35 Burst results for "REA"

US setting up $1.7B national network to track virus variants

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

US setting up $1.7B national network to track virus variants

"Administration says it's creating a national network to track Corona virus variants that could trigger another pandemic wave virus Response, advisor Andy Slavitt says Even as the administration ramps up vaccination efforts, more dangerous variants are growing, he says a $1.7 billion network using funds from the president's virus relief packages aimed Getting ahead of the variance. Its funding will enable CDC and states to do more genomic sequencing. The announcement comes as CDC chief or shovel, Lansky says the nation seeing Maura virus cases nearly 70,000 new cases per day up from 53,004 weeks ago, she says hospitalizations and deaths are also up. Partly because of variance and partly because of relaxed restrictions on gatherings.

Andy Slavitt CDC Lansky Maura
FDA Says Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Pause Expected to Last a "Matter of Days"

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:45 sec | 5 d ago

FDA Says Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Pause Expected to Last a "Matter of Days"

"As U. S officials call for a pause in the use of Johnson and Johnson's one DOE shot. ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton says there's concern about blood clots being a rare adverse reaction to the J and J vaccine. All of those cases have occurred in women. Ranging in age from 18 to 48. They've all occurred anywhere from 6 to 13 days after the vaccine, So right now, the CDC, an FDA recommending a pause as this is investigated. Johnson and Johnson just followed with a recommendation in Europe to pause the vaccine rollout out of an abundance of caution. Now The acting FDA commissioner says she expects the pause to last a matter of

Johnson Dr Jennifer Ashton Abc News DOE FDA CDC Europe
Biden to unveil plans to tackle gun violence

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:37 sec | Last week

Biden to unveil plans to tackle gun violence

"To roll out of a serious of executive actions this week, focusing on gun restrictions. Here's a BCS Karen Travis in Washington. President Biden is expected this week to sign several gun control. Executive actions are highly anticipated move that comes after several mass shootings. The president campaigned on the pledge to pursue gun control reforms. Details have not yet been announced, but sources tell ABC the president's expected to move to more strictly regulate ghost guns. The firearms assembled from parts purchased online that don't have serial numbers and her difficult to track president could also unveil his nominee to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Karen Travers,

Karen Travis President Biden Washington ABC Bureau Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fi Karen Travers
Winter storm death toll in Texas now more than 100

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Winter storm death toll in Texas now more than 100

"From Texas word the death toll from last month's winter storm and blackouts has almost doubled Here's correspondent Ed Donahue earlier this month, The state put the initial number of deaths at 57 warning it could go higher. The Texas Department of State Health Services now, says 111 people died. Majority of them from hypothermia, The number could continue to rise. Many homes went without power or drinkable water for days after sub freezing temperatures, failing power plants and record demand for heat pushed the electric grid in Texas to the breaking point. More than four million customers lost power. The number of dead from the storm exceeded 2017 Hurricane Harvey. Which killed 68 people in

Ed Donahue Texas Department Of State Heal Texas Hypothermia Hurricane Harvey
School fires football coach after anti-Semitic play calls

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

School fires football coach after anti-Semitic play calls

"Controversies surrounding the Ducks for a high school football team costs the head coach his job here's WBC TV's Michael across ducks very high school, taking swift action today after the football team used anti Semitic language while calling plays on the field. During a recent game. Dave Ma'am Aronne is out as head coach and is currently on paid administrative leave from his teaching position. The district is also canceling this weekend's matchup against Hingham. The district says it recognizes how serious the issue is. It's hired an outside firm to conduct an independent investigation. The superintendent says. The outrage is real warranted, and we hear it. The school district says a decision on the rest of the seasons Football games will be made at a later

Dave Ma'am Aronne Football Ducks Michael Hingham
School fires football coach after anti-Semitic play calls

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

School fires football coach after anti-Semitic play calls

"Feingold has sent a new letter to the high school football team. He says he wants to meet with them after members of the team used anti Semitic language in their play calls. Feingold, who is Jewish, says he has heard a lot of line of scrimmage. Audibles is he played high school football and and over. But in the letter he says he has never heard anybody use the term Auschwitz before. In the letter to the students, he says he thinks it might be productive to have an open conversation with the team about the meaning of that term, and why it's so painful to hear. Meantime, the head coach of the program, Dave, Ma'am, Iran has been fired. Also placed on paid administrative leave for his teaching position. We're

Feingold Football Dave Iran
Boston Among 74 School Districts To Request Waiver To Delay Elementary In-Person Learning

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Boston Among 74 School Districts To Request Waiver To Delay Elementary In-Person Learning

"Houston public schools waiting to hear from the state on their way for request to reopen schools later than the state mandate for in person Learning Bust in school Superintendent Brenda CASS Elliot's told the City Council's Education committee is her hope that statement approved Boston's waiver request to delay in person learning K through eight until April. 26 3 weeks later than the state is mandating. We're going to return strong, the state has okay 58 waivers. They say Boston's request is still under review as his

Brenda Cass Elliot City Council's Education Commi Houston Boston
Local Police and FBI Investigating Supermarket Shooting in Boulder Colorado

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Local Police and FBI Investigating Supermarket Shooting in Boulder Colorado

"The mass shooting at a supermarket in Boulder, Colorado. Local police and the FBI are investigating several victims reported by federal law enforcement sources. But no confirmation if anybody is dead. This police radio call from broadcast if I earlier said this, But it's not confirmed. It's the officers law enforcers just about to give a news conference in Boulder. Police sources tell ABC News. It all started hours ago when cops arrived at the store on a report of a shooting, and that's when a person shot at them in the parking lot and when inside the supermarket Sarah Moon. Shadow customers says she was inside the store with her 21 year old son. They ran outside. We just kept running, and there was a guy lingo and those straight a students. We got outside and I started running towards him to try to help him in. My son grabbed me by my cones. No, we can't. We gotta go. Sources in Boulder also tell ABC News the shooter had a long

Boulder Sarah Moon FBI Colorado Abc News
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority GM 'Commits' To No Layoffs Or Furloughs For T Or Commuter Rail

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:46 sec | Last month

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority GM 'Commits' To No Layoffs Or Furloughs For T Or Commuter Rail

"Or layoffs the Carmen's union for its part, it's still skeptical as we hear from WBC's Karen Regal. That letter indicates the team may bring back services faster than expected and that the commuter rail would see a significant increase in service next month with its new schedules. The letter also promised no layoffs or furloughs about 40 commuter rail employees were about to disembark thanks to layoffs, and now they will not Boston. Carmen Union President Jim ever says he's still worried then we have no covert numbers out tonight from DPH, the state now reporting 1887 newly confirmed cases on the seven day average positivity rate 2.1% and for context here that is the first time it's been above 2% since last month, officials say 43 more people have died of covert 19. I'm Nicole Davis. You're on

Carmen's Union Karen Regal WBC Carmen Union President Jim Eve DPH Boston Nicole Davis
Boston's MBTA is rethinking service cuts and scraps layoffs after criticism from lawmakers

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:21 sec | Last month

Boston's MBTA is rethinking service cuts and scraps layoffs after criticism from lawmakers

"Wednesday night, Congressman Steve Lynch talking about those Proposed nbt a cat's, which would have included layoffs of some conductors. And today we mentioned to you that Steve Leech got a letter from the NPT a saying that those cuts Which had been contemplated. We're not going to occur on that They were going to try to get more service on the

Congressman Steve Lynch Steve Leech NPT
CDC expected to reduce social distancing recommendation for schools based on Massachusetts study

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:59 sec | Last month

CDC expected to reduce social distancing recommendation for schools based on Massachusetts study

"Expected to switch gears and in a matter of days recommend less physical distancing in schools that switched in person learning. The agency has been considering a study from Massachusetts about this. WBC's Kim Tunnicliffe spoke with one of the authors. The findings of the study suggests that three ft of distancing in classrooms is Justus good as six FT as long as students and staff were wearing masks co author Dr Weston Branch. Women of Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital says researchers compared infection rates between Massachusetts schools that required three FT of distancing and those that required six FT. Here's what they found no statistical difference and no significant difference. Doctor Element says The study shows that kids should not be kept out of school because of the distancing issue. We can bring students and staff at the classroom safely with three FT of distance, and that's a really exciting and important finding, because it's far more feasible for many school district's to bring students back at Three ft than six FT Him Tom, a. Cliff WBZ, Boston's news radio, and we

Kim Tunnicliffe Dr Weston Branch Women Of Beth Israel Deaconess Massachusetts WBC Justus Cliff Wbz TOM Boston
Boston's Hynes Convention Center Mass COVID Vaccination Site Opens Thursday

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:14 sec | Last month

Boston's Hynes Convention Center Mass COVID Vaccination Site Opens Thursday

"Boston is the state's latest mass vaccination site for the soft opening on Thursday. The site plans to be fully operational on Monday. It'll replace Fenway Park because the Red Sox needed for the start of the baseball season on April 1st. I'm don, Huh?

Boston Fenway Park Red Sox Baseball
Massage Parlor Rampage Killer Floats ‘Sex Addiction’ Claim

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:47 sec | Last month

Massage Parlor Rampage Killer Floats ‘Sex Addiction’ Claim

"Shootings that spas in and around Atlanta, now charged with murder. Six of the victims were of Asian descent. CBS is Mark Strassmann police They suspect, Robert Long, has confessed his bizarre explanation. He's a sex addict. Not a racist and killed his victims to eliminate a temptation. This rampage began here. Young's Asian massage in Cherokee County, Georgia, A gunman with a nine millimeter shot four people dead. Two of them Asian women 52 minutes later, another 911 call they have a gun, and he said, Yeah, Morgan, shots 30 Miles south in Atlanta. Gold spot advertises 24 7, massages and police say, operates legally three more Asian women were murdered here. President Biden is condemning violence

Mark Strassmann Robert Long Atlanta CBS Cherokee County Georgia Morgan President Biden
Biden administration says $122 billion of COVID-19 relief will go to schools: "This spring, we want our students back in school"

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:15 sec | Last month

Biden administration says $122 billion of COVID-19 relief will go to schools: "This spring, we want our students back in school"

"In class by spring. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona says his priority is to safely reopen schools quickly adding $122 billion from the covert 19 relief package will help with that. Gunman accused of killing eight people

Education Secretary Miguel Car
Iran Inaugurates New Underground Missile Facility

Nightside with Dan Rea

03:39 min | Last month

Iran Inaugurates New Underground Missile Facility

"News story out of Iran is that the Revolutionary Guard. They've inaugurated a new underground missile facility that was intended designated for missile storage reported by state TV. I mean, so there are transparent to that extent. On by the commander of the Revolutionary Guard who we first met when I say we, the United States first met with the embassy takeover. In November of 1979. He said the cruise and ballistic missiles will empower the forces Navy even more. They had a TV report that showed footage of scores of missiles in an enclosed space resembling an underground corridor. And they claimed that these missiles contractual 2000 kilometers, which is 1200 miles Um, placing much of the Middle East, including Israel within range, and I'm not mistaken. There was a bit of a dust up today. I think that Iranian forces Struck a U. S military base in Syria. And I think there was a little bit of a problem over the weekend with with an oil tanker in the strait of her moves. It just seems that they're just spoiling for a fight. Even even again. You know, a few weeks after we've have have resumed participation in these talks. Am I missing something? When the the Washington has, uh has had talks to try and re enter the J C P away, but it has not yet done so on. It is requesting certain focus and understanding from Iran before doing so we'll have to see Where Iran takes it. But yes, Iran's the military prowess has always been very, very important in the region in the world. The Iranian military power when the molars took over in Tehran that you mentioned 1979 when they did take over is the Iranian army was the world's largest army. Andre the always been a very, very strong military force in the region. They fought a decade long war with their neighbor Iraq at the time in the 19 eighties on into the 19 nineties. On But But yes, one would. One would hope that the world does understand as I mentioned in the beginning when you live closer to to a country like that. I think you understand it better. It's all very well to live tens of thousands of miles away from from Iran. But if you don't have to deal with what they're doing, and they're undermining Off the Middle East on bits all over the Middle East, their connections in Lebanon and in Syria and in Iraq and in the Yemen on their meddling in affairs in governments all over the Middle East. When one begins to understand. I think Iran and what it's focusing in on and it's revolutionary. God are incredibly problematic. And Ruth that group lists, of course, know, Della,

Revolutionary Guard Iran Forces Navy Middle East Iranian Army Syria U. United States Israel Tehran Washington Andre Iraq Lebanon Yemen Ruth Della
Massachusetts is launching a vaccine preregistration system Friday

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:47 sec | Last month

Massachusetts is launching a vaccine preregistration system Friday

"With 19 3 registration system coming on Friday, after intense pressure from state and federal lawmakers, held advocates and regular people, The Baker administration is switching gears. The safe will no longer release vaccine appointments on Thursdays and will move towards a pre registration system. Speaking in West Bridgewater, the governor was asked. now creating a free registration system that makes it possible for people to register and then no Where they are in the queue, and that they will be notified when they are eligible, and an appointment is available for them to book takes some of the some of the heat and some of this thing I think out of the Out of what the supply shortage does generally to people here in the Commonwealth State health officials say nearly 785,000 people in the state have been fully vaccinated against the

Baker Administration West Bridgewater Commonwealth State Health
Senate votes to start debate on COVID-19 relief bill

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:51 sec | Last month

Senate votes to start debate on COVID-19 relief bill

"Hill, the Senate voting to proceed with the nearly $2 Trillion covert relief bill. In a move to delay the process, Republican Senator Ron Johnson, insisting the entire bill be read out loud on the Senate floor. After that debate on the bill starts, here's a B C's Karen Travers with more on what's in the legislation. The Senate version of the Covert relief bill includes an expansion of the unemployment insurance program an additional $400 per week through August $350 billion for state, local and tribal governments. 50 billion for covert 19 testing and contact tracing. 16 billion for vaccine distribution and 130 billion for K through 12 Education, 40 billion for colleges and 40 billion for childcare. Republican lawmakers have called the bill a liberal wish list, saying you will add significantly to the deficit.

Senator Ron Johnson Senate Karen Travers Hill
Where Conversational Interfaces Belong in Banking - with Shankar Narayanan

AI in Financial Services Podcast?

06:18 min | Last month

Where Conversational Interfaces Belong in Banking - with Shankar Narayanan

"So shankar. I wanted to start off talking about what elements of workflows within banking where we can really apply conversational interfaces today. I think there's a lot of claims about ai taking over customer service or some other functions but of course it's more nuanced than app when you take a look at where your technologies being applied and what you see in the landscape. How would you summarize wear conversational interfaces fit in in banking right. So there's a lot of hype around conversational So i would like to break that particular meant we are on the very early stages of conditionally. I am in the technologies just evolving as long so in terms of in banking. I think the key use case for conditionally is of several but let me talk about the customer engagement side am banks are looking at cutting costs on call centers and reputation calls which comes into the call center they move into some form of a flow for chat bots and chad votes has to be intelligent enough to understand that alonso's and respond appropriately the challenge. Which we've been seeing and which most of the companies thunder companies are evolving from celebre. Give you an example. This has been restarted. This company was that everything's moved conversation and unstructured data. And we just happening where you have people chatting or come on what they can ask anything. Because there's no structured work or the zone many shropshire that they can ask anything. So you'll you'll heavy lifting is done by your systems in entirely to understand. The piece has to be good enough to understand the intent and appropriate the answer Their tools at one is banks have to be pretty strict in terms of how they respond just to make sure that the brand is kept so the way. If if it's an ai which is open to training or training without any human interface. It can this phone and get trained and If based on property may give a wrong response so if we need to have a better control on that and stock has to be built in that so what we are seeing or the bureau of let me give you an example right when we started in twenty seven twenty eight when we launched our first services with a bank the workload pretty structured the opportunity impact build a lot of variations on radiance fall the the intense again the stroke of the nlp to understand how pavilions for that to respond a car in the food has to happen is let me give an example if i make a query that hey there's my checkbook i applied for it guest today so you may have multiple variants which built in and the system understands what you intend hits and response to it. We launched. We had of art. Sixty thousand interactions per day mid some of the banks on viet launched in india. Where the there are twenty million customers and the operational team was overwhelmed. Because you can't keep having team billions so we have to build a deep learning mortar so that it auto trains and the billions auto bill so this my team both so there was a lot of learning which we act do as we each rated in canonisation layer journey the customer engagement side. That's the sign the law of other use cases which is emerging will the last few years especially in a machine comprehension whether market documents which banks have and. Let's assume that you are a relationship manager and you just want to know that on. How is the apple Gonna be doing tomorrow. And what does the cio report. Amancio information office of has created and the relationship manager doesn't have time to read through it so you have a reading the document which is being fed understanding the intense and comprehending it and you can quit any queries and it will not give up particular on servile pick relevant answers and showcase whether human gan understand it and pick up the knossos. It's such plus plus right. So i see that as a segment which we are working on with some max banks so using a for internal processes you have the rpm which is basically. That's a separate were to complete version. But in terms of con- additionally is fell focus on you. See a lot of use gives us or hr all the mundane tasks which people have to communicate with. A human is being moved onto box or workflow base os and that starts the shift which is happening. And we're seeing that. I have data which shows the in fact last month a one of the banks did six million interactions in a month. Or the because it's amazing but the final. Wally masur doing now just to clarify chocolate. This is six million internal interactions. You're talking about this. hr faculty here. No no no. No your customer writ large of a lincoln howard phasing customer actions retail banking iraq jumps rea-. Now that makes sense humans out there but just imagine a call center will not be able to have that kind of scalable volume now. There are lots of unique interactions which are happening which banks looking through. So i'll give you an example while the banks had to adam. Api just tell where the credit card is going to be delivered on which day just going to be delivered because they didn't have the use case but customer Asking that i applied for credit card. Where is it. I haven't received it so bank said okay. I don't want this to go to the call center. I want to based on customers asking these questions. Why don't i give a particular times time kind of thing where i can tell where the where the credit card is share not share so what is happening with conversation is if banks can leverage and i think banks are slowly understanding the scale of it

Shankar Alonso Amancio Wally Masur CIO Lincoln Howard India Apple Iraq Adam
"rea" Discussed on MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

08:34 min | 11 months ago

"rea" Discussed on MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

"The end of twenty twenty in the first place because that would have been the way to get back Lorenzo and not have it negatively affect them as well and everybody else in the paddock. I mean they got everybody to agree. It's not like every other manufacturer didn't have a rider that was interested in writing a wild card race and so again why would they bulldoze everybody in the garage? And how can they convince everybody in the garage to say yes to this all just to get back? Lorenzo I. It's quite the stretch. I think Kelly. Pero may been binge-watching Davinci code or something like that during his time off because I don't even know where he would come up with that grand of a conspiracy. Theory that Honda was going to make the entire paddock. Suffered just to get it that who are Hey Lorenzo. When they could've stopped them in the first place and they chose not to all right. So let's finish up the show with a couple of stories that are devoid of just about any drama at least in my opinion. And we'll start with pearly and Katie. I'm getting an extension for their engine. Homologation for twenty twenty. You know a few weeks back motor. Jp announced that development all development will be frozen for all teams through the end of two thousand twenty one and of course that would constitute quite a bit of cost savings for the teams and the bikes that they would run in any races. That are run this year and all of a mixture are based on the final Arrow and engine designs that were submitted near the end of March. Well that's not actually going to be the case for APPRECIA- and for KTM Apparently the change was spurred on by. Ktm they were a little bit uncomfortable. Giving up concessions completely and that's understandable because remember team in APPRECIA- they're not locked in like the non concessions manufacturers do coty Yamaha Honda into Sukey. They spent one engine. And that's it. They can't change that engine the rest of the year but because our concession teams they could potentially change their engine design multiple times throughout the year as long as they stay within their gentlemen for the year they can pretty much do whatever they want but with this new role they would be locked down. They submitted that engine back in March. They're locked into it until the end of two thousand twenty one so in essence cates Yemen. Apprecia- become non concession teams. Just like the rest of the factories even though they haven't reached that same performance level yet. And yes everybody would be saving a substantial amount of money. Which is the goal. But there's no question that in that scenario. Ktm in Australia are giving up far more than the other manufacturers are. They're giving up their concessions in addition to agreeing to give up development for twenty twenty one But at the same time you can't lock down the other guys and then just give him inappropriate carte blanche to keep right on developing for a year and a half when nobody else can so the compromise it came up with is to give. Ktm inappropriate until the end of June to keep working on developing engine technology. And them whatever they submit by June twenty ninth. That's what they then have to stick with until the end of next season and honestly. I don't think that's excessive. At all. They get three months more than the non concession teams as really that big of a deal especially considering that both of those manufacturers. Ktm especially APPRECIA- have made some major changes to their chassis in the off season. So this will help them at least try to maintain some sort of footing to help them continue to compete to get closer to you know being in the ranks of the regular factor teams of the non concession teams. Because that's the goal. The goal is to have no concession factory teams that they're all non concession teams. You can't do that if you don't give them some sort of opportunity to try to catch up and that's what these extra three months or four and I don't think like I said that's excessive at all. In fact I wouldn't hold it against them if they maybe had an open window sometime early next year to have a couple more months to hone in refined their engines as well. Although it doesn't look like that's going to happen and as far as the Grand Prix commission has stated the revised deadline only only applies to engine development. It doesn't apply to Arrow packages sense concession teams. Don't get any extra benefit when it comes to aero. It's really just the engine. Engine allotment an engine development. That they get those advantages in over the factory teams on and then the last story. I want to talk about something that I wanted to discuss a few weeks back and I said we will eventually talk about this weather. Suzuki is going to explore a satellite team for either twenty twenty one or twenty twenty two. Well Apparently Day Brivio listens to the show and he wanted to make sure that we had something to talk about in reference to a satellite team so he revealed a few details last week. So thank you David. If you WANNA come on the show let me know. Just shoot me an email. Get you on But he said that they are indeed considering their options but for twenty twenty two now for next year the big question though becomes who who would be their satellite organization and he didn't answer that question. We're left to debate that ourselves. There are really only be two options here. Either picking up an existing team or you bring someone else in and expand the grid and it looks like the grid is going to be expanding anyway in two thousand twenty two because seems more and more likely now to take their factory operation in house. Of course that would then leave Grozny available but the talk. There has been that they would stick with really as an official satellite team. And so you know if you're Suzuki at that point you've got really just Vinci A- or a new organization and seeing Vinci as position with to. Kati may be a little bit tenuous after they decide what they're going to do in the future with Johann ZARCO. I would imagine that would be the best move for everyone. Involved IS I as Yuki to partner with VINCA and a big injection technology of resources could bring that teams level up along with those Zouqi bikes. But but who knows if they do want to expand and they get it approved by Dorna and Apprecia-. Does it takes their operation in house. We could potentially have four new bikes on the grid. Starting in twenty twenty two and that would be pretty huge when you think about it. That is a massive expansion of grid for one season but it would be great. I mean especially in two thousand twenty two when they're going to Max out with the full twenty two races that would be pretty huge to also be adding two new teams and four new bikes to the great at the same time. Although I really think that eventually if are approached by Suzuki I think that they would be stupid not to say yes because it would help them up their game so much their performance level will come up so much compared to the situation that they're in now they would have better sponsorship though would have better funding and they wouldn't have to do these pay to play rides like they've been doing the past couple of seasons and that would make everything better in the paddock. One hundred percent not knocking. Any riders may bring money to the table but we all know that when the team is paying the rider as opposed to the rider paying the team usually end up with a better quality team and a better quality writer and better results so I knew that the news was GonNa take our insure enough there. It is it did. That's why I decided that we would just put things up. Do the comments in separate show. Plus I don't know if you could tell or not but my voice starting to give out a little bit. I mean terrible allergies the past couple of weeks or so and that's all it is. It's a justice. There's nothing more than that. I'm not I'm not sick. Everything's cool but you can probably hear my voice. I can certainly feel it in my voice a little bit. So it's better. If we chop it up into two shorter episodes than like two hour long episode by the end. Be Talking like this so next up our comments not just yours but more comments from Mr Agostini but this time it has nothing to do with where he lorenzo this time he's talking about Marquez and weather mark needs to be able to win on another bike to solidify his legacy. So we'll chat about that and hopefully we're going to have some sort of official word very very soon on starting the season at Horr- as and what's going to happen after that plus whatever other motor. Gp News comes up in the next couple of days. We'll talk about that as well. So because we're doing a couple of episodes this week I wanNA make sure you don't miss out on any of them self. You haven't done it yet. You can always subscribe. You can do it on itunes speaker. That's great place to subscribe Stitcher PLAYER DOT FM. Google play music. Iheartradio spotify just go to your favorite podcasting.

Ktm Suzuki APPRECIA Lorenzo Honda official Pero Kelly Apprecia Google Grozny Jp Katie Horr Yemen Yamaha Johann ZARCO Mr Agostini Grand Prix Gp News
"rea" Discussed on MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

11:09 min | 11 months ago

"rea" Discussed on MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

"So I had a bunch of work to do this week to prepare to be able to have a day off and that delayed the show. Why is it? That holiday's always end up meaning extra work before and afterwards it doesn't end up being a holiday in that case a but what it does mean. Is I get an extra day to do what I really want this weekend. Which is talked with you guys about Mo- GP and we've got a lot of news to cover from the past week or so in fact there's so much so that I think what we're GonNa do is split things up again this week like we did last week. We're going to start in this episode by going over all of the latest news stories. Then we'll do a separate show with the comments because you guys had some awesome stuff on Reddit this week. Some great pictures great stories along with some video From chip at the track owners are fifty one. Which was pretty epic. So we'll talk about that on the next episode on this one will cover the news assorted this week by drama level he s because there was definitely some good old fashioned drama in the news over the past week week and a half or so and it was spread evenly across all of the manufacturers to. It wasn't just to cloudy drama so we'll get to it here in a second before we get to the full rundown. I do invite you over to the website if you have not checked it out yet at Moto Week Dot net. All of the latest episodes are there. You can follow along on twitter and Instagram at motor week and most importantly like the show and leave your comments on facebook at facebook dot com slash photo dot net and read it our slash Moto Week. Subscribe to the form and then dive into the conversation. As you'll see when you get there people are talking about all kinds of stuff. When it comes to motorcycle racing we would love to. Have you join in the conversation so go check it out at our slash mode week all right so here we go. This is the rundown just about everything we're going to talk about on this episode of the program and like we have the past couple of weeks we're going to start with the latest motor. Gp Schedule News. Unfortunately there isn't anything concrete offer up about harass at this point. Hopefully that's coming soon but we do have some other tracks talk about including the prospects of having Asian rounds this year because Carmelo escalated was talking about that just a couple of days ago and I think that those comments probably apply to all of the flyways including Texas and Argentina. So we'll chat about that and then we will dive right into the motor. Gp News and like. I said we're GONNA sort it this week by drama level and we're definitely starting at the top and working our way down whore Halo Giacomo Agostini part to a Roslyn trying to flex on Valentine Rossi over a patroness. Ktm May or may not be after Andrea Cosell and Jonathan Ray. At one point could have been could have been a Repsol Honda Rider then after that will move down to the intermediate. The middleweight class of drama with Jack Miller potentially being factory rider soon and could do coty have a fight on their hands if they want. Or Hey Martine for twenty twenty one and Beyon- and is there a conspiracy in the works? That band wildcard entries for twenty twenty. Get out your tinfoil hats. Because we're gonNA talk about it. Then we'll finish up the show with the low drama stories. The lightweight class of drama as it were some engine rule changes for concession teams heading in the twenty twenty and then something of wanted to talk about for a while but we haven't gotten the chance to yet. The prospects for Suzuki satellite team. Either in two thousand twenty one or twenty twenty two because wd Brivio was talking about that couple of days back. So that's how will finish up this episode of the Shell Art? So let's get down to it by starting with the latest on the motor. Gp schedule for twenty twenty. And like I mentioned a moment ago unfortunately we still have no update on a possible start to the season in harass but here in the US. We hadn't ask our last weekend and we're having it again this weekend and knowing that those guys got back racing again with no major incidents and also knowing that motor GP is going to have a much more solid plan in terms of having actual testing in place as well as you know time on their side to learn from everything going on around them the other sports that are starting up. I'm more optimistic than ever. That the harass rounds will be approved by the Spanish government but of course we are still waiting on official word from all parties involved. But keep your fingers crossed. I think we're going to get some news soon and I think it's going to be good news For starting the season sometime in July. Meanwhile French GP organizers are the latest. Toss their hat into the potential round. Ring They said that they're working with Dorna. And the French government to try to reschedule Lama for one of the first two weeks of October now. Technically Thailand is already penciled him for the first week about Tober with Taghi and Australia scheduled for the third and fourth weeks. Now we're going to talk about the Asia rounds here in a second but we all know that the situation is completely fluid with these races especially concerning the flyway rounds and the specific back that you know the French DP was saying. We're looking at early October. That's what we're targeting pretty much confirms that Dorna really is pretty focused on Europe just for now and they're only going to venture out further when the situation improves now. Of course we're not talking about fans here at all. We're just talking about racing in France on just like the harassed thing. Lama is aiming pretty far out even in relation to the proposed first round. And that's a good thing in terms of planning and organizing but it also means that we're probably not gonNA hear anything concrete for a bit. In fact they were talking about not having real decision until June about that round. Hopefully we hear something about who says much much earlier than that now. As long as the French government is going to allow the event. I think that chances are very good. That we're GONNA see a race there but let's talk about those. Asian rounds that are right now scheduled for October because the situation is quite a bit different for them and we discussed last week on the program. How resume Rizzoli made some comments about how? Sapang was very hopeful to have their round as scheduled this year but Carmella Belated Conham told everybody the slow their role in that respect. He didn't interview with Fox Sports Asia and he said that the current plan isn't to do any racing at all overseas until much later in the year and they don't even expect to make an announcement on any flyways until September no announcements until September. Lead loam racing but then. He went on to say that. He doesn't envision any of the Asian rounds until spectators are allowed back at the track again and while. That is a bummer. I do totally get it. Because the cost involved in taking the entire series overseas is really big and without being able to ask for the healthy race fees that are provided by the promoters under normal circumstances. At these rounds. There isn't a whole lot of benefit to laying out all that money just to move the series from place to place around the world now escalated did not specifically mention circuit of the Americas. He didn't mentioned Argentina and those comments. But I'm certain there included in that statement. You know when Dorna is already going to have to cover all of the costs. You know of modified race weekends already. You'll you add in the freight expenses for all three series in world superbike for that matter to travel around. That would likely eat up the majority of the TV money that normally they wouldn't have to dip into because they're getting money from the individual tracks to host these races so I would expect to only see European rounds until restrictions on large gatherings or east so in other words I would expect to only see European rounds for any races. Run in two thousand twenty. But you know like we talked about before in general. I'm okay with that because obviously each track does have its own personality. It does have. Its own separate challenge. And we love seeing the variety in those tracks. But let's face it part of the uniqueness when we all watch on. Tv is the atmosphere. You know the fans in the stands and if you're taking that element out anyway then at least for me. It becomes far less important where the races are physically run. You know if they happen to be in Texas at the time or in Argentina or in Japan or in Thailand or in Australia. It doesn't really matter as much I mean they're just gonNa run them on a handful of tracks as far as I'm concerned that's about the same thing as long as there's some variety you know if it's all at the same track well then it's going to be get very boring but if you don't have the fans in the atmosphere created by those fans anyway then it becomes less important not non important but less important where they're actually running those races so we didn't really get any verification any official indication that we are going to go racing or when but at least we know that it's probably just going to be your up and it's probably going to start mid July and then we're going to have to wait for more details after that if things go really really well and you know you can have limited fans at places. Well then maybe they will think about. You know traveling but until then. I think we're probably going to see European rounds. Carmelo's made it very clear there. That is their focus for the rest of this year. And it'll only change if the situation changes drastically for the better and keep your fingers crossed but right now I'm thinking we're probably looking exclusively at European rounds this year but that's better to know racing at all. Don't get me wrong better. No racing at all definitely all right. So let's dive into some real motor. Gp News now. And like I said at the beginning of this show. We're sorting by drama. And I don't want to go back to far with this whole Jorges. Lorenzo Giacomo Agostini thing. But it's still lead to finish the story from the last episode the show and then we'll move on to some more current stuff because Lorenzo versus Giacomo. House wasn't done. I was hoping it was going to be done after the last show but it wasn't quite finished yet because we're hey. Lorenzo went on an unnecessarily lengthy instagram rant. Not Going to bore you with all of the tawdry details because the entire thing can be summed up as a pretty much saying when instagram. Okay boomer whether that's a nice thing to do or not. Well that's up to you to decide but the interesting part about this or hey took particular exception to Aggo. Nicking him on his record at Takada in saying he was failure at Duke Audio now. I'm assuming that. Lorenzo left Honda out of the discussion. Because well there's not really a person around that would back or hey up if he suggested he didn't completely suck at Honda but as fond is his memories of the Italian bike may be his record would be nearly impossible to defend if he had not one those three races in his final season that combined with the late year injury Kinda gave Lorenzo get out of jail. Free Pass when it comes to any real argument about how he performed on that Takata because he can always point to that and say look look at what I was doing up until the point.

Lorenzo Giacomo Agostini twenty twenty Argentina Gp News Instagram French government Dorna Carmelo official Lama Reddit Moto Australia Thailand Honda facebook Suzuki Ktm
"rea" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

15:45 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Harmontown

"A girl yeah but it's not all right I'm not going to be sincere anywhere I rea- thinks I believe you a little bit when you're saying nine nice done fan coolest which that'll be the fucking name of this episode Nice Junkin coolest switching as I'm going to decree that as the title of this episode but as easy to recruit as the lineup at least these current teams right these four eighty five middle eight hundred nine thousand nine hundred to Dream Team like changed my brain so like.

rea
"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"This is like crazy crazy thing to think about you know it started getting me to think about more writing you know it opened up that little part of my brain that there's maybe there's a few other stories in air to and are there yeah definitely. Are they going to be emerging well. I did have a piece with The New York Times magazine during the summer months. There was a travel issue that they did our journeys issue. It was written an illustrated piece. I was like eight pages about a gift that my mother-in-law gave us she's from Sweden and she gave us the gift of a patch of mushrooms and forest on on an island and so writing about that experience in this place and kind of thinking about it when you're far away from it and and we all have something like that but what's interesting is I've been in keeping a book just about ideas and I'll write a page or two and then I'll move on and on all right another pager to move on and quite a few of them are actually children's books ideas but with the kind of slant more towards an emotional storytelling it kind of voice something related to life and and you know the specialness certain level. How would you categorize this book. Would you categorize it as a children's book for adults or adult book that children could learn. I'm from yeah I mean. It's been really hard to kind of. Put it into a category I would say. It's an adult book that you know hopefully kids steal from their parents. Let's you feature some of deaths paintings in the book. So death becomes an artist and death starts to create these canvases. How hard was it for you to create an entirely different style because death is not mimicking the visual language of the book. It's an entirely different. The visual language yeah that was that was kind of like a playful departure. I didn't think we could go there too many times but I thought well if he's going to be an artist. He's going to produce some things. The number of those pieces are just there my pallets from like my ink washes and things but I love the look of them and I thought well I got these in here and fortunately they made it. You know they made it through the edit but it's just another way of kind of bringing perspective to the book and treat it more like an art book and less like a comic book because I thought it was it was something else though I love comic books. It felt like there was an opportunity here to do something different. I mean I think there's also one part where he goes to the museum. In these e he sees is this painting that you know everyone is is familiar with the death of Murat and that was an opportunity to kind of Affleck's my photo realism skills I suppose but the selection of that piece was really critical to making that singular page compelling I mean well the obvious one to go with would have been the scream right because everyone knows that one or for something by Gustav klimt or something else that is kind of in carrier scarier or saying you know but of course those two is really hard to draw the the thing about the death of Murat piece in selecting that piece for that is that there was real quietness to that that image and also if there's any art history nerds in the audience they know that that was about a journalist who was killed and so that kind of spoke to a little bit about the politics that we're living in today you know in though there isn't a lot of politics in the book there was one opportunity to kind of sneak some of it well the the allure of the busy culture. The business culture is pervasive through the book and you mentioned before the notion of having fewer days in front of you then you have behind you. There are two bits of the book that reminded me of different print things that you've learned in your own life through your grandfather or your father. I'm in the middle of the book. Death reflects in states. It's occurred to me that now I have fewer vacation occasion days in front of me then behind. Perhaps I should try and fill the remaining time with more meaningful things. I've certainly really done a lot of stuff and met quite a few interesting people but what have I learned and I think that that's something that so. Many of us can relate to as getting older older now. There's no question for a while. It was little like fifty fifty like maybe I have viewed as more than behind but now no and how do I remake a life. That feels does meaningful. How do I start to make choices that feel better about who I WANNA be given. I have less time yeah. How are you grappling with those questions and for me as a creative person you think about it in terms. Of How many projects can you produce. This project is one of the more ambitious projects I've worked on in the last few years ears but that takes time that takes you know quite a few months to develop. You know it takes years of CO developing the story and you start thinking about okay. So how many of those do I have. You know how many more opportunities to way to produce special work and what are you leaving behind. What is it that you're trying to say with your work and does the work that you created created. Does it have impact on people's lives. I think about that a lot more now being a father my time in the studio is a lot more precious. It's compressed into a certain degree so I have to be more efficient in the studio and I and I also have to be maybe more selective about the things that I'm working on that are coming into the studio and then also being really selective about what I'm putting out there because I think now that may be shifting a little bit more towards offering art directing and illustrating rather than just illustrating. Oh straightening someone else's words so now I'm being a bit more selective about which ones of these really have some weight I am. I going to be really passionate about throughout the entire project and that I'm GonNa be really proud to produce I'm assuming that you either have to self select more and say no more for opportunities coming in but also have to say no more to your own ideas about things you want to pursue yeah. How is that been to navigate. How do you feel scared saying now less so now. It's kind of learned language because it's it's a luxury to be to be in that position. Not many people are but you you I think over time you get a little bit better at sniffing out the projects that are going to be exciting to work on your working. You know you know really early on this. Is someone that I've never worked with or this. This is someone who I'm excited about working with. We kind of similar interest in we're kind of heading in the same direction in terms of an idea for this and there are times where you you know the flag starts going up really early on the project and you know maybe that's that's when you want to avoid but I think getting to your question about balancing the two things between commission work versus. You know personally driven projects. Fortunately I've had some kind of space in the schedule to kind of work out some of the ideas and then it's going to be amount just kind of picking ones off the shelf that I'm really excited about working on I. I'm wondering if you can read a short excerpt from your book. It is one that I took a long time thinking about and I was really happy when I asked you earlier before the show. If if if you would mind reading that you said it was your favorite spread in the book okay my whole life up to this point has been about other people mostly leaving what can and I say it's it's my job. It's who I am but if there is one big thing I've learned this past year is that quality time with others is important and that smiles count. I've learned to take people in rather than taking them out anyway. Time is short and all that so. I'm going to get to it living thank you. It's such a beautiful beautiful book Brian. Thank you so much for writing it. Thank you so much for being undesired matters today. Tell us before. I let you go what you're going to be doing next. Hopefully more writing. There's a few a projects that are going to be hard to to just leave on the shelf for ten years and and hopefully let me another booker to in the future. Have you gotten any closer to dream assignment of painting a plane not yet know every time I come on your show. Reminding pig branding agency Brian Ray wants to pay to play well. Leave our listeners in anticipation for the answer when you come back again. That's Great Brian. Thank you so so much for joining me today again. Design matters and thank you for making such a big impact in the world with both your art you're right Brian's. Latest book is titled Death. Wind's a goldfish reflections from grim reapers yearlong sabbatical. You can find out more about Ryan Rain. His work on his website Brian Ray dot dot com and sees illustrations. Every week in the near time was the fifteenth year I've been doing design matters and I'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference. We can make a difference where we can do. Both I look forward to talking with you again a special thank you to who are partners..

Brian Ray Sweden The New York Times magazine Murat Gustav klimt Ryan Rain Affleck ten years two bits
"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"That people won't forget well. It's super descriptive it is about the grim reaper who is told by the HR Department of Death Inc that he has a lot of vacation time that he has to take and he ends up with a year of vacation time so he has to take a year off. Yeah I am forced year off. How intentional was your choice of the grim reaper winning a goldfish which generally has a very short shelf life yeah and yet remains with the grim reaper for the his his almost this entire journey yeah yeah he's yeah. He's there all the way through not to spoil the ending but yeah. I was really worried about that whole fish this other thing that like my my assistant who was helping me with this Leonardo Santa Maria is amazing illustrator he was he was along on the journey with me doing a lot of the production and scanning of the drawings and whatnot it was great to have him in the studio because I could bounce ideas off and you know the ending was something that we were trying to figure out because initially it was just a lot of individual scenes a lot of individual moments and and you know he goes to the State Fair. What's he gonNA do at the State Fair. Oh well we all know what happens with Goldfish well. There's a really interesting tie and so as as a reader you have this idea of what normally family would happen with the goldfish that you bring all that you bring home from the State Fair but can we flipped upside down. Can they become buddies can they. You know there's something that they're going to do beyond this and and so this and there really aren't any other recurring characters in the book necessarily so in that way it's really it's a bit unconventional and so trying to use that device all the way through the book and parts to kind of give it a little bit. More pacing was helpful. You've said that the book is not about dying but about living Can you talk a little bit more about that. It's a reminder that time is short and it's a reminder that time is precious. You know I had a child almost three years ago now and I was working on the book right right after he was born and and you know you start to think a little bit more about these things you know you have less take time in front of you than you you know then you have behind you and so all these things they matter oftentimes. I you know I would think about the you know the book and so. How will you know if I had a different character rather than death. Could it be carrot. Could it be a Unicorn could be you know what would the other and you can't really do that. Because having the grim reaper is there's a complete cliche. You know it's an archetype that you know. Everyone knows what it looks like. Everyone has a vision what that is but it really is. A reminder on each page that you know time is is precious. I was thinking a lot about the notion of the book being about living versus dying and as someone who had somebody very very important important me die recently I was re reading the book in preparation for our show today with an entirely new perspective and I think that the book is is really more than a book about living versus dying. I think it's about learning to live yeah. That's a really great way to put it actually you because the grim reaper has never had this experience of living no and and so you see the first the first time he goes to a state fair the first time he goes to a karaoke bar the first time mm he takes a class the first time he goes to a Frat party in ways that are bittersweet cleverer her absurd surreal and yet perfectly normal yeah. I'm glad that you got that from the book I mean I think in the back of my mind that's certainly what I hope. People people you know other people get from as well I mean because he's almost kind of naive in his approach. I mean he spent his entire career taking lives away now he suddenly amongst the living right and he's learning how to conduct himself within that universe and it's yeah it's a bit of holding a mirror up to us as a crazy culture you know he he does cross You know put together a dating profile you know these kinds of things and all that stuff that kind of leans into that absurd you know for sure but then there are moments where he's he's he's in a hotel on on the city and he's smoking a cigarette which is of Corrado Smoking in the grim reaper is allowed to Eh do what he wants vices but he's thinking about the time that he's had and he's contemplating what he's learned and and and the people that he has he has grown as he changed. You know and these are questions that I think we all ask ourselves. Throughout the book we see deaths diaries from this time we don't ever actually witnessed or observed death talking no which was an interesting choice yeah and I'm assuming very intentional yeah yeah. Initially I mean it's it's kind of crazy to think about it this way but but the book was only going to be drawing so low and there was there wasn't actually going to be a written component to it and pretty quickly on. We realized this is missing a year. There was a lot more that I wanted to say and I think bridge it was kind of hoping for kind of getting a little bit more blood out of the stone kind of thing and so she she was pushing me and we we worked out this idea of doing it more journalistic the great luxury and doing that his that I don't have to develop a voice but in some respects I did oh yeah I am. It was going to challenge you on that. One I feel like the grim reaper has a very distinct voice yeah yeah and and my mind I've always seen it almost like a like an animation film you know when I was working on the book drafted it all story you know like one long story board one hundred sixty something pages with little drawings and writing that I would change over and over and over again but I think the writing part because I'm not an author. I certainly don't have that experience of doing that. That was the hardest part of the book is trying to find the sweet spot between language enough writing to you know move the story forward but also allow the drawings to kind of drive the story so they're they're kind of they dovetailed together other and is a really easy trap to fall into that. I kept repeating and failing and then figuring out which is to over. Tell a story whether whether it's too much from the drawing too much on the writing. Do you know what I mean. How absolutely that's one of the hardest thing about visual storytelling. Does you have to have the visual and the verbal completely. Lee intertwined wine is overwhelming the other than it's no longer a visual story yeah yeah and I've spent my entire career telling stories with pictures alone. Suddenly I have an opportunity we use language and it's it's almost like too much so you know along the way I was writing and rewriting writing and rewriting and asking people that I know who are writers opinions you know and getting feedback from a lot of different people and and that you know my brother is is editor and writer and so I was getting his feedback in some other friends and and and it was invaluable you know and and it was almost like I was learning a whole new way to create you know which was kind of special. I love love the narrative the Ark of the journals through the calendar year like you death makes lists the diary the entries are touching and also kind of darkly hilarious on February third death rights. I'm not big on words. What's there to say really come with with me. No you can't bring the dog. It's always the same things and I'm I'm wondering how much your own fears his or relationship with death played into the way you portrayed the grim reaper yeah. There's a lot of my voice in it for sure a lot of my anxiety and in things that I've thought about you know so. It's definitely holding a mirror up to myself. You know their journal entries that are straight out of old travel journals that I had I mean the there's a page wjr that is about going to the redwood forest stepping inside a tree and that's directly pulled from one of my old journals from forever ago but they're also moments where it's a reflection of us as a AH culture you know as a creative culture even when we're away from work we oftentimes still thinking about work. We may ever turn the light off and and he does that to where he's as you know reading the obituaries to check in the office to see what's going on. I know I loved that. The writing is is so unique you have such a really clear visual and verbal voice death describes a carnival this way. It's nuts like a thousand sugary smiles covered in lights all spinning in screaming at once and then death muses. It's the wind that makes the trees talk. You have to be listening and I think that must have been then from your your own own journal about the redwood trees. What was it like to be wholly responsible for this part of the book after working with the words of others throughout your career sure yeah it was only after the book I started getting the cops back of the book. It's like a whole book you know kind of bound or getting page proofs and things like that that I started to to think about wow. This is actually going to be something that holding my hands we had such short turnaround time to produce the book because we had condensed compressed press the schedule in order to get it out in the spring of two thousand nineteen so Israel Assembly Line of the studio. I would draw right rewrite. Redraw sounds like the way that you approach the Working Malcolm Glad Wolves book to be very similar very similar yeah very similar and the fortunate thing in both of those cases. I have really great people around me to make it look special you know or make it look accurate and that assembly line process of in a weird way is it's almost kind of therapeutic in some respects. It's a bit like working at the New York Times a daily section. You you know your routine. You're going in there. You know I have to do this many pieces each day this kind of thing and once we got into that routine was get it done by the deadline fine but then it was afterwards where I was like wow this we just made a book like three and a half months..

State Fair HR Department of Death Inc Leonardo Santa Maria New York Times Israel Assembly Line Malcolm Lee editor writer three years
"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It's important you know and I think the other thing too is. It's a responsibility you know you're it's a love com share and we can think of that as being light-hearted hearted and miles and come out and these are people's lives and their bearing their souls and I've come to take it a lot more seriously. You know over the years dear illustrations ever get rejected by the editors not the finished pieces. Although there are times where you know an article Meggett swapped out at the last minute. We might have to punt at the very end to do something changed their minds about the actual column that's happened. Maybe once or twice but it's less about them. Changing their minds. It's more about getting rights sites and getting approvals and things like that and there have been moments where I think there were there was a moment actually this past summer where I'd illustrated something and and when the finished piece came in they said we were not as comfortable with this particular idea the great thing is we have such a good relationship and and the fact that also I've been an art director I kind of understand some of the concerns you with the art director for the New York Times vital time yeah for almost five years yeah so I think having been in that seat I know some of you know the challenges and the things that they're faced with and we're a team you know and if something is you know not right. We all have to do our part to fix it having worked as an art director. You've actually said it's helped you as an illustrator realize that everyone should have equal footing in the relationship that you're working with someone rather than four someone but I'm I'm curious. You have that advantage having been an art director in the industry at large. How common do you think this is very. I was GONNA say I come to those kinds of relationships often yeah and I think it's you know I think part of it is just being in the industry for a long time or you know as long as I have been and people kind of come to you with knowing that you've you've kind of experience some things I think as a young illustrator I probably you know I certainly wouldn't have that same kind of footing but it's important that you know you kind of approach in a way that you're collaborating with someone you know. I think that's key. It must feel like you're always on deadline having to illustration every single week that's it's in one of the most popular columns in the New York Times. Do you ever find yourself short on ideas. No I don't believe I don't believe in creative blocks. Someone is asking about that recently and you know. Perhaps this sounds a bit arrogant but I think early on perhaps I might have felt more of those. You know creative blocks at times but I I think you know because I've been practicing illustrative for awhile. I have like there's all sorts of ideas projects that I would love to be. Doing you know even right now. There's you know there's always something it to do. You know if if the fire is still burning you know an I love coming to my studio every day like I it. It has never changed. It's never that flame claim hasn't really ever gone out so you know there's always something you know to be working on and in terms of working on the column week-to-week these stories are so complex complex and different you know and people oftentimes say oh well. There's a system toward a formula there really isn't you know everyone is different and because of that the illustration should be to do you feel that you can tell when you've done a particularly good illustration. Do you fall in love with your work. Do you have a assertive trajectory where you like it. Then you hate it then you think it's garbage. Then you begin liking it gets then you love it and then you think this is yeah. I think it's more than anything it's IT'S A it's. It's a battle you know you start out drawing. Some ideas that you know might look good on paper but they might be better for other illustrators. You know so you have to scrap those and you're kind of digging for awhile. I tend to begin game. Most most all of them are projects with writing so I'll write my way into some ideas and then I'll begin to sketch based on those things but it's a wrestling match but I love that challenge like like that wrestling match. I like destroying some sketches in the beginning or even some finish work in the beginning and to get to a place where you know what that drawing feels right. You know something about that. Line makes sense on an emotional level with particular essay you collaborated with Pablo del Ken in California Sunday magazine on an animated short film about the Director and artist Mike Mills who's lovely. I've interviewed him as well and what a what a spectacular human. I know you were excited to work with Pablo but we're really anxious and scared by what Mike might think of the work and when he posted the film on His blog I read that you had a fuck yeah few moment. So why are we so nerve is being. He's you know he's a Rockstar. You know I love his work. and it's rare that you have a chance to not only do a drawing about another artists but do an animated piece based on his life and of course there are films that are based on his life too so you you're kind of up against a lot. Beginners is one of the great illustration films of all right and so you you're kind of working against that and trying to tune all that out and still deliver deliver on the project was tough but you know when he posts like yes since our last interview you've done a lot more work with animation particularly with Pablo del Ken in addition to the Mike Mills Film. You've created television spots for the US open a film for Marnie one of my absolute favorite fashion labels. What about the process of two questions about this. What about the process of animation captures you. What is it about the the moving line fine line yeah I think part of it is the fact that I've spent most of my career telling a story one picture at a time right and suddenly suddenly being put in a position where you can tell a much more elaborate story or more fully fleshed out story with lots of imagery you know is compelling. You know I'm a big fan of films and and you know obviously animation but I think for me. It's a it's just new ground having an opportunity tune kind of explore what I could do with my alteration work within animation seemed intriguing working with Pablo's amazing. He's you know he's brilliant and and we have a really really good working relationship because we push each other. There's nothing that's safe. Every every idea that's put out on the table can be taken off the table and we're we are able to work together together. You know really really well. on a level that you know when. I have a chance to work with them. It's just like a real joy you know so my second question is as an artist artist whose voice is uniquely your own. What is it like to collaborate you. How do you collaborate with people like Paul say or Pablo people who also have really singular powerful voices yeah and it comes with with Pablo for instance. It's you know it comes up a lot like if a project comes through his studio you know there's a kind of awareness ernest or conversation that we would have at saying okay stylistically. Maybe we lean a little bit more towards perhaps a more graphic approach whereas if a project comes in my studio I they're probably looking for something more line art. You know illustrative on some level and so we we have that decision. We make that decision pretty early on Do you ever fight right now. We both want the same thing right. We send storyboards back and forth and we way. There's almost no authorship to it. I don't look at them as saying. Oh these are my films and public certainly doesn't doesn't feel that way either and so the ego we just leave that at the door and we're able to kind of produce what we what we hope is good work. You know that's telling an interesting story. Let's let's discuss your new book. Death wins a gold fish reflections from a grim reapers year long sabbatical mouthful now discussing its beginnings. You've written that it goes back to when you were working at the New York Times at the op-ed page and the Advice Your Dad gave review that I mentioned in the introduction after he retired to work less how did that impact you and how did it lead to the book doc yeah a couple of different entry points into coming up with the idea. I think that was certainly one. I was at the tail end of my time at the at the New York Times and I had been gathering drawings. A sketchbook of you know based on this idea. You know like God. I'm I'm. I'm I'm in a cubicle cubicle. I'm at the New York. Times is a daily section is real grind. You know in New York City is a lot of pressure and I was desperate to find some more balance in my life. You know I was dying. Hang to live a little bit. You know take some trips do these kinds of things so I wrote down dying to live in in the sketchbook and I started thinking well you know who works the Mo.. If my dad's saying this who works harder than him and you know if we're going by the numbers right you know might be death right so I was doing these drawings and it was more like a list of ideas with a couple of little drawings things here and there and I thought maybe I would present a couple of them to the New Yorker perhaps as like a cartoon ideas but the list kept growing and it it was probably like three or four pages and then just shelved it for awhile like ten years. I didn't even you know it was just sitting collecting dust in a sketchbook and I had an opportunity eighteen to work on something with chronicle and they said hey do you have any ideas for book. I thought well you know this might be a chance to you. Know Kinda float this out there and see if you know if they bite at it and and they did which was amazing about the title I it's not only a mouthful. It's also it's dark yeah. that was a wrestling match for sure because I was I was convinced dying. It was an amazing title bridget rigid. Waza Bain was like no. That's fucking terrible you. You know that's like a self help book. You can't do that and I was like no. It sounds great you know but fortunately she pushed and I you know great editors do that and and she she said what else do you have what else you have and of course the marketing people start creeping into it and they you know they want to marketing anyone in the Nanna added a but we really committed to coming up with something that felt unique you know because I thought that there needs to be an opportunity to something that's somewhat sweet eight and somewhat dark and definitely something.

Pablo del Ken New York Times director wrestling New York City Mike Mills Meggett US Waza Bain California Director Marnie Mo Paul five years ten years
"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"That's the same as also in the northeast part of the United States in a in a fictional town yeah so I think you know early on. It was just trying to fall there. Steps a little bit but even before that you know it's just trying to draw as many comics as I could. You know it got really good at drawing like Garfield and I'd love of disease and religious early sketches drawings on the back of jeans jackets for kids in high school and you sold them right. There was a couple of guys you want him. You Know Hey can you aerosmith uh-huh oh God. That's a tough one. I embroidered yes. Yes logo on the back pocket of a pair of jeans. I had yeah yeah. I had those for a really long time. One of my big collection regrets not having kept though I know I know I'm kind of ashamed. Not have that didn't make it in high school portfolio. It's right right now. In College. You had another mentor Ron Menard who was a former editor of the Patriot news. Who advised you to never work for a newspaper. So why is that and then. Why didn't you heed his advice. Yeah I mean he was a he was in editor at the Patriot News in Harrisburg and I interned at the Startup magazine that that he had begun called the Harrisburg city paper or something like that and it went on to become like Harrisburg City magazine so I was doing everything from doing illustrations for undoing some of the paste up work you know this was early days of the computer kind of thing in the thing that Ron was great about was showing me the value working really hard but also the really I mean. Didn't you already get that from Your Dad. I did but but he was showing me in a way that was more aligned with creatively what I was going to be doing. My Dad applied the work ethic thing and then Ron was showing me some of the opportunities that might exist for the talent that I was starting to to show but the cool thing about Ron was that he showed me that like okay at six o'clock. We turn off the lights at the shop and we go home and we celebrate life. You know we you know we would go to have great dinners. We have glass of wine. You know we'd you the race tracks with the whole family kind of thing and it was it was just a kind of celebration of you'd always have music playing in the evening. He played the piano so it was it was kind of really interesting interesting balance between living and working. You know that I hadn't I hadn't really seen before early on in your career. You were doing a lot of work for business magazines and then on the weekends cans you'd disappear into pen and ink drawings in your sketchbook. Would you said lead you to a bit of a split personality some art directors and happened to see see your personal work and that's the type of material that they wanted from you. What was that like for you. At the time. It was really hard me. You were successful one thing desirous of doing something very different. Exactly you know I wasn't happy with the work that I was necessarily doing because it didn't feel like as if I was offering it distinctly as my own voice and the other thing that was real interesting thing was was the types of stories that I was being asked to illustrate. Were nothing like the types of stories that I wanted to be telling with my drawings right so for instance. If I'm doing something about computer you know like a modem or something you know. This is early days as right if I'm doing something like that but then I'm reading the Atlantic and there's this really interesting narrative piece or rolling stone has great feature and it's you know it's it's more like documentary entry style drawing on some level and there's a real kind of emotional component to those essays that I felt was completely lacking in my work a certain point I needed to kind of push a little bit harder and so when I started doing these pen and ink drawings and my sketchbook I started showing them around you know to our directors and friends who were designers that I respected and and you know I wanted opinions and you know Paul Sarah. Someone Leeann chapter was another person I sent some two but it was just xerox copies of black and white line art and with my name on the you know Manila envelope on the outside or something my phone number and I started generating work in that lead to more than you know. As for the style you began to develop Ella you said you found the less you added in the images the more emotionally impactful the pieces became and wondering if you could elaborate on that a little bit how did that simplicity actually create more resonance yes. It took time to get that too. I think a lot of what we're talking about some of that growth that happens. There's an artist you know you you find your visual voice or your stride in a certain point and a lot of it is experimentation a lot of it's failing and I think some of that early work though it was keeping me busy you know it was a lot of just letting the line we're kind of percolate to the top and then just scraping away all the phone you know what I mean of collage or mixed media things a lot of things that I was doing well in in school just a lot of searching right and then once you kind of find that mark it was more like okay okay this feels right and all these other things don't they feel unnecessary on some level and I think for those no my work no that I rarely ever show a kind of emotional feature on the faces of the characters that I draw they tend to be a bit more reserved in in that kind of illustrative device that a lot of people tend to rely on. I think about it more in terms of how close or distant people are from one another the gesture of someone like if someone when has their head down and they're sitting on the edge of bed and the light sir darker colors more muted that is so much more powerful than if you just show tears dropping from the corners of people's is right but it took time to get to that place where I understood that on my work there are very few illustrators that I think are really successful at capturing during that gesture I think your one I think Alison Bechtel is one. We talked about that when she was on the show and Chris ware where you can literally create an emotion with gesture align yeah which is just remarkable yeah. Thanks No. It's those two artists are amazing you know and Chris Rock Star you know and but he's someone that really can it feels emotional. It feels psychological on some but it also is like that vacancy of space not only in just individual frames but in in terms of how he designs a whole page you know he's masterful at it. There's a Swedish filmmaker name. Roy Anderson who's incredible doing. It's a lot of a lot of it. oftentimes is just spacing closer far apart. People are from one another can really define a lot and say a lot about a story without you. Actually having to oversell or Overcook can idea you've been illustrating the New York Times modern love column now for many years disclosure. Here's the first thing I read right now because it's also something you can now read on Fridays. It's pretty much the first thing I'll read in the New York Times on Friday. No matter what after all this time I'm your iconic illustration still captured the essays in the most brilliant of ways. You've described how you don't replicate the writer stories one hundred hundred percent but rather create a parallel story. Is this still your approach yeah yeah. I think you know as an illustrator. You know someone's calling on you to create a universe to create a whole new world for readers or viewers to kind of experience and I think if I was just going to recreate the same story might it'll just take a photograph and I'm not a great photographer. How did you first get the modern love Gig. I would say it's almost ten years. and there were two other illustrators that were doing it before me. Chris Neal was the one who is doing it just before me is amazing amazing love his work. I don't really really know why they switch gears because I thought he was doing a really lovely job but I think because I was an art director ago. You know my sense. Is that art directors you you carry with you the artists that you love working with and that you really enjoy appreciate and I suspect maybe they wanted some kind of change in it on some level but you know that's a question for them. Oh yes now I know you have good working relationships with your editors but do you ever get pushback or feedback from writers in the way that some of the writers writers and editors get pushed back or feedback from readers not as much from the right usually if I if I hear from a writer it's hey thank thank you so much for you know you've captured something or the tone of the piece. You know you really kind of you know you nailed it or something like that. I don't think I've ever received an email from mm. Someone say hey you blew it which you know I'm. I'm grateful that I haven't yet having said that. Readers will reach out and they will say hey. Do you miss this or you might have tried doing this on really the feedback on your illustration. I I read it all respond to all of it because it's super valuable you now. I mean when you're doing something as long as I've been doing this this column you. There is the concern that you kind of get into a routine right or you kind of rely on you know familiar. Thanks so to get that feedback is super valuable. You know and I really appreciate it when when it comes in and we had a there was one a reader who had read a piece yes it has been posted online and oftentimes pieces of personal line prior to them being printed of great and she caught something in a piece and it was about ethnicity and what she caught was something that I had caught but I hadn't I can't remember exactly the ethnicity of of the character in the piece but I tend to do a lot of the work in layers in photoshop the finish work most withdrawn by hand at first but I hadn't turned on one of the layers for skin tones and the reader immediately you know had emailed me and said hey you know this is is this is not right and she was hundred correct and you know I called The Times as soon as I got that email and I said hey we we need to fix this and you know good on the Times they you. You know they did immediately. You know because they recognize this. You know it's important..

The Times Ron Menard editor director writer United States Harrisburg New York Times Garfield Chris ware Chris Rock Chris Neal Roy Anderson xerox Paul Sarah Atlantic Harrisburg City magazine Ella Manila
"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Brian raised father worked hard all his life up before dawn back after after dark the work ethic was the ethic in his house after his dad retired. Brian asked him what advice he would give to a thirty year old version Russian of himself. His Dad said work less. It was not the answer Brian expected from his dad so brian a bona own a fight famous illustrator. Did something equally unexpected. He set to work on both illustrating and writing a new book called old death wins. A goldfish reflections from grim reapers yearlong sabbatical. It's a bittersweet comical comical reminder to all of us overworked stressed out and overwhelmed workers of the world that there are other things besides work in life. He's he's here today to talk about the book and beyond in his illustrative life Brian you're on the podcast in twenty eleven so welcome back to design matters yeah. Thanks for having me Brian. Twenty nineteen has been dubbed. The Year of Keanu Reeves with John Wick three his hilarious turn in an always be my maybe toy story four cyberpunk twenty seventy seven the filming of Billon. Ted faced the music and the announcement of a new new matrix film but before all that the real Keanu renaissance began in March and you were there documenting it. Can you tell us what happened yeah so I was on a flight back from San Francisco and I had almost I actually missed the flight a they had an standby mode and the kind of shuffle me down sort of the last minute. I thought I was the last person to get on the plane and behind me saunters this. You know kind of guy with a baseball. Capital is and people start taking pictures with them along the way. I realize you know it's Kiana. He's getting on the plane as well well. He sat a few rows up in front of me. You know just kind of checking out you know see what he's doing and I snapped a picture because I thought you know my wife's. GonNa love this but I didn't realized the plane was actually GonNa have some engine trouble and we got rerouted to Bakersfield which is an airport that actually wasn't even open at the time and whereas Bakersfield odds in California -fornia but it's about it's about two and a half hours outside of La so it's a bit of a drive and they kind of shuffle us all into the airport and I'm thinking well. You know there's not much else to do except sit around and wait so I start you know documenting you know as a storyteller would not thinking that this was going to go on for a while and as I kept instagram posting Kiana is up to I ended up getting a car with him and we drove back to Los Angeles and did he know you were documenting this at the time I think he did you know in the beginning you know in hindsight. I look back and I thought well. Maybe there were a couple of things that perhaps I you know I probably Shoulda held off on on posting quite well. I mean I think if he's kind of having some fun with us. In singing songs in it seemed him like he was comfortable with that. He was well aware that you know people were taking pictures and whatnot but I think it was. Also you know I learned some things to about the power of social media you know there were the probably two hundred and fifty three hundred canneries fans like deeming me about him about his life and how much he meant to them and all these things and and and you kind of take a step back and you're like wow. I didn't even realize that you know was actually happening. I was just kind of posting humorous things and and some things about life and things that you know is it's just kind of sweet moment and we were having a nice ride conversation but it seemed like a very intimate experience yeah you know and and and truthfully we were just we were all having a nice nice ride in conversation. You know we learned a lot about each other a long dry but but it was just casual conversation it was nothing more than that but it just sitting beside me in the back of a you know now a school bus. Was it yeah it was like a four seater caravan kind of thing you know I would say both thirty years ago twenty thirty years ago. I saw him in on the street and he was so so handsome. I almost tripped over myself. He was so handsome and personnel. He's beautiful. I mean he's totally amazing looking and and he's still like a genuinely sweet guy. of course he's very private you know but I don't think his people had any problem with like a bump in his press like the day before he was announcing. Variety of the biggest Keanu Reeves Zero Yeah Brian. We talked about your past in your rise in the illustration world on the show in twenty eleven so I won't hew too closely to that today but one thing I don't believe we covered last time is that your grandfather was a Stonemason who also excelled eldest art and influence your dad's work ethic as well. Tell us a little bit about him and his impact and an influence on you. I come from a really big. family back in. New England and my mother had seven brothers and sisters was really big family and my grandfather tended be quite shy you know at family outings he would tend to go in the other room. He was very quiet and I noticed that when he went into the other times that you know he would be sometimes working sketchbook and things things and and he showed it to me one day and the drawings that he did were weren't necessarily drawing from life for that kind of thing but he would try to recreate a photograph or there's another part of the sketchbook that had add images of the Tarzan Comic Strip you know but he didn't have a really high education so I I also noticed that. A lot of the writing in the sketchbook was my my grandmother's writing so she would actually shared his sketch yeah so but most of it was just her adding writing to it. I never had the opportunity to ask him. Whether or not it was just like a relief for you would just curious about learning how to draw because of course he had to support a family and the majority of his time was spent laying brick building stone walls and things like that while at Chelmsford High School in Massachusetts. I discovered that you won the Gold Prize in the Boston Globe Art Awards in nineteen eighty six and nineteen eighty eight. Do you remember which pieces one I. I doubt that you've done some digging. you know we had to go deep. This is a deep cut right. We've already done surface server stuff before yeah I don't remember exactly exactly the pieces but I do remember when I was in high school. I ended up doing a mural in one of the walls in the high school and it's funny because when I think about that mural there's very specific things within in it that it's almost like it's foreshadowing of where I am. Now in Los Angeles really yeah. It's it's really really strange. I didn't Grow Up Surfing. I didn't grow next to the Russian. I grew up inland but demille wave in it. I'm wearing shorts and a tee shirt. It's you know Jackson like a nice sunset in the background and the thinking when I look back with I don't like maybe I really knew where I was. You know where I was going to end up or something. It's strange to look back on it now to other people that won awards in the same aim competition. I thought you'd be interested in knowing we're Chris Ware and frame Collins. Really Good Company back in the eighties. Yeah Yeah you've gone on record about how your art teacher. Eric Hoover made a huge impression on you back in high school and I was wondering if you could tell us more you said that he was was the greatest influence on your artwork for sure I was really fortunate to have parents who were supportive of my career and that's not the case with a lot of young artists and as a teacher I see this quite a bit with my students but Eric he was great in taking what he saw in my talent in really kind of being very supportive of you know hey this is where you could go this these are these are some of the options that you might have. These are the weaknesses in your work but he did it it in such a such a great way that it wasn't hey you're never gonna make it kind of thing or hey. You got a long way to go. It was more like you should try this. You should look at that. Hey this other person who's a few years. Ahead of you is doing these things and now they're going off to college. Maybe you could explore that and so he he turned on a lot of lights and sometimes in the beginning. That's the best thing you can do for a student. I understand that he not only encouraged you to follow your passion and help you develop confidence in your ability but he also pushed did you every step of the way during the early part of that journey and I was really curious. How did he push you. How does how does it teach her really push a student student in a way that's helpful and not overwhelming now having taught for a number of years. I get a better sense of how to do that. you know I grew up with two other brothers and we're a bit competitive play lots of sports and so there was always that kind of competitive rivalry but that's not the case with every student or young person and I think Eric probably picked up on some of that so he was able to kind of nudge me a little bit harder than perhaps some other students but I think with every student it's different you know and you have to approach it differently and I think a great teacher is someone who who was almost like a like a sociologist at some level or a psychologist or psychologist you know and and and I think and I think Eric you know he stepped in and pushed harder when he saw me me maybe coasting and not trying new things and and then when he saw me kind of pulling back on some things you know he kind of stepped in and helped me nurtured a little bit more in other ways so have you stayed in touch with him. Yeah actually I I reach out probably once or twice a year and so. What were you at that time? Did any other career paths tempt you back then I mean was this always something you kind of knew you wanted to do. I mean I knew that I loved drawing more than anything else. and I don't think I was very good at it in the beginning but in high school you know the goals draws photo realistically as possible right and and the cool thing about in my high school because Eric was you know the the the instructor for a lot of the different age groups in department. You know the levels. There were a lot of students above me that went on to have really really interesting. Careers like a number of students went on to work for the simpsons early on in fact Lance Wilder and John Krause were two guys this who were a few years ahead of me and they did all the background drawing so like for instance the town hall and the Simpsons is based on my town library and really there's like a pizza joint..

Brian Eric Hoover Keanu Reeves Los Angeles Chelmsford High School instagram San Francisco Bakersfield baseball Boston Shoulda Lance Wilder Ted New England John Wick Billon Massachusetts Chris Ware instructor
"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It's an archetype that everyone has kind of visual reminder page times precious. Here's here's Debbie I with a word from our sponsors then her interview with Brian Ray generous support for design matters is provided by AC hotels and and Albert's I love to travel whether it is for pleasure or business or design conferences or speaking engagements. I love to visit places is I've never been before and experience new things. AC hotels by Mary it has been striking the perfect balance of the details. I want when I'm on the road. AC hotels are intuitively designed refined crafted and considered to create an elegant and unobtrusive experience that lets let's me maximize enjoyment inspiration and efficiency the AC guest rooms provide me with everything I need and nothing I don't there uncluttered and truly comfortable letting you live life by design not by default. AC hotels member of Mariot Bonfire the perfectly precise hotel visit AC hotels at AC HYPHEN HOTELS DOT COM to learn more. I felt the difference the moment I slipped them on. They were the most comfortable shoes I've experienced wearing their all birds. They're impossibly soft as if I'm floating on air their cousy like little magic sheep hugging my feet they're beautiful now. I can't stop wearing them and they've quickly become my favorite show and for good reason all birds are designed with just the right amount of everything and nothing they have clean lines in subtle detailing and and are made from premium all natural materials by Z. Q certified Merino wool an F. FCC certified eucalyptus fibers for a person super-sensitive feet like mine wearing them is a treat and Ajoy. I can't recommend them enough. All birds perfect shoes for any style. Get Your own compare at all birds DOT com..

Mary Brian Ray Albert FCC eucalyptus
"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

Natch Beaut

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

"Skin caroline ever and then the other one is tasha uh-huh honored yes. I love their meal oil. Yes good. I also like dermot logic as a pre cleanse. That's really ah good to that. I like because i bring that up because i for years now have been using special cleansing joe. It's a foaming cleanser. There's something about a foaming cleanser. I like like my skin to feel almost squeaky clean when i'm done and people say they don't like it because it feels dry but i'm gonna add a whole bunch of crap on top of my skin afterwards then then we take that squeaky clean clean feeling away but i like my skin to be really clean when i wash it because i want it for for a moment to just breathe and not have anything on it and let everything that's still might be inside start to kinda. Just come out so those are the the two cleansing things then after that you know i go walk around and get my coffee. Go do whatever yeah let let my skin dry off and then i come back and i use a couple pull drops of that la prairie balancing lotion all over and it is just like the best thing ever. It has a light oil in it. Then after i i go to my s. k. two and i use this. It's a little bottle that almost this shape like a beauty blender. I think it's called like gin kaylynn dino look up to hey to my sister. She knows like everything but yes. She's thorough. She even knows your skincare ripped up right now. Okay okay okay 'cause. I've about their essence. I've never used their essences to drying for me now when i say i like my skin to be squeaky cry i don't like my skin to feel draw and i feel like that kind of right really dry skin out but it could just be my type schedule right. 'cause i know people. Love love love that don't okay. I've said on national route several times that to me smells dirty toilet water but you know what to do much to cover me. I'm not afraid of you well. That would be a deterrent for me if it's right to the water yeah but anyway so so s._k. To essence serum and i put it all over my face everywhere they sail avoid areas. I just slather everywhere and then after after that i go to my suwat sue moisturizer. It's like it. It's like it's so expensive like i. I'm at a loss for words to tell you about this because it's the most beautiful cream it's in this gold jar and it's <hes> forget what it's actually called. Gosh gosh f i knew what it is but it has this golden little spoon and you just take a little thing and because you already got all this other moisture all over your skin you jus- excludes all over the jar lasts forever because it's just and really i think that's the way it's designed to be used to because you know applying more isn't always best so i think and then and then that's it and then i use more pacific has a beautiful ice cream that i use and that's it yeah and then we get out our founding. I get out my dealer my bounce bounce it out and for someone who's never tried this the beauty blunderbuss dave how would you describe the coverage. I would describe the coverage as well in cosmetic terms medium to full coverage..

dry skin tasha
"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

Natch Beaut

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

"And i put them in everything nobody used them but it was too soon. There wasn't enough education about blender yet and so people didn't know what to do with it. Then i created this other bag called an airport which is a leather or it's a mesh cylinder lender with a magnet closure that you would just put in your bag again. People still too lazy and aid us no they would put them in ziplock bags which is like you know success. Would you put your. I know oxygen. I mean think about a commodity. It's it's like yeah. No that's see that's healthier than putting air hit it. Yeah i mean so yeah. I've come up with a couple of different iterations but this blender defender is one of my most popular products well. I'm going to have to get get one of those sent to me. I think maybe you would do that. Yes thank you thank you. I think you might have a hookup brand okay. How often should we replace beauty blunder. I know it says three months on the package <hes> and why is that well okay so i am many things yes but i am not psychic. I'm sorry to say clairvoyant tendencies. I don't know why feel you might i do yeah. I got that feeling the sign i'm a libra but i don't know how everybody uses sponge right. Oh look how often right or how they treat it right how they clean it right right how they store it. You know right to their let their dogs chew on like there's all kinds of these surprise. I've seen messages. I i've seen videos they are. My dog would definitely love to play with one. You're not playing vessel expensive over you. Porn stars have a us. Everybody has a us so i. I don't know how you're using right so i have to come up with a reasonable amount of time that will not get me in trouble or not make you feel bad yes and based on the executive my head to make an executive. Yes yes yes so. I had to make this decision and i said okay so i i know that for three months when i'm using them more than most people use because i'm gonna make up trailer on a backlot somewhere working that you know i have to replace it every month so i would imagine the consumer probably does their make up half of that time or even in a third of that time so that's pretty much how i came up with three months and <hes> i believe it's really the right amount of time too because after a while because the material is so so special and if you're you know if you're taking care of it and not using it very much maybe it can last longer you know we can. I can tell you that yeah but if you're you're definitely using it raw diet throwing it. Doing whatever you know like every three months. You need to change because you'll start either seeing a lack of bounce back mhm. Some of the color will start to fade. Sometimes you'll see some splits in the material because if you're not taking care of you know gets pushed around right <hes> so that's why that's why three months okay love that how this is again for what you said the consumer. How often should we be washing shing them and how do wash and can i just say the beauty blender sopa. I've never seen a river of color so satra adron. I mean 'cause i all like oh wash it with this or that and then i use that even under soap and i'm like that's a down nile river a fucking make-up's flowing down my second isn't that shit lee satisfy love. It's like one of those oddly satisfying video. How much crap is in my brush. You know what i mean like. That's the the exact argument. I used to tell people. When i was hawking my beauty blenders beginning they were like well as my brush. I'm like well okay..

executive nile river satra libra us three months
"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

Natch Beaut

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

"Additional fifteen percent resolve everything on their website. When you use my code natch at checkout that's bio clarity dot com use code notch and it h bio clarity. Your skin looks great so beauty blender. I think we'll listen. We all know it took off. There's okay we got to get into some of my questions about the the beauty blender so the term is you wet it. You squeeze you bounce it. That's right <hes> you know. People say like beat the face uh-huh face beat <hes> that sort of came from the beauty blender bounce well beating a face actually came from the gay community. He accidentally came from draft. Yeah you would beat for the back row. Yes that's why you look crazy. Upfront sam close to the same concept of like you have to breath press the makeup into your right right. I've seen videos <hes> when mario's doing kim kardashian's makeup he's like hit. I mean she's a beauty blender. Are you know bouncing. Yes skin bounced bounced bound. I have it is there. I know you've said that. Beauty blender is extremely user friendly. How how hard should we be bouncing or does it not matter. I don't think it matters yes. I think the most important thing that still still after fifteen years today amazes me is that people don't know that they should wet it right which is on my totally different. Private arrived when it's wet soil somebody when you bounce really hard when it's wet. It feels really good when you bounce really hard when it's dry i. I don't know it could feel little interesting so you're saying do not dry dry bounds do not you're saying do not drive drive. That's like doing a deal. I used to dry out so drives. I know i i'm not gonna call him out but i do know people who use their b._b.'s girl family members still don't know they don't pay any attention. They care so okay. I have a question in how damn because kylie likes. Her beauty busters extra wet and we've. I've seen the video she she likes the drip she does so is is that a right or wrong. Is there too much wetness with the bounce girl. Would i literally have the founder here in front of me. I'm asking the questions. Y'all wanna know. I would say whatever works for you however i designed it and created it with the special material cereal that you will not find anywhere else because of the water absorption other materials. You'll you'll find some of my some of my fans dan. I feel like i have a lot of do not just beauty blender fans but like manufacturing fans that like to kind of steal a portion of my market and that's fine because they don't really but and the reason they don't is because in the end their materials are always different. I'm telling you yeah some absorb. Wait too much in. It's like chia pet. It's dry bridge grows really big or it. Just doesn't feel right the pores yours is too big right. Beauty blender has very specific and exclusive material and i want it to be completely wet squaws out to whom.

b._b. kim kardashian kylie founder mario fifteen percent fifteen years
"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

Natch Beaut

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

"Yeah. It was her first show and it was really ahead of its time. I think i think known gone now. There's a lot of shows that want to depict you know a successful career young career girl what they go through in in the world but at the time it was was really you know very new idea and kelsey grammer actually was had enough foresight to really give mara kill brock who's now huge producer. You know the opportunity to create girlfriends and she brought me in and <hes> in high def. It's a again more cost efficient way due to shoot film versus video but the makeup's look different right and that's so wild that girlfriends was the first show shot in hi def. That's such an interesting fact and this has come up on nashville before when i've had some <hes> when i'd carry her to on a makeup artist she was saying that this completely changed changed in disrupted the entire business because now the makeup had to change in order to make up for the cameras well the makeup application had to change make-up's did not change the way you applied makeup and what you thought was a complete look to change you know the in the history of makeup ak- as you may know because you cover makeup you know shooting a sitcom with three cameras that are shooting film are lit very we different than shooting three camera sitcom that is shot in high definition and the way that the film looks is very different and the challenge challenge. Was that makeup artist that worked in television belong to a union our local seven. Oh six shout out. I'm a local seven a six member for twenty years but the makeup artists at that time only shot films so they really didn't understand how to make the make up's look good in high definition because 'cause they didn't have the opportunity to really try where there were other forms of shooting video music video where we were starting to use video before so i had more our experience and i happened to be a union member..

kelsey grammer brock nashville mara producer twenty years
"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

Natch Beaut

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"rea" Discussed on Natch Beaut

"Much. I knew what i had to do because i was also dabbling in acting acting at the time and i needed to have pictures and all that so i i was not unaware of the makeup business. I just didn't ever think i was going to be a part of it <hes> but when i suddenly realized hey i think i can do this. I just started plotting my plan to get a book together and to practice my craft and meet photographers that would let me test shoot with them and <hes> just be able to perfect my craft and that's how it all started and you know my first so it was hard work yeah and then if i said if i want to be honest i mean really what happened to me early. On in my career was i was <hes>. It was very easy for me to meet people. I'm a people person so it's easy for me to just start talking to people so easy for me to to meet you know a producer or a director or somebody that would give me an opportunity but i didn't have the history the background or the resume that necessarily said at this point in my career that they we're gonna hire me to do mariah carey you know so they would give me the guys to do okay yeah. His grooming grooming grooming is a lot <hes> <hes> more correctable say if somebody's a horrible groomer. You really don't know it but these are not going to do a full beat onto pock not at all yes so from what i could tell. He looked like he had incredible scan. I mean just so so beautiful. He was a beautiful man you know but but that's so you have to know your audience right so <hes> yeah so it was easy for me to kind of get in by grooming and doing a lot of men and then you know when i was younger i was kind of cute and they liked me and they would say hey. Let's hire the latina girl is hard that latina girl you know and i would say okay and i would just keep getting jobs and getting the job is a set is a party and you want to invite the people who are going to do fun at the party. It's around yeah i mean i was literally spending more time. I'm onset than i was with my little erica time and it was really distressing for me so i used to bring her with me. She has a lot of stories about being <hes> on on tour or on set with me with biggie with two puck was sean combs with i mean i will hammer with the rapper like i did. Kamini rap videos. You were like the rap emulate. It was crazy. It's so funny fall into a roller category and you're like well this is this is paying the bills. I'm just gonna sale but the great news about the rap videos is that the rappers always wanted women in their videos and those women always had to look beautiful and what what i could offer them was i could do both i could do the men i could do the women just hire me a couple assistance and you will save i could show them early on in their budgets how they would save money by hiring me so that's how i ended up then starting to do women because some of those girls ended up being very famous entertainers in their own right and they would take me with them and then one thing led to another and then pretty soon i was doing all kinds of different celebrities and really. I only done celebrities in my career. That's right yeah speaking of so then eventually you start working on the show girlfriends yes man which just so everybody. Everybody knows if you haven't seen their show. It is such a funny show that it sort of didn't get the the respect or didn't get the audience deserves in my opinion. I'm a huge fan of it so y'all check that show out <hes>. It's a sitcom. It's about a group of women tracy. Ellis ross is one is one of them. It was an ensemble show. It's really funny and a great show yeah..

sean combs mariah carey Ellis ross erica producer director
"rea" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"rea" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Dan rea. Radio. Zayn with Dan rea. WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty. Nightside with Dan Rae is talk to vote, but we are out of the studio tonight. And we're delighted delighted to be here on the campus. Endicott college in Beverly Massachusetts, we're talking about ballot question three Massachusetts. If we're gonna continue along with questions, and I think we're gonna go where Rachel is Rachel. We have a question right there. Please feel free. Yes. I thank you. For BBC nightside. I've listened for about ten years and learn so much. Thank you. My name is Patty. And in the town. I live we have folks Odeen in bathrooms. It's not safe. I would like to say that I have proudly voted no. I just could someone just explain to me why this is safe for women and good for the public. Okay. I think that's going to go to Paul Tucker initiate, Paul. So thank you for that. And we appreciate that. Even when congress Moulton said earlier, sometimes we can have a difference of opinion as long as that opinion is based on fact, and I think that's part of the reason why we're having this here tonight. We should not have out exceptions of who we protect we protect everyone. And when we start taking people out of our community. These are folks that that use the same hotels and restaurants, and health and hospitals and buses when we start carving out that we're not going to protect a certain group. I think society has lost its way our attorney general has put in very specific guidelines of how to handle these issues handle any complaints. She's cleared up a lot of this. And I think that as a police officer for longtime might very very very, first and foremost issue and things I wanna do is make sure that people were safe when we look at a community the police chief of York community. No with bet anybody else, they know the people that live there new and old know the streets when uniformly across the board the police chiefs of Massachusetts from small town. Towns to the largest cities of Boston Springfield in our in support. This is to protect.

Dan rea Massachusetts Rachel Dan Rae Paul Tucker Beverly Massachusetts Endicott college Patty BBC Boston Springfield Moulton York community Odeen officer attorney ten years
"rea" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"rea" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Here comes the night and all the dan rea wbz newsradio ten three better keep it rolling here as we continue to talk about judge timothy feeley we're going to next let me see here we got matt in quincy matt and quincy how are you tonight matt hey danny this is amazing i this is this an amazing story it it just it gets worse and worse i go to law school i'm not sure he was a federal prosecutor for seventeen years so this is not an inexperienced judge in in that in that regard i i don't get it i was trying to find it his educational credentials because i don't know whether this guy is like a liberal elite like did like an ivy league law school stick or whether he's like warren where he went to some dumpy law school and two new divall patrick and just like got a favorite you know what i mean he was nominated by develop patrick in two thousand eight i'm not sure what his what is academic record is it it it doesn't matter but it kinda does it kinda does but i'll tell you this if you worked as a federal prosecutor those are not easy jobs to get and obviously a judge no matter how you look let people say what would become a judge you got to donate to a politician and a lot of guys who a lot of guys and gals who are lawyers who may donate to politicians but they all don't become judges so i i don't get it i've i've talked to people who said gee this guy's a good guy and he treated patriots people respectful guy because he's letting criminal law he's a nice guy that op ed no that was even more of a disgrace reading that thing i mean i like i thought i was reading an article from the dan unbelievable i couldn't believe that was a real article but i guess it was it was in the globe but like that was.

timothy feeley matt quincy warren patrick dan rea danny seventeen years
"rea" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 4 years ago

"rea" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"About the what actually fuck already years all yours menu conversation of the conversation nights with dan rea w the z newsradio ten thirty to the ball i think about this issue oh you more offended but those who would like to who would like to change the english language and goal from norm home pro now owns that we've had for years gender prone announce he did she him in or to see i'm more offended by that then by someone who for whatever reason might want to use a bathroom a different bathroom then he's been biological a you would think that they birth certificate will require let's see what you have to say kevin in cover hey kevin how are you very good them but i just want to call up and say that i have a nice that's going through this right now and then you that's to where the us gender fluidity okay i had i had no idea about it until mouth but as she gets real never savvy from dimension from she says she didn't the white house now i always feel like every day i'm going to prosecute under to fill well i think you know not all have yeah i see i first of all i feel sorry for anyone who feels that way they were they were friends of mine who said you got to look to review nuclear wore within a week so far i haven't checked but since feel of that like news but i i still think we're nuclear wore yet right yeah yeah i think i think a lot of that is fear and i think it should show married to politically what do you think you nice thinks about the the decision by the president yesterday to in this in a sense just to turn this back over to the state since and and he basically said it's no longer a an issue that that we should deal with from the federal got it's not a federal case it's in his opinion it's up to the states yeah that that i'm not sure it's kind of and i told you so there for maybe but i i don't know i i would assume that she rather have them feel.

kevin us president dan rea