27 Burst results for "RCA"

Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning vs. Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady is on

WBZ Midday News

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning vs. Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady is on

"Now WBZ news radio live sports are slowly making their return to the United States in the we're waiting for professional leagues to finalize their plans to resume or cancel we do have this look forward to the match this Sunday afternoon in Florida when former quarterback rivals Tom Brady and Peyton manning will square off in a game of golf with their decently well known partners Phil Mickelson Tiger Woods there's been some trash talk leading up to the charity event and Brady let another bar blues on manning in a chat with bleacher report I'm just worried about them pumping crowd noise in there he starts making putts like they used to you know at the RCA dome so I'm ready to deal with anything that comes up with I think there's a degree of mental toughness that comes into this he'll make his first your shots Brady sees that jab before but still good this should be fun and a nice way to spend party or holiday weekend when the match is aired on TNT

United States Florida Tom Brady Golf TNT Peyton Manning Phil Mickelson RCA
Are We Experiencing a Black Swan Event?

Rich Dad Radio Show

09:11 min | 6 months ago

Are We Experiencing a Black Swan Event?

"This is a trick question. I have to ask you okay. You know what the standard pitch in from people on the world's go to school get a job work hard save money get out of debt. Invest long-term above their festival portfolios talks wants which avoids. Atf's so if you're a financial planner and you've been telling people for the last thirty thousand years. Invest along term and the well diversified portfolios stocks bonds mutual funds and. Don't worry you know the market's always bounce back by the dip is going to be probably a V bottom which means it goes down and comes right back up or a w goes up down and then back up again which it has done over the last. Let's say fifty years so if you're a financial planner and your clients are calling you and you've given them that advise of invested a long-term well-diversified for pulling the plug mutual funds. What do you say to them today? Harry well I I say a financial adviser is going to be more hated than I am. That were passing the end. Up this bubble booms When it happens and and that is true most of the time. But what my work shows and clear the bell clears your heartbeat. Every second generational booms come about every forty years technology surges every forty five and then big bubbles every ninety years when you get east. T- turning points like the late sixties and stocks or the late the roaring nineteen twenty nine stocks or now stocked. Go Down Robert. And they don't get back to those levels for twenty three to twenty five years. I think this time with slowing demographics and the US we may never see the dow higher adjusted for inflation than it is recently so this is not the time to sit through it these type of long-term corrections or crashes after bubbles. They're going to be seventy to ninety percent like twenty nine to thirty two that by the way not small-cap stocks or penny stocks blue chip leading stocks like General Motors Ford and RCA. Back then went down. Eighty nine percent. The Dow and two point seven years can talk until nineteen fifty three twenty four years later to get back to even so when a stockbroker tells you that doesn't understand history. Harry hang on you got to take a breath and so what Harry is saying. Nineteen twenty nine with a crash came if you are holding waiting for the market to come back so in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine dollars at three eighty one. It took approximately twenty four to twenty five years to get back to three eighty one and when I was a kid nineteen fifties when I was growing up most of the people who are part of the Great Depression my parents and the people who are pounded by the Great Depression and the stock market crash. They were never in stocks there so gun shy of stocks and then in my generation the baby boom generation that brought back the Sangala 401k defined contribution pension plans and all this at the stock market took off so the baby boomers are caught pro with the proverbial pants down and now comes the next big crash. Which you've been forecasting for a long time airy so what you're saying. This one might be a long one. Yes because this is the culmination not only of the baby. Boom gigantic is your heading the largest generation history and it wasn't just. Us hit globally to to grow up in earnest. Money which is totally predictable. Average person peaks in forty six for the baby boomers and spending forty seven for the millennials today and then and then decline so. We started to see that declined to name her. This is a rich audience. Like me a little slow. We gotta speak a little slower. So what you're saying. Is that when a person hits forty six? That's when they're at the peak. Earning and spending and millennials is forty. Seven is that what you're saying. Yes the average. The average person for more fluent people college educated professionals. It's more like in the mid fifties but still average forty six so baby boomers if that peak collectively in two thousand seven something. I predicted like twenty some years before that. And we've been just what we went down big big crisis worst since the Great Depression but not as bad because they printed so much money to stop it and we've been living on quantitative easing ever since to make up for these slow down in this generation spending. That's simple and we're not coming out so let me so. Let me go back again. So let's talk to you. Know My generation. The boomers you know. What would you say to them? If they bought that they drank the KOOL aid. Let's say they have a 401k on IRA one of those things are Roth IRA. They've they've they've seen their portfolio per se. Go Up and now it's crashing. What advice do you have for them? I mean how do they do? They stay in or they exit. We don't give advice rich TAB. I WanNa hear your advice. No you get the hell out period. I think he may have one more. Little run left could be a couple of months. Could be a couple of weeks because the feds pumping in more money than ever with the Repo crisis and now the Krahn advisors but I think this is the death knell for the stock market. They can print money to stop. A recession stopped banks from failing companies from failing even stocks from crashing too much normally. But they can't stop this virus from spreading and it just kills business businesses. Stop people stop. Traveling people start stop spending. I mean my wife's not going to a of of women stay over tomorrow night. They're all coming in from New York you know. And she's you know she made the virus and she's over sixty like I am and that's what it hit. Its old people like you said earlier. So so this is something. They can't buy with money printing. They have kept this following far beyond when it should've peaked in two thousand seven and now they've got something that this doesn't work on so I think this is it so you have to get out of the way so Harry. I was talking to this young guy. He was He's a laborer. Was Painting parts of my house and he says you know. I bought a house like you told me to back in two thousand eleven you bought it for like I think hundred thousand and the reason round numbers and now it's three hundred thousand and he has no retirement is what should I do. I said I saw my house I went. I don't once again ladies and gentlemen at Rich Dad. We don't give financial advice and I definitely couldn't advise US guys. Only forty got three kids. He's got a job. Painting houses got no snow stocks. You and I are calling for twenty five year possible. Depression long-term deflation. What do you say to people what you because if he sells he sells his house? I sit where do you go? What are you going to do with that money? Let's say you have two hundred thousand dollars. I gotTa Pay Capital Gains Tax on it. What are you GONNA do any? He was clueless. I I got some simple rules Robert. I had become a bubble experts since the tech bubble crashed and early. Two thousand on top of demographics and technology and all these psycho because we are in a bubble era and the last bubble era we saw the roaring twenties. So nobody's lived in a bubble before and real estate was not the bubble back then. Because you couldn't borrow money so easily against housing back is very difficult so now. It's everything the rule for. Housing is real quick bubbles. Go back to where they started that that house if he bought it at the bottom of one hundred eleven and now it's worth three hundred K. My rough estimate is going to go back to near that level if he's comfortable sitting through one hundred eighty nine thousand potential decline in something he probably has a mortgage against maybe some home equity lines that he went on deck that fine. I think anybody with any brains would say oh no. I don't want to sit through that one in by the way The demographics I've got a new real estate model. That doesn't just project peak spending like other consumer categories. I have to subtract the dyers and guess what baby boomers are now dying unprecedented rates and will continue to do so into two thousand thirty nine or forty that takes down the net demand even takes it negative at some point for real estate so homes are never gonNA appreciate like they did this boom even in the next boom so it's better especially older. People who retiring lot of baby boomers are realizing they didn't say per retirement. 'cause they're living in good times thought they didn't need to and now they're saying. Oh wait a minute though might make mansion which I don't need now that my kids are gone. I can sell that instantly. Fund my retirement plan and rent my retirement home. I think that's really excellent vice. Do that

Harry United States ATF General Motors Depression IRA Rich Dad New York RCA
Electronic Television: The TVs of The Future

American Innovations

09:23 min | 8 months ago

Electronic Television: The TVs of The Future

"We are. Currently I think a lot of people would say living through the golden age of television in terms of the quality and the quantity of shows that are Out there you are scholar of the medium and scholar of the technology itself. I'm curious what you see. As the connection between technological psychological breakthrough sort of happened and the development of the actual content that we see on those screens. You have any thoughts on that we could start at the current moment right. I mean in terms of the way in which networks are producers have to respond to both kind of changing industrial conditions like the challenges to traditional networks new distribution services how streaming services actually changed the way that not only is content delivered but then what kind of genres actually seem best within that context and so often I talked to my students about you. Know How do they view. What do they consider intimate viewing and so it both is about the actual genre the kinds of formats and the programming? But also. Oh it's about the technology itself so they'll talk about how viewing on an IPAD is more intimate for them and that they pick particular genres to view in that intimate context so dramas that they have to concentrate more on our things that they would watch on their IPAD. Things that they watch on big screens are things that they want to watch. What their friends traditional television network programs sitcoms like a good place Game of thrones of course because they WANNA have all the sort of detail of the screen. So it's a combination of both the viewing practice the screen itself and then the kind of industrial and technological conditions. The moment my son was watching for a while wilde his my oldest son this so this is appropriate. It's not like he's seven was what was watching. Game of thrones on his phone and I was like that is just a terrible injustice to visit experience. No you can't do that. You have to see a lot of excrete and then eventually came around. But the other thing that I thought about a lot is the ability to both binge-watch but also to re-watch right but kids today forget I mean when when I grew up on fifty one when I grew up we didn't have VCR's even much less streaming and so things just aired pretty much once and then there would be like a rerun in the summer and that was it you would get two passes at it and you had to watch it. You couldn't posit. You can do anything like that and so it put a ceiling on the complexity of the kinds of stories. You could tell because people could only take in so much they couldn't go back and re watch it again to figure out what happen right. What's you could tape something and then once you could stream it will once you could binge-watch it suddenly the kinds of stories? You're able to tell really got more complex. Yes absolutely I mean I think think about lost as this kind of transition moment to about like how they even. I don't know if you remember when they tried to do reruns of lost and they had to put captions on the bottom him to explain how the what would happen before because people couldn't kind of remember it was seen as such a complex narrative and it just didn't work in reruns right and so that would not be a problem now so you can tell these kind of very complex stories but it's fascinating to me that kind of toggle between different attention levels so some the students to where I just had my first class yesterday of the semester and they were talking about how often it's difficult for them to only watch something on their screen that they want to also so you know chat on their on their phones or whatever and so that. They put in sort of safeguards for particular programs so that they will only watch and so they're capable of doing that right. It's now these various contexts. Viewing we have all sorts of sizes and types of screens for viewing. So I think that's not just a new thing and so thinking of the history of Color Television in is also related to those kinds of issues chain so I want to make sure we go back and talk about the history because we were just immersed in early days of what was effectively black and white television television than Farnsworth was working on. TV The next big breakthrough after that is really colored TV. And you've written about this. At length was the first kind of most most promising attempt to what was the first hint that colored. TV was coming. Well it's interesting because color. TV was always the development was kind of running alongside black and white but it was a more complex technology to develop you know just to manage the various technical aspects it would require eventually a larger bandwidth and it just was also also more difficult to manage and control to get color right severi early on it was sort of seen as this is a maybe a novelty that will eventually become something that is what what everybody watches. It's the eventual place. We're going is color because that would be the full sensory experience yet. Black and white would probably be the first standard and and so we have a moment in late twenties where we see demonstrations of color. John logie Baird in the UK. And Herbert Ives at Bell Labs and the US demonstrating color player and people being very impressed with it. So that's kind of a big moment Like a successful color television system reporters are writing about it and so it's what year period of seven hundred eighty nine. Yeah so color. I'm just thinking about color. Film is like wizard of Oz. That stuff is thirty. Eight thirty nine. Yes but so really. The history of color film people will talk about how it's really always had colored handpainted color film and so forth so again that was always we've seen is that would be the complete experience sound color movement rate for both mediums. In a way. When do we start to see things? That aren't just kind of science. Experiments elements where people are actually like they were building actual sets in their starting to talk about how we could get these into consumers homes. Well there's a period in the forties it starts with the competition four four. What would become a working color television system? That often was talked about as a practical color television system that could be commercialized really intensified and that's when RCA starts it's getting involved in it too about Amir's workin starts working on it as well as CBS well in there becomes this sort of competition there's other inventors and that's of course I'm sure you talked about with black and white televisions not just one in bitter right. It's this kind of complex story about patents and industrial competition and individual inventors and inventor's that are working for major companies and so that happens with colored television as well but we also have World War Two. That breaks it up Chris. Paul and so it's not not until the late forties early fifties that we start to see the industry getting together to start coming up with a standard and so various companies are competing to be the standard tendered for us color television so the first commercially available color TV sets show up in the fifty in the fifties. There's a brief brief moment were CBS's. I awarded the standard and then it goes to RCA WHO's the parent company of NBC so NBC starting in Nineteen Fifty Three. They are the only network. That's really taking color as this. Is Our project. This is our brand. Eventually that's why they have the peacock rate as the funding the logo and and it's also point of identification. Of course that this is brought to you in living color was away for you to know that you're missing something. This program in particular is in color Unusually it was some kind of spectacular. Something that you would actually want to see in color and then the reviews were all describing it like oh this Peter Pan Spectacular. It's only really worth it if you you were seeing it in color. Because they of course gave color TV sets to all the reviewers as well and they were different places in the fifties where RCA placed color TV set so that people people had exposure to it because color TV sets were around two thousand dollars when their first release in and quickly went to like five hundred but still in there. What's out roughly in? Oh I don't know the translation a lot and so the black and white sets which has only gone in the market in the late forties and we're just starting dissemination. Were more like two hundred right so they were already a big item color. TV was a big luxury so that was seen as a high end luxury items. You had to be sort of an early adopter to maybe do it. And you had to have a reason as a consumer to really want to see it right as you were just getting used to black and white and this was part of the discussion to consumers had just been sold. Black can wait television. And then these color systems were coming out and sew. CBS did not have a compatible color system. Which is color system that you could transmit in color and would be picked up also at black and white and so that was some of the issue and NBC made this kind of public interest argument? That people had just bought these sets. Why should they now make? Those was useless. So we're developing a compatible color set which was allowing you to do it either way you can broadcast in EP of black and white set. That's great it'd be of color set. You can pick it up and color in terms of the content pioneers Disney. Did some early influential work with color. Right he was one of the typical were Disney. He was one of the early adopters the format so that was that the wonderful world of Disney. That was I called the wonderful world of Colored Disney had been working with ABC in the fifties and then they moved to NBC purposely for color. Because they're yes. His Ni saw himself as a if you could go back and watch the first episode sexually available on on Youtube and he presents himself and the studio as a an innovator in all these different ways I we brought sound to film than we were the first with animated films films to bring color and then now here we are and we're bringing teller to

NBC RCA CBS Disney Colored Disney John Logie Baird Youtube Herbert Ives Farnsworth Bell Labs UK ABC United States Chris Peter Pan
Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

American Innovations

05:26 min | 8 months ago

Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

"It's nineteen thirty. The world is stuck in the early stages the great depression many Americans lift their spirits at the new moving picture shows in theaters and nickelodeon 's Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin comedies. These films are often introduced with Mickey mouse cartoons or newsreels one newsreel in particular dazzles the audience with the promise of soon bringing these new moving picture shows into their very own homes presents. A backstage preview television the newest miracle of modern Electrical Engineering Mr penalty shown shown at the right is working on the image dissect to photoelectric camera. Tube of his own invention that distinguishes his system of television from others. It is said to be responsible for the most clearly defined television pictures placed in the second of this receiving system is a funnel shaped cattle due the round flat surface of its bulb becomes the picture screen in Studio Monitor. It does it as well. As in home receiving sense the image detector Tube and the Cathode Ray tube are the heart and brain system. Television Vilo Farnsworth's image to sector tube and camera system had finally brought the long anticipated picture radio into being station equipment. The electrons become radio impulses to broadcast and picked up by receiving sense where the routine is with us. The radio impulsive becoming points of light that appear on the screen as picture thirty pictures. I completed every second. These earliest television programming was live performance music and sound accompanied. The OBAMAS was action both visible and audible elements going on the air in perfect synchronization battling with the speed of light to amaze of tubes and equipment. The show leaves the station send the towers viewed by the television public and audience as yet small and comparatively ignorant of the research and experiment. That makes it possible rush to see and hear people many miles away watching this newsreel in the movie theater. The audience is intrigued but sceptical. The most fanciful dream of mankind is day startling reality destined to become the world's most popular science in one thousand nine thirty in San Francisco. Two years have passed since Filo funds worth with help from his wife. Pam Gardner and her brother cliff triumphantly showed off off a working prototype of electronic television. Violence picture was on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle under a headline that called him a genius is name was being being mentioned in newsreels magazines journals and the Associated Press but he hadn't yet found a manufacturer to partner with so financially files fortunes agents hadn't changed Penn gave birth to their first son. Filo T farnsworth third the previous year and a second son. Kenny would follow in nineteen thirty one but now a curious envelope in the days male brings a new possibility. You got a letter here. Filo says it's from New York I can't believe. RCA is offering one hundred thousand dollars for the image sector would. That's wonderful that exactly pam they want to own it outright i. It's not ideal but one hundred thousand dollars is a lot of money. Not compared to what television will eventually be worth. It's a mistake to cash in too soon like this. We have to keep the faith. I understand. Filo it's your invention that's Pammy. It's not it it never was. It's it's all of the great minds that have come before to make this possible. And it's you it's cliff. All of us were a team but they wanna buy our work and call it. There's it's just not fair. They can license it if they like. I've spent my entire life working towards this Pam. It's like it's like trying to sell one of our children. The Lord will provide Filo a a few weeks later. The farnsworth's receive another big opportunity with visit to the lab from United Artists. The Film Production Company was Silent Age Film Stars like Charlie the chaplain. Douglas Fairbanks D W Griffith and Mary. PICKFORD PICKFORD is especially enthusiastic. We just had to see this amazing new television system. We've heard so much about it. But when the time comes the image to sector won't cooperate Filo is rattled. I I'm sorry folks. This is humiliating million chaplain smiles. Don't sweat it. I've seen worse like Douglas's latest picture a few hours later. After the stars leave cliff finds the problem on a wire wasn't plugged in it. Was that simple Dan. How did I not see that Pam tries to reassure him? Mary Pickford was here. We were all a bit distracted. It did keep the faith Filo when a third opportunity knocks a few weeks later Filo is determined to answer the call this time. FILC who radio in Philadelphia. They they they want to license the Patents Fund our research. But it'll still be ours with some help Vilo at Phil Co so in Philadelphia moving from the bay area to the city of brotherly love. What do you think it sounds great? And so the Farnsworth family packed packed their bags with their belongings precious equipment and board a train to head across the country to Philadelphia Pennsylvania. His family counting on him. Kylo could only pray he was making the right decision.

Filo Vilo Farnsworth Cliff Filo T Pam Gardner Mary Pickford Philadelphia Charlie Chaplin Pickford Pickford Buster Keaton San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Nickelodeon Obamas New York Pennsylvania
This Console Cost the Equivalent of $758 in 1977

Covert Nerd Podcast

05:47 min | 11 months ago

This Console Cost the Equivalent of $758 in 1977

"The Atari video pinball system I think it was a Tari pit video pinball C.. Three sixty I think is the full name and it was released in nineteen seventy seven but we got this one. Probably in seventy eight seventy nine maybe even eighty but I was looking back at this is is the way it set up. Have pictures in the show notes. So you the listener can go check it out. But it basically is a big block of the plastic and it has a dial on the top and then it has two little push buttons on the side for your pinball games because it was a pinball game basketball ballgame and then break out or pong. Excuse me break out. And then Pong too and you use a little side buttons as flippers for the or the pinball all game and then the dial in the front used for breakout in then it ran and it was color but the most insane thing is is that Iran on six exte- batteries six at sea batteries. Yeah yeah let that roll off. The tongue see batteries. It didn't plug in and I remember we'd always have to replace stupid things with the batteries and you win. It started running low on batteries. The lines on the screen started to get blurry a little bit and kind of Fade in and out and you hooked it up to your TV and it was done through the antenna system because back then they didn't have hd Meyer higher even the RCA. Jack You just had this antenna attachment that would kind of you. Had these two screws on the back of your TV you'd loosen them up and put these little wires underneath and tighten. Tighten it back down again. And that's how hooked up and it was color but way we had it at our house is the Nice TV was upstairs and it was color and the downstairs had an old black and white. TV So we didn't even had color for for this system. Sometimes my parents would let us bring it upstairs and play with it up there. But so so the seven video games at a had were four pinball pinball variations basketball game in two versions of breakout so breakout had the little paddle at the bottom. And then you knock out all the little color tiles at the top and the I don't remember much about the basketball game I just remember the pinball and the break breakout by far are was the one that we we played the most. But I don't know if you've ever seen this one randy before her heard about it. I've heard of it but I've never seen it. I've never used used one. I've never seen one in the wild super interesting I. I'm so surprised that it runs on batteries. No definite it's that's so weird but this is one of those like it's Kinda what Nintendo does anymore. It's one of those. The controller is the console. Guess where the controls patrols built right into the console. That's that's very interesting. I it is like we you or Or a switch and I didn't know about the is cool that it's has pinball and it's got the buttons on the side for the flippers. That's fun yeah. It's in research like we were saying earlier. There are a lot of systems like this. That didn't this is before the days of the cartridge. So you put all your games in one big block unit and we primarily had this on the floor in front of the TV. So you Kinda lay on your stomach car. You might sit and put it on your lap and use it that way and that's us the buttons. There's some buttons on the Front. You have five different buttons ones reset select elect option power and then ball served so when you did pong or breakout you hit the little button and then the ball comes down and you start playing then as how how that worked so the the guts of it your your calculator. Your watch probably has more world than this thing but it was. It was our first system. I was probably five six years old at the at the most when we got it and so for me it was like well. This is really cool and I grew up in the in the country out in Nebraska. So we didn't have an arcade nearby and so this was. I'm surprised my parents bought this. Actually I'm shocked and yet because the kind of had a pong market back then but this kind of came to an end of course when later on the Atari Twenty six hundred came out and you could more more than seven games on system and the cost for this. I was researching this. So the cost for this back in seventy seven on one website said it was isn't one hundred seventy nine dollars which would be seven hundred and fifty eight dollars in today's dollars. Imagine your parents spending almost eight hundred bucks or even now spending spending seven hundred fifty eight dollars for a game system that only played seven games seven games so yeah there's no Expanding the library there. Wow that's insane I. I was just shocked when I ran the numbers on that as a website. You can go to plug in the year and it will you put the dollar amount. It tells you what that is valued today but seven. Let's see systems like playstation four and Xbox or what four ninety nine. I think we're based system. I think so. Yeah I one hundred bucks. This is two hundred fifty dollars more than just so. When I heard that I saw that I was like? I'm sure my parents pigs except year or two later so probably wasn't quite that but it was still still a lot of money and I think the thing that of course this thing is the style gic for me so of course I'm probably is not that great of a system when he kind of look at it but at the time and that your first system you kind of like Whoa. This is cool. I I have no plans to buy this. You can buy it on Ebay and other places. But I don't know we don't even have an antenna hookup. You'd probably have to get some sort of adapter to make it

Basketball Iran Ebay Nintendo Meyer RCA Nebraska Seven Hundred Fifty Eight Doll One Hundred Seventy Nine Dolla Two Hundred Fifty Dollars Fifty Eight Dollars Five Six Years
"rca" Discussed on The Brink

The Brink

11:54 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on The Brink

"Sports officiating in a way you haven't before you'll hear from some of the most influential people in sports and the perspective perspective on officiating and how the rules impacts the way to play sports aren't your thing. We'll even take a crack at breaking down some everyday every day. Life Fools to trust me. There is something here forever. Listen to good calls on apple podcast on the iheartradio APP. Wherever you listen to podcasts. We're going to get some ugly stuff Yay Kaz Sarnoff. It is a sort of take-no-prisoners kind.

Kaz Sarnoff apple
RCA @100 with Tim Sarnoff

Talking Tech

05:28 min | 1 year ago

RCA @100 with Tim Sarnoff

"Whether you're an established name a brand new startup right. Now has a television this listen to the radio. <hes> has played a record. Well thank R._C._A.. For that or C._A.. Is a name that many of us older folks oops remember. They were so dominant the <hes> the company was started by David Sarnoff. I am sitting here with Tim Sarnoff David Sarnoff grandson to talk about the legacy of R._C._A.. which is now a hundred years old? Tim Come a little closer to me and just re just spit out some of the multiple dimensions that came from R._C._A.. Well R._C._A.. Back in nineteen nineteen was really focused on radio and what was important about radio radio in one thousand nine thousand nine hundred and it's hard for people to sort of grasp a world without it but before radio the only way you got news was through either the newspaper which was mostly local newspaper or walking not driving. I'm walking to the nearest town and the average person only walked one day away so the news you got was as close as one day aways walk and frankly when radio came along it brought the world to everyone so significant invention initially was to bring the world to everyone's living and between Nineteen nineteen through nineteen twenty six that was sort of haphazard until N._B._C. was created under our C._A. and it. It was the first network to bring the news from all over the world into your living them R._C._A.. Sold the first radio had the first network that actually spawned the set on the second network which was A._B._C.. That's that's true. It was <hes> the red network in the Blue Network and then a year later was C._B._S.. <hes> so there were three dominant networks there were a number of them that came up and disappeared over fifty year period but those were the three that basically were maintained until cable came along and had the first TV well R._C._A.. During that time in Nineteen twenty-three started developing the T._v. with his work and on the side were a number of other inventor inventors. There was Farnsworth who was inventing a version of of <hes> electronic T._v. and all of the functions of those inventions had to be culminated into a business so the real invention of T._v. wasn't the T._v.. Itself but the business to actually manage the T._v.. The broadcast system that had to be set up there was an antenna that was put up on the Empire State Building that was the structure of creating call letters and times for the <hes> stations to actually not interfere with each other there was the advertising system television was more than just a box television was an industry industry and R._C._A.. Spent about fifty million dollars from nineteen twenty three to nineteen thirty nine to develop the first television business and then there was records and record player well yes of course C._A.. Had acquired through Marconi Tony Victor talking machine and Victor Records and they also owned R._C._A.. Music Label R._C._A.. Also was very much focused in newer high technology so when the tube which was probably one of the greatest inventions. Inventions of the twentieth century was vacuum tube and that allowed all sorts of other inventions to occur until silicon chip came along and the semiconductor in the second half of the twentieth century and it was able I'll bet enabled everybody to miniaturize all of the pieces of the electronics so that you could fit an entire world of electronics inside a small box during the thirties and forties after television was starting to really really become a reality for the rest of the world are then spent a disproportionate amount of its treasure about one hundred million dollars to create color television to add little fidelity in reality to television system and even in the sixties sixty s when television was ubiquitous across pretty much everywhere the notion of trying to slimline the television by creating a liquid crystal display rather than having it in a tube and the notion of trying hi to transfer with fiber rather than just over the air and the notion of setting it up on satellites rather than having it go terrestrial. We're all focused as R._C._A.. From the fifties sixties and early seventies and then G._e.. Bought R._C._A.. In the eighties and today day R._C._A.. Is a memory for many of us even though the brand name is owned by technicolor. You'll talk about that in a minute but what happened what happened R._C._A.. Why did it fall apart well? It didn't fall apart. It was acquired. It was acquired by G._e.. And and what G._E.. Acquired was R._C._A.. And all of the companies owned underneath the banner which included N._B._C. and Hertz rent a car and banquet foods and say records and R._C._A.. Records and <hes>. Patents thousands and thousands of patents for inventions that are C._a.. Had created over the first half of the century and there were <hes> many people who still thought of R._C._A.. From what what it was which was sign of quality and invention and there are many

Tim Sarnoff David Sarnoff David Sarnoff Blue Network Victor Records Empire State Building Marconi Hertz Farnsworth Tony Victor Technicolor One Day One Hundred Million Dollars Fifty Million Dollars Hundred Years Fifty Year
R. Kelly's Sexual Assault Controversy Hasn't Impacted His Royalty Earnings

The Frame

06:27 min | 1 year ago

R. Kelly's Sexual Assault Controversy Hasn't Impacted His Royalty Earnings

"Friday, the singer and producer R Kelly was arrested on ten counts of aggravated sexual abuse. He posted bail in his due back in court on March twenty second after several women shared stories of Kelly's sexual physical and mental abuse in the cable series surviving R Kelly his record label RCA said that it was parting ways with a singer yet Kelly is still making money for his music in a recent article enrolling stone music business writer, Amy Wong cited a Nielsen report that shows are Kelly's music streams had nearly doubled in the days following the surviving R Kelly premier when we spoke Wong explained why dropping in order to the modern streaming age is not so simple. So it goes back to this peculiar nature of the way. We listen to music nowadays in the CD era. You supported an artists by buying their physical CD or even itunes you would bite digitally. Now, you stream it which means that they're getting your attention positive or negative. So if for instance, you were someone who hasn't listened to R Kelly in ten years, you saw the news, and you're sort of just curious what is Kelly sound. Like, I forgot what was his big song and you streamed at you're actually unintentionally making money for our Kelly because those royalties are being paid out bias dreaming service like Spotify. And then when the labels splits with an artist, they don't really just get out of business entirely, right? They're still deals. They're still publishing. The artist is still making money through the label or the publishing arm is that right as well. Yeah. That is right. So in the streaming era, it's a little bit tricky to say that you actually dropped an artist because there's no consensus on what that actually means previously. If you drop to artists, it would be the end of their career, they might not ever get any money again because no one will release their music. However, even our Kelly never releases any other music in the future. He's still making money off of what's called the back catalogue. Which is the music is already released from RCA that is now on streaming services, which will continue to be streamed profited off of swollen obvious kind of comparison would be a publisher who says they're not going to publish works from a novelist that novelists has maybe a dozen books at the publisher bookstores call up and say, we need another one hundred copies, and they send them off. So they're not working in the future with an obelisk. But they're still selling books as record label would sell streams or Buzek publishing or even CD's. That's right. Yeah. And the sort of the problem with the idea of dropping someone you can sort of applaud record label or publisher for that matter and shea they're doing the right thing. But ultimately, it's more of a virtue signal than anything because they're saying they won't do something that future while maintaining that prophet string from someone's past. So before any of these new developments happen Spotify. Last year took our Kelly's music and the music of XXX and Tasio from its playlists and received a lot of criticism and backlash and Spotify. Later, retracted, those removals, however music platforms trying to figure out what they can. And should do with artists like R Kelly, and how are they trying to enable listeners to be able to limit access to artists like R Kelly. It's a really tricky and unique situation what Spotify did which was attempt to do something very well intentioned. So they wanted to not support our Kelly, but it came off as, you know, Spotify saying that they want to judge people on their moral character, regardless of everything else. So what they did. Instead recently was they launched a mute feature in beta, which means that a user can go through and click mute on any artists. They don't want to automatically plane playlist doesn't mean that the artist is disappeared. That means that I'm using Spotify. And his name is on a certain playlist. I pick it will just skip that song. His name will still be there, and I can still find him if I really need to. But it'll just skip automatically coming into my ears. So that's one way of sort of getting around it. However, the bigger. Shen is whether streaming services should be taking any sort of stands outside at distribution. Which is what they reportedly do a record store, for instance, in the CD era would never Donelly decide that they don't wanna stop the person and then make a huge judgment at none of the people to buy that CD anymore. So the question is should Spotify. As ticket keeper be doing that sort of thing. So the labels doing that sort of thing or should anybody at all be putting a moral spin on what people listen to. I'm not sure there's anything morally wrong with a private business saying, we're not going to stock are Kelly's music in record stores are streaming services and by that extension. I wonder if the record label was really willing to wash the towns of art Kelly could they suspend every part of their business with him or their contracts in place that they would run afoul of in an artist contract. Typically, there are a number of albums, especially for big artists that are planned for the future. For instance, our contract may have said, you know, we still expect three. Albums in the future. And in that case labor would have had to pay a certain amount of money. Traditionally to artists to sort of let them go from the contracts that may have happened. We don't really know the terms of the deal, but what's clear is that money has changed hands. Somehow if artists let out of a contract or like, go from one. So you're right. It is mainly at the end of the day. It's a financial issue for the labels for the publishers and for services like Spotify who have to weigh that with the idea of corporate responsibility. Which is another issue that has been sort of bubbling up in the last year or so. Wanted to could he do it himself. Could he start somehow his own streaming service? Release his own music independently assuming that he's not convicted and going to jail. He actually if he wanted to release music independently which is the beauty and the curse in many ways of the modern streaming age because it's so easy to put out music and get it distributed through a do, it yourself distributor and just sort of get it onto Spotify or apple music on a medically like that you don't actually need to go through a record label. The question is whether anybody will listen to it or whether you would be able to build up an audience without the resources record late for provides, which includes of course, studio time marketing all those resources that artists typically get as per no record deal. Just why record labels are still important. But of course, if you're someone is big as our Kelly, you might just have the money yourself and be able to do it. So if he does release music that'll be an interesting question for this nurse because they'll have to be making an active decision to go. Listen to our Kelly.

R Kelly Spotify Kelly RCA Publisher Amy Wong Producer Buzek Publishing Nielsen Writer Donelly Shen Tasio Shea Apple Twenty Second Ten Years
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"So a big question, you might have is you know, I started this all up by saying RCA is celebrating its one hundred year. So what is it what what is actually left? What is what is celebrating its one hundred year the company which had ballooned into an enormous and troubled conglomerate in the sixties and seventies has been through so many different sales spin offs and mergers that there's no longer and RCA company. There's no longer an independent company called RCA the name RCA still exists. The brand still exists. It is a trademarked brand today. The owner of that trademark is the French company technicolor essay that was the one that used to be known as Thomson the company license, the the name RCA to other companies that wish to use it on various products. So that includes a RCA records, which I mentioned is part of Sony Music RCA telephones and RCA projectors a company called telephone uses those RCA audio and video and our CEO. RCA accessories are both licensed by vox international. That's v o x x RCA televisions. Licensed by on corporation of. RC computers, which is licensed to American future technology corporation. You get the idea like there's there's the brand the name still exists, but the company doesn't so to say that RCA is celebrating its one hundredth year is I think a little misleading maybe more than a little misleading because the company itself hasn't really existed since one thousand nine hundred eighty six it's interesting to see how a company that was so instrumental in very important moments in consumer electronic history, like the development of color television could ultimately whittle get whittled doorway down two to nothing. Really? But I thought I would cover this because it was a fascinating story, and it has had such an important impact on various parts of technology. Our next episode will not be so deep and and grave a subject as. As the one hundred year history of company were instead going to look at a popular video game. And how it got so popular, and it's story until you about four night. That'll be the next episode. Hope you guys enjoyed this one. If you have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff get in touch with me the mail address for the show is.

RCA RCA company Thomson Sony vox international CEO whittle one hundred year
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"And at that point once GE takes over you could argue that the end of RCA RCA is no longer an independent company is now part of GE and more than that. Jesus starts to make some pretty big changes over the next few years they begin to merge departments. So they begin to take RCA departments and merged them into existing GE divisions. Or they liquefy parts of our CA and sell it off and one of those divisions. That did this with was of Astro elect electron IX department that was the the company or the part of RCA that was specifically focused on space technology GE would merge. That department with its own space systems division, and thus created the GE Astro space division, but this was not meant to stay on as GE property forever. In nineteen Ninety-three GE would sell off this entire division to Martin Marietta which turned around and merged with Lockheed, and that's where we get Lockheed. Martin in nineteen ninety-five lucky Martin announced it would close the Astro electronics division facility and that finally happened in nineteen ninety eight. So that part of RCA is no more it. It ended years forty years of research and development and space and communications tech out of that facility. So that was just part of it. You would get to a lot of other spin offs here. GE would sell off a lot of what made RCA the company that it was and it would also spin off other divisions like NBC became its own sort of autonomous unit instead of being. Connected to what RCA used to be in one thousand nine hundred eighty six GE would sell off RCA records to Bertelsmann. So that company would become the steward of RCA records, which was formerly RCA Victor. And remember Victor was a company that even was older than our CA in nineteen eighty-seven GE would sell NBC radio to Westwood One. And it would hold onto the NBC television networks. So the radio network would be sold by the TV networks stayed behind selling off the radio networks was one of the conditions. That GE was forced to meet in order to get approval from the United States government for the acquisition. Then a g would also sell the RCA name, the consumer electronics brand essentially to a French company called Thomson Brandt. We'll get back to that. In just a second in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight Sarnoff labs that was the RND. Arm of RCA was funded. For GE for several years, but then GE would transfer Sarnoff labs to the nonprofit organization, SRI international. It's another organization, I should probably cover in a future tech stuff as SRI international. It's a scientific research institute. It's based in Menlo Park. California originally it was founded by trustees from Stanford University in the nineteen forties. In fact, SRI stood for Stanford research institute, but the organization formally parted ways with university back in nineteen seventy anyway by two thousand eleven Sarnoff labs had become fully integrated as part of SRI international. So it does not exist as its own independent thing anymore in two thousand four G E would merge NBC with Vivendi, Universal entertainment in that created in B C, entertainment, but GE would remain the majority owner at that point also in two thousand four Sony Music and the Bertelsmann music group or BMG would. Merge together and that brought RCA records under the umbrella of Sony. Interesting side, note Sony is also the parent company of Columbia records. And if you remember from my earlier episode Columbia records and RCA were fierce competitors in the early days of records. Now, they're both part of the same overall company as for as the Japanese Victor company that was part of RCA for awhile that actually had split off decades earlier it split off from RCA during World War Two for obvious reasons. It was operating in Japan, and we were at war with Japan JVC has a record company called Victor entertainment. This one's still uses the logo of the dog looking at the gramophone, the the one that's titled his master's voice and two thousand eleven Comcast would buy controlling interest in NBC. So it's no longer part of GE. Comcast has. Is it as an enormous conglomerate?

RCA RCA GE RCA RCA Victor NBC SRI international Sarnoff labs Victor entertainment Comcast Sony Martin Marietta Astro electronics Martin Westwood One Lockheed Japan Stanford University radio network
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"He switched and saved a bunch. So it all worked out. Aren't roped in nineteen eighty-five. This was a monumental year. Because it was the year when GE would make the decision to acquire RCA, although that acquisition wouldn't be complete until nineteen Eighty-six and the deal was for six point four billion dollars. Now, this this meant that this was the largest ever acquisition or merger business deal. That didn't involve an oil company and the history of business at this point is since been clips, obviously, but in one thousand nine hundred six a six point four billion dollar merger between two companies that were not oil companies that was a record breaking moment. And it came in a time when RCA chairman Thornton Bradshaw and RCA CEO Robert r Frederick had managed to get RCA on a profitable track. They had managed to sell off these businesses most of them. Anyway, that didn't make any sense to our. As core business. They're able to refocus our CA they were able to make it profitable NBC was doing incredibly well toward nine hundred eighty five and had started to win awards for its programming and starting to to get more viewership things were really looking great. And on November six nine thousand nine hundred five after having a meeting with the board of directors Bradshaw would go off and meet with a guy named John F Welsh junior who was the chairman and CEO of GE at that time. Now, if you've been listening to all of these episodes, you might remember GE was one of the founding partners for RCA. In fact, it was the principal partner way back in nineteen nineteen GE owned most of RCA for many of the early years until it was forced to divest itself because the US government said you can't do that anymore. However now are in the eighties. This is the Reagan era when the US government was less concerned about things like. Nop elise. And there was a very Lhasa fair approach to corporate politics in corporate acquisitions, this was the era of hostile takeovers. But you might wonder if our RC was doing so, well, why was Bradshaw? Willing to entertain this deal. If RCA is actually on the right track. Why go with an acquisition deal in the first place. No part of the problem. The Bradshaw was the culture at the time. Because like I said, this was the era of hostile takeovers. So there was always a fear that someone would end up creating an environment where they would approach shareholders with the deal that was too good to refuse. And then take over the company the only that but RCA had two billion dollars in cash because it had divested itself of all these other companies and also found that it had been overpaying the pension fund. So there was actually extra cash leftover because the pension fund had more money in it than it needed. It also meant that if a company came in out or some investors came in and a. A huge amount of money to acquire RCA. They could done leverage that two billion dollars in cash to pay off any debts and more problematic than that parts of RCA were really really valuable. In fact, it was thought that if you were to divide up our CA into different pieces, you can make more money selling those individual pieces off to different companies than you would if you just operated our CA as a full company in itself. In fact, Bradshaw had even looked at offloading. Some more of our CA at one point he had looked at the possibility of selling NBC to Disney, but eventually Bradshaw realized that RCA really needed in B C the revenue NBC was bringing in was too important to RCA's business. So he couldn't really afford to divest itself. So the two companies GE and RCA happened to have some divisions and departments that clearly complemented one another our. She had done a lot of work for the navy and G had done a lot of work for the army, so bringing the two companies together would create a more unified approach for military contracts that kind of thing so after some debate RCA's board met and agreed to GE's terms..

RCA Thornton Bradshaw GE NBC chairman and CEO Bradshaw US chairman CEO Nop Reagan partner Robert r Frederick army John F Welsh principal
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"So this was the man who had largely been associated with our C A. In fact, a lot of RCA's history tends to get tied directly to David Sarnoff. And his personality. He was a force to be reckoned with and his passing was probably one of the more remarkable things to happen to our C A during its full. History. It seems to me like this was a case of another leader of a company having an extreme influence on hell that company did business. You know, some leaders you would think they would have an extreme influence, but they may just help keep the company going while other people handle stuff, they might be more decentralised Sarnoff did not come across to me as that kind of person. Also in nineteen seventy-one RCA would get out of the mainframe, computer business. They sell it off to another company called universal automated, computer, better known as univac, and ultimately this computer business was unprofitable for RCA the sale represented at a huge loss for the company. According to some sources, I read mostly the New York Times it amounted to essentially a two hundred fifty million dollar right off, which wasn't great news. And in nineteen seventy five the board of directors. Decided to aalst Robert Sarnoff as chairman and CEO they felt that the attempts to diversify RCA had weakened the company. This this decide this exit from mainframe, computer business, also hurt the company. So this was essentially what some people referred to as a palace coup came from within the company itself and RCA president and chief operating officer Anthony Conrad led this coup attempt. Anthony Conrad I joined RCA way back in nineteen forty six after being discharged from the army after World War Two and had worked there ever since he had made his way up the corporate ladder and in the nineteen fifties. He was the executive in charge of overseeing RCA's missile and space tracking operations. And now he was the head of the company he became the new CEO and in June nineteen seventy six he was elected chairman RCA's performance was starting. To turn around. The company was beginning to make money things seem to be on the mend. However Conrad turned out to have some skeletons in his closet in September nineteen Seventy-six just ten months after he had taken control of the company Conrad announced he was resigning his position and it turned out. He had kinda sorta failed to file any income taxes for five years and the IRS kinda wanted to talk to him about it because the agency had held a routine enquiry and saw some irregularities. So Conrad would end up settling up with the IRS. He was essentially a fugitive in New York state for two years until he was able to reach a plea deal in which he paid a one thousand dollar fine. But also an undisclosed but presumably sizable amount of money in back taxes interest and penalties. So after he resigned a guy named Edgar h Griffiths took control of our CA Griffiths was concerned with getting RCA back on. Track from a numbers perspective. So he wasn't so much of a leader. As far as strategy and long term plans goes he was trying to get the numbers to lineup. So he began to divest the company of many of the subsidiaries that had been accumulating throughout its history since Robert Sarnoff had taken control stuff, like a, banquet foods and Hertz rental cars. So he's kind of trying to undo what Robert Sarnoff had done in nineteen eighty Griffiths directed RCA to purchase another company. So he sells off a lot of companies, but then he directs RCA to acquire a different company. This would be commercial investment trust or CIT and the deal was for one point three billion dollars or thereabouts a huge sum CIT is an investment company. And as the name suggests it provides financing to other companies after acquiring CIT RCA would sell off several subsidiary companies that had belonged. Two CIT including an office furniture manufacturing company and the greeting card company, which just tells me corporate, politics are weird and complicated. And I don't understand diversification. Very well. Anyway, this acquisition caused RCA's credit rating to drop and that made the board of directors vary upset so they demanded that Griffiths resign, and he did and in nineteen Eighty-one..

CIT RCA Anthony Conrad RCA David Sarnoff Edgar h Griffiths Robert Sarnoff chairman and CEO CIT president and chief operating New York Times New York IRS Hertz two hundred fifty million doll three billion dollars one thousand dollar
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"Company to RCA corporation also in sixty nine RCA and CBS would ignite a new feud. If you listen to the previous episodes, you know, that are CA and CBS fought several times in the forties. They were battling to define the standard for color television. Now in sixty nine just at the dawn of the nineteen seventies. They were competing to try and create a new technology for home video playback. This would be a device capable of playing back video. Media on demand at home sort of a precursor to the VCR, and then later still to technology like DVD players and Blu Ray players the CBS version debuted I actually debuted in sixty seven I think, and it was called the electronic video recording device or VR for short. RCA's approach was originally called the SV hollow tape later, the company would dub it these Selecta vision, which gets really confusing because RCA has used Selecta vision for a few different products over its history. But CBS's version was further along than RCA's when RCA debuted. There's in fact when RCA showed off this technology. It was not yet able to play sound it was showing video, but it was all silent. There's no soundtrack to go along with it. The process of mastering a tape for this system was actually really cool for for RCA's. It actually involved. Lasers and holograms, but RCA would experience some financial difficulties as it was trying to develop this technology further. Those those financial difficulties were largely due to RCA trying to extricate itself from the computer mainframe business. Ed gotten into in the sixties, and meanwhile, while RCA was trying to weather that storm another video technology, the VCR came out and pretty much made both the EV are from CBS and RCA's Selecta vision moot. They just couldn't compete against the VCR. And it would automatically mean that RCA would abandon its attempts to market the holiday as a consumer product. So it never really launched as an actual thing. You could go out and buy. In one thousand nine hundred seventy David Sarnoff would retire as chairman of the board. Although to be more accurate. He was really in the late stages of a long term illness. And so he was affectively removed. As chairman, I don't get the sense that he chose to step down so much as he was forced to also in nineteen seventy RCA announced a -nother plan for another acquisition. And you remember they had already talked about. There are bought the Hertz rent a car and Random House publishing. So what was it this time? Well, it hits close to home for me. Actually, they bought that industries. What was coronet industries or what is it? It's a carpeting company a flooring company. So again, this was another effort for RCA to diversify its holdings, and this acquisition would officially complete in nineteen seventy one. Now, I said it hits close to home. Whether I mean by that. The headquarters for coronet industries was or is in Dalton Georgia Dalton Georgia's in the northwest part of Georgia. If you ever drive through that part of Georgia, you will see numerous billboards for rug and carpeting wholesalers, and yeah that so I actually was surprised to hear that RCA at one point owned that company. RCA would eventually sell this off in nineteen eighty six to see I Holdings Inc. The we'll get into that. Because when I say RCA sold it off. I don't really mean RCA that's a that's a hint for things to come in nineteen seventy as well RCA would also by another company that made people scratch their heads. This would be banquet foods, the company that the time was most known for its TV dinners and frozen foods RCA would hold onto this for a decade, but sell it in nineteen eighty and due to the efforts to diversify. By and the fact that there didn't seem to be any rhyme or reason for the types of companies that RCA was going after some people inside the company felt like RCA was losing focus. I mean, what did RCA even do anymore? It's core. Businesses used to be electronics both for consumers and for business to business as well as for government and military uses. But now now it had a rental car company at carpeting company in a frozen food company. Some people began to joke that RCA really stood for rugs. Chickens and automobiles in nineteen seventy-one David Sarnoff passes away..

RCA corporation CBS David Sarnoff coronet industries Dalton Georgia Dalton Georgia chairman Hertz Ed I Holdings Inc Random House
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"The other side of the world RCA would partner with NASA to develop whether satellites and ground based observation station. So they were really becoming. Ng an instrumental company in the space race as well around the same time RCA contributed some of the equipment that would make up the United States ballistic missile early warning system or bemuse B M E W S. It was a system of radar facilities and communications channels meant to detect an alert the United States to any sort of missile launch originating, particularly in the Soviet Union because this was taking place during the Cold War between the USSR and United States, and it became particularly important in the wake of the Soviet Union's launch Sputnik, which wasn't just a satellite. But also a demonstration that the Soviet Union was capable of launching a missile that had a long enough range to potentially strike the United States. So if the Soviet Union were to say attach, a payload of nuclear warhead to such missile they could. Enthusi- have a nuclear strike against the US. So the United States went to have a system in place in order to detect any potential missile launches from the USSR RCA would produce a radar set and a communications data processor for this system. It also relied the system that is relied on equipment from many other companies not just RCA companies like General Electric, western electric, and Silvani a- also contributed components to this. So while RCA was prominent in the minds of consumers looking for television sets at home, the company was also working closely with government and military organizations in the United States in the nineteen sixties RCA dominated in the television camera industry. The the consumer television industry going out and buying a television set that was really competitive, but RCA was pretty much the name in television cameras for actual TV studios. The TK forty four had become the Indus. Standard and on the consumer front color television. Sales were starting to pick up in the early to mid sixties by nineteen sixty six the overall color television market was around three billion dollars a year. Now, that's for all color TV's. Not just the ones that are CA was making. So we're talking worldwide sales reaching three billion dollars hefty, but not anything close to what the television consumer market is today. Obviously now at the same time the company was participating in larger efforts to develop new technologies and one of those was the stereo eight four Matt also known as the eight track tape. This was a form of magnetic tape storage specifically for audio and music. It was largely designed for in car audio systems. And honestly, it probably merits its own episode of tech stuff. I should probably do a full episode of tech stuff about the development of the eight track for. Matt, particularly since some of the people involved are real characters. One of those would have been the legendary Earl madman months who was an important and eccentric figure in consumer electronics in the forties and fifties and sixties as well. Anyway, prior to the eight track Goldmark that was the brilliant engineer who had been a pain in the butt to our RCA's as David Sarnoff back when they were trying to race against CBS in developing color television, and the thirty three and a third RPM long playing record Goldmark was the guy at CBS who developed both of those will he also developed a hi fi car system a system that would allow you to play recorded music in your vehicle, not just rely upon the radio something that is pretty standard in vehicles today. But it was brand new back. Then now, however gold marks approach rely. I'd upon vinyl records. Yep. You would have a turntable in your car instead of cassette player or CD player or digital radio these days. So as you can imagine this was not ideal. Because if you went down a bumpy road. It would start sending this needle skipping all over the record. And so you would get terrible experience that way, you know, the the song would skip around or you'd have this horrible scratching noise..

RCA Soviet Union United States Matt NASA General Electric Goldmark partner CBS Enthusi David Sarnoff Earl engineer three billion dollars
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"So RCA got a relative late start in the field of transistors and solid state electronics and semi-conductors because they had focused more on using vacuum tubes. In fact, in nineteen fifty RCA was the largest manufacturer of vacuum tubes in the world at that point. Now is the even built an experimental television with transistors as. As early as nineteen fifty two. But this was again, an experiment not meant as a consumer product in nineteen Fifty-three. An engineer named Cohen built a wrist radio that quickly got the nickname the dick, Tracy wrist radio. After the comic strip character, dick, Tracy who has an iconic wrist radio device that allows him to speak with his supervisor. Now RCA did not build this device. Cohen wasn't working for RCA. However Cohen did use some of our c- as transistors to help power and operate this device. So RCA actually got a nice boost in publicity because everyone was really excited about this risk radio. It seemed like the thing of the future of the gadget of the future and the late nineteen fifties RCA began to design and manufacture components for satellites. So this point solid state is ready to go, and they're now looking at creating a satellite technology, specifically they were looking at radio communications. Technology in satellites are CA started doing some preliminary research and development in nineteen fifty seven and they created a dedicated division for that purpose. And eventually, they call it. The RCA Astro electronics division actually got the official name in March nineteen fifty eight now in turn this particular division was under a larger department called the RCA defense electronic products because our C A was still very much in the business of designing components for defense systems for the military. They had been doing that since World War Two. The company's first satellite to launch successfully was called these signal communications by orbiting relay equipment or score is the acronym for that. And that entered into service on December eighteenth nineteen fifty eight RCA was kind of exploring the possibility of establishing a network of satellites for the purposes of global communications, and that would really. Begin in earnest in nineteen sixty two with another communication satellite called relay relay would relate communication signals between North America and Europe and between North America and South America, so quickly. It was theorized that with a an appropriate number of satellites in orbit. You can have global communications and just use the satellite surrealist signals until they got to wherever you needed them. Go the relay communications satellite also worked in conjunction with another satellite called the Centcom three and the two satellites together where able to provide live television coverage of the nineteen sixty four Olympics which were going on in Japan over to North America. So that was an amazing development being able to watch stuff live with only a a slight delay really as they were going out on.

RCA RCA Astro Cohen Tracy dick North America engineer Centcom defense systems supervisor South America Olympics Japan official Europe
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"FM and AM transmitters and receivers are not compatible. You can't have both in the same radio set. If you have a receiver it may have an FM receiver and an AM receiver, but they are two separate receivers. They're not it's it's it's not a compatible technology again because you're looking at different modulations, and you're looking at different sizes of radio waves as well. So in nineteen forty RCA says, you know, what this FM thing makes less sense to us. Now now that we're really looking at it that we've got deal to make with you. And they present their Armstrong with a really attractive contract. He would get a cool one million dollars which in today's money. Around eighteen million dollars. In return RCA would get a royalty free license to use his FM patents. It was supposed to be a non-exclusive deal. However, so RCA would not get the exclusive rights to use this. They just wouldn't pay any royalties on anything they earned and in return Armstrong would get this one million dollar fee. However Armstrong had already made arrangements with other companies to license his patents, and they had to pay royalties on everything they sold anything that made use of one of his patents. He would get a little cut of it. And he felt like if he signed this agreement with RCA, it wouldn't be fair to these other companies that had to pay him every time they sold something. If RCA didn't have to do the same thing. How is that fair? So he refused. He said, I'm sorry. This deal's not gonna work with me. And that ticked off Sarnoff to no end. So Sarnoff directs is a genius to work on FM. Check of their own rather than license Armstrong's work and give them royalties. He says forget it. Let's just make our own FM tech and the company starts develop systems that they claim do not infringe upon Armstrong's patents. RCA then took another step casare enough isn't pleased with just trying to sidestep Armstrong. He wants to punish Armstrong and the company begins to encourage other companies to not license Armstrong's patents. And other words, cutting off our Strong's source of revenue because Armstrong's not making radios himself. He's licensing his designs to other companies. And now RCA saying, oh, don't do that. He we've come up with our own FM transmission stuff, don't bother paying him for this stuff. So Armstrong goes in sues RCA NBC and he's pretty confident. He's going to win right off the bat. But. The legal proceedings lasted much longer than he anticipated and the expense drained is personal finances by nineteen fifty some of his patents had actually expired. So he couldn't even really leverage those anymore and the lawsuits were continuing. Meanwhile, his mental health was deteriorating. They felt strongly that he was being cheated out of his money and the credit for his work. And what's worse? This mirrored something that had happened to Armstrong earlier in his life. He had worked on an invention that he felt he was responsible for that. Ultimately, the credit went to a different engineer. So he felt like this was happening all over again in the winter of nineteen fifty four after having driven away his own wife. He he actually hit her during an argument, and she had left him to leave an live with her sister Armstrong decided to end his own life. He jumped out of the window of his thirteenth floor apartment and landed on a on a bow. Johny ten stories below and died. He had a suicide note in his pocket. The expressed his deep regret for hitting his wife and for his actions and Sarnoff would shrug off any responsibility. He might have played Armstrong deterioration. He said, I didn't kill Armstrong. Now. Armstrong's wife Marian took over the case on behalf of her deceased husband and she pursued it with determination and the end of nineteen fifty four RCA and Marian Armstrong reached a settlement. The amount was said to be around million dollars, which was the fee RCA had proposed Armstrong and return for the royalty free. Use of the patents. Pretty tragic story now before I sign off. I should also mention that at the same time RCA was working on technology. That was not meant for your average consumer. I've been focusing on the consumer tech because that's the stuff..

Marian Armstrong RCA RCA NBC Sarnoff engineer eighteen million dollars one million dollars one million dollar million dollars
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"They don't go well together typically so in order to avoid overheating RCA chose to make the TK forty cameras silver, though, it reflects some of that light away from the camera. This is after some enterprising camera crews had done a DIY approach and taken silver paint and coded earlier. Prototype cameras in silver paint to deflect some of that light to to make sure that didn't get too hot. And RCA took a note and decide to make that an official design point these cameras also had what are called Lynn's turrets. If you take a look at old school television cameras, you'll see that they appear to have four lenses poking out of the front of them. That's actually a lens turret it's kind of a disk that has different lenses mounted on it. And then you can turn the disk. So that a different lens is actually active. So the whole purpose of this is to create different focal lengths of of lenses rather than having to physically remove them. And swap them out. They were all mounted on the camera. You could just change whichever one was active at a given time. So the common setup on one of these lens tarts was to have one eight and a half inch lens one one thirty five millimeter lens one ninety millimeter lens of one fifty millimeter lens, and I gave the camera operator and director, some odd. Options to choose the focal point for specific cameras in whether it was going to be a close up or a wide shot. They could choose whichever lens. They wanted to us. Now, it was possible to change lenses during a live show typically you would do so by switching to a different camera. And then changing the lens on camera one while camera to his active, but this was pretty uncommon usually they would just set the lenses for whatever shot they wanted. And that was what it was gonna stay as RCA had introduced lens turrets with the older black and white television cameras. This was kind of a holdover from those days now once light pass through the lens of one of these color cameras. It would hit a beam splitter. Then that would divide the light into three beams each of those beams of light within hit an individual orthodox con to non the previous episode when I was talking about black and white TV's talked about a special component called the economy scope, which was in charge of taking light having it hit a photo electric bass. Then using an electron beam to scan it and that would send out the signal the Ortho. Con was the successor to the scope it used a low velocity electron beam instead of a high velocity electron beam the economy scope used the high velocity ones, but the problem with that was that it would sometimes produce secondary electrons. So you would get quote unquote noise in the signal the Orthon used low-velocity electron beams which would not create these secondary electrons. And again, it would use it to scan a Photoelectric mosaic on a special plate inside the tubes. The lights hitting that plate the electron beam scanning the plate, and that's what's creating the signal. So in this case, the light comes into the camera it splits into three beams and each being goes into a separate Ortho. Con then you can guess each of those cons was dedicated for a specific representation of color, red green or blue and these cameras would then. Send that signal out to be a transit transmitted over to the color televisions? They were large cameras they are relatively primitive. They required lots of adjustments and tweaking to keep them tuned to the proper colors, but they worked and the most important aspect of this whole approach was one of practicality that was how RCA was really leaning into this technology. The CBS color television was incompatible with the older black and white sets as I mentioned. So the CBS approach meant that you were going to have to go out and buy a brand new very expensive television said if you wanted to watch this new programming, and you would have to have an older black and white set if you wanted to continue to watch all the programming that was made just for black and white televisions. So it was not a very attractive technology to consumers it you weren't able it wasn't backwards compatible as we would say in the in the video game console age..

RCA CBS Lynn official director Orthon
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there in welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland haven't executive producer with how stuff works iheartradio and love all things tech. And before I jump into what is going to be the main focus pun intended for this episode. I want to mention something about RCA because we're continuing our story bell RCA and something that happened RCA nineteen forty eight that was the year that Howard Hughes would by controlling stake in our KO pictures, the motion picture company and also theater chain RCA had purchased a theater chain and created our Cao's specifically in order to get a foothold with its optical on film sound system. So if you listen to the earlier episodes of our CA, you remember they went so far as to create an entirely new film company in order to establish. This technology will that being done now in nineteen forty eight. They no longer saw necessary to keep this motion picture company around and sold off the controlling interest to Howard Hughes, someone that I should probably do a full episode about in the future, but that is one complicated cat right there. Anyway, in nineteen forty nine David Sarnoff the man who was the general manager. And then the president of RCA would then become the chairman of the board of RCA the Elsa remained on as president of the company. So he had unprecedented control of RCA and Sarnoff. You may remember had a bit of a reputation of being something of a control freak someone who really wanted the company he worked for to excel and he greatly resented. Anyone who appeared to stand in the way of that? Well and the previous. Upset the most recent one I talked about how RCA was a pioneer in consumer electronic televisions, and how the US government forced RCA to spin off one of its to NBC radio and television networks, which would become ABC. Also, remember CBS the third of those of the the big three networks in the United States actually grew out of a talent agent's failed attempts to get his clients booked on NBC radio shows, so we are now in an era, and which we have three broadcast giants NBC ABC and CBS and NBC in ABC both came from the same company CBS came out because no-one NBC would hire. This guy's talent. Interestingly so television is slowly starting to pick up, and as I mentioned at the end of the last episode RCA would push a new innovation in the early nineteen fifties, which was colored television. But RCA wasn't the only. Company working on color. TV CBS was also very much in the game. Both companies had been experimenting with color TV strategies since the nineteen forties. And it was a CBS engineer who seemed to win at least at first. Now, I want to chat about this for a moment as well. Because the system that this guy made was truly amazing and it was dependent upon peculiarity of human biology. We have what some people refer to as the persistence of vision. This is the same thing that makes animation work for us animation, or or film, if you're looking at a real film, you know, like sewing this actually posted to photographic film is just a series of still images if we play those still images back at a fast enough speed, we perceive what appears to be movement. Even though if you were to slow it down enough you'd see it's just a series of still images. There's no actual movement happening. The human eye and brain can process about ten to twelve separate images per second and can retain an image for about a fifteenth of a second..

RCA CBS NBC Howard Hughes David Sarnoff US ABC Jonathan Strickland executive producer president general manager chairman engineer
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"Fifty lines. So RCA shows of this technology in nineteen thirty nine the company also broadcast. The first televised baseball game on may seventeenth nineteen thirty nine. It was between. In Columbia University and Princeton. I don't know who won. I didn't look it up. But it was all done on a single camera, which I imagine created a somewhat limited affect for watching it on TV especially considering that at the time you needed a whole lot of light to get a good picture on these on these televisions because the cameras were limited early television. Broadcasts were tricky in general, the camera technology like I said required a whole lot of light to create a strong enough signal to send out to TV's and a lotta light meant that television personalities actors newscasters that sort of thing they were all pretty much exclusively white people at that time, they would appear washed out on screen because they had so much light on them to deal with that the actors would often have to wear dark makeup frequently green makeup, it would show up better. And remember all TV's at this point are black and white sets. So. No, one knew that the people were all green because they're seeing a black and white image of the actors newscasters at cetera would often also wear black lipstick. So that their lips would actually be visible onscreen early. TV sales were a little slow. The nation was still climbing out of the great depression, and it wasn't expensive new technology and another event meant that the entire industry would be put on pause for several years and that little event would be World War Two. Now, if you listen to my last episode, if you haven't you should you know that the first World War was what led to the formation of RCA in the first place World War Two would slow down the consumer electronics business, but RCA wasn't put into mothballs and storage. They weren't struggling. Instead, the company opened up the RCA research laboratories in Princeton, New Jersey, and for years, the company had relied upon its close association with General Electric for our D. But now it could pursue its own research with its own facility with I think one hundred twenty five scientists when they first opened up and much of that early research would be dedicated to the war effort on the part of the United States are CA would develop a smaller version of its icon a scope for the military. The iconic scope was the television camera tube that Zora can had developed. So I describe how the cathode Ray tube worked in a effort to display images the account. The scope was how these images were initially captured to be transmitted to a television. And it's an element that has a particularly peculiar shape. It would be inside the television camera. I've seen the shape referred to as a barrel shaped bulb and an angled neck and there were a couple of different versions of the scope that did not take that particular shape, but most of them dead. I do not think I can adequately. Describe what this looks like I don't I don't think it's within my powers of description. So I suggest if you are interested in seeing what these things look like because they're kind of funky. Looking you go onto an image? Search and look for icon of scope, I see in O S C O P E because they do look pretty unusual. So they consisted of a few parts. One part was called the target. This was the area of the iconic. Nope. That would receive the focused light coming for the camera's lens. All right. So you've got a scene in front of you. Let's say that it's a news seen. There's a desk a news anchor. You have very bright lights shining on that scene. And that light is some of that light anyway is traveling through the camera's lens, and it gets focused onto the target the targeted self has an array of photosensitive dots on it or pixels. If you like, and they would end up generating a different voltage based upon how much light was hitting them an electron beam would sweep across the target the electron beam is generated by an electron gun. That's in that angled neck, I had explained about just a minute ago. So you get this proportional. Current flow from the dots based upon how much light is hitting them and the electron beam sweeps across this, and then it would send this signal out through to an amplifier for transmission to television receivers that would then reverse this process..

RCA Princeton Columbia University Zora General Electric New Jersey United States
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"And EA's on-demand. See details at turbo tax dot com. Okay. We got a jump back to the nineteen thirties. Now, we went ahead a little bit to talk about the thirty three and a third versus forty five rpm speed wars that stretched all the way into the late nineteen forties. Back to the nineteen thirties in nineteen thirty two under pressure from the United States federal government. The partners that formed. Our CA all jumped ship at issue was the monopoly like status that RCA enjoyed as both an operator of radio stations, and as an arm for these various companies to develop and sell technologies. So in other words, the government that had created this monopoly now fell the maybe things have gone a bit too far because remember the United States made this monopoly, they encouraged it. And now they were saying well, this is getting a bit uncomfortable. So General Electric Westinghouse and AT and T also their interest in our C a to the new company and be. Am a independent company called the RCA corporation. David Sarnoff would remain in charge of this new independent company. RCA was a pioneer in another big consumer electronic category, which would be television RCA had employed Vladimir's, Oregon, the television developer who had fought for the title of inventor of television untitled that most people would give to his rival Filo Farnsworth Farnsworth. I demonstrate electric television back in nineteen twenty seven can however had worked with a guy named Boris Rausing in Russia who had been working on a similar experiment more than a decade before Farnsworth demonstration. But Rusling's work had not really reached a level of sophistication interesting enough for big business at the time. And it was crude by comparison to farnsworth's invention Sarnoff with hires work into head up a division and RCA to develop electronic television technology with the goal of creating a consumer product in the future. Now as a whole RCA would invest around fifty million dollars into this project, which is a princely sum today. But remember this was back in the late twenties and into the thirties and forties that was a truly gargantuan sum of money back then and it shows how Sarnoff the man who had proposed the radio music bucks before becoming the head of our CA could see how the future of an entertainment might unfold, he he was convinced that television would be the next big thing after radio, and you certainly could say he was absolutely right now all of that work that this investment would bring about would get shown off on a very large stage. The nineteen thirty nine world's fair in New York City RCA demonstrated the electronic television system there and broadcast. The first televised address by US president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt that same year RCA would pay Farnsworth some licensing fees. To use some of his patents and RCA began selling television sets. They're pretty darned small the picture tubes. Measured five by twelve inches or twelve point seven by twenty five point four centimeters..

RCA corporation Filo Farnsworth Farnsworth RCA David Sarnoff United States Franklin Delano Roosevelt General Electric Westinghouse Boris Rausing Oregon New York Rusling AT president Russia developer Vladimir fifty million dollars four centimeters twelve inches
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"To make payments on their radio sets because a lot of families were buying these things on credit. They would end up. Paying for the radio say their families that would get rid of other luxuries, but they would keep that radio because it was such an important element of home life. They were not ready to dip in and buy a whole new piece of electronic equipment. They didn't have the money for it. They didn't have the interest in it. They would rather just stick with the thing. They already had. So the economics just weren't there for RCA. So the company ultimately abandoned, the thirty three and a third format when Columbia records was ready to debut its technology more than a decade later executives reached out to RCA to see if the company would want to license the technology and build its own thirty three and a third turntables, but David Sarnoff who you'll remember from the last episode was the very strong willed guy who was in charge of RCA refused. He did not like the idea of conforming to someone else's standards. Particularly since RCA had tried to do it earlier. Instead he would push RCA to market its own disk format which would play back. Forty five revolutions per minute. And thus another format war began the speed wars. RCA would sell seven inch disks that would play back at forty five rpm and Columbia focused on twelve inch discs at thirty three and a third rpm. This took place in the late nineteen forties and by nineteen fifty after seeing several artists leave RCA to join Colombia, the company finally gave up and began to create its own thirty three and a third rpm long playing records, the forty five rpm disc would become the favourite format for singles and juke boxes. So it wasn't a total loss RCA still made money off of its format. It just did not become the standard. I have a lot more to say about our RCA, and it's innovations, but first, let's take a quick break to thank our sponsor. Guys. Let me talk to you a little bit about turbo tax live. I don't know about you. But for me, nothing really cranks up my in Zion, easy, like tax time. I'm always worried I'm going to do it incorrectly..

RCA David Sarnoff Columbia Zion Colombia twelve inch seven inch
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"So that was a pretty primitive approach, but it was how some early talking pictures were made including the first one the jazz singer, which debuted in nineteen twenty seven RCA photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film. Some actual photo reactive film. The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There was a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The wits of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound. That was record. Id onto the film. So essentially if sound that's transmitted into a microphone, it is turned into an electric signal which in turn is used to treat this this federal to film. So that it has this record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form if you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on a audio editing software. So then when you're playing it back. You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip. And you have a photo sell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell, and that signal goes to a pre amplifier, which can then boost the signal strength. So it can go to an amplifier. And then ultimately speakers the lamp for reading this optical sound. And the photo cell are not in the same position. As the projection lamp, though, it just get in the way. So. This is actually it creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running a little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon the method that was actually used so in playback, it's all synchronized because if you as you put the fell through the right type of projector. The audio track gets read through the audio system at the same time as the video or the film rather the images are being projected through the projection lamp, and I'll get synchronized together so in playback, synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector, then you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is the audio. You're looking at would not be the audio that occurs in synchronisation with the image. You're looking at the advantage of that approach was..

RCA
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"And you can file your taxes and know that you're doing them correctly their tax experts are there when you need them. So you can file with complete peace of mind. Turbo tax live with CPA's and as under. Amand? See details at turbo tax dot com. The acquisition of the Victor talking machine company met that RCA was now getting into the consumer electronics business. Keep in mind up until nineteen twenty nine are see was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was -ffective -ly industrial equipment. But now RCA owned the company that had created the icon Vitrolles machine, and they created a subsidiary company called RCA, Victor that company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor company, which is also known as J V C also in nineteen twenty nine Arcadio radio. Pictures released a film called syncopation which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham, Bell that was also called photo phone now, this was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronization. Sized visuals and audio in other words away of making talking pictures and the formation of archaic pictures at self is a great story that ties directly into our history of our CA. So the development of the RCA photo phone technology date back to the early nineteen twenty s there was a man named Charles a husky who was working on recording audio to photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created our CA. Now hawks these work, and that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures, but just recording audio in itself, but by the mid twenties General Electric was thinking about applying hawks he's work in the direction of talking pictures. Now, the desire to match sound to moving images dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge. And a lot of different companies were taking various approaches. To this problem. So for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called vita phone vita phone, you would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to in L P record when you're ready to play the film. You would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the disk..

Victor talking machine company RCA Japan Victor company General Electric Charles Warner Brothers Amand CPA Victor Edison Alexander Graham Bell
"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"rca" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there in welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer with how stuff works and iheartradio in the love all things tech. And while I was preparing for CAS twenty nineteen which I am getting ready to to travel to as I'm recording. This. I'm agreeing list the Friday before I jump on a plane and head out to Las Vegas, Nevada. Well, I read a lot of emails from a lot of different companies, and they're all attempting to entice me to go to a particular part of CAS to see their booth or their presentation, or maybe even to a hotel suite off the exhibition floor because you know, some companies will rent out a suite of rooms rather than secure exhibition space for lots of reasons. That's neither here nor there. Anyway, one of these companies the ones that sent me these emails was our CA, and the thing that really caught my eye is that in twenty nineteen RCA. Is celebrating its one hundredth anniversary RCA has been a really important company in technology for lots of different reasons. Not just consumer tech and RCA is responsible directly for two of the big broadcast networks in the United States and indirectly is responsible for the third. I thought I would explore the history of this company and what it's been through during the century of its existence. So this is the first episode where we're going to talk about the formation of RCA. But of course, this also means that I'm going to be doing a lot of backtracking because while RCA which was an initial ISM originally for Radio Corporation of America. It would become an established company in nineteen nineteen the history actually dates further back. So we've gotta talk about some other companies and some politics and some other big issues that would lead to the formation the founding. Ng of RCA. So let's go back to the eighteen hundreds in the late nineteenth century invention and innovation were rapidly. Changing the world you had the industrial revolution. And it had altered the way we do work at impacted the price of goods things became cheaper. Because it was easier to make a heck a lot more of just about everything people had more time on their hands. And at the same time, you had engineers and inventors who are experimenting with stuff like electrobi- and magnetism and radio waves.

RCA Jonathan Strickland executive producer Las Vegas Nevada United States
Sony’s RCA Label Parts Ways With R. Kelly

WBBM Programming

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Sony’s RCA Label Parts Ways With R. Kelly

"Flights are Kelly and Sony are parting ways billboard reports the R and B star in Chicago native signed to jive records at the beginning of his career in the early nineteen nineties and then jive became part of Sony. BMG Kelly has been under contract at RCA a Sony subsidiary since. Two thousand twelve the business. Break-up comes on the heels of a lifetime network documentary series, which alleges Kelly has committed acts of sexual misconduct on women on Wednesday people against Kelly protested outside Sony's

Sony Kelly Bmg Kelly RCA Chicago
Sony Music reportedly drops R. Kelly

24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Sony Music reportedly drops R. Kelly

"Was denied Sony Music is reportedly cutting ties with controversial Aren P artist r Kelly's been accused of sexual abuse by multiple women allegations. He denies a source tells variety that RCA Sony will dissolve it's working relations. Ship with Kelly who hasn't had a release on the label since two thousand sixteen earlier word that Kelly's former manager Henry James Mason, surrender to thirties in Georgia today. This after a warrant was issued for his arrest for allegedly making terroristic threats against the family of Jocelyn savage. The woman's parents say their daughter has been brainwashed by the singer and is

R Kelly Sony Music Jocelyn Savage Sony Henry James Mason Georgia
Kevin Mckenzie Bazo, Sony Music And Sony discussed on Fred and Angi

Fred and Angi

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Kevin Mckenzie Bazo, Sony Music And Sony discussed on Fred and Angi

"Him, the women's rights group ultra-violet has announced plans for a plane towing a banner RCA Sony dropped sexual predator R Kelly will fly over the Sony Music officers later on today. We've been talking about it all morning, Kevin McKenzie bazo, and they're divorced and his

Kevin Mckenzie Bazo Sony Music Sony R Kelly