lawyer not mentioning matt gaetz this time specifically but did bizarrely tease. There's a lot more to come here because my client have information. That could hurt an elected official. I guess this is you know. Mostly.

Joe greenberg matt gaetz six charges yesterday greenberg Matt gaetz trump tonight orlando Yesterday margie taylor seventeen year old
"roe" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

08:43 min | 4 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Start Here

"It's tuesday may eighteenth. It would never fly under current abortion law. That's the point we start here. Anti-abortion rights activists been hoping to make their case to a conservative supreme court. They got their wish. If the court upholds mississippi law. I think all of a sudden basically everything on the table. Could this be the case that effectively overturns roe v wade. It's hard to run a movie studio. Just ask your phone company. Basically he who dies with the most toys wins or he who dies with the most shows wins only three years after joining the streaming wars eighteen t. announces a retreat will tell you how it affects your binging and he's pleaded guilty to sex trafficking that he says he wasn't alone. Greenberg is prepared to hand over evidence that may implicate gave land now. Convicted sex offender could spell trouble for a sitting u s congressman from abc news. This start here. I'm brad milkey. Episode of start here is presented by uk g when your employees feel supported your business becomes more than a place of work becomes a work of art and uk. Jeez hr in workforce management solutions. In help you create your masterpiece u. k. g. of purpose is people. This is the time of year when the us supreme court makes its biggest decisions. Yesterday the justice released several new opinions. Well nearly fifteen hundred louisiana. Inmates were found guilty by divided. Juries will have to remain behind bars. This comes after the. Us supreme court refused to make its ban on non unanimous jury retroactive but the courts. Most notable decision was not any of these cases wasn't even a ruling rather the biggest legal news of the day. Perhaps of the month was the court's announcement that it will add a new cases to its docket for next term. The supreme court of the united states has announced. It will take up a major abortion rights case which is widely seen as a direct challenge to one of the central holdings of roe versus. Wade and activists will tell you just the fact that this is being taken up by the court is a huge huge deal with profound implications. So let's go straight to. Abc supreme court analyst shot kate. The supreme court turns down cases all the time right like this. They have to take every case in fact they don't they could have turned this one down and they didn't why no they didn't brad and i think you're right the decision just to take this case at all is hugely significant. So you know what states pass laws all the time. That are clearly unconstitutional under roe versus wade and planned. Parenthood versus casey mississippi law is no exception it bans virtually all abortions after fifteen weeks of pregnancy less than a day after the governor signed that fifteen week abortion bill into law a federal judge put a temporary restraining order on the law and the courts in mississippi where the law was challenged ruled that this was not a close case. This law was clearly unconstitutional. The fifth circuit court of appeals agreed with the ruling of judge cartoon reads here in jackson that the law violates women's constitutional rights because it bans abortion weeks before a fetus is viable and so the fact that pre court agreed to take the case at all is a pretty strong signal that a number of justices disagree with that conclusion. And thus may be looking to change the law of abortion. Fundamentally like you were telling us. I think when this law was introduced like there's no way this is constitutional under the current president like. There's no of appeals court in the land that would uphold this because it does so directly contradicted. Roe v wade. The supreme court said yeah. Appellate court obviously got it right unless they had something else they want. Say of course. And that's a typical. That's what the court typically does and lower courts. Don't find them legally difficult they say. Look under bindings cream court precedent a ban like this is just flatly unconstitutional and most of the time. The supreme court just let those lower court rulings stand so its decision to intervene. Here is really significant experts. Say the nation's high court may not ban roe v wade outright but you state laws like mississippi's too slowly chip away at a woman's right to choose a lot of state. Legislators over the last few years have seen the writing on the wall. The composition of the supreme court has changed and it may be that roe versus wade is not long for this world the time of choices at time of conception not after conception early this morning missouri lawmakers agreed to ban most abortions after eight weeks even if the pregnancy is caused by rape or incest and so a lot of states have basically passed laws that are designed to provide the supreme court and opportunity to overturn roe alabama virtually banned all abortions. But tonight even some conservatives say this might be a step too far they wanna challenge roe versus wade but my humble view is that this is not the case. We want to bring the supreme court because i think this one lose. Does she think conservatives are specifically looking at this court with with the trump appointees with conybeare with cavanaugh with gorsuch in their thinking. This is the time. This is what this was all building to. Oh absolutely admitting very explicitly so do you agree with justice. Scalia view that roe was wrongly decided senator. I completely understand why you are asking the question but again i can't pre commit word say yes. I'm going in with some agenda. Because i'm not i mean. I think we can count. Probably four pretty rock-solid votes to overturn roe. I think so. I think it's pretty clear that justice thomas justice alito justice course most likely justice barrett Would cast that vote. I actually think the big questions are chief. Justice roberts and justice cavanaugh court has struck down a louisiana law which requires doctors who provide abortion services to have admitting privileges at a local hospital so just about a year ago. The supreme court issued last big abortion decision and the supreme court. They're surprised a lot of people. By striking down a louisiana law that was quite restrictive of abortion. The crucial vote in this case came from chief. Justice john roberts who wrote he joined the liberals only out of respect for president the reason it was surprising even a year ago was because there were already five conservative justices on the court to supreme court. Now where the justice considered a case yesterday about the fate of obamacare chief justice john robertson justice brett. Cavanaugh signaled that even if they do strike down that mandate the rest of the law could still stand. Cavenaugh and roberts have been voting very much in lockstep since kavanagh joined the court and he is kind of emerging as this sort of more moderate kind of median justice on the court But so i think that because roberts joined the liberals in the last big abortion case it seems possible. He would do the same here and because he in cavenaugh have been voting together so often. I think it raises the question of whether roberts could potentially bring cabinet over with him and you've studied reproductive case law extensively right like what kind of real changes are conceivable here. I mean i. I know this. Mississippi law is no abortions after fifteen weeks. If they say you're good to go. Obviously that's a big difference. But it seems like they're even other dominoes to fall besides that brass. I mean so so brad. Basically since nineteen ninety two. The supreme court has said that total bans on abortion prior to viability or flatly unconstitutional. And other kinds of regulations of abortion are unconstitutional. If they pose what. The court described as an undue burden so sometimes there are hard questions about how burdensome regulation of abortion are but when it comes to bands like this those have not been viewed as presenting close or hard questions. Aban is obviously unconstitutional. Under the supreme. Court's casey precedent. And so if the court upholds this case a ban it will have formerly or functionally overturned. Its decision in casey. And that's that's what is governed abortion and casey is the constitutional standard the last thirty years. So if the court upholds this mississippi law. I think all of a sudden basically everything is on the table t lease but tilles can say a lot especially when the number of cases that kate shaw has supreme court analyst. Thanks so much kate. Thank you pat x. Start here eighty billion dollars still can't buy people's attention why and said. Hbo no after the break. Your business is important to you and the best way to improve. Your business is to improve the lives of your people. Uk g. develops hr and workforce management solutions designed to take care of your employees because when they.

Cavenaugh tonight brad milkey kate shaw john roberts Cavanaugh kavanagh yesterday Greenberg trump Scalia fifteen week tuesday may eighteenth eighty billion dollars john robertson Abc supreme court Yesterday justice barrett five conservative justices a year ago
"roe" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

Ordinary Equality

08:04 min | 6 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

"What she should do. Norma had sacrificed her body and years of her life for a movement that hadn't wanted her to represent much more than a pseudonym on a piece of paper. She was extremely poor and without many resources. The antiabortion side used her to one of the conditions of the bribe. They gave her took away. One of the most meaningful parts of norma's life her longtime partner. Connie gonzales here's the money. The people who became so entangled in her life in her post road life were basically using her. She was very vulnerable. She had no money. She was poor. She wasn't particularly educated and then came to her and said. Hey we'll give you all this money if you sort of switched sides and she said okay. I'll do that and sort of tragedy that attends. That decision was the fact that she was in a lesbian relationship. She was in a relationship with another woman a very serious relationship for years and years and years and before these these anti choice campaigners these terrorists essentially would even give her the money that they promised to give her if she switched sides they forced her to give up this relationship that was really important to her in the winter of two thousand seventeen. Norma passed away. From her deathbed she spoke to her experience with the reproductive rights movement. Did they use you as a trophy. Of course i was the big fish. Do you think they would say he used them. Well thank you. It was a mutual thing. You know i check their money. They put me out in front of the cameras and tell me what sign. That's what i'd say women have been abortions for thousands of years if it's just the woman's choice than and she chooses to have an abortion then it should be safe roe versus wade. Help save women's lives. Here's gloria allred again. And then of course in a way. She made a deathbed confession on a documentary She knew was getting to be the end of her life and she confessed that she was really pro choice. All along which i'm sure was very disturbing to the anti-choice side because they appeared many of them to enjoy having her as in a way. A poster child for the anti choice movement kind of nanna. Jane roe was anti choice. But i guess she managed to wipe the smiles off their faces. What she said she was really pro-choice along And i as a lawyer think about norma mccorvey in the context as a litigant It's very difficult for people who are not lawyers and not involved at the legal process to understand that a lot of times litigation especially this high impact supreme court litigation is actually not about the plaintiffs. You have to have a story you have to have an actual person with an actual injury but at the end of the day because it takes so long and the processes so involved the individuals who are involved in the litigation may not actually get any relief they may not benefit. And so you know again. Norma as a person with no Resources very little education. She seeks out a lawyer to help her get an abortion and many years later there is a decision that helps everyone but her get that thing that she was seeking. And that's really hard to understand and it's really hard to explain as a lawyer. It's hard to make clear. This case is actually about a bigger issue and a bigger cause than you or your immediate situation and so. I'm not sure that she had that conversation. And i'm not sure that she understood that in the end even if they win the case She wasn't going to win. So i can see how she would have felt very disappointed and let down by being part of something so big that did not benefit her personally And i think. I don't know i think women just get really taken advantage of and used as pawns. And it's sad to see that she felt like both sides were kind of using her. Yeah and i think that's what was so interesting to me and watching it that she's kind of like you both used me and i'm gonna go out on my terms with my story as i see it and normal corby was a survivor and i think that's something that i respect about her. Although i didn't respect all of her tactics right. I i see that. She was facing some pretty tough circumstances. She was marginalized in a number of ways and she kept reminding people that. Hey what's a winfrey. You doesn't necessarily necessitate a win for me. And it sounds like her voice wasn't always heard and so i think it's a good cautionary tale for all of us to who find ourselves wanting to support survivors of broken systems. In general to really listen and to really listen to what people need and also to try to fight for policies that promote access. And i think it's important to remember especially when it comes to human rights. It actually doesn't matter what when individual person believes like it should have no import one way or the other that the plaintiff in roe versus wade changed her. Mind it doesn't matter what one person thinks. That person is still permitted to not terminate a pregnancy. That's fine saying like nina. Someone changed their mind. I understand the rhetorical flourish. And i understand the emotional impact of that argument. But when you really think about it it shouldn't matter at all it's totally true. It's totally true and that there has to be the sort of legal strategy. I think it's interesting. Because a lot of times i mean i've seen it and my own personal life and family experiences where people think that you know taking a case to trial or having a legal engagement. All of a sudden is going to fix things you know and a lot of people don't truly understand that the law is the law but it doesn't mean that the law will ensure access or justice. It's about how you wield the lots. How engage the law. And how you hold the law accountable. As we're all too aware road did not solve all our problems. It did not preserve the right to access abortion for all people in all instances a huge part of that failing ties back to my favorite topic. The ira the rookie was based on substantive due process rights or rights to privacy but in doing so the court completely ignored equality which should be at the heart of the issue in nineteen eighty-five the late great justice ruth bader ginsburg then an appellate level judge openly expressed her disappointment and the roe versus wade decision to ignore how abortion access discriminates against all women or as she wrote a woman's quote ability to stand in relation to men society and the state as independent self sustaining equal citizens instead of asking the justices to acknowledge that under the constitution. Women should have unassailable control over their bodies. Because we're full fledged human beings. We instead settled for an argument that in their minds. Male doctors should have some say in what we do with our bodies and that legislators with no medical expertise can also meddle in the way that we access our healthcare that fundamentally puts us on shaky ground both legally and.

Connie gonzales Jane roe Norma norma thousands of years ruth bader ginsburg both sides One both nina many years later one one person two thousand seventeen years one way nineteen eighty-five gloria allred corby rights
"roe" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

Ordinary Equality

04:23 min | 6 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

"Was minors second. low income. Folks lost out on very quickly after row. The supreme court held that states and the federal government may exclude abortion from the otherwise comprehensive healthcare coverage provided medicate. Perhaps the most emblematically excluded in the roe. Decision was bro herself. As we know pregnancies are time sensitive endeavors. The law on the other hand is not particularly fast. Moving years passed between the first lawsuit and the final supreme court decision. I always need to take a deep breath. When i think of the weight of this but norma mccorvey the abortion she sought when the nineteen seventy-three decision was handed down in washington called norm to share the good news exclaiming we want normal replied. No you one. Why would i be excited. I had a baby. The fact that the suit was a class action lawsuit on behalf of all pregnant women made it so the circumstances of the case did not hinge on norma's pregnancy alone. Well that was a savvy legal. Move it left. Norma's immediate need for relief behind in service of the greater good. The movement around roe v wade was not particularly kind to normal overall. Here's gloria allred. The famed women's rights attorney she represented norma for a time after the road decision. I met norma mccorvey also known as jane roe of roe v wade many many decades ago at a big rally a pro choice rally in washington. Dc and i think she came up to me and she said i'm jane roe and i said oh. Are you of the speakers today at the pro choice. Rally which i thought she would be and should be one of the speaker. She said no. They won't allow me to speak and they didn't invite me to speak. I said really am so surprised about that. And in any event after that she stayed in touch with me and she wanted to speak. So i helped to start speaking out. Because i think it's important for people to hear more about pro-choice and she wanted to speak about it felt she had a right to speak about it. That went on for some years. So the woman whose case one us all the right to access legal abortion didn't get any relief herself and she was excluded from the pro-choice movement in a sort of mean girls way given that context one of the biggest scandals to rock. The post real world was when norma became an ally of the anti choice movement. She's likely to trade traded her status as a symbol of one side of the abortion debate to that of an icon of the other and both sides water as jane roe norma. Mccorvey is a different story. This was paraded around is a big win for the anti choice movement. I mean turning vivo of roe. V wade into anti-choice advocate was quite the scoop. And there's nothing. They love more than a redemption narrative. But the story wasn't that simple. Here's gloria again. And then one day. I suddenly received the news and also let me know that she'd gone over to the anti-choice side now. My feeling was that she was pro choice and because that was her attorney. I'll never say what she said to me or what i said to her because that's confidential. But i always had the feeling that she was pro choice and had done it. Because you know the anti choice side would perhaps pay her for speaking or help her with some form of economic support. She needed that. She didn't have sufficient funds to live. And the pro-choice side was not doing that. They weren't having her speak and.

Mccorvey gloria allred Norma today first lawsuit washington roe v wade both sides jane roe norma norma norma mccorvey jane roe one nineteen seventy-three norm one side second many decades ago one of one day
"roe" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

Ordinary Equality

07:56 min | 6 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

"Without question that pregnancy to a woman can completely disrupt for live whether she's unmarried whether she's pursuing an education whether she's pursuing career whether she has family problems that sarah wellington the lead attorney representing bro. Sarah was only twenty six when she argued this case in front of the court which honestly is just wild to comprehend. She was not all that far removed from her own abortion story. that's right. Sara lee revealed in her book published by the feminist. Press a question of choice that she'd had clandestine abortion in mexico just six years prior. She kept her personal connection with the case hidden saying quote. I secretly resolved to find a way to fix things in the future. It seemed a big waste of energy to throw a hissy fit over my own experiences. According to sarah's book the idea to challenge the abortion laws in texas came out of a garage sale fundraiser for a local abortion referral group standing in the driveway. Sarah was peppered with legal questions from the women who had gathered to raise money for more equitable abortion access. It was through these conversations that her resolve grew to take on the texas abortion loss. What she needed was a plaintiff. Here's a mani. Gandhi essentially texas had a statute that criminalize performing abortions. It criminalised doctors that did not criminalize pregnant women. Pregnant people and norma mccorvey. Jane roe needed an abortion was not able to get one and filed a lawsuit the fact that norma mccorvey who we will come to know as jane roe was pregnant was important. There was also a couple involved in the case as co plaintiffs. They took the pseudonym dough. And norma got row since doe was already taken but neither member of the couple was pregnant at the time in order to sue. A plaintiff has to have an argument that they will suffer an actual injury for the people who are not pregnant and perhaps weren't going to get pregnant. It would have been harder to prove that point. Norma mccorvey on the other hand had an injury. She was pregnant. She wanted an abortion. She was not able to get one because doctors who gave her if any doctor would have performed an abortion on her that would have been criminalized. Serra wellington had her case. Norma mccorvey is a complex character onto herself. Normal was a queer poor woman who received little education and grew up in really tough circumstances. When norma sought legal counsel. It's unclear whether she understood. It was unlikely the case would favorably resolve in time for her to actually have an abortion while she went onto win rights for people across the country norms. Personal journey wasn't as victorious. We'll dive more into how her life evolved after the case in a bit but first let's take stock of the wade portion of roe versus wade the defendant henry wait turney up twenty four death penalty cases which we ask the death penalty verdict. Twenty-three henry wade was a texas politician and district attorney in dallas county over the thirty five years he spent as a. Da he's sentenced twenty nine people to death. Row not very pro-life in that regard the lawsuit that sarah whittington filed challenged the existing texas law that criminalized abortion providers despite her inexperience sarah her first federal court case but. Da wade was pretty arrogant about the ruling. Because the court had ruled in sarah's favor but didn't dictate specific changes. He decided he didn't have to uphold the ruling. Well one would think that if a court says. This law is unconstitutional. That the district attorney would say okay. I should probably stop prosecuting doctors under it. That did not happen. Henry wade was like well. We're gonna keep on going forward prosecuting doctors. Because you didn't say. I couldn't so that's sort of one of the ways in which the district attorney's and the people prosecuting these laws were playing playing fast and loose with the law because pretty obviously if a laws unconstitutional. You should probably stop prosecuting people under it. But he didn't see it that way. Weights arrogance and defiance of the court order since this case on a fast track to the supreme court but not without bumps along the way a new york attorney named roy. Lucas stepped in to help. Prepare roe versus wade lacking litigation experience. The road attorneys gratefully accepted his assistants. But then he sent a letter to the court behind the backs of sarah waddington and her female colleagues and stated that he would argue the case in front of scotus they were shocked at his betrayal when they found out luckily clients have the final say in who argued their case the dough couple and jane roe wrote to the supreme court and corrected the record. They said not so fast. Survey wedding was to present the oral argument. Not roy lucas who they'd never met and so sarah became the youngest person ever to argue in front of the supreme court. One of the constitution was to guarantee to the individual the right to determine the course of their own lives and so far there was perhaps no compelling interest and we allege there is no one more peculiar comments. They happen twice. When the case was first heard on december thirteenth. Nineteen seventy one. The supreme court was two justices short. There were still enough justices present to hear the case and vote on it which they did but instead of issuing a ruling they decided it should be heard again by a full bench. It was scheduled for rearmament on october. Eleventh nineteen seventy two after justices. Lewis powell and william rehnquist had joined the court. This is highly unusual. There's a rumor that president. Nixon may have had something to do with it. He was in the midst of running for re election and didn't want the court which was often called the nixon court at the time to weigh in the final decision. Wouldn't come down until january. Twenty second nineteen seventy-three after nixon defeated george mcgovern in a landslide in november nineteen seventy-two. So let's get back to the supreme court arguments such a young woman arguing a case before the supreme court was highly unusual. There weren't even bathrooms for women at the supreme court at the time. Sarah said she had to cross the street and use the bathroom at another building during breaks. I often think about what it meant for women of reproductive age who had already had a clandestine abortion to be arguing a case that would impact her own bodily integrity ends that of her peers. Think about that juxtaposed with the lawyer representing weighed a man named jay floyd who tried to use the courts discomfort with women to his advantage. He opened his oral argument with a joke. Joe on our man who against two beautiful ladies lack this. They're going to have the last word. The joke bombs no one laughs and the sheer awkwardness rattled. Floyd good evening. In a landmark ruling the supreme court today legalized abortions to majority in cases from texas. And georgia said that the decision to end the pregnancy during the first three months belongs to the woman and her doctor not the government in a seven to two decision. The court ruled in. Rose favor the right to privacy framework from the griswold. Decision held up. When applied to abortion abortion access was officially a constitutionally protected right and legal everywhere in america besides the seven two ruling.

Sarah Norma mccorvey Jane roe jane roe Lewis powell Sara lee jay floyd texas sarah waddington december thirteenth mexico george mcgovern october Serra wellington Henry wade sarah wellington sarah whittington sarah Nixon dallas
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"In America today. So they weren't even asking the question. So she's like, let's go. So now, we have two white men onstage Tuesday night. They've had problems there've been allegations very, very very let's just. Very different kinds of problems. Problems, we also have a white male moderator Tuesday nine. So White, the shining whiteness of. Trump has nominated a number of conservative federal judges and Barrett is confirmed like we said they'll be another conservative justices to Skoda's Biden says he wants to pass federal legislation to protect the right to an abortion, but he has flipped on some things and one of them which Mary has already brought up the Hyde. amendment. So let's get into this debate. How do you expect this topic to be covered in the debates and trump and bite in what are they gonNa say Mary what do you think I threw a lot your way well, I think if you start with the debate, I think trump has had a track record of wanting to talk more about abortion. Biden is seeming to pursue a strategy of thinking that abortion or reproductive justice shoes generally or sort of too divisive I mean on the merits who knows if that's right as a matter of strategy, it seems a little bit troubling that Biden seems to be prioritizing the views of say like white independence, which is presumably the group he's trying not to make uncomfortable over the views of the people of color who really Right. Black women who voted for. Exactly. Yeah. So I mean, that's a little bit. You know talking about abortion at all is, of course, a way of talking about women of color because women of color are the ones who are GONNA lose out the most Roe v Wade is gone and a reluctance to talk about that is a little bit creepy because it does bring to mind this sort of history of ignoring women of color when it comes to reproductive justice which the Democratic Party has been guilty of in the past in terms of what's going to happen I mean. To some degree, the Supreme Court is probably going to be extremely conservative and likely Undo Roe v Wade. Almost you know regardless of WHO's president unless we have some kind of court packing retirement by the Democrats, which, of course, introduces uncertainty. If trump is president, you can pretty much take it to the bank that you're GonNa have a pretty big rollback of abortion rights probably overruling of Roe, you're going to see continuing dismantling contraceptive access. You're probably GONNA see more conservative Christians in positions of power trying to limit access to other things like sex education, and like Michelle said, you're also gonNA see kind of undercutting of other programs like healthcare or. Employment Protections Employment Discrimination, protections all the things that make it hard for women of color who do want to have children to actually do it when they want to without facing kind of impossible life choices. So you're gonNA see more of that Michelle. Let's be clear. Annette wait to marry. Thank you so much for that which is that when of color will only be the canaries in the coal mine which is appointed I emphasize my book. So if we look at criminalization of pregnant women, it began as black and Latino women, but once you establish a pesident. Accelerate is on that precedent then white women become vulnerable to. Elevate where in the last few years, hundreds of white women arrested for endangering their fetuses under a law that was never intended for pregnant women along that was originally designed to try to deter folks who turned their homes into meth labs who were blowing up their homes in their trailers in. So legislators passed a law. A child endangerment law that which to discourage men from making mass in their homes but. Prosecutors go after. Pregnant women do the complicity of doctors but I WANNA go back to the debate question and even if you don't mind thinking back just a few years ago I know flipping back but I don't know. Because these things don't come out of thin air rights. Why in two thousand sixteen, where they're not questions about sexual assault and rape during the debates. Federal. Judge that said, we'll let this lawsuit go our where there is an allegation of rape against one of the candidates. Now, all of this time about emails but yet no questions about a federal judge saying, okay. This case involving an allegation of rape no questions. Any this has so much about our country and about the value of the lives of girls and women in the United States and of course, foundationally a nation that said, it was permissible for men to rape their y exactly. That would give them an out both criminally and also in civil law that it's okay to actually beat your wife. So long as the instrument US notes thicker than your thumb. So that is a foundation but also strategy to. So as folks are looking at this current. Nominee A- question should be raised about the opportunity that was had during the Obama Administration because let's be clear. This is not just a question about Merrick Garland. There was actually a deeper strategy. The Obama Administration could have been the one to say we're GONNA put forward another woman to and we're GONNA put forward another woman. And we'RE GONNA. Hug wore a black woman and we will dare you Senate Republicans and Senate. Democrats. Give her day. Yeah, and then you have a different kind of narrative and strategy going forward in terms of women getting in the street. Now you know instead who's going to get in the streets should have short for Merrick Garland America Lynnwood, kind of like so many other Supreme Court justices that we've had in the past but fashion had a woman not in given her do by Mitch McConnell. The marches that came in January and February. Yeah. They would have commented March and April and May and June leading to November, and so there are other ways in which we've been failed that they're not just Republican is a failure of imagination in terms of where women deserve to be altogether.

Trump rape Biden Supreme Court Roe Obama Administration United States Mary Michelle Merrick Garland America Lynnwo president America White Merrick Garland Senate Mitch McConnell Democratic Party Annette endangerment Barrett
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"You consume alcohol during your high school years? Yes. We drank beer. My friends and I the boys and girls. Yes we drank beer. I like beer still light beer and Amy Kuney Barrett might be in that camp to a lot of these people want to act as if they're not partisans even if they are and that doesn't mean that Roe v Wade is safe, but it does mean that it might take longer to unravel abortion rates and there's some hope in that because of course, the longer it takes the more uncertainty there is so then you. Might have, for example, retirements on the service side or deaths on the conservative side you might have court packing if that's a road, the Democrats. decided to go down. So if you're looking for kind of absolute certainty in the near term, we might not get the handmaid's tale now but we're gonNA get some kind of rollback of abortion rates but make no mistake that where it's going is an absolute prohibition nationwide of worship. Michelle all right. What's your take on the debate with and the potential of having another? I. Mean It's going to happen another conservative judge I just want to get your takes even after row there were challenges put in place for poor women, women of color with Hyde Amendment a series of Supreme Court cases that preference pregnancy, the state funding pregnancy, versus pregnancy termination even in the wake of data that we know that an abortion has a A. Shot. Even though we know that a person is fourteen times more likely to die by carrying a pregnancy to term in the United States than terminating it me, we really need to look at this for what at is you know when the State Says No, we prefer that you do this even though we know it's fourteen times more likely to kill you for women and women of Color. What is that? Place with those kinds of tomatoes I mean that really then places in context the very deadly nature of what the state is playing around with in terms of belives of poor women and women of color and I'd like to expound upon what Mary. So eloquently, put a before us to think about what the court will be doing with another conservative justice in terms of voting rights, criminal justice, the environment, all of these issues matter immigration rights, and that we must understand when we think about reproductive health rights injustice within a whole person's context, which that there are many different ways of undermining somebody's liberty and rendering them without the value of their person hood. Won't be just reproductive rights which are critically important. But what thinking about these issues in a holistic way means that we really are talking about Jim crow kind of politics mean United States, and we already see this in front of us when you have a government at quitting children ages. Yup. Separating them from their parents are up for people who are at meat packing plants that are riddled with Colbert nineteen to go back to. Work when you have a government that think that little of the wives of people have caller and that is Jim Crow. Now we can papered over with the fact that they're. Now we've gotten rid of certain swarms of discrimination in education. We see lingering effects still in housing. We still see the lingering effects of that still in boating though we still see the lingering effects of the reality is that for those people of Color. Who Have the means to somehow hopscotched? Over so many of the substantial barriers that have been put in place, not just abortion, but just living an equal life than everybody else in many ways are returning to a kind of Jim Crow Stassen. Hyperbole. That's real for all of the black women went to stand in line in Wisconsin during the pandemic summer in the primary to vote for hours and you know about Justice Ruth. GINSBURG. One of her last two cents was exactly about that. You know sort of underlying racism really with how the Supreme Court and. Supreme Court handle that which was to say if you want to vote and risk your life to do so we're not going to get right for you to be able to vote, and let's be clear in Wisconsin at the time of that. I, never though black people constitute six percent of that state, there were forty percent of the deaths. My name is Leah and I'm here to tell you about native deodorant because I, believe in using products that are clean and native has ingredients you've heard of coconut oil shea butter and Tapioca Starch. It's also Vegan and it's never tested on animals with over ten cents. Native has something for everyone. My favorite is citrus and herbal because it keeps me and good and feeling fresh while I'm bicycling around the city native is a risk free try. Every product comes with free shipping within the United States plus free thirty day returns and exchanges do what I did and make the switch to native today by going to native do dot com slash in the thick or use Promo Code in the thick at checkout and get twenty percent off your first order that's native dao dot com slash in the thick or use Promo Code in the thick at checkout for twenty percent off your first order. If we look at the history of reproductive rights for women of Color and for immigrant women there. Yeah. As you're saying, there are clear roots of racism in the antiabortion movement Michelle in your book which you first conceptualized. About. How the laws right many of these laws are from the quote unquote so-called war on drugs that have been constructed to police and criminalize pregnant women women of color in your introduction you start with this line. This is not a work of fiction although I wish it were right and you write while we may think of the handmaid's tale actually this is the United States or specifically Texas? When you recount the story of Marlisa, Munoz's in two, thousand and thirteen. Who is brain dead and decomposing and was forced by the state to state for nearly two months before she was finally taken off organ support after a legal battle the state literally had control of her body, her husband and parents had no, say there was no say because of quote unquote fetal protection. So that story so visceral, right it tells you you know the way in your book how you humanize the women criminalize victimized by these laws and we've been covering the recent reports of these forced sterilizations of immigrant women in detention. It's not a surprise. It is the natural next step we have in fact been screaming about this some of US journalists we've been talking about the sexual abuse that continuous in these places. And it's really nothing new for women of Color, for immigrants, black women for poor women, we go back all the way to slavery to Eugenics, in Your Book You Interview Loretta Ross Who's one of the leaders of the term in the movement reproductive justice who directly linked the attempt to control women with white, supremacy Patriarchy and actually let's listen to a clip of Loretta. Speaking with the Western states center well, the beauty of the reproductive justice framework is that it is the isolation of abortion from other social justice.

United States Supreme Court Michelle Wisconsin Jim Crow Jim Crow Stassen Loretta Ross Amy Kuney Barrett Justice Ruth Western states center Leah Democrats. Colbert Mary GINSBURG Roe Texas Wade
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"INTIL Charlottesville right so it takes something like the murder of heather higher than. An a coming to grips with these issues in Virginia in order for there to be a reckoning at Monticello about the life of Sally Heaven and even the offspring of Jefferson, the black offspring of Jefferson, the please the efforts over decades and decades for their due recognition. You know it. All is a part of what has been sadly an American conspiracy to actually high what has happened to black, women Daesh. All right. I'm just saying that is an American conspiracy. In terms of WHO's writing the history and the policy, right? So many dots are being connected, and as we shift to discuss about reproductive rights, it really is all connected. It's in the work that both of you have done. Yeah. So her true spicer when sojourner truth says in the eighteen hundreds in her famous women speech most people remember it as a speech about chivalry. But it's actually in that speech he says anti bore thirteen children and near each one snatched from my arms and nobody heard my cry. But God anti wanted making those connections, but we still have to talk about the. Latest right with the supreme. Court. With the passing of Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG president trump has already announced his nominee judge Amy Coney Barrett who is a judge on the seventh US Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago and this was buried in two thousand and sixteen talking about Roe v Wade at Jacksonville. University I don't think abortion or the right to abortion is would change. Restrictions my think some of the restrictions would change. I think that's what we just saw last term. In the case out of Texas states after the criminal guys now. Affair and all of that states have imposed regulations on abortion clinics and I think the question is how much freedom the court is willing to let states in regulating abortion I think the question of you know the court has held. That in some circumstances. States can render partial birth abortion illegal very late term abortions i. think that's the kind of thing that would change I don't think the core case grows rose coral building that women have a right to an abortion I. Don't think that would change but I think the question of whether people can get very late term abortions how many restrictions can be put on clinics I, think that would change. So we talk last week right about the hypocrisy of Republicans pushing through nominee during election year right? It's an election year it's only weeks away. So we want to get into what the implications are of having a conservative nominee for Roe v Wade. So Mary you already tweeted out that Amy Coney Barrett's. Confirmation. Could in fact, mean the end of room. In fact, Mary in the first sentence of your book, you write quote with the Supreme Court likely to reverse Roe v Wade the landmark abortion decision American debate appears fixated on clashing rights and your book really complicates the idea that the Supreme Court is solely responsible for divisions over abortion rights and the backlash against it There are a handful of cases that may, in fact, reach the highest court of the country's soon, which will have a direct impact on reproductive rights and I just want to remind people that the essence. Of Roe v Wade. Is Privacy Bright Mary so Is this the end of road. Yet you saying it's the end of row. So what does this mean for abortion and reproductive rights for women particularly women of Color in this country if you're just saying this could be the end. This is the end of Roe v Wade. Well if you think about it, we already had a conservative supreme. Court majority. John Roberts is not a liberal savior. There's no real converts to the cause of reproductive justice among the courts conservative members as it was. So you can almost view amy conybeare it just kind of an insurance policy that reproductive rights will be overturned because. Yeah. Then even if you have say someone like John Roberts or you know someone else who kind of breaks ranks with the rest of the Conservatives, that's not enough anymore. It's also I think of all the court's members. If you look at he conybeare, she's been the most I think kind of vocal about her views being anti-abortion of the courts current members. Now, in some ways that doesn't really matter if you're opposed to reproductive justice because you're you know just whatever you're a misogynist or you're you're just conservative and you don't like me for some other reason, the outcome is the same but. We have less reason to doubt that she will kind of blank when the time comes it's it's a big deal in it's especially big deal for women of color. It's a big deal because Amy Conybeare, its presence on the court doesn't just extend to abortion. It also extends to contraceptive access. It extends to what's going to happen to the affordable care act, and as we know because of racial bias in this country whenever. There is less privacy and making reproductive decisions or whenever we get rid of things like the affordable care act that people who bear the brunt of that or women of Color Right? So historically, it's always been easier for women with money, and that's historically disproportionately been white women to navigate around any kind of restrictions that have been put in place that's always been much harder. I mean the the rate of deaths for. Black Women has always been higher on it was much higher before row than it was for white women we expect that to continue and I think maybe even become more pronounced I mean it's sad to say how little progress we've made when it comes to restore justice in this country. But then when the bill comes due for what it would mean to overturn Roe that that's going to be women of color paying the bill. Can I just ask and and and you know. People. I'm super honest on this show is actually had to abortion. So I, I realized now that my abortions happened just after Roe v Wade had been legal for about a decade so In the early nineteen, Eighty S. but when we think about this nominee, what is up just a moment please help me talk me down because I had to stop watching the handmaid's tale. And what made me stop watching? The handmaid's tale was when all of the women were told that they had to leave their offices because there were no more women allowed at work. So Amy Conybeare, it is a member of a particular conservative Christian faith group. It's called people of praise Newsweek reported that the group quote teaches that husbands should assume authority as the head of the household. In fact, her parents are members and her father was a coordinator of groups chapters in the south and that was reported by. NPR. So talk me down on. This does this matter at all when we're talking about women of Color Reproductive Rights? And the Supreme Court. I guess to me how much you WanNa Freak out depends on your time. So, if you really WANNA freak out, the history of the abortion debate would suggest that the anti-abortion movement is a whole. Even if you don't need to worry about specific faith groups are Amy Conybeare at the anti-abortion movement as a whole the goal has been to ban all abortions. The goal is not to overturn Roe v Wade that's like a waystation on the road. The goal is a right to life and the right to life. If you kind of follow the logic would mean that abortion is illegal everywhere right it's illegal in California it's illegal in Newark been raped. It's illegal if you're a minor of it's definitely illegal if you're a woman of color like that's the that's the end game. I think in the short-term though we still have a lot of conservatives who are interested to some degree in saving face justice. Roberts's in that camp probably bread Kavanagh's in that camp after the kind of disastrous confirmation hearings. Dr Ford has described you as being intoxicated a party. Did,.

Roe Amy Conybeare Supreme Court Wade Amy Coney Barrett John Roberts US Circuit Court of Appeals Mary Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG Monticello Virginia Daesh Jefferson Charlottesville murder heather Sally Heaven spicer Texas Chicago
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"The other side of the country Santa Rosa Beach Florida is Mary Ziegler she's a law professor. At Florida State University she's a historian and author of the new book abortion and the law in America welcome Mary, and thanks for having me. So you get you get the idea of what we're talking about people talking about reproductive justice. And how women of color are too often criminalised in this country around the issue of reproductive justice and as you know, this is a very sweet spot for me like a very personal one But the first thing we're going to do is we're going to talk about this update with Briana Taylor case which has been for women. Just, not a slap in the face it's like we're getting pummeled. So. Just to recap the back story of Brianna Taylor back in. March she's a twenty six year old emergency. Medical technician was shot Multiple Times and killed when Louisville police raided her home last week a grand jury charged only one officer Brett Hankinson in the shooting for wanton endangerment. You know he was the one who's shots actually hit the neighbor's homes ripe. So Not Brianna Kentucky's Attorney General, Daniel. Cameron said that the officers had acted in quote unquote self defense. But as of this recording on Monday afternoon, he is yet to release the transcripts from the grand juries deliberations. On Friday Brianna Taylor's family and lawyers held a news conference. BRIANNA mother to make a Palmer released a statement. It was read by her sister who is Brianna his aunt her name is Bianca Austin. Undo camera would never do his job but what I do know is that him and countless others will go to bed sleeping with his face. Still hearing her say her name. Camera. Didn't feel her but it ended with the lack of investigation failed her the officer from told lies to obtain the search winfield her the judge who signed the search warrant field her the terrorists who broke down her door filmed her the system as a whole has filled her. You didn't just rob me of my m, my family, you rob the world of acquaintance. Acquaintance. Willing to do a job that most of us could never stomach to do a queen willing to build up anyone around her of. Who was starting to pay for? I hope you never have to know the pain of knowing your child. is in the and help. You're not able to give them. I hope you never hear the sounds of someone cry and begged for your child to get health and she never receives help. Those cries was ignored. I hope you never know the pain of your child being murdered a hundred and ninety one monroe own. To make. So. Michelle really. The question is, do you reform a system like that or? I mean it doesn't feel like you can reform a system that right here saying, Oh, right. The only officer we're going to charge the one who hit the neighbor's home some. You know we live in a society that begs best to suspend our intelligence Let's be clear about that because we know that she died her body riddled of bullets. And many people believe in the criminal justice system that what it does is to see something like that in the outcome, is that this innocent person? Sleeping in her own bed in the middle of the night. And essential care worker during these times that if she is hard, there is justice on the other side of it. But the criminal justice system engaged with black people's lives. Especially, black women's lives has historically been not rendered that last result, which is just as and that's historically. So so let's remember that historically police forces were slave patrols in the United States. The very same model of the is the same model of a badge from the sixteen and seventeen hundreds as a slave. The earliest policing laws in the United States, the earliest laws related to homicide made it not a crime to kill black people right so you could because black people were considered property. Pretty can't be killed SEC. These cases involving that weather was black people being maimed black people being murdered. Any of those things that white people were just not held to account for an even in the cases of those things that happen to be the most egregious horrific. Let's think about in it tells that still no conviction even after people admit to doing what they have done or the murder of the four little girls in Alabama, church, Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, and so many of the main with wire recording knowing exactly who did it no rest no convictions for decades. So in that historical light, we're still looking for a constitution that adequately fulfils its promise to black women well. Mary your thoughts. I think it's a good segue to what we're talking about today I think even with the say her name campaign it's so much easier to forget about what happens to black women in the justice system versus even two black men and I think that's one of the reasons this conversation is so important often when people talk about mass incarceration or criminal justice reform, they're not thinking about women and they're. Not Talking about women, which is one of the reasons Taylor story is so important but it's also a good reminder of how these criminal justice issues go beyond just the sorts of concerns about the police and about released violence and police brutality that we've all been talking about they go even into the sort of most intimate corners of our lives which are the kinds of things Michelle and I have been studying i. Knew it's. In the backdrop of what happened to be on a Taylor it wasn't until George. Floyd horrific. Murder that we all saw that then said, we'll left pay attention to Brianna Taylor too because recall that she was murdered weeks before he was. Rain you know and and it just takes that and it's so unfortunate that sort of devaluing of black women's lives such that it has to be an appendage to something else horrific happening for people to begin paying attention to the dairy and the harm of black women, and that's just historically been. So we've been several hundred years into this enterprise of a failure to take seriously and to honor the lives of black women the ways in. which their bodies have been abused through rape and sexual assault, the foundations of our nation and slavery papered over. But so real I mean in one example of that is think about Monticello literally the papering over of Sally hemmings bedroom. Yeah. So woman who has a Thomas Jefferson each her to France sired children with every element of s we've not yet dealt with Brian, our country emend literally her bedroom papered over turned into a best room.

Brianna Taylor officer Mary Ziegler Brianna Brianna Kentucky Briana Taylor Michelle United States murder Florida State University Santa Rosa Beach Florida America Sally hemmings Taylor Monticello professor SEC Sixteenth Street Baptist Churc Thomas Jefferson
"roe" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"You know people who If they if they're poor if they don't have any money if like there's always going to be an opportunity to sell yourself in a certain way you know in the same way that I think like you look at. I don't know a candice Owens or something there's always gonna be people have marginalized groups who then turn around and say well. I can actually have a whole lot of notoriety and success if I become a spokesperson for like the other side. You know and then all of a sudden you're on Fox News and you're everywhere and I just kind of price that in like a yeah. That's that's always going to happen. It doesn't for me. It doesn't like convince me either way but I don't know if the right is more about like spokespeople than arguments or not. I can't tell I mean so. That's that's it's it's hard for me to answer that question. Don't you obviously my biopsies are GONNA show here? I don't think the right is particularly good at arguments or logic. I think they tend to get these questions very very wrong. I think what they're very good at is narrative and selling a story in a way that the left is not good at and the left very often wants to sort of respond to the right wing. By saying we have the superior arguments we have the American College of Obstetrics and gynecology on our side. We have the American Medical Association putting out a statement saying that abortion is essential care and should not be interrupted during the pandemic and the right is like we don't care look at this grieving. Women coup is the face behind Roe v. Wade crying about the dangerous at abortion poses to women which is something that Norma mccorvey was saying in the eighties or the nineties after her conversion which was false and so I think we ground there. I'd also I thought the short answer is no. I don't think the right cares about logic arguments and the truth unfortunately is I think that's to their advantage because I don't think most people are going to change their minds based on arguments and reason in fact like most studies bear this out. People actually don't deliberate themselves or their way and most moral judgments that they hold were swayed by stories. We're pulled in by narrative emotion. And that's what makes Norma mccorvey story to me so tragic because this is a woman who was vulnerable. Her whole life and whose vulnerabilities were exploited for the personal gain of people who were not her and I think that is so often the case in terms of abortion and motherhood is well. That's not something that often gets paid attention to one of the things that I keep thinking about during this pandemic as you keep seeing reports and hopefully we're gonna get to talk about this of increasing domestic violence. During Times of pandemic women are locked at home with abusive partners. The the socioeconomic factors that exacerbate abuse are worse because people are losing their jobs. They're isolated. They've lost healthcare. One sense of of meaning and location in the in the world has been has been lost and whether or not women have access to to medical resources or psychological. Health resources has so much to do with their particular. Vulnerability is and how their socio economically situated? And this is all present Norma. Mccorvey case like her dad left when she was thirteen years old. Her Mom was a violent alcoholic And She described these periods of her life when she was in this like therapeutic boarding school as the best years of her life because she was taken away from her home that was violent and disruptive and so she would lash out on purpose to get in trouble to be able to be sent back and then at one point. She sent to live with a cousin who she claims you know regularly raped her. Obviously she's accused of being a liar after she says this and this is just a woman who's never had agency over her own life and to whether or not she was paid to be an antiabortion activist or not. This is the story of a woman who's because of the way that pregnancy impacted her was denied agency over most of her life. And I think ultimately that's what makes reproductive rights so important. Yeah you know as you're talking about You know arguments versus narratives. I just remembered there is the shot your abortion Which I think is a is now an an organization. I can't remember. It's been a while since I came across it but I pulled it up just now and That that was all about normalizing the experience of abortion Is that something you're familiar with? I've seen that I. Yeah I've definitely yes if you WANNA talk about it when like man's playing it but it's I looked on twitter and it's got you know forty five hundred followers so I guess it's not it hasn't taken off quite as much as like a a candice Owens type thing but But it but I guess that that that came to mind is like an attempt to try to tell the story which I think would be compelling which is there are all kinds of women. Obviously a there are all kinds of people who get abortions. Don't regret it. It's a good thing for them. It's healthcare it's you know like their choice and normalizing that make sense so that came to mind. I think that's a that's a good organization. Yeah that sounds awesome. You know things like that. I worry about things like that. Only to the extent that to be able to shout your abortion one must already have quite a bit of privilege and be very different from me right like I had an abortion. And so it's very for me to sort of talk openly about that because I don't have to navigate communities where having had an abortion as the sort of thing that is going to cost me a job that's going to cost me the respect and esteem of my peers. Inouye as they're going to be additional negative consequences that come along with me saying like hey. I had an abortion. I have no regrets about that. Turned out to be a great thing for me. I'm so glad that I did it. where there are people who are in different sorts of communities where it could impact their job. It could impact their social relations like at this stage in my life. For example this is very silly example but like I wouldn't even consider dating anybody for example who has an ardently pro-choice but it may be you know maybe an Alabama Missouri you know that's going to to further have implications for one social circle or how to date are how one may be viewed and so it just gets into really weird things. Get into really weird territory. You put the sort of like performance. Tive pressure on like disclosing one's medical history. Yeah I mean I think it's a it's a social media thing I don't think they they take anonymous contributions it's not as though they're saying. Oh Catholic. Stand up and physically do it. But it's it's about kind of collecting those stories. I think and trying to harness harness the power of those stories so yeah. Do we WANNA talk. Maybe about abortion general. Kind of getting off the row. V Wade specifically Norma mccorvey story unless you had anything more on.

Norma mccorvey candice Owens Wade American Medical Association Fox News American College of Obstetrics Roe twitter Inouye Alabama Missouri
"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"In Millhauser you covered the Supreme Court for Vox. And you're at the court yesterday for oral arguments in this case. June Medical Services v Russo. How did it go? It's a little surprising. So when I woke up Wednesday morning I thought those zero percent chance that the Supreme Court would vote to strike down this antiabortion law okay and when I left. I was a little surprised by Chief Justice Roberts who is very conservative and very conservative in particular on abortion I left. There's a thirty percent chance that he will flip over and vote to strike down the antiabortion law which means the clinic would win and the state of Louisiana would lose. That's right I think there is at least some chance that there's going to be five votes in favor of the clinic here on the reason. Why is that? The state claims that it passed this law in order to protect patient's health and Robert seemed unpersuaded at times by that argument. It's not a convincing argument. There's very little empirical evidence for it. Hope Medical Center the abortion clinic at the heart of this is performed about seventy thousand abortions and only four of those have led to complications that required hospitalization. So you know if your fear is that. There's this epidemic of People who are having complications after they have an abortion require hospitalization. And they can't get into the hospital because there isn't fear not problem has already been solved by the fact that abortion is very safe and the chances that abortion patient is going to require. Hospitalization is vanishingly. Small is the argument that the clinic made in front of the court yesterday. That's right yeah so the clinic and I and I should point out like some of our listeners. Be Having Deja Vu here. The reason why they might be having Deja Vu is because in two thousand sixteen. There's a case called whole women's health. V Heller Stat chief justice and May it please the court? The Texas requirements undermine the careful balance struck and Casey between faiths legitimate interests in regulating abortion and women's fundamental liberty to make personal decisions about their pregnancies. They are unnecessary health. Regulations that create substantial obstacles to abortion access and what the Supreme Court said in that case. Is that admitting privileges. Laws do not benefit patients and basically all at the clinic was arguing. This case was hey that thing that you said less than four years ago still true the Federal District Court after trial found the two provisions were unconstitutional. They constituted undue burden on a woman's right to choose. The Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit reversed. We in agreed with the District Court and we reversed the court of Appeals. So why here the case then? They've already decided something so close in Texas. The biggest difference between whole woman's health the case from four years ago and June medical. The case that was heard this week has nothing to do with the facts of the cases. Nothing to do with the law has everything to do with the personnel on the Supreme Court four years ago Justice Kennedy was stolen the court and Justice Kennedy. You Know I. I wouldn't call him a huge defender of abortion rights. You voted to strike down the overwhelming majority of the abortion restrictions. That came before him. But every now and then he would see a restriction. That goes too far. You're cutting too far in into this core constitutional right that Mike Boorda's recognize and that's what he said in whole woman's House Kennedy's gone on Kennedy was the fifth vote whole women's health and his replacement. Brad Kavanagh has a very consistently antiabortion record in making your argument you ignored and I believe mischaracterized Supreme Court precedent. You reasoned that Jane Doe should not be unable to exercise our right to choose because she did not have family and friends to make her decision. The argument Rewrite Supreme Court precedent and Gorsuch is also fresh to the court from that two thousand sixteen decision. That that's right yeah. Neal gorsuch was appointed to replace justice. Scalia who actually died. While the whole woman's health case was pending so did gorsuch and cavenaugh weigh in on Wednesday in any way. That might suggest how they're going to vote. So gorsuch was quiet at the oral argument but based on his record when he was a lower court judge he took a very aggressive steps against planned parenthood. Like I'm pretty darn confident that core such is going to cast antiabortion votes. Cavanaugh also signalled that he intends to vote with the state here and Kavanagh's argument so remember that whole woman's health the Texas case said that admitting privileges don't do anything to benefit patient health and it also said that. It's also really hard for doctors to get these things early for abortion. Doctors take to get amazing privileges and so this is a huge burden for no benefited struck down capital. How do we know? That's true in Louisiana. Sure it might be true that in Texas. It's really hard for abortion doctors to get these credentials but maybe it's different Louisiana. Is it no? It's not the American Medical Association and the Medical Association representing Obstetricians and gynecologists filed an amicus brief where they said Nope Zane the evidence in the case suggests that it's the same there several doctors in this case who tried to get admitting villages and weren't able to do so you know and and often it was for the exact reason that I said. I like one of the doctors for example only provides medication abortions and doesn't really have much of a medical practice beyond like every now and then prescribing on medication abortions and so. This person admits pretty much. No one to a hospital because there's no need that for any of this. Doctors patients go into a hospital and so that person would have really tough time getting omitting village. In fact the state's own expert witness admitted that yeah that that doctor would have a tough time getting admitting privileges. So what's the bigger picture here? We know from what you said about giving the state a thirty percent chance of winning this case here that Louisiana would go from three abortion clinics to maybe just one bright which would make the procedure even more restrictive in the state. But but what's going on here with the Supreme Court Roe v Wade and this new cast of characters. So this case is likely to come down to Roberts you know he was the only person I saw up there who seemed in any way uncertain about how he would vote. And Roberts really doesn't like Roe v Wade you know if the lawyer for the state had come in and said we think that Roe v Wade was wrongly decided and and we think that this court should overrule at. And here's the argument for why. This should be overruled and they've just been opened about what they were trying to accomplish. I think there's a really good chance Roberts would have said like that's what I want to. What the state did instead is. It passed this law which is really an abortion restriction but it's Kinda disguised as a health regulation and then they asked the justices to say like we want you to pretend that this lol is going to protect people's health even though we can't provide you much evidence that it will and even though you said for years ago that it won't and even though our lawyer is now in an oral argument and the liberal justices peppering her with questions asking her to Find Demonstrate. Evidence. This will protect women's health and she's unable to do it. The state was asking the justices to participate in a pretty deceptive. Act here. There's a chance that Roberts isn't GONNA go there. But what does it mean for the next case that comes? That isn't handled this way. That doesn't have this precedent. What does it mean when someone comes to the Supreme Court to this to this new cast of characters gorsuch and Cava and says Row v? Wade is bad law. Yeah I mean I think the bad news for people care about abortion rights is. I think that there's a chance that Roberts gives Roe v Wade a stay.

Supreme Court Justice Roberts Court of Appeals Texas Louisiana Supreme Court Roe Justice Kennedy Federal District Court Wade District Court Neal gorsuch Brad Kavanagh Deja Vu June Medical Services Millhauser Hope Medical Center Roe Russo Vox
"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"By nineteen seventy twelve states had passed reform laws and that year New York Hawaii Alaska and Washington repealed their criminal abortion laws completely. Burn something thing Nelson happened in one thousand nine hundred seventy a woman in Texas named Norma mccorvey file a lawsuit against a district attorney named Henry. Wade she was single pregnant pregnant with her third child and had tried to get an abortion but her life was not considered in danger so it was a legal in Texas and she couldn't afford to lead the state her case. Ace made it all the way to the. US Supreme Court where they used the pseudonym Jane Royale this was a rover swayed court. Today ruled that abortion is is completely a private matter to be decided by mother and Dr seventy-two ruling to that effect will probably result in drastic overhaul of state laws on abortion specifically specifically the court. Today overturn laws in Texas and Georgia and rule. The government has no right to enter into a decision which should be made by the mother and her doctor. The nineteen seventy-three seventy three ruling putting into the therapeutic abortion puzzle. It was a huge win. For All the women who fought to make it happen from Pat McGinnis to Sherri Chessen Chechen and also the doctors because without them fighting to protect themselves. It might not have happened at all. The main author of Roe was Harry Blackmun. Who did a great service to American women and I know way mean to at all to denigrate him but for him? Writing row was all about protecting acting. Doctors it's not that he was unsympathetic to women getting abortions. But you know if you read the language of Ro It's the physician and his his capacity. Should be able to decide etcetera etcetera and a lot of feminist actually including Ruth Bader Ginsburg have criticized row sang sang rather than being decided on the right to privacy and rather than focusing on protecting the physician. I ideally row should have been decided on on the issue of gender discrimination. Only women get pregnant. Therefore only women are denied certain quote benefits such as being able to participate in society because of unwanted childbearing..

Harry Blackmun Texas Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg New York Hawaii Nelson Sherri Chessen Chechen Ace US Wade Dr seventy-two Pat McGinnis Jane Royale Henry Alaska Washington Georgia Roe
"roe" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on On The Media

"WNYC in New York this is on the media. Pop Garfield is out this week. I'm Clyde stone in March. The supreme aim court will hear a major case called June medical services versus key about Louisiana Law requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting meeting at a local hospital. The law would leave Louisiana with just one clinic three years ago. The court struck down in identical Texas law. Aw but that was before justices. Gorsuch and Kavanagh joined the bench. Now everything is different. It's not just Alabama Missouri Georgia Mississippi Ohio L. Kentucky and. They're all trying to go bubble up to the Supreme Court and Overturn Roe v Wade last spring nine state. Legislatures snuck in abortion bands of various lengths all now under appeal and just last month. Ohio lawmaker's introduced a bill requiring doctors to re implant and a topic pregnancy a medically impossible procedure or face murder charges. But we begin this week not with one urgent headline but with decades of accumulation. Good evening Kinda landmark ruling. The Supreme Court today legalized abortion is extraordinarily trough event. January twenty second nineteen seventy eight would be an historic day concern. We've been faced the problem. I turnberry a slow moving avalanche twenty years ago. Abortion may have seen the easy way out for a society reeling from the collapse of moral consensus yesterday. The Supreme Court said that Roe v Wade was still alive if substantially restricted Roe V. Wade wishing very bad decision Barbara. I think it was a bad decision. As Mike Pence has said for decades. I want into put Roe v Wade on the cheap of history and this is something I think will do a.

Supreme Court Roe V. Wade Louisiana WNYC Pop Garfield Ohio Mike Pence New York Texas murder Gorsuch Kavanagh Barbara Alabama Kentucky Mississippi Missouri
"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"I'm Lisa Barry Drako and this is distillation 's a podcast powered by the Science History Institute. Our next episode is about the rubella epidemic that swept swept country in nineteen sixty four and sparked a national conversation around abortion. Maternal viral infection during pregnancy especially in the first three three months has the potential for producing a number of harmful effects in the developing fetus. When the rebel outbreak hits panic sweeps the country? So there are these headlines headlines There's going to be twenty thousand damage babies a deep seated fear of disability combined with a pre. Ada World led many women to the conclusion that they needed an abortion but there was a problem. Abortion was illegal with very few exceptions in this episode. We're going to hear from women who spoke out. As mother's how does a mother knowingly bring into the world a child to suffer. I cannot do it. I couldn't do it for for two seconds knowing what I knew. I had to take the course that I did and I don't regret it as mothers. They demanded they should be the ones to make tough decisions about their own. Reproductive lives demand of people. Listen and eventually grudgingly people did. It's not what most of us think of as the Movement for abortion rights because it's not it's not Grounded in sexual freedom. It's really about family family and children and it is. It's grounded in motherhood. These housewives are probably not who come to mind when you think of abortion activists from the nineteen sixties but they helped push the conversation forward around reproductive rights and this historical moment all sparked by a virus pave the way for Roe V. Wade the tune into the next episode of distillation 's on December seventeenth..

Ada World Lisa Barry Drako Roe V. Wade Science History Institute
"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"So a lot of people assume that roe was what made a worship controversial and that couldn't be further from the truth mary ziglar is the author of after ro the loss history of the abortion debate before row in nineteen seventythree was state by state war going on to determine whether abortion would be legal in specific states heated debate on abortion is taking place throughout the country you can hear it in churches women's clubs on college campuses and state legislatures both sides press their propaganda war with rallies and marches slogans and posters for example new york state had pretty much no worship restrictions before row other states like texas pretty much didn't allow any abortions at all and many states were somewhere in between so there was an ongoing fight on state by state basis between antiabortion forces in worship rates forces to figure out what the law was gonna look like one lawmaker brought a fetus bottle to the new york debate right here in the jar fact decision is personal not only for the people of the state of new york but for each and every member of this legislature no priests were politician no doctor or any hospital administrator no government official or husband who should have the right to force any woman to have a child against her will so when row came down it was part of our ready really bitter fight the supreme court has been asked to rule specifically whether the laws restricting abortion in texas and georgia are violation of the right to privacy and a denial of individual rights guaranteed by the constitution if the supreme court decides the texas and georgia laws on abortion are unconstitutional that would open the way to legalized abortion throughout the country number eighteen role against to wait who's row who's who's wade i want you to meet jane roe of the fame case roe versus wade she is norma mccorvey norma mccorvey was a woman who a wanted tender pregnancy in wasn't allowed to because of the law that texas had on the books at the time normal corby at the time was twenty one i found myself pregnant for the third time i fan out where an illegal abortion clinic was in dallas i went to it it had been closed about a week before i'd gotten there your baby was brought to terminate opted right yes there it was viewed never had an abortion now i never have and they then took you as their symbolic case to go to the court yes her but i didn't attend any of the court hearings are testify or anything like that just knew you didn't want a baby yes and she subsequently in kind of famously became a pretty prominent simple for the antiabortion movement i've td people out of money i've saw drugs i was abusive alcoholic for many many years but i think the far greater said that i did was to be the plaintiff wrote versus white okay so rosen alias for norma mccorvey who's this young woman who wanted to enter pregnancy in dallas who was wade wade was the district attorney of dallas at the time that roe v wade was litigated and norma mccorvey and other the other plaintiffs in row were arguing that texas law was unconstitutional and filed suit against the state of texas and henry wade was the the named defendant in a landmark ruling the supreme court today legalized abortions the majority in cases from texas and georgia said that the decision to end the pregnancy during the first three months alongs to the woman and our dr not the government thus the antiabortion laws of fortysix states for rendered unconstitutional birkbeck alarm or infamously bay and second that it violated a woman's right to continue or terminate pregnancy who delivered the decision in roe v wade the justice who delivered the decision was harry blackmun who was a republican nominee interestingly and he spent a lot of time at the mayo clinic in minnesota thinking a lot about abortion as a medical procedure and doctors thoughts about abortion and a lot of that research in thinking was evident in the final opinion in roe the more recent abortion decisions out of the supreme court of in pretty close calls was row the.

roe three months