20 Episode results for "R. J."

Financial Services Analytics, Before and After AI - with Dr. Derek Wang of Stratifyd

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

22:33 min | 1 year ago

Financial Services Analytics, Before and After AI - with Dr. Derek Wang of Stratifyd

"This is Daniel Fa gelling. You're listening to a in business podcast, one of our most popular podcast from those fourteen months ago. was about the core differences between business intelligence and artificial intelligence was from a leader at Click Q. L. I k.. And in this episode, we're actually looking at a somewhat similar theme. We're talking about what does analytics look like before, and after the use of machine learning specifically in financial services. So how is financial services sort of deploying analytics broadly today? What does it look like in terms of their data and how they're getting value from it, and was it look like after we leverage artificial intelligence to get a little bit predictive to derive deeper insights? This is where we're focused on what's that maturity landscape from sort of retrospective dashboards to? To forward-looking predictive analytics in what does it take to actually get value out of such a system? Our guest. This week is Derek. Wang Derek is the CEO and Co founder at stratified stratified as a firm focused on helping financial services. Companies get more value out of their data and Derek goes into detail in terms of the hard lessons. He's learned in terms of how financial services leveraging data today, and we'll be able to do for them in the future. As you're aware, this is Tuesday. So this is a use case. So, our format is going to be talking about how the business process operates today, and then what it looks like after ai so that you can fit those puzzle pieces in with your own mind and imagine how your own business can change and evolve of the format. Here is really very deliberate based on some of the reviews. Some of the feedback we've had. Had on our podcast over the last six months of thank you to all of you who've left review on Apple podcasts per easy to find the A in business podcast on apple podcast. If you're so inclined like what we have here, drop us a five star review. Let us know what you think about the show really is your thoughts that helped me. Me Craft, a great format to make a great podcast. If you haven't already downloaded it, we're diving into financial services. Today, you can download our AI in services cheat, which is full of both terms and core use cases of how a I is transforming financial services. It is an excellent primer on this topic, and you can find that at EMC R. J. Dot. Dot Com slash F I n one, that's F.. I n. like financial F., I n., and then the number once will merge dot com slash in one. It's a short pdf brief it's free to download. You can grab that on emerge dot com without further ADO, we're GONNA fly in. This is Derek Wayne with stratified. You're on the AI and business podcast. So Derek I want to get started with this kind of problem of operationalizing analytics. You guys work in financial services, a lot of our audiences, retail banks, big insurance firms at a lot of them have similar problems. How do you describe this core issue of how disjointed the analytics? What does it look like in there? Yeah. Let me give an example when I a professorship I was working hours Department of Homeland Security and Defense Strategy Deduction Agency, and really working on multimillion dollar kind of federal research to Human Jenner data to predict pandemic hall pathogens transmitted from different nations donation. It's a very timely skill right now derek a forty. Five years ago, six years ago. Got Big projects. They're Harvard. That's part of the. The motivation of starting stratified is because when we done not eighteen twenty, four months of product would deliver our software to folks on the other side, just start using it. They can operationalize that because as many Prada as we have been serving without customer, it's so centralized in a small group like the PhD's like the data scientists were looking at, it wanted pushed. A business is harder for them to use it. Right? That's where it triggers. The whole motivation of generating company like stratified is, let's let's bring future data analytic, which is really operational is the data analytics. Poaching that from the business lines, then live on business started using that in solving everyday problems they have. So we essentially become the operating system on their business analysts, their desktops day in day out there analyzing it in our station and my philosophy as in ever their laptops either they're collecting data. Or they're making decisions. So that's where we're going to operation is analytics for folks. Got It. So I'M GONNA assume a little bit up and kind of paint the problem a little bit more, and then we can start to go into some example. So the challenge that you're articulating is that analytics sits in this it universe where maybe I t tell me if I'm wrong here, they might build some dashboards they might build. Build some little interfaces maybe, but they're not day to day up next to the marketing people day to day up next to the compliance people day to day of next to the fraud people in financial services, for example. So those people in the business. So to speak in those operational wings, they don't really get their hands dirty with analytics, they just kind of get whatever they can request and whatever get built for. For them and what you're talking about is a dynamic where they actually can have their own interface and build and use the things they want. Am I hearing you. Correctly, you're absolutely right. One little thing to add to that is they're lacking the feedback channel, right? They're always as treated as consumers of what the other team has spilled. However, what other teams build because they are not business savvy, their lack of bag. Bag and updating what they're looking at to your point dashboard whatever the real time hurts the business. Yeah. Yeah. Because I guess nothing could be as customize. It really needs to be for the compliance people unless they're able to engage with it and build out the way they need or the marketing people build it out the way that they need. Now, of course, that's kind of a new skill set in a new. Set of things to learn for those teams and when I think about adopting a I, you guys, obviously, you have enough traction you for a fifty million dollars at this point. So clearly you have, you know some traction onto your belt for you folks, you've got to build I, guess, build something that simple enough that a person marketing or compliance will actually use. So I'm seeing that this problem is we've got to be. Consumers of what it builds analytics. That's not great. We WanNa see our own things about churn or about some regulatory issues or or whatever. But if if we want to put it in the hands of those users and let them really engage, how do we make it simple enough for them? What are the lessons you learned there because to me, that feels like a big challenge. It absolutely is, and you said are valued problem really while it's really democratizing Ai. Right. So think about this. What we have it, we will we have put a lot is simplify the model, right? You don't need to know what model is what you care as a marketing. You care about the results you care about attorney. Cariballo. Complies will we have done is spent a lot of time researching into how we can provide automatic machine learnings. Now, just one model. Model, not just two models is really led the model, the fit in whatever data for my to it. So that's simply put stratified were based on four simple part of one flywheel number. One will provide over one hundred, fifty data collections as individual. Do you don't need to worry about how can get hands on data? You are data market, you can get all the data connect to it. secondarily, that's where the preparatory auto, but she learnings county in our. It will go into based on what data get in automatically apply analytics and then visually showing you. Boys Costumer as Customer, experience folks to see what are the head and signals that really locks into that data set, and then you can start connecting those signals interactivity real time to tell a story. So that's how you made a simple straightforward and it becomes a skill sets that people can start leveraging without years of training. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I think this is kind of the golden dream of of of what a I would be right is that everybody would be able to to. To leverage the capabilities that unlocks without having to go get you know a post doc somewhere at Carnegie. Mellon. Her Mit or whatever you know and I know that there's tools like and I imagine you have quite a few differences with some of these companies. But the data robots of the world, you know a Unicorn up here in the Boston area. Now, working on I think potentially different kinds of things, but but the same value prop of applying auto l.. Letting people who aren't data scientists use use ai I would imagine tell tell me from wrong here when you talked about that data market, probably a lot of what you guys have had to figure out is how to integrate to all these different clients system. So I think you had mentioned off microphone a lot of retail banks in commercial banking. Get, to figure out all the different loop into, they have all these different types of data. You probably have to see it behind the curtain of enough clients to say, okay, what are all the integrations we need to build? What are all the API's me set up? What are all the data harmonization problems that can happen with those and solve the heck out of that because it doesn't feel like those hundred fifty things they are just by plugging it in, right? It feels very hard work. I. Think you're. Spot on. So whereas a company grows at a lot of difference between data robot were more like a friendly in the market is we started with human generated data. Essentially the way that we look at world at our very strong proprietor site is on the actual data side. So essentially, you have your job, you have your. Own CFP. Services all those human tax data feedback that consumers that individuals provide. That's where our Brad Bar is not sets US quite apart with other competitors. Now will we're looking at is giving the core out to dinner data. We started bringing operational data from the organization like data points from your dupe data points from your arrest ship data point from all the other data storage. Storage because fundamentally this is deliberate and this is what we have deployed to the market I don't care where your data comes from. 'cause, we goldstone to the fundamentals of data, which is the types of data and our Amal which is so center human generate data to be automatically trigger as well as any of the operational data that it can automatically digest analyze. Them together. so that's the dots, the golden ticket that we have done in the platform, and when you talk about human generated data just so I can wrap my head around that. I could tell that meaning a lot of things generally speaking what does that imply to you guys? I guess to find that term just for the audience say anything you can transcribe into digital taxed. Call Center data videos, TATCHELL CHATS, online survey free forms, including the questions. You know the forum comments, newsletters attacked up y'all don't stop so that tech stuff. Okay. which is eighty percent of what organization has in their in their database, and that's the problem we start tackling. I'm not our bread and butter is got it. It makes sense to begin their I, guess on some level. So we know thinking about this use case broadly. So we're giving people access to a platform where they can tap into the sorts. Sorts of data assets that they have, like you said, you know if it's all text that may be, it makes the world a little bit more bounded. You know it's not like you're pulling in video feeds in your pulling it either, this is probably a lot that falls out of that, but that would be a little bit tougher. But regardless of people have access to this stuff, what's been the process for you guys to turn that into value for these different departments, compliance, marketing I, imagine you gotTa. GotTa work with these teams, you gotTa say, okay, with this actual data marketing team, what are you want to build with this kind of learn with them learn with them will learn with them to the point where now when you work with a client, you kind of know the workflow that they should use his. It's not like getting a PhD, they'll have to do as much school as you, but they still still have to uptick their skill that process to learn what to teach because you could teach him. Him Anything, but you've had to figure out the areas of value. What was that like you actually got me excited about this, right. So for legislation, your first comment where Buddhism, like this in need to be darned easy to use, that's where stratified is right. So essentially, we will credit by Gardner to be cool bender in terms of our day zero deployment. So literally, people get access to the popular, you can start using it. So fully south serve in that, but let me take that back to you. Think about this environment. Why'd there's destroy is I'm not marketing expert none of my. I, remember live to have strategy in my team member who are marketing experts, but the customers are our day in day out line of business folks they are. They are problem right now in their operation leising machine learning as they don't know what machine learning. So that's what we are good at it. So essentially, what we have gave number as a blueprint that it can coming easily to say, Hey, this is the model that will give me hidden topics based on my customer data full connected. Here's the result visually. They're they're still start to building that storyline fixing their analytic similarity. This is maybe the same data set, but once you put into a customer experience experts, had they look at the same result, but based on their business targets, they're gonNA pivoted the other way leveraging outside. So we literally asked with the platform as what made it easy for people to take a look at it and starting tractive was that they are the craters of building. Building more and more of this on the back, will we do? This is quite interestingly as we started with a platform company, but rapidly where we're building is a library market. So essentially, we're building up standardized templates to engage additional folks who are one explore WANNA taste one to see how other best practices done yet, and then through our pop war, we actually engage industry expert may not be a direct customer of our thinking about the. The case to off a APP store. But now we're bringing experts beauty and transferred that into our users through our platform play. Got It. So let me see if I'm hearing this correctly. So obviously, the goal is you give them the tools, they do what they want with. Obviously, you're not. You're doing something very different than what a tableau would do, but but I imagine a similar idea tableau doesn't say you have to build pie charts. Charts right. They say, here's some tools. Go ahead and visualize what you want. This is easy enough free to use. You can just click around. You can watch them youtube videos you're GONNA be fine. So that's obviously the goal for you guys at the same time when I think about going into a marketing team at a bank, this is not any is not Amazon this is not I go into a bank citizens bank, not everybody. On the screaming edge of marketing automation or whatever you know smart people. But it's just it's an old system right when I think about going to them and saying look you've got the Santa Lyrics Platform you've got all this data like you can do what you want with it. Probably, that's too much for them probably we. So we do need them to be able to do whatever they want. That's good. But we probably also want we need to go in and say, Hey, what a? I can do these few things that are really valuable when I think you saying is it. You're aiming to build out a platform where the use cases that were really valuable for other teams. You could potentially replicate and sort of make it to the people can say, Oh, I, WanNa do sentiment analysis on chat data. Oh, there's been a couple of really good models about this for shorter chat conversations with other customers. Here's. Here's one that you can use this kind of what you're getting at. Yeah. Even more further to us the business side, right? I know your audience liked to, if you're not a use case, but the exact point, well, we're going to the bank out saying depending on who we identified as a potential user. Let's say compliance side go into that as a hate in the compliant side, you are required by federal that you'll reply to CFP at US thirty days given where the nature of your organizational setting. You probably don't have that workflow build out. You probably don't have that operationalized. Here is the entire operationalized process that stratified offers to you from data in two automatic classification, automatic routing to your department plugging your email, it will send to Toe Smith's to answer this type of data went while daily routine update. The motto itself we go in and say here is the entire solution based on our platform for the compliance department. That's how we engage with them and even more to us. Solution. Rounded lesser than say, Hey, come in and paid. Sunday. Bend Motto Cause Sediment Modern Chat Wireless specific enough. What is the outcome at? What are we shooting for? Exactly? Exactly. Exactly. So we're on the same page. We're going to that problem. The way say, okay, you want to identify the sentiment on top of the CIA to trigger. If they're low sentiment, score a sumo package customer package care package to make sure happy even after the track to give you a concrete example, lot of this case has happened in our contact center offering where two percents off the callers calling to a contact center alpha-bank leave a mark of rating how their conversation was to. Egypt, was. What about those ninety percent? Because you have no way to know and the banks are using random sampling of sale. Yeah. Picking one of ten thousand calls I'm just many Liverpool. Yeah. We completely Outta my kind of operationalize for data based on their own speech engine, our data analytic at a modeling. We can empower banks, they build literally in two weeks based on two percent of their data, build a customer loyalty predictor model, and deploy into their contact center. So every each call is finished, it will automatically weight it a score dot and then it. It triggered into their adobe. Proud. It trigger into mcaddo. So to their crn system and then he media center care package attacks, message thing about that I was just limited calling do a banker as soon as I hang up a message come to my phone. Say Derek I. I. Heard you're pissed off here or something I can offer to that's what we're operationalizing Fordham Yep. Got It. Yeah. Of course. Yeah. Needs to be a particular business outcome in my guess is as you guys because I think the upside of a broad platform like what you? You folks have is that if a of people start using it, you can become the backbone of their holy Ai Transformation, which you know as a venture capitalist. I would be very excited about because that feels pretty strong business. The tough part about your business is that there are whole companies Derek and I've spoken to a great many of them who just focus on call centers and just focus on you know a couple industries and just focus on that kind of scoring. So you guys on, you have the benefit of being much wider but then. Then, you also have I, think the challenge of finding. Okay. Within each department. Here are some tangible things we can do records. Unlimited AI is just too much for people, but you guys have been able to suss out the specific use cases and I. Think what you're articulating is that the goal is that you can almost make those kind of drag and drop where if they're plugging into marketing, you've got a bunch of cool ways. They can leverage it and things that have been valuable for other people, and it sounds like that's the vision here. Exactly I need, you hit the nail on the head to right. So whereas our as a Prophet Company, we actually maintain two things data at openness. So we have a lot of strong partners like live person who is unlike chat is a strong partner with us where we're offering them the analytics that become their backbone for their causes. We have contact center to our partners were offering our platform to them for them to be providing their customer because our mindset of this is it's harder to have a company that really disrupting the analytic space. That's where we're disrupting west, and we're building out our the political better term, Switzerland. Tactic. You work with other company who specializing area, not even just technology companies, but think about the chain, there's a law consulting companies, a lot of aside companies who hold up business knowledge, but their operation, their bottom line, they're process dare abby. Yet. We're getting dumped AI technology to supercharge them. So they can better serve their costumers. We got benefits from that as well. So you're. You're absolutely right from our direct sales side. Also head on on the hat is we are very focused. That's why we bring experts like a consummate experienced people will inform you as a, which is a gold standard of customer experiencing finance onto our team. I'm become our evangelist to say cheer is how things should be done. Here's can be done in stroud by them very. Very very targeted. Yeah. Because I think again, affirm affirm like yours where the it is possible to be anything but targeted because you have so many use cases. It sounds like for you. It's been very. This is really interesting business inside. It's been interesting to hire in people with the knowledge to say, okay. Within this operational area, you know here are some things we should. Should really be unlocking this tech. So that's that's cool. I think from from kind of a higher level strategy standpoints hopefully for the listeners here, this has been good from both the business model and the use case Derek I. Know That's all we had for time in this use case episode, but thanks so much for joining us on the show. Thank you. Really appreciate it. So. That's all for this Tuesday I use case episode here on the business podcast on Thursday as always we're diving in four hour making the business case episode where we talk about the Roi and deployment considerations of AI. We're going to be talking specifically about how to target true problems with I, how to solve actual business problems and not distractions and not toy. Toy problems, how do we really find where is going to add value and how do we targeted dive in on that where we can actually see a return on investment? That's the focus on Thursday, and you're not gonNA WANNA miss it. So I'll get you back here on the show. Thanks so much for joining us as always on the A and business podcast.

Wang Derek AI Apple Daniel Fa Derek Wayne Prada EMC R. J. Dot Bag Boston fraud youtube
Questions to Ask When Buying or Selling AI Services - with Sankar Narayanan of Fractal Analytics

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

20:18 min | 1 year ago

Questions to Ask When Buying or Selling AI Services - with Sankar Narayanan of Fractal Analytics

"Daimyo FA gelling you're listening to a in business podcast every single, Thursday. We cover a making the business case episode here on the show where we talk about the practical realities of deploying is how do we measure our? Had We figure out if we're looking at the right solution and how do we overcome challenges to actually deliver results and I have one of my and I'm not supposed to say this all time favorite guests with us on this episode are most downloaded episode in two thousand nineteen was about Ai Roi in who was with other than Song Car Narayana was the chief practice officer at fracture. Lennox rectal analytics is a Unicorn Company, their services firm focusing on a and advance analytics. Industries like retail and CPG variety of others. Soccer has a lot of practical hands on experience. He speaks to his this week about the questions to ask if you are buying or selling. Services sometimes when a buyer is ignorant within a vendor, some vendors will take advantage of that and they'll smirk to themselves and know that they can pull one over in terms of getting away with unrealistic upfront expectations. But most vendors will serve frown knowing that they have so much educating to do for this buyer to even see if there's a fit in the first place or if there's any kind of long term potential with someone who doesn't really know what they're talking about, but as it turns out. To be you don't even need to know how to code to be able to ask the right informative questions to assess vendor and find fits whether you're buying or selling. This interview is not going to be one that you wanna Miss, and before we dive into the episode, if you haven't downloaded it already, you can get a copy of our pdf guide called the five ways to select the right vendor for free download. The entire PDF for free it's an e. m. e.. R. J. DOT COM Slash B U Y, and then the number want emerged dot com slash. By one, you can download our five ways to select a writing vendor. It's a free pediatric and download immediately on the page it'll add a little bit of texture and color to some of the principals and some of the questions that song car brings up in this episode. So without further ADO, we're GONNA fly right in this song Narayanan with Frankel analytics here on the business podcast. So F N, we'll dive into this interview and focus on your the the must ask questions as we get started working with a client. When it comes to artificial intelligence, we heard all kinds of horror stories of people going into a project and then. Realizing after the deal is sign that they can access the data that we don't have enough of it or there's some legal. or HR issued, it's keeping us from doing things when you think about what really has to get answered to know that this project is going to be real on the way in what are some of those big ones for you Sharp Dan thanks for the opportunity. It's a it's a very interesting question I. I'm going to struggle to limit myself to the time you know, right? Yeah. Yeah. You could probably talk for three hours on this when I realized that. So you don't discretion has a very connection on different industries need to deal with different problems as attempt to solve organization parodies to. A, let me take a couple of examples. So one of the things connecting industries like healthcare banking in shortens is regulation without a number of cases where you know the business quarter, maybe the head of marketing or head of customer. Management. Is Very focused on growth and driving customer expedients, and the the have gone vision of out of you know how they will really the position around doing the things. So to conceal and building a very customer centric organization on. Equally on the other side, there is a need to ensure that driving better customer expedient. So a building around the consumer will. Also, need to have a regulatory construct sitting about scenario lake. Banking and customer expedients. Simplifying the financial solutions and products for the consumer might mean having access to information about the consumer that'd meet. This actually discusses more meaningful. The side to that is what amount of information about a consumer is actually legitimate or legal to hold. And what information about consumers has the potential to be used in a manner which is different to what it was meant to be used for So, this is a very critical competent to think about because a number of organizations have been. Publicly find far using information that they have access to a for purposes that ought not necessarily what was meant for. So asking these questions right up front end especially in the world of you know non explainable. It becomes an even more critical competent to consider. To be a big area. Yeah. So let me do I'm just going to jot down the first one just to nutshell it and it will keep moving a now you've got plenty of these. Are All important. The first one is just around regulatory concerns. Does that mean we need the regulatory person persons may be in the room while we're scoping project. So we're determining what's important determining where to focus. Do we just need to Yank that person in for one of those meetings just really flesh out all the risks and make sure it gets the okay with them. What does it look like to handle that question is it looked like to actually make sure we can be confident. The. Most non scalable manner of doing this is to have it literary person handling regulation in every meeting. It's it's great. It's solved the problem, but it's just not practical. So this has to. Have a bit of a different approach. So engagement said we're working on the baby think about this is for us to construct this in such a way that a person that is involved in regulating management is able to conceal what we are looking to build in their language in their world, and that allows them to very quickly spawned with be the do's and don'ts so. Absolutely bringing them in initially is critical, but that does not necessarily mean taking their band with a way to focus on to think about every possible problem that is happening across the rest of the rest of the organization. So that's a very critical competent. In fact, the more we do this what's also likely to happen is that people that are looking at risk and regulation. Day Job will. That Lens on everything. So it might also the flip side of that is might also stifle innovation. So it's a delicate balance and how we look at this is established milestone reviews with with some of these specialists. Milestone reviews with regulate regulatory folks is a great way to help them keep a best of what we are building up, but also taken extremely critical and important input at the divide stage in the engagement itself. Yeah. Got Up. So it'd be it'd be neat to have the men for the whole process, but sometimes, they're gonNa just be skeptical about everything nervous about everything. It makes more sense to know the high level commander's intent big issues that we need to steer clear of speak to them in common language everybody in the room gets it and we figure out the next time when we're GONNA need to pull them in we set our milestones and we we move forward with the original business contacting build our plan. That's right. So. That is one. Okay. Second. A big bucket is is technology choices and by technology choices, I'm not just talking about information technology. I'm also talking about the upstream and downstream points of connection for on board with it is that we're building. Let's say we're looking at Halloween customer expedience trouble and be looking at understanding how do we simplify customers indirection with St? Organization that there'd be a bank or get provided unsought. Now the mini upstream downstream bonds to this process that is the development part but before that there is. The opportunity to think about all of Star Data Consideration Steve Building the right data pipelines and what did is available, accessible, accurate, and enterprise ready. So that is a very key part of this this problem and then the downstream aspect is equally important riches. How does this get concealed within the vote of users that are actually going to be the recipients of of Ai Famous oftentimes, the biggest roadblock we've seen in scaling area and creating Ottawa turn into a I is this issue of downstream adoption MVP also huge deal offenses on it did it been engagements where we've spent the first eight to nine weeks off a off at twelve sixteen week engagement figuring out adoption dynamics. Yeah. That is the tougher part I mean there's an algorithm that might be able to find an anomaly. There's a there's a recommendation we might be able to kick off in who's workflow does that have to show up? Do they have to click something separate to see how is it going to be embedded in their workflow? So they actually use it are they going to trust this thing if they weren't part of building I mean these Are questions that are often there. So numerous that they'll just slay project dead. What does it look like to really flesh out that fit you said the upstream but now you're talking about the downstream almost feels more complicated. Is that just about talking to those users is that about figuring out what the workflows GonNa look like and doing mock ups and making sure people feel confident they would actually do that when we have to handle their. Yeah Yeah. So there are two ways in which case we have been thinking what this problem one is. Definitely. Out Rapid prototyping and bringing a design thinking famous to this right a great way to help people become part of the solution. Especially, downstream users is for us to be they're better and what better way than mocking up and scenario simulating. A users joining. So building personas of various users and looking at each of the problems from Deir Lenses is is it's it's an extremely important part of part of our thinking I call this the. Modern. Effect off problem, solving. Because, the idea is you know when we look at the same problems from different lenses, different people involved in actually making this solution reality. The ought come from different contexts and holiday are going to use. The solution is going to be contextual to dare your day daylights, which may be very different, do or day in the life of data scientist. So being able to create a those personas and user journeys that they are going through on a daily basis is a fantastic prerequisite for making a solution super successful. A second way in which we also have been looking at this is the point that I was saying earlier at on observation. than. Oscar right. Back to the question on the would. Have being an idea that consumers would have. Wanted if we had asked consumers with the, they'd like an iphone most consumers. In fact, at that point in time said that you know how can afford not have buttons that are conflict right righty. Envy now, know how important that that you know one particular innovation was in understanding a great deal about human attitudes and how we think about a problem The Not. We cannot really reason out why we think we are going to do something on why want to something and most on says that we tend to provide question is on the expedition what we want to be as opposed to who they are, and that important distinction is also very critical in designing the framework itself who account for the fact that we are not very good at being able to reason why we want something but via extremely good at adapting something as soon as it is, it is in front of us. So these are the two ways in which we think about the strong. Yen, how do you take that second thing the the fact that that you don't know if they want the iphone instead observing then asking does this mean Were sure we go in. We build a persona of of the actual users that's one side of the coin. Were you implying that the other side of the coin is? You may be suggested, maybe build out mockups of the solution be things that you know. They would never ask for themselves and then see if they like it is this the deposing perspective you're bringing up? Were you implying something different? Yeah. That's right. So so one part of it is understanding the journey or personas, and then once we understand the putting on a solution into that vocal becomes a straightforward on. Many many vote flaws such. As you know, think about getting shuts, it's a highly complex workflow right and there are many many many different personas enrolled in a typical underwriting workflow pretty much every intruder. Is Thinking about Zita how do we simplify this process because even though there is really defined workflow that is working? Well, it is highly clunky and that drunkenness is leading to a lot of additional cost overheads, wages effectively also making premiums expensive. So That is a clear opportunity in simplifying the process. But if you ask the various personas that are of this underwriting workflow on what they would need, they may not be able to articulate that simply because no one person has a fully comprehensive view on all the parts of underwriting as as a function. That's. Taking provocative point of view to help simplify. This is a great way for them to three margin. What could be the ideal before it. Got It. Okay. So we've got the regulatory considerations. We need to get those out of the way we've talked about a way of doing that we need to figure out who the heck is going to use this. Of course, there's the upstream, but you know you're talking about the preeminent difficulties with the downstream ways of thinking that in terms of other critical questions. Is there one more than for you out obviously? There might be twenty more, but one more that you would really think is maybe most important to close out on that that also just has to be handled up front. If we WANNA know that this deployment is going to be have a chance of delivering value. If we want to know this is really something people are Gonna be able to carry forward what do we need answered during those early conversations? What else? Yeah. Sure. Like I said I'm anymore. But one other important one for me would be around the solution itself. What is it that we are building? and. This goes back to the question on what is the Ottawa of A. Two ways in Richard onto this if you asked this question of a functional head ahead of marketing ahead of this head of games into launch the end not so much. About the generalize ability of the solution, but they are more focused on its ability to sharply address dad functional metrics right which could be reducing the cost claims it could be marketed on investment unsold until foot. Now, this is somewhat like you know ai for chess, but a I go are a for. Natural language processing. But organizationally, auto I may be something else. So if you also same question to the CEO he or she is most probably thinking about generalizing the process of learning across the organization and not just functional return on investment through. In her mind, this question is something similar to how do I make this organization as good as a beebees adaptive learning ability right? How does the organization ginger lies the process of learning and that's really the true value of Ai for the organization. That's what the thinking not just marketing away or dribbling the cost of flames. And that for us is the is the other important very, which is to identify and work with different parts of the organization and you're being external in. We had able to distill the requirements of so many different personas or are you know thoughts of organizational leadership in helping construct something that will be jelly into functional leads but also building an organization of fabric. Generalize night. Yeah Yeah. So when you say what are we building? What is the are y? What you're saying is that involves a lot of wide conversations and that involves being able to connect the dots between the what we could maybe call lower level. We can move which, of course are important if we're not moving any needles and this is not a real exercise for Natalie trying to. But then also addressing the higher level meets the longer term transformation, the evolution maturity of our company in terms of AI. Readiness Digital. Transformation, etc. so it sounds like connecting the dots of different conversations in different needs to a coherent vision of here's the measurable. Here's the strategic value here that has to be sort of solidified early on number one is that a good nut shelling or do you want to add to that number two? How do you know when you've gotten there? How do you know when you've you've framed it well enough that you're kind of complete more or less yet so in exactly what you said so completely agree with that. The second run it is it's a it's a it's a good question. So I don't think there is a good answer except for of these conversations continuing to happen on an ongoing basis that is the only measure of success if these compositions are continuing to happen, it means that debt is organizational interest in building further and further on this, this goes back to something that I said earlier, which is about the moving goalposts probably up. are dealing with chest problems organizations dealing with a moving goalposts, a consumer sentiment that is going to continue to evolve onto the street, which is going to ask different questions. So a good sign off organization's success is if the goal posts actually moved, it simply means that the first goal post has been attained already, and that's that's a great way to understand if the organization is making progress. I dig it. Yeah. So we can get to good enough to feel good about moving so we can get to good enough. Hey, functional leaders you if you feel like we're on the right page. Yeah, I think. So Hey, CEO. This is sort of a coherent vision of how the low level connects the fuel around the right. Yeah. But really what we're doing is we're hoping that we make couple checkpoints forward and we kind of updated interact on that, and then we we come to a new consensus on a new set of directions. So ultimately, we can get so far but the point is to learn and then get so much farther. It sounds like that's where second All right excellent and I know that's all we have for time. It's always a pleasure to have gotten some excellent stuff written down while we were chatting here today. So thanks as always being able to share your insight. Thank you thank you for the opportunity and jarred. The question says usual united become a habit of me saying this retain. But really glad to have this position Newport to anymore. So. That's all for this episode of the in business podcast. If you're thinking about procuring artificial intelligence solutions or products in the near term, you'll definitely want to download the guide I mentioned in the intro five ways to select the right vendor. These quick rules of thumb to make sure you only speak with companies that are relevant match for you, and you can find companies that can genuinely serve your needs. That's EMC RJ DOT COM. Slash. B. U Y one, just the number one by one. In the RJ DOT com slash. By one you can download five ways to select the right way I present their hopefully that resource will be useful for you, and hopefully you've enjoyed this episode, be sure to stay tuned for next Tuesday. We give back into a I, use cases here on the I in business podcasts and otherwise thanks for tuning in and catch next week.

Ai CEO Ottawa Soccer officer Narayanan Lennox R. J. Unicorn Company head of marketing Steve Building Deir Lenses commander EMC
Episode 37: What does success look like to you

Inspiration Nation

56:57 min | 2 years ago

Episode 37: What does success look like to you

"Inspiration nation hello the campaign once again for another week in the podcast. Joe and Roy with me how we doing this well guys. It's fantastic so I like to hear what's what's been going on this week in anything exciting in okay things are happening our thinking yeah blocking away. Style giant blogging ally. Why you can head out to judge website block logo? Sh- would always monkey have some exciting news. The people that Fi just podcasts. You've seen in the last week so twitter that was we were in our last recording session. I may who completed the challenge that was set for me and I want to raise this. Because someone in the runes become comfortable with. Is that someone named Roy. Could Sleep. Isn't all okay so I took my coach Joe. VDOT's as for me all. I was wearing shorts and a t-shirt the time wise with no go onto twitter instagram. Even Stri I struck out on that Sarah nail the I have completed the cold shower. Challenge how we feel about your dad. Dancing clipped houses. Else's standard contractual. You said the nuclear side and we cannot listen. I met my don't New Date for Roy and going to choose to take this time next year. So conceal Roy does it. This is going to be a recurring theme on the pub cost. We're talking about About it just seems to be on his writing copy West in Georgetown Talk. Come on come on literally only made that. That could didn't think you'd follow through because we brought up last we allies. It will never never happened so you made your mistake. Then you'LL WANNA boy as we so again if you not see outsource which listen to Ya Anne or instagram the same Afro. CVS Mont repulsed. It when this show goes out. Just keep all the video case mistake because we do not have fun here inspiration so we should. Yeah algebris besides trying to becoming Joe Johns doing something video all the way back to mark the challenging consults and thank you. That Challenges Francais. So again we thank you all listening as you mentioned a crossover platforms. Listen to listen in. Joe E. R. J. In coaching tech daily videos got there we really recommend following so you can see them. Get your daily dose of inspiration and of course I forget you get your inspiration. Nation merchandise at inspiration to alter UK. Right now if you click on the banner of the top you get ten percent off Roy Out until Christmas hoodies tee shirt sweat shirts mugs stickers or that good stuff all the shop to show your support support the nation is in right now. Good plugging salesman mowed down the way jokes station this week. So cautiously to the success that to you this coincided because I'm afraid FRY juice You may not be alone time months actually. Because he saw we talk together for for many years he actually qualifies a counselor to you. Degree is called a thirty degree. You don't have to do two years category thirty to chat with you and we got down to about successful. The lawsuit talked about people. lamborghinis McCain's with this outcome for us to have that to me and it's really important to recognize what does success. What is success? I think he's a very personal thing. And this won't Dante Suite plus my question to you. How do you guys perceive success and what goes so to be successful? What does it mean to you? I'm funds quite interesting because I've had gone to that right now and that's good. That's the CY believes it taken down. That's going to be quite interesting to kind of dig into that to me. It's evolved as Golda. When I was younger it was defined? Six S.. Is is only my first robotics or owning my first house about mortgage or gay marriage. I guess having kids it's just to find those life successes in a way once you can afford to go out and purchase XYZ edge or join a stable place in your life and with a family but without kids whatever whatever you define stable. That's how I found life to be a success. However now I've grown op? I think the more materialistic sides of the the Grammy's vast rations don't necessarily exist as much however however the house without mortgage still talk. They investments in fishy houses and stuff. Not I don't see my money off of them and I think more is now you as you grow up you kind of find war drives you more whether that's you'll pathological career or it's money or it's friendship or social circle sport or either. They could hold different manner of things but for me the exchange to successful career because whilst money as we discussed last week he said it's no good Mazda but it is a good seven. The does an honor. The money can't buy everything the Fray says but definitely Coz you'll never is definitely push as we said the hierarchy of needs dealt with Having food water someone to live on one of them is sex actual base level. And then at your living standards so once you have the the lowest which is what most people have overwatch you have. The next is level which living standard I believe now the house that would be owning a call. That would be something that's GonNa live with not hierarchy so mind standing of successes potentially climbing that hierarchy the other But me personally. It's kind of draw from my career. I think so so success for us you career. Yeah I think I as I go for everybody I think about climbing hierarchy pyramid another six or seven steps both remember the first three or four but I think as you climb find the hierarchy the the more I was as a personal accessible you up because that takes out things that just specifically orientates money. Oh family has a social circle chuckle. That's self esteem ego. That's a successful career. That's everything in your life whereas for me I think this stage of my life month lease this complement parade and then the rest should on since he building everything eventual career at this stage. Yeah that may change if become a father in ten years time then it will shake from Korean and maybe we split with family and they become comical wig ven diagram of everything though I would need to get seven dipping two circles to this out. Then we're interested so solve your career would be sort of pizza. The band aid well. I was social side as well but I think to kind of get solid standing for a stable adult life a good career that that brings in medical income to enable you to do so again appreciating the know everything revolves around money and and that kind of side but as I say it's a massive factor to me. Anyway I think things which will pass careers and stuff is there are tons mockery is just to torsion around. If you just making sure. Social Maturity Passes Latino careers. Some happens all you know. Business goes down. Whatever then that pattern? You Career Korea so what happens next joy and happiness to point. Yeah I mean there are other things outside of why I do. The social side of we've talked about last week overseas mainly pedal four nine. I play videogames ovidio team and stuff things to draw on byles. I mentioned last week. I try to develop my skills and become his. Notables as candy my Bro- so that should happen I can find somewhere else in this industry to just check on at the same point maybe media hotpoint and push with the current value. It's not always the case of tiny benign. I've tried to draw much out as possible so the should ready should it disappear or should I move shop the ray okay or whatever I can then use this goes. I've learned to to just move on rather than just working a nine to five enough office. Guideline focus for you says to you. Is Your career and with oems around slow. No mention the circle. Oh I'm just mentioned the circle political pollock. Am Mind Map imagined as you mentioned in Seoul. How much pick things have been family of coming in? And then maybe a social life will come in at the end of the sensor. FORBE's make all the different things. Different circles will feed into that. Could Save you ally for more you have I talk radio. Climate the hierarchy. Because you you say interesting. Imagine you creek. Eventually you just said euthanized Antonia surroundings around us and everything that applies see that because they use embassies riot. Because now you go you career. WHO's probably have larger circle of both into that and then you go is social sites and those also connect into that you Paul? You'll very conscious about. Sounds to me about developing skills. Excuse in a rounded. Why because your career used to doing this video things also help you know who is tossing adding message very focused? Is Things never. You could still your phone calls on that work in industry You put yourself out this. These awards circles outside the circle. So you incentive of repping wasn't actually one of his release recognize it was gets affected you control and something else to talk about aww investment profile as they call them US occasion for us and you know lung tanks is a woman bring before well and and something that automates thing nauseam his wife. How some done those things news bunkers on eh had been popular by career? When that's stumbled on struggled it was actually more in the hallways Asian? Kid is a really good were you. Are you have that mentality around. It's not just me. Send these things around injuries all success. That's intellectual could be a lot of could social good stuff of that success so swamped with proceeding success. I mean look people. Listening are terrorists terrible Arab this focus on one area where they is not working but they're not saying what actually wells in my life at. She's doing a riot. Maybe report that Bruna up give me to to to tackle that challenge in to bring it back some of absolutely not what in the world wherever businesses could disappear tomorrow. Nothing so two. And what we've got to we was was trying future-proof in different skills and that's the thing that's what we're talking about. That's what we do and success as building connections being coins the people helping people being half policy was also about can play positive and collaborate really. Well because he's getting help is in those talk when we struck struggle not those connections if we tanks where reason we can join US couldn't should market so these uneven now focused again outside our industry which is lousy amazing. Things can help. What's your definition to finish it? He's doing this on actually doing it. A Copy Hindu and do roy getting the content putting out. I'm actually looking for sex. Is What might happen in the future guy at that now doing now. Britain wasn't as successful system this morning. What page Roy Moore Journal? ooh that making the base. And if you talked about success Roy you might have the best you did it is done. I think he's recognizing the crisis that we have don't think we recognize stacks up we can do. This is that you are prepared for. What would his little increments of actions and resolves that began making everytime we thought enough that task writing down now we have recognised? Actually we've done that thing is because you visit and that's prepared difficult on the head so when that comes we'll bring you to face it embraces all challenging so why roots reloaded loud not from things at the moment. That's a look totally different looted. Twelve own recognizing people signs. Think think about that. Well you your support a family but that success you know supporting a family the house you know recognizing that just focusing on swamp thing and think because get Sucre obsess about stop you from Sicily. Why would just as all think about? In fact this is why I'm super obsess about self development. That's for me so this love but boys give me an away after other things too so also be died also go make sure do mature the more efficient college from one pilot. Joe Did it Pity Authentic citizen is recognizing nice things. That's what we ought to be smart. Chevy read this issue orcas Roy Walk into the Capitol and use a cam for your. That's one of the essential thing that also found. Actually you see that one is successful. Maybe a coaching vegetables. Less these so something. That could have been something that we didn't solve context context chose technical difficulty stepped in and we had repented. Tug was there metro in the back of the recording. Just take take take hopefully By now we'll have known that podcast when Lincoln's wants to that exactly. Yeah because of the cost of sure not on this phone usually bridge you. Why why? Why hit me with the Truth Ryan when you dot home? Look we now interrupt the consultants. DECI shakeout chose website. Jane Coach Tech Sticking Chicago Machine. Take charge website lots of really useful reading materials resources. Is there a future help with your own journey toward success. Joe's we brought you can sign up all links towards videos and there's contact that form on their this is what Jerry does. He would love to help you. If you're engaged. Show services you can call it. That is coaching tech now moved to South Walk Licking it was it was okay so talk about is quite a few things I something about all sweeping sleeping quin results. You folks who was going to get result was mcshea possessions and things that because you get what you want Okay so you focus on those things you can start with as well pews back. Knows what you're doing in the among want that one thing that you do next shifts you from being that place to mix place but it could be all cost. Whatever is it shifts? We frustration and it might have happened. These things are things you wish for people to have those things. You do What success? Let's use the things that you enjoy to do. You can bounce them how to make sure would mean a lot to you in connection with the military. We've been attacked we. Actually she's quite as many people of the worst things that rely of suffering appreciate that appreciate nothing gratitude around that my few read even think about it and that could you send you. Think about recognizing people get super dams because his might decrease off McRae's administration. You see that's okay but I don't see well doing around it and it's had some okay. We'll get you get into refined. Some what have you done without actually dismissed. That's all well. Let's go back nausea. Plus it lasts about James Kid of the person you want to pay us just depends less moderate so I see it mainly due process going to about last week is care about we care about what you care about it and then just set those goals and suggested that are successes that you can build them. not just disconnect from them in Tucson toddy left field totally out there because sometimes we set massively series. Eric Rico's it but if you're not in that setting that we're GonNa make you feel even worse what you put it produces many were subculture of short term goal. You could get out and it. Must you feel super happy. I said that. Hey reciprocal at that point because you have you can then feel things life doc so when it gets because of that because you had to experience emotions so it because I've been thinking and talking Swede you also question. His successor positive outcomes or looking you how will you try and being close to say stop. We took out time. and He's where I think my head is. It's actually quite host define DOC general missing. This is very personal. There's voice what's it. I feel like like you always have a conversation. We played one year old me a reference eighteen year old Kukoc to twenty one year old when sleeping grown up. They'll competition thing. What prison seen a picture of twenty one year old man knows three uh-huh well what's funny about that? I think is necessary. Toys McVeigh buys. We look at because all the time so one of the reasons I think talk defined but for me all away from doing a lot to be creative so Maleki my personal life right down on making something for myself to all all. Keep everything everything I'm doing and always trying to excavate and what I'm doing backseat starts yourself often. It's we WANNA try again and I think I've competent. So what Roy do. I can apps it beekeeping base and he can be say. Let's not say I am the best thing I day Ronn can attest to that with my former skills. But it doesn't mean don't try and and try and try and try and try twenty one year old no confidence in myself if it's whole and it's funny because I look at that picture. I don't see someone who had cope spa. You want. How Thomas engaging could take the mindset have natural and pull that into mediate. And what would that be like a battery. What would have been my expirations? My life and I think our untouchable up from last week. We're on twenty one one. That's my wife now. Think or exceeded whatever goal within I h but that doesn't mean it pays trauma auction kick back and relax. 'cause you know very ambitious person always look into next saying let's work everything you know. We go pick patch what we want to do. Do this podcast. Anything get involved so which what's next what's next what's next and I think. Initially when you ask the question I was thinking successes and then point like you said he's not be so grossly windy so the little things you do every day. So it's a big part of me that poisons eats our local petro ANACLETI GOPI Petra. Now or didn't though so with that but he's learned from its try knicks. Torments gist constant successes. In the way that you positively the attacking everything right down we do it. Every single is making vague saying in each step. I take a day in moving on moving on and being in that a positive mindset success to me the journey as much as the end result is a tangible thing that I've legacy is the right word. The big thing for me is how how we interact with other people and what I can do to help. Awesome why what might doing to support. The people help other people or how people feed off to interacting with me. And I think that's something a string of success if you can in all those interactions and everything you know the professional class team my friends with my family wiper. Uh either going through station have the money to me. That was a big felt. Really good after that and again I think that's Success in how you're living your life and being the person you want to be and I think one that same story the avenue before the next day and I think for me. It's all about becoming personnel debate. Each h come get into wars where AIDS AIDS. But I also don't think they'll be an agent put where I'm not right say cheese Mozzarella cheese improved meaning preview improving in. That's where you want to. They have an avant in my they they they use them for something. But that's not that's not in point it's a continual development. Yeah and I think that's success because I see an end point. That's Roy initially struggled but listen to talk health care for my mom because actually is it's a success is on the way to get in there but knowing in a positive way way for each on reach because you always wanted to be happy like I said that's a twenty one year old committee and I look at how I am now critically happy in my life because for young version of me of typically box live in life and I'm really happy. Let's the he's still trying to improve when everything I love the the about. This is that if you if you could go back in time and you could go and sit next the twenty one year old seven. So you're going to be made in. Eighteen years is complete. You took your love if I went back to my eighteen year old self which is plenty of home time ago chimney. Sweep or something back then you oh you live in the street no court. I always hunting down tonight because it never ever dreamt of getting people that was for other people other people's lives yourself and the kid in you you be doing podcast and talking about your thoughts about self development. We'll get to my age. You have to have never locked with no chance that no white. I'll be doing that. So you too exceeded expectations In that way which I think is super interesting. Yeah Look Back Down that mountain and talk to us so if we think about what we could accomplish in the next ten years. What's that girl at like? That's interesting you guys. If you talk to yourself now would you say I suppose that compassion and if you just before we go awesome and can we touch me lost weight but whereof took Lamar realized some of those more basic patients. He's he saw of what we've have come. This time next week that I can walk. Can that be potatoes in now. Which I think is an excellent thing and I think everyone listening appreciate that one way or another they will be in a place that the themselves take advantage and see my would be and you can just keep looking things and building or not what they WANNA be? It's about getting that navigate mode and you know what can you do to make them accept together being intentional. Absolutely another one's TACO. Vince causes that people reported successful results. Money to construct. New Money doesn't equal success and I'll call with it depends on how that's happened. I think is where you feel about it. I've felt that you've earned it. You know you walk. Cost achieved nothing. Yeah when you say that it's interesting. Eh Teaching kids people who attain that money don't disagree but I think there's a lot of people who happen to destroy for does does it's not a major success and any book you read. It looks right. I'll tell you such a short time motivator also of course this it is important but it's not number one yet and I think we will get across. The success isn't money. It's not funny and I just want solutions. I think he's all the message that we get in through social the media through advocates. If you have patriots you have these logs amazing but you know Lunka apple chart you get some computer you get into whatever your great for that moment and that she wears off you get the gadgets and then the next thing run you get a Rolodex. I'll be grateful for the then. You'll become mobile now. What's next you the land but you got even cholera now fantastic? You gave it a month after driving around this is what we we saw not recognizing that you call this authority constructed inside the poor but it's not it's not the thing have absolutely I think if you want to share yourself of your money that's way down inspiration to order. UK and you can purchase some fantastic inspiration nation much noise and we will take care of that money for U. T. shirts thinkings on there. If you wanted to wear them who these sweat shirts. There is a fantastic reward. Yourself with a gripe t-shirt for Ryan which would comment science fantastic stuff on there is for now to Christmas. Ten percent offers world so he can get even more merchandise from us by some for people but Christmas presents. I'm sure they would love for those watching on here. We have our mugs right. Hey in which we absolutely love each nation to order. UK mostly rigid very smooth votes for the reasons listed above it because we we will be partners to help grow the focus one hundred percent because it take money to spread out to help promote the podcast let more people see how message. So that's the whole point East countries result. Okay I saw officer service should be there too so so this this healthy we're talking about we're talking about talking about the people want to serve and success for me and we talked about is helping people. We'll listen to a CASA off struggling. You might not have loud moment. You might have that we want to give value so you can use these these tools to stop wound up success. We've talked about his loan programs out there. Did you bodies. Oh boy this program. Dan You'RE GONNA YOU'RE GONNA be successful hundred pound on diesel converted into these top notch style for. Yes a story about that thing you into the story about where people and hoping we went to where you way this. This is the thing where we want to do. This is all we can start to take audience where we will be with. This is an epic is for a seminole conference. Whatever type thing all about successful shirt success everything so nice? The free business won't be so nice the Freebie and it was it was. It was very much very large site was paid to the day so all these talk only speakers synthetic background will play do and Cabell spoke for an hour and very much sales pitch on their product. So the debate was and you too can have successfully different presentations down or invest in property or close down off of people have done and then and let into the pitch that they will do all of them let into the weekend seven off the coast also my anywhere from thousand pound to some of them three or four thousand pounds around to the weekend with the price of this great success and it was very heavy sales pitch kicked in in the room so as part this normally costs nine thousand thousand nine hundred ninety nine pounds you. You'll hear today will do it for four thousand pounds but he's off rezoning openness on toy would sell on the wall counting down the hound. The software was war. Offer entity financing stuff. I'm people in Massey's cotton showed up to these things. which if I wanted it's comfortable? It was interesting. CEOS damage the suit. I think that I to join the step one hundred people start to which 'cause I didn't take anything from the time because it was not teases for you can have this lawyer spent on us and a bit and don't get me wrong. I'm sure these people will have massive value to add to the right people because they have done these things they don't buy was unsolicited. So you there is no vetting that he saw things to say that if you invest your time with me you're at the Roy stages a person in your development to take these move forward so I think that's not the phrase for Joe. I felt praying for people's hopes and dreams and it was very heavy. Hey heavy humus soil. Now get this and I didn't like it for that. That whole that whole thing you said torn into what we WANNA do is we. I want to help people. And they're all obviously the shop and things there are things that we we need necessity for that service to make sure that we it's always difficult to do but we don't want to do is deliver. Something doesn't add any value. It's not hope he something that people like we do right now. Nothing cost calls anything. There is no other people's time there's no cost to listen to what we have to say what we have to see what message trying to give out and we are hoping that it has massive massive value to people and go more little way speed that there are you know they might be some low cost things but the value should sit Nathan. Can we have why. It shouldn't be risked to it. There is an invest in thousands of pounds in something artist. gave me so. I think for people doing that. Sort of stuff. You'll see works giving but there's only so many people to do saturation. That's after that's myself that why Mike came on this Byzantine skill of all this enemies. I have to have that. But we don't have it. That's right we'll just start. They've it's going to be both you and all I come from a physician where there's a tone but we never would have stood up in front of groups. I now some coming to just Israel right now in Tennessee go out and deliver a presentation hundred people and we walk in room thinking about but that was developed. A toy is not something you can learn. We came we fifty people in practices where we have France Attention you send your dream because we'll come and then walk up in. That story was the result of that. Say Difficult on the result when I concede concert I wanNA resolve. That's what it listening to resolve. That is really really. It was up in that store specimens. What if what that pilot piece that? Almost that thing where you can have that overnight success not just drop him on my people selling sending so bond that you can have images hikes. Time to build. Success doesn't take the time to deal with this podcast as you put non. I'm not sure you said this is exit thirty six. So that's their their amounts nine months and also as probably one nine months so if we take even with more years worth of we'll consistent action focused action if we can is done Joel Remigio. You just started all you could be on supervising and be taught exact within that time one real estate not so why people one. Why do people think that can just get on this thing? I think thank Allah can other schools. Often I'm GONNA crush it in ninety six months. Oh we've been here. That's why I think that's it Kinda disheartening off to spend was far grand all your grandeur four to pay that Menomonee uh-huh something they all do. Now you can spread the payments for year so some people have been great from Bam thinking they you can spend a year cardiff squeeze in this money into your budget. Every single bomb for once you're six months in and you're I'm GONNA say trump's to go that causes gone and you're you're not going to suddenly be bringing in these massive income from one. We can cause and accidentally for presentation as love. The truth is that you money's going to spend time at do that if he will be going on Wall Street presenting stop practicing scene yourself. That's absolutely. Yeah absolutely you thought you call them which I really enjoy doing what to be good at thing. If you got that thing eh presented you know you get goad Straw boy talking to some one stop doing them. It gives us tools for nothing and then generate value. And then you would you purchase a much. Mr With her vocals helpful. Positively because people because you feel proud Advan- I want to show and that's the whole point is anything that's the thing we won't let that happen differently. Good I should say one thing that covers. How can we start to build up? Pictures Exist windings from Al Schwartz. Said if you if you want to call stuff before more than just go off on the table that you care if just wipe off nothing I just you nothing and just on the title for the most important things to you and everything else decided the most important things focus on those things. What's your feeling about? May everything inches per year or wherever an input. The most important things to me family friends closest people breathing being alive. Keep himself half alive and making sure I'm trying to be the best health wise I hand and those types of things once you get those important things in order because we can sometimes get distracted with stuff takes them calls the I think that would be. That's how you can stop the convoys choice success because when you put things I you could focus almost as important as was homeless. Well doing those things make that lovely pace or just being even funny we talk some mice just just ignored. That finally faded. We should just pull you. She took off and she just listened cried news. She's where she just go fifteen hundred for some combos so it takes some amazing signal and if you listen back we'll come up so it was about anxiety because it makes eh but things like that so that's important to me and so now you can see all the moment because that's being run. God they also successful because a lot of that Wall Street June peaceably awesome. Just in June five. People probably had said something that said that you go Charlottesville child reaches out to hand out to pats a held hand. He's not so roy you recharge was which we reach a hand full of. Yeah we catch on every success for me as I recall seeing somebody you call us you success. If you put just just one thing you can title anymore if you want somebody. Everything's on polk. Everything everything not secure older. Everything's GonNa pick some things the musty point in your life. Would I be sticking want to tell you the time. They've called the Kospi recorded on the laptop thanking Sandcastle. Cacophony is on the phone. So we'll see one knows the critical no dissimilar us. I think for Magnum. Especially if you saw oh insinuated down you can only put in the title. Boom they golden you go family friends and then I think also from before on quantity and my toy boy myself doing things. He's really important as well. And I think I'll go get get higher and in scope is GonNa get on ready for the next day those things but you know there's a few pause and stuff to listen to nothing. Sometimes if he's the Bay of snow cover that year four coming home and being in that little routine ads listening to my podcast and doing those things and stuff like that is really important porn thing. I don't think you saw down released when she gets up. COACHWORK and each more is tight public can spend and the people interact with spending time with my family so I think that was the first into the table they encountered career and stuff. I'm doing from a self govern there that makes sense because this is causing. You might think about an appointment as long due due to decide on the title and just listening. I think he's too is similar to what we said to be. Honest allow myself oversee friends family Talk Kohl's Ryan by few made from canal fluid injured up as well. There's also someone wasn't people inuit people you can talk to people but on a Saturday people would much rather take someone not to call them. The twenty th century. Ah She sent me bring short on his dad's gained early Tex was worse right and what is worse is when you have a friend who NC some face time just calling uber faced on Mr the Noah which will become comfortable with bomb. No show kids talk about the first batch she now so they'll face tom you kids and it's funny because I phoned them. They'll say can you call him back. FACETIME 'cause I prefer the face to face raw for then there's that it's very much like you prefer attacks yeah and disrupts will have doing something or I could. I can take on and have a conversation in person somebody else without it. Being rude to the person that I'm with that makes sense so for me. I never phone call so I just prefer to the time issue. Your doctor's appointments on his. Yeah definitely is I think he's because consignees and I think it's the worst we take someone you can kind of Eerie controllables saying anyway. But I feel that through a text message you can kind of control more of the situation. I don't I wouldn't consider myself controlling on Faisal. Michael Things can get out of control. I guess so definitely time by myself. Things are on the table. The most important things I do tend to be in that by yourself. Bubble play importance nucor attended by myself overseas teams fall as well so we'll such as in the same inspect computer computer games tend to be with people by myself poverty social aspect. I mean when you put when educate your work on there. I guess that's why you need. That only put work on much. I feel that you need to try to you. Still an occupational step him with My. Maybe this is that this scene sorting things because I said McKee says analyst Frayn's days my stepfather for me but I don't think are per my job on the table now enough job enough where I work and I love the people I work wave wave but actually the thing I on the table. He's mosquitoes are using the job. Because that's the beat this me. Why is love more than anything is what I do? You just have to do that where I work now. I would always do that. Going for woodworking in the same place work in other places and not just work or use use that same managing doing my energy in promoting the podcast. And everything else so. I think my skill was award on there and stuff paperwork with all that and the job facilitates the I think the skill to the important bit. What was the original question things table that mostly everything else off just amazing brain being made off of what you said having the skills uh you have is impossible so being in the week as we talked about in previous postcards? 'cause you you develop in yourself you know you give everything to your job and your development if you continue date be the best person for where you work and what you do you do not for yourself as well because you always have those skills for years from now. All those skills you've been building was still be important in whatever you're doing and I could be in the same place that could be somebody completely different but I think it's the skills base that that that's what you kind of all right. That's my best to success in work. A big part success isn't just the results. livermore games backtrack grow as a person thing and personal coach talking about around post po costs of the causing arms the ASA language yes and you're working for a business and I will not doing the doomed. The goal I thought the hub in the business. They don't hurt the businesses Aso and sorry thousand mindset shift and shift at one. I'm set for them. Tubby revolution PAT themselves. Not Recognize actually really for me. Is the the business benefits. But actually I'm getting because I've taught in perfectly with what you said which I think is fantastic. It lets us all of his title. Paul knows important and recognize. Those are the things that these are the things skills and things of that you will family to concentrate on those things and that will help you create. Your reality was excessive not that thing where society trying to influence you to look after them both have the bonex science bad well. Siamese is not real success. That's success when you law being new and I'm just about things are important to you not some fed to you being we'll take you about those things not being fixed successful. That's the inpatient stay. Symbols doesn't have to have the status seems to be successful. I think that's what society carves out. That's the festival society wants us to believe because there's a lot of things five behind Matt decide that's what people are buying won't the people. This is Paul Waking people up to the reality. That is no success on successive. Talked about in this call's else great well from stop and I said this will be an interesting toy already. Seeing that's helped in my own head of different kind of perspective on stuff which really good kid yeah SCIATICA. That's just come from somewhere office Brown. I think we're all we will tell them. Always telling me about fifty minutes in Oxford time. CIANCI's there so visit twitting. Three's cup sites go. We chose twenty days as we ran out of time for the twenty on the last year he got twenty s success. These are things that we're just addicted to still told US otherwise. I think he's really helped enough just wanting to get something started all these must love so to be brave leaving off. This is why it uncomfortable put in two thousand eight days. I met with the absolute pants or they might be something. One opportunity terminated. So I'm side to you too and as you can count me okay. Number one call of one a high speed do twenty twenty. I mentioned some of the pulse reference. I'm not sure I can keep that voice. Go all the way through all the uncomfortable you might better than leads the voice succumbing in at number twenty this week rights time success. So you success this action done by number nineteen come up with your own twenty one years. I imagine you have unresolved and put those on these down number seventeen now dream. Same thing Mike Audie a mighty. Mite Oggi's Mike off Agent waiting exciting and we're racing number fifteen this week. Mike any ideas that you love colorful and make them stand out to down from last week and number fourteen and have a cup of tea or coffee start thinking. I'm up for that one affect has anyone tried the the gap the gap got research. And see what I did. Can you learn anything. So I was trying to say percents cap reserves gaps in the market. Right okay so we still have awesome al-Qaeda's gaps and see if there's anything that you can work your shooting in at number twelve the gaps to nothing number look for gaps in the market and have could you fool them into the top ten finish week. My maps of mind bat number Noy types in time l.. I read material do research about the things you want to do. Lucky number seven find someone. He's doing the things you love ready. Mix If you're doing practice appropriate out the top five eve love yourself and don't take it too seriously. That just troy coming in and before have fun. Fact is now the free issue actions reflecting your ambition coast but not quite here at number two troy then then leave that life. If someone is doing the thing that you wanted to report caused a look very focused focus. Do that same and this week number one roy attempting to enjoy twenty. I felt it should be locked into media the top of the POPs countdown and that magic you aware of top of the POPs Ryan. Yeah just actually yes I. uh-huh must not be absolute pants. Sometimes you will ever is just to show Jaunty tap in about ten minutes. Join down to stay on these countries and honestly familiar with laugh myself because sometimes serious you can be a bit more exc ext you down that just put out whatever but it with that subject done that. So that's Oh really helped me develop. That's true tea and coffee with not because of my mom curricular diction to caffeine. But jeez sometimes used to be thinking Tom. Sit Down thinking thinking about what you want. We'll get them we'll anyone can you say tomato. Fake Messy Coffee Eh. To come up with something so it could be in a very rational thing I feel across the top of the POPs voice now bit doing food. Something strange you see so we just a sound check before we get the record in his Couple of weeks ago. We did the same thing. Didn't we out. I've been jolted faking trainers. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. This week you very are into the nineteen fifties fifty started because you are able to laugh at yourself comedy. I've started watch Big Bang theory of get back into good. Thank you pop pickers for tune in this week to inspiration nation of the POPs pig as you say. It's twitter facebook instagram. Listen to listen to Ya. Joe Is at Joe. Joe Juror Jar Jar so have you looked in by life up now. Jane Coach was find Q.. Again everyone for listening. Please please please leaves five Star Review leave some comments share content spread the word encourage advocacy to listen if you take in plumping from this state. CANTU if you're new to the podcast please go back through. Listen to the archives and Greg stuff in there we will join us again next week. The sound goes free to one each.

Roy Joe Ryan twitter UK US Mike Audie Paul VDOT Georgetown Talk Nation Joe Johns Joe E. R. J. Grammy Sh Sarah salesman McCain
What's the Difference Between Business Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence? - With Elif Tutuk, Senior Director at Qlik Research

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:05 min | 2 years ago

What's the Difference Between Business Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence? - With Elif Tutuk, Senior Director at Qlik Research

"What does business intelligence mean as opposed artificial intelligence as it turns out the definitions get a little bit fuzzy? There certainly are lines to draw but they're fuzzy definitions when we pulled our audience already merged. We had a long kind of ongoing survey asking folks. What topics are you most interested to learn about in terms of the applications of A._I.? And things like customer service and marketing and some we're on the list was business intelligence and it was the most selected option and so we asked those same people the same respondents with his business intelligence mean to you and we got almost everything under the Sun. The broad definition that we kind of received was essentially anything having to do with understanding the data that we might already be collecting it was kind of that broad of an idea of when people think business intelligence enterprise leaders managers s V._p.'s our audience on things business intelligence they kind of think gaining some intelligence agents from some of the day we have as it turns out there are ways to kind of narrow that definition a bit and to think about how it's going to evolve and that's we try to do on this episode our guest. This week is l.. Took who is a senior director. A company called Click. Let's click with a Q.. A Q. L. I k.. This is a firm with three thousand employees around the world building kind of business intelligence tools and speaks with us about two things first. How is business intelligence itself evolving? How has it evolved to what it is now? And what is it now turning running into. I think a lot of the confusion between business intelligence and A._I.. Is actually right because the definitions are only getting fuzzier business intelligence is increasingly transmuting in a very A.. I. Augmented Way an elephant serve talks about that in phases that I think are very helpful in addition Aleph speak with us about where artificial intelligence is making its way into business intelligence in what that is enabling what new capabilities what new actions are going to be possible within some of these systems she goes into some depth about what that might look like so anybody now who's looking at business intelligence tools or using surf interfaces within their own enterprise to sort of make sense of their own data Powell that alter two years from now three years from now. I think elephants reasonably compelling picture about what will be new and different so forward-looking perspective into the Zeitgeist of the intersection of B._I.. And A._I.. And I hope you find it useful so this is l.. If Tuta with Click I'm Dan for Gela and you're tuned into A._I.. Industry let's go ahead and roll right in so l.. I wanted to begin us off in this interview here talking about business intelligence in the enterprise sort of what is the role of business intelligence today as you see yet and what does that Zeitgeist moving towards what is it moving into. Everybody talks about being data driven. What does it mean for the role of business intelligence in a company? Yes man great question. Thank you so I think the role of business intelligence has been involved Tasmanian <unk> from just providing reporting and it is more about being able to have access to a platform that can provide an antoine approach from data analytics on finally to creating insights so what I think people should start. Doc Thinking about and she'll be thinking about having a platform that can provide a full Brito capabilities supporting the overall supply chain from data to insight and overall the way that I see the B._I.. Market is shifting is I think we have seen three generations of B._i.. Technologies so the first generation was about like twenty years ago and this is where it was the first generation read it was more I._T.. Oriented so I._T.. Was Governing and creating everything and it was more about our reports and reporting when embassies on the frustration of course it was great to have access to initial step on accessing Bayton getting insights from that but the business users were really tied to I._T.. In terms of getting into those insights and in the first generation should I think you know the systems were more passive. David just doing to human is being told to them and again. It was mostly I._T.. Generated when you say a news story L. IF I just want to hop in for the listeners who might not know as well when you say I._T.. Generated in you say dependent pendant. Do you mean that the business leaders would have to kind of knock on the door downstairs of the smart computer folks and say hey. Can you get me a report when you say dependent tied to. Is that what you meant or what did you mean yeah. That's exactly what they were. They were they had to constantly interrupt the tech folks in order to see any of the date in the first place twenty years ago yeah exactly as you imagine the challenge we daddy as you may have one question right now and since user may asking I._T.. To provide a port for that but then once you see that report worked on the next question comes up and again you have to go through that loop and it wasn't a jolly iterative is obsessed enough. Got It. Yeah no completely make sense. I mean you get the first report. You're going to have twenty more questions than if you have to bother people in I._T.. For half in our every time you're just not gonna dig very far so I I understand what you meant. Now you can make sure on on so and then be starting the second generation of P._i.. On it was like almost ten years ago and this is where the south service concept starts to come in and thanks is about having sabotaged visualization Sasser state discoveries are where it was more business users and business units were able to generate insight on the visualizations for themselves but in the second generation again the challenge was mostly again the I._T.. was governing and controlling the daytime and what I'm seeing right now is the generation of B._I.. Where it's more about democratization of data and it's about having a data around the data structure where it is universally accessible in a governmental and it's very important for our audience to think about governance of the data but still providing yourself service accessible today today and then also more importantly deter generation we start seeing more the use of a I'll go tim machine learning to be able to crunch all of that data? It's around us to be able to serve insights and that is where I I really think that we deter generation of B._I.. We start seeing the systems become more generative like they are able to generate content for user reviews of A._I.. Yeah okay then so maybe if we can paint a bit of a picture of what this means if I'm if I'm just a functional leader right a lot of our audience we might they might be in banking in life sciences in what have you but you know they might be director of EP somewhere. A high level manager may be ahead of something when it comes to what their experience is going to be in how battle shift day to day you know I'm imagining you know the old world where they have to go downstairs and knock. DOC on a door or send an email and say can I have a report or maybe they have some static reports that are available to them and now I see a world where maybe they're more able to ask the questions of what they want when they want and maybe also where they are prompted with information formation that's important to them without even having to take the action so I may be going from again a digital door knocking too easy exploration as well as kind of exploration being done for them and almost prompted them in some sense. I might be missing more of the vision just touching on some things that you said. Is there more to flesh out there yeah exactly you're on the right spot down. When I say I am our region to a is also it's about augmented intelligence? It's not artificial intelligence <unk> building technologies and this is how we should think about these new technologies where the human institutions should be in the middle of it but the technology role of technology and algorithms is really to go after the data how that the user is interesting and to really run the algorithms to find statistically significant insights in the data and surface those insights to the user so that user can first of all understand an explorer that finding by being still augmented and make a decision at the end so it's about really granting users not replacing them <hes> and as you can imagine a and finding insights it all starts with daytime so pretty important for users to be able to go like the Catalog Marmot where they can actually search for the data in a governor and by Bandai find interesting data set than by leveraging the automatic intelligence capabilities they can actually ask questions with nature language where the system not only understands their question and then be able to interpret and surface unanswered any insight are but also being able to associatively surface additional relevant insights that you may not even thinking about about what does it yeah. There's a lot here so I appreciate you going fast with me in terms of of what you're talking about number one in terms of the augmenting not replacing. I mean for something like reports. Yeah I mean I you know I'm not speaking for you by the way elephant now. I'm just kind of speaking to the audience I mean if you have you know. Four dozen people just pulling spreadsheets in emailing people that are asking for them. You may very well have to let them go. At some point I mean unless you retrain them but to your point I think the majority of what you're speaking about now. Yes doesn't necessarily necessarily involve inherently the replacement rolls it simply means easier access to the people who need the darn data in the first place in terms of what that implies it sounds to me like we're GONNA need a new data infrastructure number one. We need this data to be accessible possible. That's that's an enterprise problem. It's different for every business as you would know better than me. Massively complicated not impossible. It's just it's just not a two day task. I'm in addition. It feels as though we might need staff leaders. Maybe even frontline people who now L. Know How to and understand how to ask in requests for this data right. If it's so much more accessible they might have just never used it before because they were not going to be the people that are asking the complicated questions but but now it is there so it seems like we need infrastructure changes and we need kind of expectation expectation in workflow changes from the team to those seem like big kind of cultural technical things that go along with this shift. Maybe you can throw some color on that because I see a lot of change being implied by what you're talking about. Yeah we really think and I also think that the changes about. Not Eliminating rolls under the B._I.. Business Intelligence umbrella. It's really we will start seeing shifts in the roles. You know how the developers and the data scientists are now determines doesn't data scientist is going to change and I'm expecting that you know the definition of a business intelligence developer will become more needs to understand more like a data whisper who needs to understand the needs of the business and I'm expecting that the business will be able to spend more time with business and then also getting the data ready so that the business users can have governed access to those prepared data sets and this is barrel so the importance like the technology will also come into play in the data preparation because as you now we cannot run <unk> understand the characteristics of the data and that will actually enable the system to easily associate data from different data sources and that's very important because for a I to learn you don't want Iraq to learn part of the story right you wanted to for the technology for the Algorithm to see the full story and that is where it's very important to have technology that can integrate data from different data sources and that's that's the data infrastructure sort of game right. You're going to have to have applications that can be glue and then you're also going to have to just have those old silos overhauled as well. You know there's probably GonNa be no single vendor solution that layers on top like a layer of cheese on a pizza and Kinda just gets everything prepped up in harmonize the way you need it this probably some some breaking up with a Jackhammer of these old ugly systems and allowing them to feed kind of a Meta system that can actually make use of the date. I imagine some some kind of legacy businesses are going to have to accept yes some of that shift there yeah exactly and I think that's where I'm not thinking about. Platform approach is is going to be very important. <hes> like integrating data is the data part of it but then you also need to have systems technologists that can integrate to each other saw the use of A._p._i.. You'll become very important so that if a B._I.. System generates insights you should be able to embed that into workflow so that users become more proactive literally get the insights that they need during river flow that they are doing so. I really think that overall there are three enablers for deter generation of B._I.. Yet the first enable democratization of data and about having access to all data in a governor manner that's universally accessible on the second enabler is augmented intelligence and this is the use of machine learning to raise data literacy within organizations again. This is about augmenting the users and helping them to understand be more easily analyzed data and reputations so we have been doing research in terms of the data literacy of the levels of the organization and what be here we are seeing is actually the data literacy level is very low in most of the organizations yeah and that's why the use of technology is to help us to become more data Detroit and the tort enabler is really having a platform approach to and beyond where from the age to the C. Suite everyone they can get access to insights because now they become embedded into workflows got it was kind of the third pillar here to touch on his well. Actually it was the third one so like democratization of data augmentation okay. I'm I'm blending. Augmentation your last one here yeah and then find one is being able to embed those into maybe to dive a little bit deeper into augmentation. I think my last so okay so those are those are distinct. Hopefully that's clear for the audiences. It is for me the last report I thought we poke into here for maybe our last five minutes is around. What that augmentation means you had mentioned before so lightly that the ideas not only can we find the date? I guess that kind of fits with the democratisation idea but that the data might find us in other words. If there's patterns patterns that matter they might find their way to the user if I'm a customer service person. Maybe this means that a really angry customer response is going to float its way to the top or maybe a new pattern of a lot of people having. Let's say I'm in e commerce. I start we're having a big spike of delivery issues. People not getting their products to the door maybe if that breaks a certain threshold that data's GonNa throw itself in front of my face and kind of make itself known even though I don't pull up the report is that sort of what you had meant where her we're gonNA find ways to make date unknown when it needs to be known in benefit is our business is GonNa think through that because obviously doesn't sit there and think and say what am I human masters need right that that's not really what happens we would need to somehow tell the system on what matters to the human whether they ask you or not this is what matters to the human that also feels like a level of strategy and planning that is not really relevant to be. I today because capability doesn't exist. How do you think that'll happen so I think one of the important component to enable it in the business is the user experiences that we have to think in terms of the human admission collaboration and that goes back to your point about the machine the robot will know what is your intent? What is your question so we really need to think about experiences with technology where it's a user? I don't need to know the technical details about how to use the product the tool B._i.. Tool I should be able to just ask my question but then being able to just asking the question is not enough because as humans we are really good with our visual recognition and pattern detection capabilities right so we have to think about expenses that combines the for example the nature language processing <unk> the visual exploration capabilities so that like image in an environment where you ask a question you get inside but Dan the system can also generate you. Maybe like in on the fly Ulta data story so that you actually get more a- at inside by understanding the context so I think that it's not only having a platform that you can't run algorithms video the need to think about the user experiences that provides that cooperation between human and machine and the other thing. It's it's not only that machine is generating insides. It's also the as humans we have the intuition we know our business right so the system the machine should be able to learn from user input and Dan Adjust the algorithms accordingly so it's about creating anything that collaboration over humans we will be using what we are good at like with our non vineyard thinking capabilities being that our visual perception in advance and ultimately decision making and it's about using technology machine made what the Michigan is good at running complex algorithms on large amount of data in that that balance is in my opinion the unknown. I've probably said it a hundred times on the show figuring out the U._I.. And experience in prompts. Some features of these A._I.. Tools is in my opinion harder in many regards than the A._I.. itself if you build a system that can do anomaly detection really well congratulations. I guess you're kind of smart if you can figure out how to prompt a certain category category of user to learn more in augment their workflow and become vastly more productive by a leveraging that anomaly detection in a way that lets those insights jump out at them and let them be more powerful in their work. That's where the money is and that's where the value is and in that regard l._S._i.. I wish you folks luck because I think as we're probably both aware that is there's a lot that's unknown. They're on a lot to evolve there. I think it'll be exciting to watch in the years ahead so I'm glad that you were here on the interview. I know we're just up on time at L. If I wanted let's say a big. Thanks for joining us on a industry thank you it was a great pleasure to be part of this conversation. Thank you <music>. Thanks for listening to this week's episode of a and industry. This is your host Stanford. July hope that we catch you next week. Many of our executive listeners often get great ideas from our podcast or newsletters but they ended up coming to us for more help so they might see some research project that we did with the World Bank and they might want to do some of their own research on deeper market opportunities for a in a specific sector or understanding the growth rates of A._I.. In a certain domain are they might have seen some A._I.. Business Strategy Work that we've done with a pharmaceutical company and maybe ask about things along those lines or see one of the presentations that we've given at the United Nations and ask if we can speak at an event and while we certainly we do these things were certainly involved with clients on pretty big projects on a regular basis a lot of time. These messages will just end up in my personal inbox people will find my email or they'll just find me on linked in and send along the message and this ends up being actually pretty tough to juggle at this point given the travel schedule and given all the the client projects that were involved in and few people actually know particularly people who only listened to the podcast and aren't on emerge dot com or on the newsletter don't know that we actually have a services page that lists what what we can help with so we are not the best at everything but in terms of what we do which is mapping the capability space of A._I.. And conveying that to executives in ways that help them win in the market specific services tailored to that can be found at E.. M. E E R J dot com slash services so here it emerged artificial intelligence research. We work with government departments. We work with public companies. We work with organizations who are serious about making a I a competitive advantage and again we actually do list so the programs that we have so many of the podcast listeners don't know this these messages end up in my inbox and then I'm traveling for two weeks and I feel really bad that I get back to people later but you can reach us through that services page or simply send along an email male. Its services at E._M.. R._J.. Dot Com services at Yemi R._J.. Dot Com from there dylan or Marcus or one of our team members will be able to get back to you much more quickly than I would be linked to it so if you're interested in doing more with what you've learned here if you serious business initiatives related to artificial intelligence and you WANNA take your organization to the next level just simply reach us at emerge dot com slash services that's E.. M. E. R. J. dot com slash services or just email services at emerge dot com.

I._T senior director Dan Zeitgeist V._p. Yemi R._J Gela Doc Thinking Ulta David World Bank Bayton United Nations director L. M. E E R J
[AI Futures] Forging International Consensus About the Future of Intelligence - with Jerome Glenn of The Millennium Project (S1E9)

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

39:48 min | 1 year ago

[AI Futures] Forging International Consensus About the Future of Intelligence - with Jerome Glenn of The Millennium Project (S1E9)

"This is Daniel Fidel in you're listening to our Saturday futures series. This twelve part series is about artificial intelligence. In, this episode nine in this series, we've talked about near-term governance considerations for AI and also long-term. What's IT GONNA take it both a national and international level to sort of forge a future with it's very powerful technology in the decades ahead that hopefully be an aggregate good one, not one that instigates more economic disparity or war or other negative consequences that we'd like to avoid, and there are few people who've done more futures thinking and thinking about policy the future of governments future of enterprises I ended mapping those futures out then Jerome Glenn who is the founder of the Millennium Project to for a quarter of a century has been running the. Millennium Project, and essentially doing just that working with governments working with large organizations from the Red Cross to the government of Korea to sort of map out what the future looks like under different circumstances into poll together varied stakeholders often internationally to think about how we can get along what kind of future we want to craft and what's going to be a forged win win scenario for that future. Maybe we can do to prepare for it We speak with Jerome this week about what that would look for artificial general intelligence towards the latter part of this twelve part series, and we're on episode nine. So this is the back half for sure. We're GONNA be talking more and more about the long term consequences of strong ai when this technology becomes very powerful. The big question in today's episode is will, what does it mean to prepare for that? Who needs to be at the table in order to make sure that that's a peaceful transition? What kind of questions do we need to ask in order to ensure that we're sort of buffering against risks in so much as we can actually do that and jerome with his experience and exactly the space sort of breaks that down in depth I'd love to get your thoughts on this episode in this series in general, you can go to e.. N. E. R. J., DOT COM slash pod three to two question survey. It's not even a survey. It's just a couple of short fields you can share your thoughts. I'd love to know if you WanNa see this as a separate podcast if you like it on Saturdays, your ideas really matter. So please do share them there. We've gotten dozens of responses already in it's really helping me to kind of craft what the next day I'd future series might look like but I'd love to get your ideas as well. So without further ADO, we're GONNA. Dive into this episode this is Jerome Glenn With the Millennium Project here on this special AI? Futures Series. So Jerome got a lot to talk about here in terms of artificial intelligence governance, artificial general intelligence. The reason I think this conversation will be fun is because you've thought through some future scenarios with with very large organizations for many years. Very High Level and you've learned a lot in the process of what is the process for pulling together different stakeholders imagining, what will the future be? What should we do I? Mean very complicated. You go about it. Of course, one of the first things you do is you gotta find out the state of the art of whatever it is you know is there is, let's say five elements to it or ten elements, and you know was the state of the art on this element on this element, this element, this element. Now myself I won't know enough to do that. So we have a global network of networks sixty five nodes. Return Network himself within countries, and so I can say, here's where we are so far and they tell me what else ought to be considered. So there's so as global sort of a state of the art assessment finger. Yeah and then within that with take a look and say what questions were not asked the authorities have been asked. and. What questions were as but answered, superficial. That gives us questions to as in a Delphi study, which is a questionnaire goes around the world. And the results of that then becomes guts content to create draft scenarios. We send address narrows back out and everybody hasn't at Pat and presides over, and then we can say, okay, what do you do about this scenario? What did you do about it? You'll see a good action as well as scenarios this sort of a general approach So you talked about the Delphi study I actually recall you bringing this up the first time you and I chatted I don't remember who has five years ago or something wild like that. Speak briefly about wooded Delphi study is so I like finger on the pulse what are we missing? Pulling, those ideas together and then there's this kind of dispersion to generate even more. What is the Delphi study. Delphi questionnaire. Whose second round. Is. Determined by the results of the first round. And third round is determined by the results the second route. the reason for it was that there were generals and admirals and experts that don't always the same room with each other at the Rand Corporation. The Rand Corporation had to figure out how to beat World War Three. Well, we didn't know a lot about that beginning, but you had all these brilliant people that don't always cooperate. And sometimes in the military, sometimes, people were afraid to criticize admiral if there are only a cap yeah you avoid all this crap by saying here's around one tended out and they response good. But without a names, no one knows that you're a private or a president is state. and. So the ideas become persuasive rather than personalities or your. Then, all those responses but also happens to sometimes someone doesn't respond to somebody else's idea. If they're in person Zanele on that yeah all but then the second round, those ideas on the first are in there. So you have to respond to all that second first-round stop that you wouldn't normally have responded to. The same thing goes on those results. Everything has a chance to be responded to without name rank serial number so that ideas become persuasive by itself. So it was a way to collect intelligence at a have it learned through innovations so it wasn't just saying what's the state of the art of thinking is like you're gonNA improve state of the art is thanking as itself yeah. A I I go by. And that's brilliant. It's Great I. Still Think it's one of the best there is however what happens if you're in a hurry? Light with Kopech nine stuff you know you. Aren't working on that one. Now, you're going to do what we call a real time Delphi. That came up because of time. Sanjay questionnaire. But he will have a sign insulin come back later so you can vote early off. So the idea is, let's say you responded by by just off and we asked you explain there. So they say on a scale of one to ten, it's like five then when it comes to explain yourself. So the people see why you said what you said without your name out you're right same way, and so then come back two days later they later and I said you know I see somebody misinterpreted. So, I can go back my original text and edited to make it clear although as thought. However in Singapore, they did an avid poker contact range this way there's a web link. Then another person comes later sees that. And says, yeah but the Green. Ones Better Watch this. And so you're you're you're getting the CPAC stuff, but then you can say to somebody this Delphi it goes live today at new and we finished in one week. This is called real time Delphi got it and so the original approaches said was developed by the Rand Corporation Right Yep. As a matter of fact, partner in crime had Gordon co-founded when project was part of that original team Okay. There we go. So there some of the the the origin story here. So when it comes to congealing all of those thoughts I, mean some of your past projects I'm trying to think of an and you you do a better job is around you lifted what's most analogous to this project you And I are talking about, which is around the requirements for global governance in what the means of global governance for artificial general intelligence obviously never tackled specifically similar futurist type projects, technology type projects power in government type projects. I'm trying to think about once you've congealed all of those answers from different sorts of parties will talk about who those parties are. Then you gotta turn that into maybe more or less likely future scenarios to some degree, and that also feels like hard work but but go on about what happens after the Delphi. We're not doing necessarily more and likely scenario. The idea is to do plausible scenarios that are useful for thinking. Right, so or example. Currently. Answer to your question related stuff. We just finished a three year study on the future of technology and work. Obviously, a is a big part of that including Janelle Washer, yeah including super they could goes out twenty fifty. Nine not get super, two, thousand, fifty, but we. On the exactly why you alternate snares here's what he hit. Get Etc Sofa. So the way that we do this is we take all that content. And some of his positive negative. Obviously the negative stuff gives me the stuff for negatives Mary positive stuff. And then mixed now. Futures will argue against doing graphic. Way of doing Herman, Kahn also, Rand Corporation also a former friend worship longer live. Did the positive negative in middle because that's the way we think season. Since then a lot of futures now the trouble is that people plan for the Middle One. It becomes a self fulfilling process. However. That is evolved into something of its superficial. Which is people say we'll pay two or more uncertainties. Like you get super I don't get super high you get high unemployment don't get high on. So that makes you a two by two grid. The desert become forced air then what they superficial. Now. Describe that state of the future in quantity fifty or whatever. Aren't that's fine. That's good. Then you say. What scenario? What strategy should? I should I have the works in all of those? All right. That's the normal sort of superficial scenario plant, which is better than doing nothing on argue against because it's easy for people to do consultants work with it into understand. The real reason for joins narrows originally was. Her write a story reels Murray not describing a state. Like in a movie. A. Zach you have to have. With plausible stuff not that's the truth but Klaus we'll start why? Because as you write a scenario, you'll get to a point. You say, I have no idea what happens next this is crazy. I never thought of Oma John We've got to stop and you stop and then you do your research, call your friends you know all all that sort of stuff to fill in. The value, the original value of a scenario. was to force you into a position where you and your colleagues have insights into what you didn't even know to ask. Quick Vignette. Corporation was ideas was what happens if there's years ago? What happens? No thermonuclear war doesn't occur in years. But in Orbison to crisis comes up and you might have. While Caused. Trouble with thirty year cat. Is that you you? You don't know who's in the Kremlin? Furthermore International Affairs have changed enough. You may be looking at Beijing, etc. Right. So the whole idea of mutual assured destruction was you had to prove to your opponent you're crazy enough to press the button. How you convince an unknown power structure in an unknown political geopolitical on the world that you're crazy enough press the button. They didn't know. So you stop writing. And you do research and you think all right and they don't do that anymore. So you're stop and say I don't know all right now what they did was they came up with fallout shelters. Your original reason for fallout shelters had nothing to do with people being thousands of years underneath the ground. Would it had to do with his convincing your opponents? That you're crazy. Enough press the button. How by having real fallout shelters and then you say everybody go. So the in this scenario, the your opponents sees news stories video. Mass crowds in New York City going up massive crowds in. Chicago mass crowds Los Angeles the whole country is going to these fallout jobs. What does the opponent? Thank you guys are crazy. You're actually going to go to war. That was the purpose but you couldn't say that purpose during the Cold War because it would make the whole idea in ballot. Right yeah you never heard about this. But there's an example of where you got to figure out what you don't know as important. So in businesses say Weinstein one because they didn't look there look there they didn't go to the unknown questions. Got It. So the purpose of you're saying you collect all these ideas we sort of map forward. You're saying the hard work to some degree is thinking through these plots and then stopping at like to be honest I have no idea with this combined with. This zero clue as to what's going to go down I need to talk to folks that know those areas I need to speak to people from her from those go regions whatever the case may be. So so this help us flesh out, you know how wide is this suite of plausible scenarios because of course, you could imagine it being infinite, but you don't want it to be infinite. You have to boil down the representatives set that will be useful for thought. And informed for policy for for future action, I'm bound that reality with implausible scenarios that are a limited number. Well. There's two approaches. One approach is the one I just mentioned i. Was your plausible negative worcester possible positive and what's your mix the other courses. As I mentioned, you take your various unknowns that you really want to know about and you make your matrix can have you know a whole mess different scenarios that way and then you pick out of that mix what do you think is the most interesting? What really brings up the unknown questions and so forth. That we have asked before a so and then you have yourself a little steering committee who nitpicks you to death? And you come up with a consensus saying, okay these are the ones we wanted to approach. Now in the process of writing them, this is another good method performance in the process of writing. Is. Ours are develop outside of the original expectation. Let. Avon. A method should not be a prison cell. Method should help you. So as you right 'cause I heard while the story started get outside of the box lot at because you're trying to find the dynamics of cause-effect. Current you didn't think about before so it should evolve beyond your original expectation then you're learning. Got It, you mentioned the steering committee on some level should be open to that learning and be and be responsible to saying, okay. The these are the plausible scenarios we ought to discuss that we believe are most likely to be worth considering I. WanNa Pivot towards your eventually gonna be touching more and more on the governance of artificial general intelligence I happen. To believe that this is such a complicated scenario that it will imply some kind of a pooling of thought rather than hypothesizing in some academic tower or by some some individual brilliant scientists when it comes to coming up with ideas about how the future will be. Sometimes those have to do with real power struggles with the territory lines with the policies of. Across borders and boundaries. This process are there instances of this process where we've talked about very contentious issues with? Competitor's more or less, and are there any unique insights from that? Oh absolutely this is one of the essential assumption on the money and project his to global futures research. Locally not to have a PhD from Beijing. Moscow. At Harvard, with both got PhD's from Stanford know that's not global research. So. He leaves that like we have no in in Beijing and a node in Tehran as well as the than an silicon balance Cetera. So by having a mix of these people you onto the address questions but a question then your question, I assume going into the eye. On as we're preparing to work on a government study. One of CO partners will be the Chinese Academy of Social Science Institutes. Of saw technology saw technology the legal stuff all the well, we're working on this technology of a on. So, this is. Including, China in the conversation from round one. Because if we're going to create these international agreements and treaties and governed systems gotta how? China. And others gang so we start them to begin with. And so yeah, clearly need the stakeholders their right to presume that I'll very contentious issue. Let's just talked to one party will figure out what they think. The other party will think them will bring it to the world right? Even if you did drop something great, you know there'd be zero trust serve baked into that process. So clearly, it sounds a giving people in equal footing kind of to get off the ground is one thing it seems to me that to get folks to agree or to to at least have some degree of I guess maybe consensus is not exactly the right word but to. Serve come to the same page on some topics. There would have to be a lot of that oscillating these different plausible scenarios and say, which are the ones that are digestible for both of us ways. One of the things we're looking forward the things that they're looking for you know right now I think in the artificial intelligence race, the US China's kind of the big consideration. Of course I think we should be thinking about the developing world should be thinking about the future of Europe we should be thinking about other players organized crime because they've got the cash to buy the best software engineers in the world. And they got the institutional savvy. You create a whole bunch of middlemen corporations so that you think you're were. Is and you're not. So we're include that as well. How do you pull those folks into the conversation? It'd be like well, you know we really need a representative from organized crime. Well Nice thing about the money of project people sometimes just show up. And you never quite know why but that's okay. I figure if they can find the back door, they're smart enough to walk in a living room. Anyway. But one part of that is the UN has the drugs and Crime you're and they look at all organized. Now. There's a guy involves in that who is now part of the UN stuff on a I application Irakly directly you? mentioned. Sure that. I don't think. I. Don't think he's that he probably won't be all that offended Iraqis. Proud. About saying Oh. Goodness. All right. Well, there's a chance I'll edit this out, but there's a chance I want to go go on going well, the idea is that people who have more. Frontline encounters we WANNA have in. And but this brings up of essence also. You don't want to give your opponent. Crimes opponents speak. Ideas. And and and our work for better for worse. I did stop. So we don't WanNa make them smarter. But we would like to figure out social judo and s by as far as I'll go. Okay. Interesting. So there's there's there's considerations there to around. Can We? Can we extract from? I, mean. This is this sounds like international politics intelligence in the first place can we can we pull in everything that we wanna pull in but not be permeable ourselves to have folks learn things And there's a parallel here. This is complex. Helped me remember why I started on this. Is Self interest of organized crime to take seriously why has every go to General? We don't know how long it will take to get to. Super. Goes to super without initial conditions being in good shape. We're toes. Now is a parallel. During the Cold War. Carl Sagan went running around saying. If. You have always explosions get enough dust in the air thus clouds in the air that you knock off your vegetation. So I don't care whether Moscow or Washington has a first strike defense or a second strike defense reviser both toast. So you've got to stop it because there's no winner. No matter what you do. No matter what you do you lose. All right. So the same thing we're saying, no matter what organized crime does. They're. GonNa lose with the rest of us. If we don't get the generally I write that moving this Super A. A soubriquet I can mess around organized crime just like they could mess around with you. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm thinking forward or I guess we'll close the gap more on Agi and on Super Intelligence you know I'm imagining going through this process with you know high up folks in China High Up folks in the United States and it start at one level I. Imagine there might be a Delphi cycle of sorts and possible scenario through, and then maybe it will go up to a higher level and hopefully there will be more powerful folks involved. It would seem as though it would be challenging to come to a same page conclusion about sort of where Agi. Should land whether it be in whose hands or representing what kinds of values or it doesn't do this but it can do this. You know on these are impossible things but you know we might as well take a swing because if you know imminent destruction the alternative, why not? What is the approach to wiggle around advocates? You know you can imagine all these all these human rights, things that Europe in the US are going to tout may not exactly be you know privacy and whatnot may not exactly be China's Cup of tea no matter how you slice it. How you frame cut is a process like this help try to find middle ground if there is one. Latouche steps. You can have. Workshops national workshops or the workshops in different parts of the world. They can say, okay what do we do about that stuff? So then they have a bunch of suggestions we pull all those new did this by the way the future work and technology studies saying way we got hundreds and hundreds of suggestions these workshops around the world. A lot or lapse of course for many people think the same thing. But then we narrowed down to like about ninety or so or hundred specific actions, and then divided those into different categories whereas governor do business do. New and so forth. All right. Then we send those out is dealt by five separate Delphi's and say now was the good the bad about this, the likelihood to pause, and so then we give back to everybody. Here's the menu of actions. Here's the commentary on those actions. Here's what's been perceived to be the the feasibilities actions. And the likelihood. So if you're in country X., you might pull out that whole menu. Options that are relevant to you you another country might pull out from. So so they don't have to have world agreement. Will we have to have is a better on rotation that we have right now? Now it's superficial and it's not serious long range. So this will move the conversation just like it worked at. That has moved conversation quite a long by now. Got It so. The idea would be to concretize Internet just like well, we disagree about things well, I want power you our but to say, all right well, here's all the ways it could progress. Here's the international governance structures. Here's the local kinds of governance structure. Here's the modes of checks and balances, and here's will be good or bad about these. These different approaches years with this party thinks about it, but this part thinks about it. And maybe that would concretize. Okay. Here are things where there seems to be almost ubiquitous agreement. That's great. Here seems to be the biggest faultlines and then hypothetically you could run another cycle about handling those faultlines. But at least now we know what's contentious what's not where we agree and maybe brought categorize the points where friction exists so that we can work on them. It sounds like if nothing else that would be the output. Take a look at the the climate change. The GIOTTO protocol is a lot different than the Paris agreement. Go on his for the folks who are who are at home in are familiar with the core differences there go on. Okay Kyoto Protocol the original ideas about addressing climates. It did not have much specificity at all. And Set out the door. And then as. Of the meetings occurred going into the climate change conferences against more precise, more precise and more people play in the original protocol China did not say you can inspect me. For what I'm doing on. Carbon. In the later they get. Yes. You can expect me about what so he balls so we gotta start. And that's what. Usually. Good. Starting. Off Ideally, this helps a process that ends up into international agreements into the actual negotiations eventually, a treaty ratification, and then a treaty can be modified updated Yep. So like the process itself that we're we're talking about here. So in terms of you know we've got a number of questions before we wrap about this. Topic specifically now that we've talked about a process and hopefully the further folks tuned in, it's useful to to think through how many ideas have to be pulled together to actually have a conversation about something. So complicated, you know if you think about who would have to be involved for something as important, artificial general intelligence obviously, you know representatives from different countries. Sure but. Deep questions they're doing folks from defense private sector and academia deed folks from different Geo regions within these countries a representative for cultural nuances. Do we need folks of a certain level of rank in the military as opposed to just some guy who happens to be the one region fiction to be interested in this stuff on not that I think it's IT'S A. Separated from reality, but for some folks it is. Deciding sort of need to be in the room is challenging and it might not be that in a first round, we can pull in the ideal players whose opinions we really think would matter in starting to concretize the conversation who might we start with with something like Agi you've already done some thinking on this. Remember that Berry beginning you want to know the date of the arts. Yup what are the norms principles values what does the state of the art on thinking about? Rules and audits or a What is the status of results from different international conferences because a lot of international conference meetings have occurred. Within that body as we go through that, you can pick out who knows the most in different areas. That's one part. Then, within also ask our nose sixty five, not around the world who ought to be invited. So. Most of the people who are invited or not centrally if we didn't right, you know like I might buy you and so. We might do sent but then our Iran note picks crew from Iran will be involved I won't know. Isreaeli Rayleigh no we'll pick who in Israel, and I will not know who should be and so so a lot of picking is done by Dr knows you're supposed to be a group of individuals and institutions cut across institutional categories government business academic. So, that's our brain picking mechanism of global local conversation. Got Us into the goal would be bought up. Well bottom up and top down. His both Okay. You have the nodes doing the grassroots ball, but we're also doing a global assessment like approach as you pointed out, we'll go. Pose. Okay. Got It. Got UNDERSTA. So I imagine there may have been previous were you've cycled a number of times on a particular topic? You mentioned three years in the future of work. I'm not exactly sure how that went I. Know You've you've done other sort of broad projects, governments, etc. I imagine sometimes I passing distillation of these ideas maybe don't have. Someone high enough in the People's Liberation Army as you'd like or someone is high up in buzz, you might originally like or someone is high abed up Microsoft or Google maybe you think would be relevant for. Agi Conversation. But if you build enough momentum, maybe the second time around, you can start to loop them in. You know when it comes to the critical stakeholders who who need enough by into start to get this stuff td mentioned moving from Kyoto to the Paris agreement the nudges along that line in terms of the political cloud in terms of the poll. Businesswise politically, etc does it often happen in kind of concentric circles? So to speak are or how do we work our way to influence? The people that we attract. Are Thought leaders in the sense because they want to continue being fought meters. So they WANNA find out we know something they don't know. Looking at the other student in school what are they now? So, there's a Lotta that going on, right. So result we attract a lot of thought leaders talked other people we don't know. They can't keep their mouth shut as how they keep the reputation by saying unique right. So a lot of the stuff gets rippled along we integrate the players as you point out as much as we can. But a lot of these people don't necessarily like to fill out a questionnaire. Footnote. What we've done in the past, we have our no chair interview such people. They won't fill out the questions themselves, but they'll answer. Yeah, yeah. Drank or so we do that. So we're. -nology but the thing is it permeates out I mean there's no. We don't we run for one study at the next. We don't always evaluate how it permeates out, but you see our phrases in different things inside retired in the head. And you can tell because we pick a year or a certain consequences for. US and you can tell, yes, see who's grabbing your stuff. Leaders light to know that they're the ones who know it all they want to say I want to do X.. Think Thank X. told me to do this. No, they don't WanNa do that. Yeah. It's it's interesting. There's a funny analogy in the market research world in center of our universe you know beginning the company was working with big retail banks in a pharmaceutical companies, etc and we were warned by early advisers who who were pretty high up forrester you WANNA. Steer clear in your early days of Lake. PWS's in the KPMG's in the big consultancies because their goal would be to take whatever your research methodology is, and then they've already got all the enterprise relationships in and they'll just say, hey, we came up with this look at what we found look at how many companies we assess and so yeah, similarly there's. Consequences in your world too. So it is with ideas I. Guess Right easy to swap I can see plenty of upsides there. But of course, there are some downsides back on Agi here you know clearly you and I are on the same page why this interviews happening that much more thought would need to be given to how this would shake interested in some of your instincts neither you nor I know the future, but we have some instincts instincts on. What it would take to cross the chasm where international bodies our nation's maybe let's say would believe that human solidarity around this issue is in central. To be of the belief that at some point, we will have to come to that conclusion if we don't want competing cyborgs and competing strong ai I think that that's that's really the state of nature in terms of plugging in stuff into back of our skulls and in terms of building machines more powerful than ourselves. The state of nature I wouldn't leave very much room for for Happy Little Apes. But what kind of tensions what kind of you know precedence would have to exist four folks to get on the same page and say, Hey, we have to come up with a way to handle this. What do you think it's GonNa, take. That's why we're best prepare the sun. That's why. The but to give us a side point to that might help the audience be a little more optimistic because there's reason to be quite pessimistic as is that in the early days of the Internet I was involved in Getting what's called packet switching instead device that makes the Internet cheap put these little things all around the world and it makes packages and switches to a satellite. The satellite time is almost nothing even though you've noticed computer all day long that's why it's cheap. Now, I was involved in the early eighties getting that into different third world countries and often dictatorships you business. And as a result, I was aware of the conversation. Gt talent and all the other early early players and we are so happy and optimistic. We're going to get a knowledge of the world together. We're going to make it work. I. Mean it was just great. It was like. I got a magic wand and running around the world hurting on all these deals, right I did not think once. Far As remember anything about the use of it for child pornography. For organized crime in wandering and all that Orleans for star, a cybercrimes information warfare as but all the rest of it I was. I would say as a species we were. Lately naive about it as we ran into it. Now. That's not the case. I, mean, there are I'm not trying to keep track of this stuff and I can't. There's so many conferences meetings on on. In artificial intelligence. I can't hardly keep progress over anything. So we are looking at the negative. So thank God for Hawking's and Gates and the rest of the. Traveling this Boston Hey, this can go the wrong way. We did not have any remember in the early days of the Internet your baby him some people say you're weren't allowed saying, Hey, we got to rethink how we do this Internet yes, we want to do it but we can't just let it go. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Her what you said that I remember which means that the in my view that there's reasons to be optimistic that we get more collaboration on this one then we did on the other. And there's more downside because going to the super as you point out. Yeah. I mean you know part of me thinks that many many years ago that there would have to be some kind of an I hate to use the analogy I. Don't have a better when I probably should think through a better one before I start saying podcast but some sort of Pearl Harbor ask scenario now that it has to be an attack by another country, but it has to be an event that. As horrible as it is the common enemy idea that I the the idea of intelligence in an in an unbound survey way or in a way that maybe we feel like his dangerous would be so evident as to be real not as to be imagined I think you know it wasn't even the coronavirus here. You know what? What was it? It was. No. One's really sure about what the CCPA's saying. No one's really sure like what's true. What's not whatever I think a lot of Americans might have some skepticism there although you know certainly plenty of sympathy for the folks that were ill and for the doctors who really had a bad golf but you know you start feeling it crawl across. Europe right he started seeing like the pictures coming in with the CCP's not gonNA show you all the carnage from from a poorly handled sort of. Outbreak but you know across your, we were seeing and I think for Americans it was like by Golly, we've really got to think about this. You could still say we acted slow but the ideas like it has to be visceral. Might have to visceral here. Might there have to be some some brain computer interface some Ai. SCENARIO OF SPOOKS PEOPLE. So thoroughly across the glow, they realize we gotta get on the damn same page we can. Develop. In under three scenarios, we did on the future work technology out to twenty fifty. We did have in their some of those, for example, the idea of weapon systems of developing and and almost developing its independence capability. I mean weapons systems, alliterate act independent of human control, and we have that in this scenario. So by the way, the to it. Because government sometimes a little slow sometimes our self defensive and offensive, and see you end up with your independent hackers in the world underground folks. They create a new independent group. That gets ahead of the thing and then fighting cooperates with governments but maintains our independence from governments on they wouldn't be arrested so far so they have. Intrigues on this stuff yes. We have a couple of those. Things are lost control, and in this scenario we ended up concluding in that that particular there was never fully under control. He was a constant thing that yes or somebody hold you know part of it whole areas wiped out the still happens. Yeah. There's some stuff in there. Referrals. You. Have to check out the future of work. It sounds like that's the closest precedent to too strong. I at least in terms of your. Matter of fact, you wonder we had the very end art isn't all of a sudden things are happening around the world. We couldn't figure out why and how is happening and we think of. The Subaru has begun. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I will make sure that we linked to whatever is publicly available in that work in the show notes somewhere. So people can get an idea of what the output to these kinds of processes are and were were at on time here rebound load them I mean twenty bucks is not a big deal. Easing off. So Cool Jerome I'm glad we're able to have you on in this series. You are one of the rare folks brought on because you know you don't know. But unlike most people in those in that position, you actually have a process to figure it out I. Think more of US should be considering it through that Lens very much appreciate your perspective on the series of thanks so much joining. US. Thank you. So that's all for this futures series episode in the business podcast the next three Saturdays are three final episodes in the series on Ai Governance. So we have three guests who are in my opinion, some of the most important thinkers about strong. And the considerations of governance and management and even safety of artificial intelligence that approaches or even surpasses human ability on multiple fronts. Those three guests are Steve on one hundred who is our next interview E. next Saturday. Ben Gerstle arguably one of the best known artificial general intelligence thinkers in the world founder of a number of AI companies and organizations. And lastly, Hugo de Garris one of the earliest thinkers in this space who wrote a paper I think two years after I was born nineteen eighty-nine about the future of artificial general intelligence in his thoughts have been really important me crafting my own opinion about where these technologies are headed. So we've had on some great folks we had Stuart Russell from Berkeley. We had folks in the future of Humanity Institute from the C. from the I Tripoli so many great perspectives or really going to start stretching that into what the heck does this mean for where we're going and where do we ultimately even WanNa go as business leaders. Government leaders is people thinking about the future of humanity intelligence itself so we've got. Some excitement in these next three episodes and I'm excited to bring them to you. So be sure to stay for next. Saturday for more of that and be sure to stay tuned for. Tuesday. When we dive right back into a I, use cases here on the I in business podcasts stay tuned and I look forward to catching you in the week at.

China Delphi US Rand Corporation representative Jerome Glenn Europe AI Beijing Delphi Millennium Project Moscow founder UN Daniel Fidel Paris Red Cross N. E. R. J.
Making a Documentary Series in China with Dominic Johnson-Hill

The Documentary Life

41:18 min | 2 years ago

Making a Documentary Series in China with Dominic Johnson-Hill

"Microphone. Check one two, three cities city siblings, civilins levels. Check good. Sounds good. One two, three rolling and. China's moving on is progressing. And of course, it is a shame, but a lot of these old traditions and cubs, you will be lost. And, and I really did feel that, that we were documenting the last of a lot of things. You know, one thing I've lent. It businesses the importance of finding your niche and finding something you're truly passionate about, and being able to, to sell a story, and I think there's a lot of stories that I know in, in Beijing in China through the fortunate being hidden so long that I would love to tell Hello and welcome to the documentary life, a show that sets out to inspire, and inform you on how to best live and leave your own documentary life. I am your host Christine parkers, and this is episode number one hundred and six and it is brought to you by barong films. Proud creators of documentary film the documentary life podcast. And now, the independent filmmakers, essential checklist course our free, eight part course, designed to help you chief financial stability gained support and effectively distribute your documentary film. Before we get into today's show. I just wanted to let you know that the podcast will be going to a BI weekly release, or as they say, in the UK once a fortnight. So the next time you'll hear from us, we'll be on Friday June fourteenth now onto today's show. The. If you've never been to Cambodia, but if scene photos, or video footage of it, you've most likely seen one of two things you've either seen some kind of archival footage of the Camaro Rouge, the notorious radical group that took power in the mid seventies, and proceeded to destroy nearly a third of its own population or you've seen the images of the magnificent Ankor watt temples the incredible stone structures built sometime in the twelfth century. And then kind of forgotten until they were rediscovered by French explorer on remote around eighteen sixty even in photographs, these temples incite comes and Oz, but to see them in person it's a powerful mind-blowing experience, the faces of the ruling on Korean king. And the seventh that protrude out of these giant monoliths are forever. Sealed on your brain. Once you've seen them in person. I truly never grow tired of seeing these temples up. Close. Although until this trip it had been years since I visited the temples in the town of seem real ground zero for all things. I'm gore what and all things terrific. Over the past decade, Siham, reappeared really become pretty inundated with tourists or bought on as they like to call tourists in Cambodia, and I tended to stay away from this kind of action. Now he wasn't quite the hedonism in crowded streets of Kosar in Bangkok, but it also wasn't that far off. But my friend and filmmaking companion, Patrick. He had a place that he was renting up and see him reupped, and I needed to shoot some scenes there, specifically b roll. So we decided to head up there after our time, income Pote as it had turned out, come pot hadn't been nearly as successful filming trip as our time with sang dot I in chimney can Ben? You'll remember we had been filming saying that I in his family, and in his hometown during the Chinese New Year. Well, the bulk of that new year we spent down in Kampot a town in province. Don't down in the southern part of Cambodia quite close to the beach resort town of kype come in pen, traditionally always been one of my favorite spots in all of the country. Even if previously Patrick had had to find a doctor to hook me up to an IV to get my system back in order in any case. This time out Kampot had turned out to be a bit of a disaster. It wasn't composites fault. It was our fault, traveling anywhere in Cambodia during the Chinese New Year and trying to meet with people or businesses. It's a highly. Unadvisable thing. So when we'd set out there to try and film, a particular scene of particular cincy, but song come composed on. We didn't anticipate how difficult it was going to be navigating through the throngs of people that had descended upon the beach town for the holidays, and we hadn't anticipated having such difficulty finding a place to stay or more importantly, an artists that we could film depicting the sinc- some of song. Aw. But that was come pot. It didn't work out as planned we hadn't found an artist to film. So we were now on our way to see him. Reappear. To try and film, an artist who could depict the famous cincy summit song that he had written about seem aptly titled chump icing. The all. I should probably explain a little something here. The mean subject of our film since he's the most famous singer to ever come out of Cambodia was killed during the Camaro time in nineteen seventy five. Which is something that the Camaros were quite known for killing the artists that doctors, the teachers, the educated, and destroying the library's books, personal properties, law records money anything that depicted, Cambodia prior to nineteen seventy five destroyed. Even the majority of encore wats temples had the Buddha statues beheaded or dismembered. And because of this, we were not only making a film that was about the legacy of a man who is no longer alive. But to our knowledge and research, only had one single piece of archival footage of him a short clip, from a movie that he had been in cold up Sada. So a huge challenge for us with this film was figuring out creative ways to depict cincy summit and in many ways Cambodia of the sixties. And seventies, this was, obviously not really surprised us since we were well aware of the lack of photos footage, and even recordings from that time, we knew very early on that we would need to embrace a very different approach to telling this story, certainly in the case of the visual aspect of storytelling. In this involved our approach to be role. Role is just one of those pieces of film, making that can either make your documentary, look like just another talking head film, with the occasional bureau shots edited in Oregon, take your documentary film to another level of complexity. A lot of docs that you'll see you can kind of tell that the filmmaker shot an interview, and then based on the content of that interview afterwards went, and shot Biro shots that went along with what was being said, and that's totally acceptable. It's a formula that can work, right? But we felt that with Elvis of Cambodia that kind of approach to be role just wasn't going to bell, shall I say, cut it? We sensed early on that if we have any success with this film, and that if we wanted to create a film about one of the most extraordinary artists can Bodey has ever known then we were going to have to do our best to match that artistry. And therefore, we had to make something like our Biro one of the more compelling elements to our film. This morning was to be our second of three shoots with artists that were depicting a very specific sincere lit song that depicted, a very specific place in Cambodia as already mentioned Kampot hadn't worked out too well. And we were either going to have to cut the Kampot seen, or at some point, get back down there to try and shoot again. So this scene that we were about to shoot with an artist here in Siem, Reap was actually the first in the series that we were doing the idea, here was to take a local artist or VJ Takhar, as they say, income, I have them listen to the sense that song, and then have them create what the song meant to them are Takhar seem real was a painter in his late thirties, a Cambone, military man was making the majority of his money by selling his paintings of, on currency real. He had this welcoming smile and really seemed to get what we were trying to do. And so we were pretty excited about spending the day filming with him. So as you can probably make out behind me. We are currently in the process of the first of three sequences will be shooting with a local artist from town in which cincy Smith sangha. Very specific song. This is Siham reap in this is for the chimpanzee reap song. Let's get a closer look at our VJ Takhar, which is combined for artists that suits happening here on set in terms of approach, we decided on a multi camera type of strategy, I would man, the main camera, which was our candidacy, three hundred Mark two and Patrick would use his Sony seven s to on a slider. We also shoot some time lapse stuff with a gopro, and then also use an additional cannon, seventy the idea was that this scene would play over the entirety of the song, we'd start very close in. And we'd gradually move out until eventually by the end of the song, we would completely reveal the artist and their work are shots would be intercut with one another. Now, there might be very tight shots of paintbrush tips dipping. Into paint or brush strokes across the canvas there'd be some tights on hands in eyeballs slow movements from trees or flowers or figures as the song progressed and the painting started to take shape Patrick, and I would move and work around one another all day. We'd switch up lenses camera positions slider movements even a few drone shots for good measure. And we would kind of do our very best to avoid distracting. R J Takhar or painter and just let him get into the flow of his work while we did the same. Again, the whole idea here was to shoot our bureau for the scene in his artistic layaway as possible, and artists, and his or her work depicting, artists singing about their town or province. At the end of the day, what resulted was this kind of dance, amongst a handful of artists all with great respect for one another's work and ultimately all with great reverence for one of the most profound artists, this country is ever known. It was a deeply satisfying day and later on as Patrick. And I sat in watched some of the dailies, we were left with the sense that the bureau that we'd shot on that day was exactly the kind of bureau that was going to be needed to elevate and celebrate the story and the figure of our film and other than a few tweaks here and there, exactly what an how we needed to shoot the remaining two BJ truecar scenes. You've been listening depart, six of our, Chris and Cambodia series. I'd like to encourage you to really try and think outside the box when it comes to shooting bureau for your own documentaries, and to try and get away from the conventional shooting of interviews, and then filming of cut-away is afterwards and instead to try and find more compelling complex ways in which to shoot your bureau. If you can think about what your film might look like without the interview without the safety net of words and see if you can visualize, a more interesting way in which to visually depict, the story of your documentary, film, also just quickly mention that you don't always have to fully plan out your bureau shots all the time. Sometimes a very interesting shot may present itself, when you least expect it, but maybe you declined to shoot it thinking that it's not something you'd find a way to use will, I'm here to tell you that you should shoot it anyway there. There is a reason that that's something caught your eye or look good in your frame. You may not understand those reasons at the time but you should trust. Your instinct, anyway, you'll be amazed at how once you sit down and begin editing. A shot that you were unsure of at the time. It might suddenly really elevate a scene or moment in totally unexpected but quite beautiful way. So please whenever you see a possibility for an interesting shot, just shoot. It. If you'd like to see some of our interesting shots, and behind the scenes footage of our film shoot artist of seem real. You can check out the show notes for this episode and others by going to our website at the documentary, life dot com. Up next on TD L or weekly conversation with documentary industry guest and I've a feeling that you're really going to like this. That's all coming up next here on the documentary life. If you're anything like me when it comes to doc film, preparations checklists are -sential part of that preparation. Whether it's putting together a gear list, storyline notes for an edit or gathering materials for grant application, checklists are very helpful in ensuring that we're prepared for whatever may lie ahead in our dock journeys, which is why Stephanie, we've put together a very special offering for you a free eight. Part course we're calling the independent, doc filmmakers essential checklist in this. Course we outlined the essential areas, you need to build, or establish in the non creative or business aspects of your documentary film that will help you to affectively manage successfully fund and eventually launch your film out into the world. We believe that given the right strategy and insight. Every doc, filmmaker catchy their goals and intentions with their Phil. Uh-huh. We believe that there is money out there for every project that it's just a matter of finding, and securing it, and that would the right preparation in strategy, every film can be met by an active eagerly anticipating audience. And that includes yours to enroll in the independent filmmakers, essential checklist, and see how the course can help you just had on over to the documentary, life dot com slash courses. It's free. And just as we do each week here on the show, this eight part checklist in course will inform and inspire you on your documentary film journey something I wanted to mention before continuing on today's show. You've probably noticed that we're playing around with some pretty cool fresh sounds on this season of TD L, and I'd like to thank music vine for supplying us with those cool. Fresh sounds if you're interested in learning a little bit more about how music vine might be able to serve your doc project. You can check out the show notes for today's episode or you can simply go to their website. At music. Fine dot com. At age seventeen Dominic Johnson hill left the UK to travel alone to Africa where he stayed for a year before travelling on to South America, and India after reaching China in nineteen Ninety-three. He stayed for twenty five years. It was in China that he got to know the locals of Tong. The back lanes of Beijing and began to learn Chinese by studying and absorbing Hooton culture end its history, he was able to master the intricacies of the Chinese language starting from scratch before hosting the documentary TV series seasons of China. He founded a street fashion brand in two thousand six it was called plastered, eight and was inspired by his experiences of the local Chinese culture, Dominic Johnson hill. Welcome to the documentary life. We are. We're happy to have a conversation with you. Thanks, chris. What, what an introduction? I'm I'm feeding old you and me both man. You and me both. Dominic be part of the reason we brought you on today's episode. Is that a big part of the conversation that we often have Dominic is how doc filmmakers, certainly nowadays more than ever really need to embody this on Trump near entrepreneurial spirit, and you are someone can speak at length at great length about that. And for good reason, and so maybe a nice way to start this conversation would be to talk about, you know, before TV before doc filmmaking before the seasons of China's series, which, of course, will get to you were an entrepreneur, and you can you found yourself in Beijing? Tell us briefly about that story coming debate ching and your first instances of entrepreneurship yet. Well, as you said, mentioned left home. At an age and was really I did terribly at school in England. And so I felt that staying than bird hope for me, and I was very adventurous, and so, I started to travel and hitchhike across countries and, and started doing alpine climbing, and, and it was that was three years of travel of South America, Africa India, and then I ride in China Ninety-two because I had an older brother who was working on a contract in cynical. Ching now in China and I can't visit him came up to Beijing on my own say, why did you stay in China will not twenty seven years and it's quite simple? I ran out of money when I write them Beijing and, and I had, you know, to go, and so I you know, so much about entrepreneurship as being in the right place at the right time person, and I ended up in, in Beijing in BoomTown, you know, the nineties in China was was the crew. Crazy time where you could, you know, try Joe handed anything you would have made money and the literally to BAAs in the whole city, ninety ninety two and I went to one of those BAAs, and I was rubbing shoulders with CEO's CEO's in companies will come into China to set up the ripple, and I was doing jobs that I was totally unqualified full. And so what, what, what kept me in China was this incredible like just opportunity everywhere. And it wasn't a country I fell in love with, because it's Beijing's city that you come in certainly, like how it's beautiful. I like it was it was it was it was flat. It was gray as far as we had our own money. We wouldn't have to spend, you know, Chinese money we had to live in foreign designated housing, but, but, but I started to in, in China that I started thinking and that was because everywhere I looked that with the industry's or they will Mark his the hadn't opened up yet. No one had done this. And no one had done that. No mistake, Macher. Search no one t shirts. And I thought, wow. You know, I. Could do that. I've seen that, you know, work in the west and then, of course, then you're surrounded by millions of entrepreneurs because the Chinese are probably the most don't race on. And so an and so that's really where I got the bug in. I just happened to be in the right place at the right time and through most SIS. Learn about how to be an entrepreneur on kind of on a street level, and I and I got hooked well, and of course, for any sort of venture like this, you need a certain amount of capital and you find yourself in Beijing. And, and as you have said yourself, you didn't have much money, and that is often, the case, doc filmmakers, don't have a lot of financial resources to maybe to begin in this case, a number of our listeners first projects, what can you share with us in terms of, you know, maybe advice, your suggestion to kind of raise capital? Well, I'm my first business was in market research, and it was really know love travel. And so I went travelled out the parts of China that no one else wanted. To travel is with so off the beaten track. But it was still millions and hundreds of millions of customers there. And I applied myself and set up networks, you know, three taxi drivers and kiosk owners and I was providing in a information on products foreign products being sold in China, basic stuff, you know, so I didn't need an awful lot of money, will I need to do by fax machine for the taxi driver, who would then drive around and gathered information fax it to me before emails, and my startup custom. That was was quite small. But what I found was, you know, I had the market because no one else was doing it. So his right facing right time, but, but terms of creative projects. And now I'm in the creative industry with, with my brand will pass. Is that what I really find found was at the beginning, I was able to get incredible talent to work with me, the almost nothing and if not nothing if I could sell them good idea, and what I found was with creatives with credit injury before, is if I if I was passionate about an idea and I could. Pitch it well to someone was the amount of people that was full in line and work with me on that. I did for almost nothing while old quite often just nothing because they were behind the idea. And so, really, I had to work on my skills as a salesman and my skills in terms of storytelling, so that I could get people to, to, to, to join in that journey with me because when I started pasta and still to now I didn't add design software. And now an artist but I got to what I found was that, you know, the data I wasn't at selling story or selling an idea, and then documenting it. Well, and then putting that content in a decent form that people would see that I had, you know, dunning interesting things before, and the and then more people would want to join that journey that I was on. So the beginning, I started pasta with study house, an our and be so. Around five thousand dollars. And I, I still own the business outright. I just opened a shop on an all two-tone that had no shops. It was completely empty, and an an I then built it by being extremely creative about how I got people in to find out about my brand, whether it was through storytelling or doing events, but just getting people on board because they liked the idea. And I really with creatives. They if you can sell them on idea, you know, though, the they'll get emboldened and not need a lot of money. You know, I've been on that street. I think that the before we got on or before we started recording. I mentioned you that I'd done some commercial gigs in Beijing. I've been on the street where your shop for started in. It's, it's hard to believe that it was as you described initially, because, of course, it's, it's a, it's a pretty big booming area now to say the least. Yeah, yeah, crazy. I mean, I was the first shop on the street and it now gets on public holidays one hundred thousand people a day. And when I, I saw how started was, you know, I I moved into no residential streets, eight hundred Izzo Beijing to live with my family. And then one day, I had an idea to set up a t shirt shop on that street because the rent was cheap and it was an old alley way. And I thought it would be fun. But obviously the no people on the street that street on public holiday now gets hundred thousand people a day, and we were the in and thirteen years ago, we were the only shop on the street. And so, you know, I mean it's a long story, but, you know, I started off by holding catwalk shows on the street there. And, and then people started to come an interview me and, and I made some spun videos with my with my mobile phone, and a lot of events. And most people started to open shops on that street. And then it turned into like the busiest retail street in Beijing. Yeah. It's a crazy kind of China story, but this kind of stuff happens in China. It's, it's, it's an economy that's being, you know, going out for forty years in terms of open economy, and it's still it's still a long way to grow. And so as I said at the beginning right place at the right time, you know, and then, and then applying myself and working with the community really where I lived, you know, I was brain bedded into the community and you know what with the liquid chamber comas web with the, the local o ladies on the street to, to man my stores. You know, it was it was a great story of community and, and being in the right place at the right time. Two thousand sixteen China's twenty four solo attempt was scrubbed on UNESCO's Representative list of heritage. Command the ancient Chinese divided the sun's annual limits. Segments. Also wisdom, but China's traditional agricultural civilization and the pasta generation jittery but how's it today? Well, outed, affixing are our everyday. The twenty four says this documentary series season China will visit towns and villages old young experiencing the traditions and customs firsthand. Well, speaking of right place at the right time, your current documentary series of which you are the presenter Ron is called seasons of China. Let's turn direction a little bit towards seasons of China and at this moment, and maybe this time, let's turn our direction two seasons of China bit, and in. How did that I come to be for you were you in the right place at the right time? How did that series happen? Dominic. Well, then when I take you back to when I opened my teasha shop. China's most famous talk show host to came to my stole and I was talking about the importance of story is when she came to the stole, I told the story of my brand, and then I took to my house that was behind this introduce it to my children and then told her the stories of designs, and she was so into the story that she asked me to go on a chat show and, you know, in China talking in China's okwu free. So you're talking show gets audiences of up to sort of twenty million and that was my first everytime on television was on a chat show with twenty million people watching and, and I pulled up a bit of a marketing stunt because I wore a t shirt on the show at my telephone number on it out, tending anybody and then join and join the show she she pointed at my teasha, and then everyone started calling my number, but then will happen from there was peop- people thought I was good at telling stories and I try to be entertaining speak Chinese, and it was a great story. But Chinese media Farda speaks Chinese celebrates, you know, he celebrates Beijing through these. Zayn on his t shirts and it went from one show to the other to the other. And then, you know, I was never passionate about television. I was very anxious in front of the camera. But I just, you know, pushed myself and then it was show off to show. And then I ended up as a as a judge on China's own special that you have in America like the shock tank in that. And I did that show six years, and then I did show on CNN require one day, and then I spotted. And then I got us to show that was owned by FOX cool. Vintage Hon to travel around the world have been. And then and then I do a lot of shows in China. You know, I'm very known in China on television. That's one of these foreigners who speaks Chinese being a long time until I get pulling pulled into a lotta shows whenever there's a public holiday, some celebration. There's like let's into dominate. He's the around them for a while. Yeah. That's being here a long time. And so I you know. Started with a t shirt shop and then it ended up as a television presenter, you know. So I feel incredibly incredibly blessed and fortunate to be in this position here. The yeah. Yeah. I often ask myself how it will happen. But the seasons of China was it was quite funny because he's in China is. It's a twenty four episodes show. Yeah. And we had to recall that in one year because it's twenty four seasons. Each season happens every two weeks. And it coincided with me being China twenty four years, and it just seemed to good to be true. And so, you know, I was asked to, to present it, it didn't make any financial sense to me. I wasn't in a paid a huge amount of money to do it. And I got in a team of twenty people in the retail businesses. Yeah. Yeah. A lot of other responsibilities. But I'm so passionate amount travel. And I love China so much. And I love getting onto the countryside where you see the real China. Yeah. And so, I had to have along with my wife up to she'd had a glass of wine and say, listen, listen, something's come up. Yeah. Right. And maybe the next year or two. Yeah, exactly. And you know, we also forces in and you know, she was so sweet. Like I know what you love this, and, and you should do it. And so I commend did it was it was every, every ten days, you know, I was off, Laura for another adventure, and it was probably the most incredible year if not the most incredibly of my life in terms of sort of the day to day production, can you give us can you paint a picture on? Well, first of all, what was the size of the crew that you were operating with as a presenter, and then how much time was happened? How much time was being spent on sort of research in content building before you would arrive an inability or in a province. Okay, because it's China and this was well, funded we had quite, you know, lodged team, I guess compared to maybe you might do in the west. So we had to, to cameramen we had a sound guy. We had a director. We had the director's assistant, and then we would each province that we traveled to have a, a local government assistant, who would help us, you know, in filming in certain villages, and areas, and you need to have government permission to film in, in any area in China. So we would have they would be along to help as well. So that would be upwards of eight of us for, for the shoot. And so it's quite a large, I guess, compared to maybe some of your listeners who were working on a on a smaller budget would be quite a trinity launching. Someone Gelson hill, even though I'd been in China for long time, I never knew about the twenty four seven towns. I'm very excited to so to go on a journey festivals in Joe beautiful mountain. I we just had his shin to the. The reason. Customs and traditions. And it's a great place. To learn about all the stuff to spring. In terms of being the presenter, being the interviewer, how much say did you have Dominic in some of the actual content that was being filmed? Certainly, you're, you're leading conversations but was all of that prep for you beforehand, or, or again, how much how much did you have in that content? Well, I mean, I'm very passionate about story. Yeah. And that's how I really built my brand. And so I you know, the same time running a business. I'm not writing the script. So I would be sent a script usually a week prior to the filming and that was researched by team of probably three or four people in the private production humping. And also with the help of the Chinese news agency, and then we would arrive where I be hot was in some of the really interesting posits documentary, a Mike conversations with people in these provinces and compensation. As, as I tell you know, as I told my daughters who speak Chinese said, you have this, incredible skill, which you can go and travel, anywhere in this country of one point four billion Eva, and you can have a conversation with them. And that's so powerful and so going to these provinces. And you know, one time I was hanging out for this one season mountain. John, as you know, these combine harvesters these launch knows who borrow money to buy, these combine harvesters for, like twenty thousand dollars that he hasn't all this, and then they literally write them thousands of kilometers across provinces, all the way across her an up towards Beijing. Just, you know, harvesting weet, the families, six says at a time x time I to hang out with this night for three days and sleep with him. Yeah. You know in wheatfield. And and and and crazy conversations. You know, I mean that he has no idea about England a whole bunch of lies came into the Golden Harvest. And he said to me, Jeff is in England. I'm like, yeah. We do have very innocent conversation that and then now found it because I was I'm a foreign. I'm very hot on sleep kind of guy have a lot of emotion. And I found that they really opened up to me. You know, there's a with any society within within self as a lotta complications. We English people quite distrustful of each other. Especially when I hear an English peasants, but, you know, you'll wife is, you know, this soon as speech like he's, he's private school. These public school. He's Nolte south on then you start to make to judge each other. But this is an English guy who's six three he's bold, and he's got a big nose and he speaks Chinese. And he's talking to me about my relationship with my wife, which was funny one because he's away from his wife. You know, so long, you know harvesting this, this week and he really opened up to me. So it was it was fascinating. So I got to dictate the story on that side, which was to have incredible conversations with people, and, and really found that they, they got to open up also, you know, I got to lead the story in that, you know, it's so fascinating these things from foreigners perspective. And yeah. So it was a lot of fun as you were making seasons of China. Did you always were you always kind of aware that you guys were filming? Moments and you were filming people in parts of culture that, that, that, that, that soon at some point in time will no longer be like where you constantly aware of that, that you are, that you were putting something down on film. You were documentary something and, and there's importance in. Yeah. I mean, I'm -solutely I mean talking about when I ride in China in nineteen Ninety-three, there was, there was a full hundred million less so more people living in the countryside, narrow now. And so with that, that, that whole mass migration into the cities, you're seeing a lot of these coaches disappearing. And I even in one of China's oldest provinces Shansi, which is really the han-chinese come from when the Yellow River that I go to hang out with a guy who's being who's being is given money by the government to try to restore local customs and traditions, go to hang out with a with a nine Munger who, who makes tools for farmers and fixes tool. Perfomance absolutely fascinating guy. And an another woman who made weaved in a red lanterns that everyone hangs outside two houses during Chinese New Year. Yeah. And they're trying to trying to presentable this culture on the his job to do it. But in a country as old as China's two thousand eight hundred years, you could go back three or four thousand if you like the so much culture history. And it's very difficult to present that so really is absolutely an even down in young shores. Hanging out the guys who, who do the fishing with Coleman buds was a lot of people visits, China. These guys these large straw, hats and fishing with buzzes Coleman's. I got to hang out with them. And really no one does it anymore. It doesn't make sense that, that type of fishing full them. But some of them still there and they're doing it if anything Petur purposes, but it was amazing to be on boat and to see guy, let go of Coleman and see swim underneath my boat and catch a fish right underneath that will be. That fish. He had Precourt, and tied it to a piece of string and onto a rock and left it on the bottom of this. This is home. It was is comb. It was definitely out of shape, but I, but I did get to see it happen. And then you get a feel for it, but this so much culturing. I mean, China's moving on is progressing, and it's still a long way to go. And of course, it is a shame. But a lot of those old traditions coaches will be lost. And I really did feel that, that we were don't commencing the lost of a lot of things, especially with the foaming because the the that's the really the last generation of, of the small farmers. You know, the every family would get a six hundred acre or hectare of land for each member, and still holding onto that, but those people now in the sixties, and they getting too old Afam and the kids are in the cities, and, you know, they come back to help them, so that, that land is gonna get redistribution. It's going to become big pumps Dominic as we wrap up our conversation here, unlike to sort of ask you, having worked great. At length on this docu series, as a presenter, does it does it inspire you or scare you away from actually doing your documentary film. It does not scare me away at will. In fact, I think one thing I've lent businesses the importance of finding your nation and, and finding the truly passionate about, and being able to, to sell a story with I happen to sell t shirts and it doesn't sell it by con sell the story behind it. And I think there's a lot of stories that I know in, in Beijing in China through the fortunate being hit so long that I would love to tell, and if anything we're wrapping up the whole back end of it. Now I'm really really would love to get back into doing documentary, it's an China's grip base to do it because I think, you know, you can find funding as a lot of funding for the arts and culture. And I think if I can find the right story. Find the right niece. And, and, you know, some support and get people behind it that I could tell stories so absolutely. I would love to do more of mentoring Dominic, if I'm fortunate enough to find myself in a commercial or documentary job over in Beijing. Again, I certainly hope to pop by the plastered shop and I'd love to hang out with you, man. Please do. Yeah, absolutely. And I'll take you for swimming in an old lake in Beijing, and it's it'd be a pleasure to have you have wonderful. I love it. Thank you so much for being the documentary life. Dominic chris. Don't forget, if you're interested in our free, eight part course, the independent, doc filmmakers essential checklist. Course go to the documentary, life dot com slash courses. Thanks again for listening. We'll see in two weeks, time dot lifer.

China Beijing China Cambodia Dominic Dominic chris Patrick Kampot UK Kampot R J Takhar cubs cincy Christine parkers Dominic Johnson Ben Siham Ankor watt
Using Pilot Projects to Set Enterprise Expectations - with Dr. Babak Hodjat of Cognizant

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

18:53 min | 1 year ago

Using Pilot Projects to Set Enterprise Expectations - with Dr. Babak Hodjat of Cognizant

"This is Dan for Jalen you're listening to a and business podcast. If you heard the very end of our use case episode on Tuesday, you heard me slip up a little bit and say that one of my favorite guests is. Episode Are Not really allowed to pick favorites I, appreciate all of our guests, their unique perspectives, but I've had this guest on a couple of times and happened to have. Respect. For his expertise and ability to articulate really valuable business lessons even though his background is extremely technical on that is Baba coach John. He's the VP of evolutionary ai at cognizant previously, the founder of sentient technology's really long track record of powerful startups in now working with enterprises through Kaga toback speaks with us this week about using AI pilot projects to set enterprise expectations. So how do we leverage our initial projects initial traction to? Really, help with a roadmap of adoption and deployment. How do we set ourselves up to succeed in the long term with initial initiatives and this is hard lessons learned most companies are going to get this wrong you WANNA, make sure to get it. Right. So this is a tremendously valuable episode. I really liked this making the business case series on. Thursday I don't think we'd get as many great topics like this unless we had this bonus. Sort of Thursday episodes moving forward. So glad to have year on this one. If you yourself are just getting started with ai that's what we're talking about in this episode and you had yet to download our beginning with a short pdf brief you can check that out at e. m. e.. R. J., DOT COM SLASH B e g one that's bg like beginning and just the number one when you get paid, you can download the. Short pdf brief for free, this is essentially a primer on what does it take to actually begin adopting artificial intelligence without making the expensive hiccups and mistakes that most enterprises make it'll be a nice informative resource to help you get more out of this interview and others like it. So EMC RJ DOT com slash B e one without further ado we're GONNA fly in with Badaco shot always an excellent guest here on the and business podcast So back will kick things off talking about the components of making a business case for a I in the enterprise. A lot that goes into you know, should we deploy this? Should we adopt this? What do you think of as those component parts? What makes that a? Business case is clear if the I serving the outcomes that you're interested in. and. Therefore, I think the business case should be aligned with your own business case if you can review where it is that you are optimizing various different outcomes that's what is all about it's optimizing outcome. So that alignment should be there. Now, a lot of what we see in ai in various different businesses is sort of okay. We've heard good things about ai being able to classify images or do translation or whatever. Let's just incrementally look at places within our business where this might help. That's one way of looking at it but the way I would recommend looking at it is is in fact to work back from how you imagine. Ai Impacting. Your Business. Until. There are both sides of that coin. There is the hey, take your existing. You know, what are your key thrusts? Where's your money in your attention going to executives care about, and let's see where I alliance with those and let's pick projects. Can we move the needle on the same outcome? Okay that's good. That's that's one side. The other side is to your point maybe bringing into the strategy room. Hey, look here's the representative use cases of this new capability. It's important. Here's what it could do your. Maybe we should find some errors we can build his capability that way you recommend. Really let's hit the key business dead on. I think so I think. So I mean it's the difference between thinking of it as being incremental versus thinking of it as being disruptive and I should be destructive. That's the our our tool. So why not use it and expect from it? The outcomes that were were seeking from the business. To not have the toy application not all kind of thinking about where to say I fit questions are toys but some are like we're going to do it in a corner and then we'll say we're doing we're saying is you know where is your muscle headed at? Can we just drive ai behind that to go for that outcome? So for you making the business cases about just having your defined outcomes I think a lot of folks would say that what else are thinking about if I'm an executive at a big company. And I've got to make the call. Okay. We can go ahead with this. What else do I need to see any way to know other people have done it? It's worked. Do I need to understand conceptually what it does do I need to know these the underpinning capabilities need to build in order to enable it what goes into so I get behind my Keith? Ross what else is there Absolutely I think it's very important for you as a business to consider this as a differentiator. If we're talking disruption, that's what you want to own, and if you want to own it, you have to bring something special to it. You can't just be using it as an out of the box tool. You have to bring in the domain expertise that you have, which includes the definition of the outcome, but it also includes how you would actually implemented how you would deploy it and how you would benefit from it, and the onus is on you the business person you know that the business the enterprise to make that definition looking at others saying, well, you know other folks are using it in this manner and therefore I should probably be able to use the same way I think doesn't quite work. Any what ends up happening is Oh you know a lot of people are using a I to find more insights in their data. Let me see if I can find more insights in mind data. Let's just unleash it on the date and see what gives us. Well, that's like shirking the responsibility of defining what you're looking for, and why, why, what, what would you use that insight four and how would you know that what you have actually derived is going to be useful for you or not so to me, there's a piece of this. I was actually thinking this just recently where a lot of the business models have moved to being look, there's a very special kind of unique data going. Through my enterprise that data is my goals, you know if I if I own it, if I owned the data that goes through it, then you know that I can monetize it. So that seems to be an established fact I. think we need to start thinking a one step beyond that and saying that data in of itself is useless. It's what you make of the data in other words, the models that you build on top of that date on the way, you actually make use of it that is going to end up being your differentiator and in order for you to be able to monetize that you need to actually capture it in the form that is useful for you and your. Niche your special place in the world of business. Actually, if you get to that point, the data itself becomes less interesting It's important that it's piping through your system, but it's the abstractions that you're a is actually making off. That's that's really the goal that you're collecting. This is I wanna see on following you correctly here barbeque. So we did a massive research project for out financial services firm that was looking for enterprise search, and we talked to a bunch of these enterprise search companies. We we came to learn that actually like the crazy, NLP that's gonNa comb your documents that's valuable but it's actually just like getting the humans in the room to. Think through how do we want to search this? What are the categories we're gonNA use what are the strata by which we're going to organize these that's eighty percent of the value, and of course, none of the vendors want to say that and I'm not disparaging them. You know I I know a lot of work with them. They're they're lovely people but the fact that matters like getting the orchestrated thoughts for you of that disruptive power is getting the humans in the room to think about what does this mean and then we can wielding okay we have a saying in a I we say there's no free lunch you can't take a off the shelf. magically apply it just turn the switch and it will start giving you value. You have to bring something to the table and in the case of AI, it's the definition of the problem what is it that I expect the to solve for me and what is it that I expect to derive from and that's that's the people in the room that you're talking about. That is the value you bring to the table and it's not trivial. It is not trivial and it does take some expertise in some but once you do that, that becomes your differentiator. So I'm GONNA play a little bit of devil's advocate although we've got one other question related to this but I'm I'm GONNA kick around here so. All right. Well, banks with a professional services firm. So of course like, Hey, you know pick your goal it's build out something else for you may be the default here on not saying it is but there might be other folks like well, I might have an idea I think about banks and chat bots just often they failed wells fargo ally bank. The. Die Off. It's like what cool I've got my use case I've got my ideas at something seems plausible I chased down but has this even reasonably been able to push forward is the tack at a level where I'll ever get any darn value out of this. Obviously, there is some considerate. It feels like there's some consideration there does any of that Come in or how you factor that in. It is very, very important. The tech is at there or not, and I would say that we're close. But. We're not quite there partly because the tech isn't thinking about that way. So the I folks. Are Thinking about it more as a building that. Is that is a one-size-fits-all that you just you know. So I, think I think there's some of that. There's the fact that the tech breakthroughs that we've had. Our primarily around finding abstractions and patterns in data and so giving you insights. Whereas you really need is beyond the insights This is something that I've been talking about a lot which is. At the end of the day, you don't need yet another report You have plenty of that. Yeah. What do you need is for the I tell you what to do when we imagine an ai we imagine a robot or some sort of big computer telling us here's what I think you should be doing. Here's when I think you should be doing it. Here's what I think is going to happen if you do it and how confident I am. And Look if you want to do something else. Let me know and I'll tell you what's going to happen. So I think that's the dialogue that we should expect our AI to have with us and from a technology perspective. Many of those capabilities are not quite there. Now, I would selfishly say that the system that we've built has been built to address those problems. I can't say that we address all of them but that's the way we looked at it and. So I think that's really important to note that off the shelf ai added state of the art does not address a lot of those questions. So you're very right. No free lunches. You'd said while I can't speak to the platform itself that you guys have I can't say that your firm is lucky to have guys like you because obviously you've been doing this before it was cooler. What was your first day I company? That was one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, eight, eight. Crazy right? And him you gone through a lot of stuff again, I'm not I'm not trying to bags horn for the listeners here you know not not every consulting firm has fellas with big silicon valley experience in doing this stuff forever. So I trust more from you than from most people in your shoes is what else on last question in this little series here is around thinking about our why? Of course I think most mature certainly, our listeners are aware that you can't just say, Oh, I want a I improve my revenue by five percent by selling five percent more of this thing it's it's very hard to make these projections. We're talking about nascent applications. It's tough. When you think about how are y can be presented or thought about to make us feel confident moving forward we need to know this the right investment, but it's not always gonNa work out how can we still have that confidence despite the uncertainty to to move forward think through our wine a new way I. The way I think about that question and it's it's a really tough question. So I don't I don't think we address. But. The Way I think about it is if the goal that you set for your ai is aligned with the outcomes that translate into dollars for you as a business then you can get a sense of the impact that the I can make for you because that's how you set your system. You're telling it look you know the more of this outcome you achieve for me of the better. You are and tell me what percent is that you can actually achieve and based on that end. You know as AI scientists that's that's what we do. We take our AI and we signed this what we call outcome loss function fitness function what have you and we run it on out a sample we run it. You know we put it through the ringer basically to get a sense of. How it could impact us. Now necessarily that is GONNA be on historical data or fake data. That goes through the business, but it will give us a sense of what kind of impact it can it can produce, and that impact can then be translated into dollar amounts. Now, the closer you are in scoping out your Ai, you know to be impacting the outcomes and the more you actually listen to it and bring it into your actual business flow and business decision making the more of that are why you are going to be able to harvest. So that's that's the way I look at it is that look at the use case and then actually tasks whoever is tasked with building the I for you to give you a sense not just of say accuracy. Or. We call loss or other aspects of you know the inside itself you know how? Well it's forecasting but give you a sense of how that would that. Improvements in the forecast or in the decision, making is going to be impacting your business as a whole which also brings us back kind of full circle. Do Really WanNA use this back room as a side thing like a Chat Bot for your call center and in his that the main disruptive sort of that the main source of your problem or is it somewhere else because you're going to be investing in a enablement? Anyway you might as well invest in it in the area where you have the most potential. So that little fraction that would improve translates into the best Roi for you. Yeah yet. Okay, I'm falling. It seems like Almost, the way I'm hearing this is hey, yes this stuff is kind of nascent. Yes. WE'RE GONNA experiment. Yes. Our initial proxies are based on historical data, but you know what? If you'RE GONNA IF YOU'RE GONNA dive in and make this work? Pick your lever. That's really gonNA GONNA, move the needle hard and like certainly project your you know your accuracy but then you know connect that to business value what would that save us for time what would that translate two dollars etcetera but it also sounds like you're saying, keep in mind the strategic value keep in mind with this is gonNA unlock in a bigger way. Obviously, if you're selling, you need to be able to convey probably the strategic side to think about that as part of what Roi Means. I think so I'll give you an example we talked to an insurance company and they were like you know we have these trucks immune sure them and you know is there some way off the map in pictures of whatever to get a sense of how many of these trips are completed because if we can get a better sense of that than we can get a better sense of how much you know we should ensure blah blah blah so my first reaction. was well yet. It's a relatively tough problem, but but it can be done. But my second question was whereas I mean as an insurance company what is the most impactful decisions that you guys make and of course, it's underwriting. It's the actual like coming up with the actual number like what what should be the premium on this insurance that is the most important impactful decisions that they make. If what if I actually built an AI that can help you with that. Right rather than going into the nitty gritty of image detection. Map whatever I mean to me. It's the two sides that we started off on. Right like looking at a and seeing what it can do for you versus you know posing the problem in a manner that now ai scientists can tackle. The can derive much more strategic for you. We've seen some something like seventy something percent of the dollars that we. estimator going into a and insurance is a claims and underwriting probably not to your point. It's like what are your big decisions? What's moving the needle and hopefully a at least people thinking along those lines. But what you're saying is challenge yourself to ask what the big lever is go after that you know, don't don't find an experiment find a big lever. Yes, exactly I think that strategic value. Okay. Cool. Excellent obamacare. No, that's all we had for this first interview but thanks so much for being able to join us on the show again, my pleasure. That's all for this episode of the AI and business podcast. Thank you for joining us as always, and I should mention this actually two weeks ago we crossed the the hundred review mark on Apple podcasts so. I, started maybe two months ago. One of my business coaches was Kinda yelling at me and saying you need to actually tell folks that if they like the show, they should go give you a review. You need to collect more feedback to actually ask about that, and we we cross the hundred mark are one hundred review is from one of our longtime subscribers Dan Barry I gave him a big shout out on linked in and said, thank you and. It was really cool to see all the influx of opinions and perspective and great reviews from listeners like you. If you love what we do here and you've enjoyed this episode with Babic and the other enterprise leaders that we speak within the value that we bring to the table, a lot of these ideas and a lot of these topics come from listeners just like you and they come from some of the ideas we up in our reviews on Apple. podcasts pretty easy to find the A and business podcast on apple podcast drop us a five star review. Let us know what you love most. Let us know you WANNA see more. Let us know an episode that for you is really interesting and important. That's the stuff that I talked about with my team. That's the stuff that helps us plan out future guests and I can't tell you how much I value your perspective. So again, drop us a five star. Review if you love what we do here on Apple Podcast, the A in business podcast, pretty easy to find anyway. So I'll wrap up this episode we have our AI future series continuing on Saturday. So I'll catch you there now get you back for a I use cases coming up on Tuesday where we're going to be talking about artificial intelligence for drug discovery in farm us with sure not to miss that one as well, and I'll talk to you soon.

AI Dan Barry Kaga toback e. m. e EMC VP R. J. Apple DOT Badaco founder representative executive Keith Ross Jalen
Developing an AI Strategy the Right Way - With Joel Minnick of Amazon Web Services

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:43 min | 1 year ago

Developing an AI Strategy the Right Way - With Joel Minnick of Amazon Web Services

"As the world has been rocked by the corona virus. Something's about artificial. Intelligence are going to stay the same namely many of the barriers to adoption in Ai. Deployment or going to stay the same will continue to cover them here on the show many of the AI use cases. We'll stay the same. Of course many new ones will develop in some will develop in direct response to some of the needs from the corona virus will cover those as well. What's changing for almost? Everyone is strategy. Whether you're a small company or a big one your technology and your Ai. Strategy are evolving quickly in the face of drastically different economic conditions. This week we have Joel. Minic on the program you'll as head of marketing. Artificial intelligence and machine learning at Amazon Web Services Amazon obviously one of the Gargantuan giant players in artificial intelligence space. We like to talk. Vc's we like to talk to start ups and we like to talk to. The big players. Amazon certainly fits the bill. Joel breaks down this week. Some of his critical thoughts around what strategy looks like when it's done right if you're firm is just getting started with thinking about Ai. Strategy considered downloading are beginning with a free PDF guide. You can download that at E. M. E. R. J. dot com slash A. B. E. G. one that's BG like beginning emerged dot com slash B e g one without further ado hop right into this excellent episode with Jole from Amazon. Here on the A I in business podcast so Joel. I figured we'd kick things off by asking the pivotal question at this series. Which is how can be used as a competitive advantage in business. How do you like to think about this and help? Business leaders understand. Yeah know I think Or looking at a big shift in technology with the advent of machinery in a lie. That's true is because the service area for which we think about problems were a I can have. An impact is so large and we can kind of see that in problems that companies can face extra into the market as well as problems they can solve internal as well and some examples of bad if we think about how customers are using AI externally a few customers that come to mind that I think are really doing some interesting things one is really thinking about. How can I use artificial intelligence to drive better customer gates and what? I think the most fascinating examples of this. That really kinda proves that machine learning in artificial intelligence are are really in the mainstream now is what the NFL is doing around thinking about. How do they evolve the game of football? And so I'm sure folks actually where the National Football League is one of the most programs out there. In fact in two thousand eighteen they were averaging about sixteen million dollars per game. And it's a very long storied. Sports Franchise actually more than one hundred years old and thought about this experience and as the viewers of this war change in the viewers of the sport become more technologically savvy. What did they begin to to want to see out of broadcast and so the NFL has partnered with aws pretty extensively around understanding? How do they bring fans deeper into the game and so through next Gen stats with the NFL? We've been able to work on models that now help fans get deeper into the game and understand what's really happening out on field and one of the first models will be released to help fans start to get that insight is pass completion probability and really helping fans understand when a when a quarterback is making a decision around which receivers are going to throw the ball to what is the the actual likelihood of that catch being successful and it's driven some really interesting dialogue now about what's happening on the field around you know. Was this a really risky throw in? Is the the capabilities of that quarterback that receiver really at the top of their game? You're looking at a pass that's completed. That only had a thirteen percent chance to be caught and then kind of transitioning into looking at how you can start to solve problems internally as well the NFL's really made a large announcements again in partnership with aws around how the two organizations are now working together to begin to address player safety and machine learning and understanding. What's happening on? The field began to impact how we keep players more safe in the game. Or are we gonNA stick on Competitive Advantage? Here's this tie into that. Or is it more just something? Nfl wants to mention Or whatnot here. Sorry I was just giving us depended advantage extra literally. Got It okay. So you're looking kind of yet inside outside got another. I think place where companies are thinking about competitive advantage is also in how they began to service their customers better. Personalization is one. That's really kind of coming up to the top out in thinking about in my really look at my customers as individual customers not as cohorts not as market segments when understanding each individual customer and what their preferences are and Machine. Learning has been a big driver being able to start to do that. Another place where we're seeing. This is in also being able to affect time to market a really interesting place where this gets applied now is how do you have human beings in machine learning working together to get products to market faster. And there's a really interesting vein of of artificial intelligence. That's now being explorer Gender today where you're using AI to actually create new thanks to think about it and just making predictions on on existing data. And I think one of the really kind of interesting ways that this has been done Actually is with a partnership that was happening between Autodesk and NASA. Jpl unnecess- in the process right now of building a new rover that's going to go and explore search for signs of life in the moves of Jupiter and sadder. Now as you can expect this very long journey very perilous journey to get a rover out that far into the solar system and if you think about any typical product design in this case a very specific product design as. You're going through that engineering process. You often you have to come up. With a set of criteria dads that product needs to satisfy now. In this case. The way that this often work is you would go through a centralisation phase. You would narrow that down to a set of prototypes. Then they were let down into a final design as you go through each one of those stages I think anyone in manufacturing will tell you you start to make trade offs and you start to have to say well. This factors not quite as important factor. So I'M GONNA I'M GONNA allow us to not quite meet the requirement there as long as we optimized this one over here. Yeah and that process is slow and it's expensive and you end up with an outcome that this kind of what you wanted but not entirely what you wanted with generative. Ai What Nassan autodesk rebels do is have human beings and a I work together to come up with completely new designs for how to think about rovers. And I think what's really fascinating about? That is not only degenerative. Ai Let them get you outcome. That was materially shorter and less expensive than the traditional engineering design process but they were also able to satisfy every requirement. They had for this rover and they didn't have to make the kind of traditional trade offs that they would have had to do in previous bills. And so I think from a manufacturing standpoint that really starts to allow companies to think about building some really innovative new kinds of products to customers because is able to see things that we've not seen before able to apply human judgment to those decisions to make sure that we're ending up with the best possible outcome. Yeah I I really wonder Joel. What the world of like when a generator. They is a third of its popular as I guess what we could call par for the course use cases of machine learning. It's like a kind of an entirely different interesting wave. I'm going to touch on a couple of points. You mentioned because I think these are some some neat ones that could really extrapolate into competitive until for for the audience and have them kind of think about their own advantage and the first is around personalization Amazon. Obviously you guys provide tools. Many folks are familiar with that. I think a lot of people know Amazon has kind of the the king of kings at personalization in terms of really customized experiences. You know I think to myself there might be two different kinds of world's there's there's kind of a way of leveling up your personalization that that kind of is like par for the course like everybody else is also sort of getting better recommendations better email. Promotions better serve onsite experience after you log in based on previous activity. Then there's another space where we really can start to pull away from the competition. Inform kind of like a like a moat so I I could see personalization being kind of the the incremental if everybody starts to kind of do it in a similar way but there might also be ways to to maybe do it with particular kinds of data over a narrow kind of product sets where it really could could spin off into a more sustained advantage. Debbie thoughts are about about how to leverage it in. Maybe the biggest way that one could well. I think one of most fascinating ways to think about personalization is not necessarily in the reactive personals that we often see a lot of today as you mentioned but beginning to think about personalization from a proactive stance. On and what we've seen with this is customers who I've seen both in retail as well as in food service delivery where folks are starting now to think about what kind of offers. What kind of notifications do I send customers? Based on what? I'm learning about their habits and we're learning about what they like to do. And how they like to engage in so if I know that's a given customer is a football fan what I WANNA do. Then is delivered notification to their phone about an hour before the game with an offer for their favorite pizza at thirty percents off and began to anticipate what my customer's going to need based on what I know about them and quality of the models I can build around that to not necessarily now have to just rely on the customer coming to my sites or to my storefront before I can engage with them but now being able to get out there with them when they're in the moment in the activities of doing and bring to them. The kinds of services are the kinds of goods that I believe. They're going to need got it so you're saying kind of expanding beyond the when they do. X. We do y thing and thinking about well. What might they respond to our. Does this event affect what might matter to them and then being able to kind of reach out at those times exactly got it and do you think that in a space like let's say pizza delivery? You know for talking about Domino's here who seems to be kind ahead of the game when it comes to adoption of tack in their little domain. Do you see the potential to create a wide moat in other words. If somebody can crack personalization really hard within their space. Let's say something like pizza. They're winning that deal before the person knows they're hungry around football season or whatever they are getting way better cart values because they implement serve recommendation systems in and more productive kind of workflows for ordering online than their competitors earlier on to the point. Where now they're they're more convenient. Maybe they have more on the bottom line. They can reinvest in that and they can kind of spin that flywheel to the point where now more people use them and now of course they have more data and they can spin even farther ahead potential. Their competition could things like that in personalization Say like monopoly but could have a really sustained wide advantage from spinning that data. Flywheel BA gained across. Almost any niche and personalization were there kind of bounding boxes. People might think about. Well I mean I think you're you're onto something that we talked to customers about quite a bit and I wouldn't even found it to personalization the important thing that I talked to a lot of customers. `Bout in machine learning is it's exponentially and when you're moving forward with machine learning the rates at which you can learn has a direct impact on the amount of competitive advantage or going to gain from machine learning and that's why we talked with customers about kind of what is the role in machine learning in their business right now. It is really important that they start thinking about it today because waiting a year waiting two years waiting three years before you decide. That's when we're going to invest in shing learning it's not a linear lag between competitors who have started investing in it is much more of an exponential because it's all that much more data all that much more model refined they've been able to do and therefore they're that much smarter than other competitors in the market about in whatever niche up machine learning. They've chosen to apply a than their competitors are. And so. That's that's a big reason. Why is your thinking about machine learning strategies today it is very important that it's a strategy for today and not something that's part of a three year five year plan for where technology investments are going to go for your position hunt. Now I want to get into our second question for this interview but will you just mentioned was kind of interesting you. You're sort of putting your foot down that the AI strategy for today has to be for today. I think there is a take where a lot of these technologies will take quite a bit to be able to enable in terms of data infrastructure and talent and whatnot and we. We really do need to consider a plan that has phases potentially in some cases in whatnot. You're you're really putting your foot down around. You know a focus on the the near term and I think there's there's some importance there. Why de emphasize it so much. And where do you think people go with that kind of thinking? Because I've actually I haven't heard anybody put it that way. Well we emphasize it so much because of this learning factor. That's waiting to get started. Is something that is going to have a lasting impact on the pace at which your models were able to learn versus somebody else's the other big reason. That's we talk quite a bit about this. As well is that. I think they're still a tendency at times for folks who haven't yet made investments into machine learning to have a bit of a futurist mindset around the technology and that it can be perceived as something that is new and emerging and we should pay attention to it but it might not be something we have to do right now and some of that is true. It is an emerging field. And there's a lot of new advancements happening moving very quickly but what's not true is that folks are waiting and that there are tens of thousands of organizations who are in production with machine learning or building machine learning models on. Aws today and that's happening globally across any industry any GIO. They're making investment sends happening at the enterprise level. It's happening at startup level and so to think that people aren't yet making big investments into this can be a bit of a false conclusion in thinking about where technology announcements are happening right. Now got it. Okay so maybe a point for people to sort of double down on. I think that obviously as a vendor you guys have some degree of a have interest in people sort of being ardently. Ansi about adopting today. But I think there's also a lot of credence to that point where you wait too long the disadvantages as you had mentioned can be exponential just like the advantages could be. There's credence to that point as well. The second last question here Joel and we can be somewhat swift on this one but I think your take on this will be will be interesting is really about how leaders can think about getting to that advantage today. You know I'm thinking about companies who. Maybe there are big four billion dollar enterprise but they don't have a Gargantuan data science staff. They were started eight years ago. Digital is not necessarily in their blood there. You know there's still some paper flying around in the office but they like to do what they could do. You know they're not gonNA snap and have an Amazon type workforce tomorrow but you know they want to inch closer to getting that competitive advantage. What do you often advise folks to do? Or what do you feel like the smart moves for companies that you know? Maybe we could call them. Stodgy but they're definitely ambitious. You know where to folks start. Even if they can't enact everything today. Yeah well. I think there's two big pieces to this and the first one would be thinking about. What kind of moves do you WANNA make into machine learning? And when we set out to you really begin to invest in building. Machine learning services for customers. We very early on said. Our mission is to put machine learning in the hands of every developer. And so it wasn't just to go and serve data scientists folks with PhD's in Math know a lot about how to go and do this and so the way that we did that was we thought carefully. About what kinds of services we wanted to build and they fell into three layers of the stack and at the bottom layers where we often talk about frameworks and infrastructure and speak very much to existing data. Scientists were with technology in Chile with managing the kinds of infrastructure. That go into machine. Learning at the second layer of the stack is where we then invested in building tools that data scientists and engineers would want to use to get to their models faster without having to worry about managing all the structure and Amazon. Sage makers service that most comes through there. But then I think in answer to your question about if you don't have a lot of this expertise. How do I still go get started? This is where we've made a lot of investments into this top layer of the stack that we call her is services and these services are built around being able to offer customers different machine learning capabilities so forecasting personalization text to speech computer vision fraud detection but the service handles the science for you and so as a customer what you need to understand is your data and be able to bring that data to the service and then you have to really understand your applications which you do understand and the service handles doing data science in the middle and making the predictions on the data and that's been a way that for customers who don't yet have deep expertise in machine learning across the organization ation to still be able to go out and implement these kinds of functionality. These machine learning functionality into their applications into their business and began to see those rewards and how the servicer customer data is sort of initial step. Might be hey start to leverage some of the more accessible. Api's and sort of higher level. Frameworks that maybe we'll let you work on some of those. Nlp problems maybe work on that search applications that little computer vision use case without getting yourself for PhD's from Carnegie Mellon to get it done exactly and of course people are going to have to upgrade their skills as well. Their in house talent is going have to evolve. I don't think auto a male will take a whole enterprise to level up. I am definitely excited to see how Amazon and the other players in that space can make this stuff more accessible. Because you're you're you folks over. There must be more familiar with I about just how big the accessibility gap is. And it'll be cool to see those those tools developed. Hopefully some of that stuff is useful for the folks tuned in. I know that's all we had for time on this particular interview. Joel but I sincerely appreciate your sharing your insights here in industry thank you. I appreciate the time. So that's all for this episode of the AI. In business. Podcast I should mention. I didn't say it in the introduction since the time of that recording Joel has since moved to data bricks actually quite a recent interview with Joe is now with data from his role at Amazon web services. If you've enjoyed the show let me sure to stay tuned with US and be with us here next Tuesday in the next episode of the AI. In business podcast also consider following us on social. It's at E. M. E. R. J. on twitter. You can find us on facebook and linked in as well if you WANNA see our latest interviews of course from this show we also have another podcast all the ai in financial services podcast. You might want to look that up on I tunes. Well you'll see both of those come out live on social. As soon as they're published. In addition to our other research reports and insights we cover different industries recover at gigantic banks. We were in the military all kinds of new use cases and interesting a strategy and tactics that you can use in your business and you can follow that full feed when you follow us on social. It's at E. M. E. R. J. Can follow us. It linked in as well. So hopefully you've enjoyed the show this week. I'll catch you next week on the. A and business podcast.

AI Joel Amazon Amazon National Football League football aws AI Autodesk rovers head of marketing Vc E. M. E. R. Chile facebook E. M. E. R. J. Sports Franchise Jole
Recruiting Women in Tech

getWITit | Women in Technology

25:46 min | 2 years ago

Recruiting Women in Tech

"Welcome to the GATT WHIP CAST. I will be your host Elizabeth. This podcast will focus on the decline of women in technology and how our grass best roots organization works with the Community to foster relationships in reducing the gap of women. And we'll be talking with both men and women and how to continue to move the needle forward on those relationships for more information. Please check US out at get wit it doc. Hi there. Welcome Tracy Heavily Chattanooga's from J. P. Morgan Chase. Thank you for joining us on get with Podcast we're live actually at becomes woman at early get witted out thirty annual conference for women attack here in Columbus. This is our third year in Columbus. Ohio We just got off the stage R. J. P. Morgan Chase Cio. Miss Lori Beer. She had a lot of really great stuff to be Morgan. Chase is has been with us since the beginning in twenty ninety sixteen and they are extremely passionate about women in technology so so Chuck Tracy thank you so much for joining us. What what did you tell us? I don't know whoever wants to start off why. GB Morgan Jesus so passionate about women in technology never had so we're passionate about diversity period Women in technology is it. You look at the numbers and over the years there. We're have been a declining number of women coming out of school. What's offer engineering degrees? And we're trying to change that we're trying to show that women in do have a seat at the table. They are just as smart smarter in many many many cases than you know than the traditional old school guard yard of the guy and technology and the guys creating everything and I think it really. It really get driven home. I'm to me. When we hosted a conference at at our site for women in technology and we showed the movie code debugging the Gender Gap and there was is one moment in that movie that like it was that everyone has that spark moment that moment for me was when they were talking about airbags and how the first airbags airbags were killing people and they were killing people because the quality engineers were bunch of guys so they modeled the test dummies after themselves and women and children were dying in these? So it shows the impact of having diversity in the room room for whatever product you're making and at J. P. Morgan Chase. We are a technology company. People don't think that way people think of us as a bank or somewhere you've got your credit card or you're checking through but we're a technology company was sixty thousand technologists. We need to have women at the table. trixie I would. I would very much echo a lot of what chuck just said from a diversity perspective what women bring to the table just with. They're they're different ideas in their perspective and the value that they that they add from that side of the house In addition to that and you know dove tailing off of the Movie Bat we ship we screened Deep debugging the gender gap. It was I opening in the fact that the number of women that start out in technology and don't follow through as well that that any don't follow through that there was a technology. They're going through college. They're going through their classes and they're surrounded surrounded by men and still today and one of the women that was speaking to that was one of our former interns are tapping lists that was on the panel and she was saying how difficult it was to walk in the room every single day during their labs during class and you know basically made fun of or. You're not good enough into counseling. Only face that in addition to handling your coursework and keeping that focus to complete your journey so so as an employee of Jiechi marches. How how do you guys make women feel like I mean one thing is having more around right like recruiting and retaining? What are the practices? Do you think that chase of digging Morgan. It follows to try to set that right to ensure that women feel that way and supported. I think to just just having the conversation around it and being open with their conversation Shen and are thought we have much more of a focus on that over. The last few years Our diversity and inclusion our business resource grips that we have within the organization that allow that to you. Know to bring women's voice to the table and to put it up front and center another everything and this is just women in tech. This is how J. P. Morgan Chase as a company Thinks about their employees. In general we are one of the few companies out there that have onsite daycare premises and its backup daycare but for new mothers and mothers returning to work. You get a period of time where it's free so think about if you're a new mom who's had her first child and you've got at this great career going and you're like I'm going to be missing my child every single day you can bring your child to work at the daycare. Go I see them any time. Care for them feed them. It makes it a little bit easier to come back to work as a mother. So when you're talking about retention in technology rate that that's an important thing in the company focuses on someone. I think I may have heard that you guys also offer paternity leave and while some people people may not consider that directly linked to a benefit to women attack it just goes to show how mortgage eight values Women in that were saying. Yes as a company. Please go help your wife take care. Help guessing together. It's not the old way any more. We understand that an equal responsibility in neighbouring meant to be able to do that. You're showing that the company in general like it's okay day for the men to go and help also because if we look at change and general You know do. We want women to become more accessible. If they're handling all moms stuff right like you're gonNa make him comfortable and able to take back on their their career like right after you know whatever they're ready for but then you also have to say to you on the converse side that men are also able to go support their wives to. I think that's that's really unique and again it's creating that environment where everybody's voice is important and where you get to bring your whole self to work. Whatever that is fantastic? So what are you so you in general. Why don't you talk a little bit about what you do at J. P. Morgan Chase or well I am the are recruiting sightly for Columbus hub? Okay J. P. Morgan Chase has has eight strategic hubs or technology centers of excellence in the United States That an technology means that you have at least a thousand technologists in in one location. Pay Soul I in the CLEM sightly for our technology recruiting group and then in addition to overseeing recruiting at a higher level also responsible for diversity city pipeline and strategy and working with our tech leadership team tested. So I lead our North America up strategy for the recruiting and and what Tracy failed to tell you is that Columbus is one of our largest hubs in the world with over five thousand technologists just at J. P. Morgan Chase. Wow yeah that's a lot. It's a lot of responsibility and when you think about you know again the the impact that we can have in our local community By helping women in technology giving them those opportunities. It's really a great responsibility that she has input Lynch now. So if you like just in a journal day day in the life of recruiting You know you're out shaking. Bagan begin talking to people she can she bake. That's what you do you. What do you find the hardest thing to approach approach with women and technology like what what is the biggest challenge is it finding access to women? Is it when they had the conversation kind of driving it forward order. They already having a job somewhere else. Or what is what is what are common conditions that you see when you're trying to engage women too. I don't think it's necessarily a woman thing. I think it gets a technology across the board. Because we're all in the same mission to find good technologists and the numbers of decreasing so the numbers. That are coming out out of college that are coming out of school From a female perspective that population is obviously smaller. So you know targeting that population and having those conversations because most most of the women that we are talking to aren't looking for a new position okay at selling your organization and building those relationships and having the conversation. So what is the toughest technology role to recruit for. Is it new stuff old stuff like what what what kind of role is like the hardest to try to. I'm the people for. That's a great question and I wouldn't say there's a single answer to it but I as much. That's as I hate to say this. Just Software Engineers Java C.. Sharp software engineers. Are there still such a a demand. And and there's an increasing demand right J. P. Morgan Chase really understood. That technology drives a business a long time ago. Oh so we have been building and building and building and building. We'll guess what the rest of the world is catching up. So now your smaller companies your midsized companies are understanding adding that the two needs offer engineers to help drive their business. That's more competition for us. So what do you look for in a software engineer. Like what what are the what are the core foundational things like you know. Obviously looking at background do they have that. That's a great question and I'm going to also oh kind of mirror off of something that that Lori had said in the conference which is when we're talking to mail software engineers I'm going to some stereotypes out there so forgive me but There's actually studies done about this as well. The men tend to over emphasize their capabilities and their skill sets while the female technologists ten into under emphasize their skill set and their value. And I don't know why that is because I'm not female but But it's one of those things where we have to do. We have to do a better job of coaching our interview. Words and hiring hiring managers on focusing on aptitude not experienced melody coach ability adaptability ability cultural fit. And just quite frankly the people who get it right you can teach you teach me to write right code. I won't write good code but you could teach meteoric you could teach a lot of people to write code but it. It's how the person does it. It's the thought process that goes what's behind it. That makes all the difference in the world absolutely so. Are there different things that people are being like. What kind kind of things in the interview process when you train someone to to hydro that outright? Because I mean let's just face it speaking of stereotypes in the tech field you can you can get a large majority of introverts extroverts are not always your two people technologists and that. That's just a fact. I don't know that anybody would deny that whether they're female on male but but when you go in and you know that you know how are you drawing it out or the drilling down right like like if you know it's kind of like recognizing inflator inflation typically. What is that coaching? kind of sound like to. I'm a manager and I'm going to go in and I need to get people on my line. I got an application deadline to get it going like I did. Now Gimme people. I'm sure that's exactly what they. Yeah we we do. A couple of things first and foremost We have all of our software. Engineering candidates take a coding challenge. WJR CAN NOT GONNA call it a coating assessment. Says we don't score it. We have the ability to turn scoring on but we purposely. Don't want to all we you want to do is look at how they write the code right. So how did they think about it. Because first and foremost coating is agnostic nasty so you can't throw bias in there by just doing the code so that gives us an opportunity to look at right there their skillset that but we coach hiring managers to to not think about hiring as grocery shopping. Right when you you when you write checking off the list and these are all you know I want Spring and Hibernate and selenium etc etc etc Will you know they don't NFL spraying. They've got stretch. Forget it like now stop. It's it's a framework if they were smart enough to learn spring they can learn streit's as well. It just takes a little obita coaching and mentoring. So do you WANNA wait another three months to find that her fake grocery lists or do you want to work with the ingredients. You have that you can build. That list can tastic. So where are where. where's all skills coming from like? Where are we talking college graduates? Let's hear I mean what are some of the cool ways you guys are looking at talent. Yeah so we like all companies right. We have very robust campus recruiting program. And it's exactly what you would expect it to be were here at the house at University and Stanford and we're here with Google IBM. Yeah the Microsoft were all hunting for that same talent. So I'm not going to talk about all that but some of the more innovative things that we have been doing is working with boot camps. And we've had really great success in Columbus Ohio Wilmington Delaware New York New Jersey and some of our other locations hiring people from boot camps. And what is that bootcamp hire. You say. Sometimes it's a student who went to school for say chemical engineering but had a software engineering classes like. Wow I really like this too bad. I picked that up in my last semester of of college and I don't want to go back another two and four years to get a degree so they go to these these boot camps but a bigger chunk of the people are career changers changers complete complete career changers and what they bring to the table that a College Destroy College College Grad doesn't bring is experience so one of our first boot camp hires in Columbus. Ohio was a female title math teacher and she had her jd but didn't want to be a lawyer. She's got her masters. She was teaching math and she decided you know to go up in the educational system. She had to get into administration and she didn't want to do that so she said well. You know software engineering math numbers logic. I could probably we do that. And she went to boot camp and she is We hired her about a year and a half years ago now as a software or engine near her trajectory is high and then you know she decided I wanted to do something different. I WANNA get into big data and data science and and so at j.p Morgan Chase. Fortunately we're large enough to have those opportunities. And she transitioned from Software Engineering role into data science role And is just continuing to grow and learn and and we tell that story as often as we can it. It's very inspirational and look. She had to to take a big sacrifice to do that in a big giant leap of faith to quit something after ten years of doing it pay money to get get educated again job. Yeah kind of cute comment about people like that like when you come across them. I mean the drive for self motivated. They're passionate. They want to succeed and coming in the door that they bring that in the door with them. Bedspreads fantastic so if you were to talk to you a woman Hugh Justice exploring different options right like I think. A lot of women generally speaking for all of them. But there's a lot of them that I know and just from being one myself a whole lot interests and very similar to that right and it is hard to start over but if if someone wanted to begin to to start doing something like that where would they start. What would you recommend you know like if you just he's having to meet someone in your evangelizing? It which we have to do you know what would be a first step. Our transition you know. Is it to go to boot camp. Learn coding being or are there other paths. That you've seen people kind of enter into the technology realm I would say almost every single one of them has had a a friend. A colleague a loved one who was in technology right and they and they kinda got the bug from them. There's a ton on of free online coding classes that you can take to really try it out to see if it is something you want to do. You know if if you're in it because it's a growing industry and you can make a lot of money. Those are the wrong motivations and I would say you know don't quit your day job But if you find That takes these free. Classes in the bug has bitten you. Then there are a plethora of options out there Regardless of where you live live so one probably shouldn't plug a website and cheaper Morgan chases in no way shape or form affiliated with this website. But there is one out there therefore boot camp says called course report and They do a pretty good job. So I was interviewed by course report Because of our bootcamp involvement and they wanted to understand they wanted me to give a report on a couple of the boot camps that we hire people from the positives the negatives cbs the everything else and then they also interview graduates. So it's not just you know someone going out there and leaving their yelp report. These are people. Who've I've been through the program or hiring people who the program and you'll get a really good understanding of who you should be reaching out to town your local market and so Do you have any advice for women aspiring or maybe not aspiring to. It why would somebody consider it. I think earlier before four. We were kind of like headed. We talk about really exciting opportunities allergy J. P. Morgan Chase like what are some of the things that are just so cool that it's like you'd be crazy. He did not want to get on board or like you know would would inspire somebody in order. Cool being chased you get someone inspired want to consider technology to ultra already technology. Yeah not that are not already in it or or it and potentially wanting to why would they want to come to GP Kocic. I heard a lot of grief over the culture. A lot of great stuff. Julia like cool stuff is happening there. I mean just from a if you're what we're doing across the board from taking everything to the cloud and our agile transformation that we're going through right now enterprise wide with J. P. Morgan in chase as a woman in technology coming in the door and the room for growth and mobility. That you have if you are willing to put in the work and you have the desire and you have the passion to be able to as he was referring to our female from the boot camp to be able to move to different areas. Whether you start on the tech side maybe move into the business that sort you go business and technical back and forth to come to an organization. That's large enough. That provides you that mobility upward growth. Some cool things. I'm GONNA anad specific. WHO also how are they solving moving twenty trillion in dollars of money around the world's financial system day really chasing trees Payments a day. Right we did the Doctor Eagle for those just listening to them like five trillion payments day. Hey think about so all the cool stuff right who hasn't purchased something on Amazon. Well guess what that money has to go from somewhere to somewhere and people. Don't think about it right. They've got their digital Wallet Chase. They've got their credit card chase or or someone else but but there's still the technology behind it so JP. Morgan chases the payment processing systems for Amazon. So you buy something on Amazon even if you're using a a capital one credit card or if some other institution right that money is going through our systems we we had some difficult. Time recruiting crude in In Silicon Valley quite some time ago. Because you know everyone thought well who wants to work for bank right. No one wants to work for a bank. You guys just this mainframe systems and what we would feel the the the thing that we back is OK. Well I get it you wanNA work for startup. Aren't there Nimble Agile. But guess what they don't have money for innovation structure stability et Cetera. And Laurie where he was talking about this. But you know there's a our post on linked and so we're not sharing anything but you know we hire one of one of Google's top three. The art official intelligence technologists left Google to come to J. P. Morgan Chase right left. Google is it big ler to come to J. P. Morgan and chase so that's cool stuff and we're we're attracting the best and the brightest because what they get to work on from a scale and scope perspective is just phenomenal. I mean when you talk about the size of twenty three trillion dollars. We're also talking across the globe. Yeah it's not just you. ACID globally fifty thousand technologists globally globally. We have more technology than most tech companies have total employees a bank. Wow that's pretty exciting. Yes it is really and we get the higher all those enclosing. What what advice would you give to someone? You just going to beat them like if somebody just came into your conversation you discover the passion for technology. What would you advise them? Besides succumb to call you technology. Not currently in technology. Is that what you're saying. General whichever compassion for technology in county out whatever advice you give certain people not I would say the same thing that Lori in many other folks say which is keep learning keep pushing the envelope. Don't sell yourself short. Don't ever think I can't always. I always think I can try and fail. You learn more from failing than you do from success and And just follow. Follow your passion and get others around you passionate about it too right. Value drains fantastic. Thank you very much for joining us. PODCAST I thankful to have you and we look forward to get technologist your way especially women over how popular in your pocket line. Okay waving take it back. Yeah thank you. Thanks for tuning in. And don't forget to subscribe to our podcast and leave a review. Forgive you will see you next time and feel free to drop us a line at get with it dot org.

J. P. Morgan Chase J. P. Morgan J. P. Morgan Chase Columbus Chuck Tracy Lori Beer Morgan Jesus R. J. P. Morgan Chase Cio Google Ohio Chattanooga Elizabeth North America United States Amazon Microsoft
Smart Sex, Smart Love  Episode 45  Dr. Hani Miletski on Mother-Son Incest

PodcastDetroit.com

30:08 min | 1 year ago

Smart Sex, Smart Love Episode 45 Dr. Hani Miletski on Mother-Son Incest

"You're listening to the PODCAST or visit www dot podcast detroit dot com before information. Welcome smart sex smart. Love. We're talking about sex goes beyond the taboos and talking about love goes beyond the honeymoon I'm Dr Joe Court. Thanks for tuning in. Hello and welcome to the first show of season two of smart sex smart love with me Dr, Joe. Court I'm so pleased to be back in the studio. We're talking about sex goes beyond the taboo and talking about love beyond the honeymoon I'm kicking off the new season with one of the most taboo topics out their mother son incest despite societies denial of mother son. Incest. Does happen and most people don't want to think about it talk about it or do anything about it. We idealize mothers and Never WanNa think of them as behaving abusively or of harboring bad or sexual intentions toward their own. So their own. Overcoming this taboo about the reality of Mother Son Incest is not easy for either victim or therapist here with me today Dr Hani. belitsky honey is a psychotherapist in private practice Bethesda Maryland with over twenty six years of clinical experience. She's the author of the only solid valuable book about this topic mother son incest the unthinkable broken taboo persists and it is revered voice on Mother's son sexual abusive relationship. Welcome honey. In Q.. I'm so glad to have you here I've wanted you here last season, but we'd filled up really fast. So I thought this season I'm GONNA. Ask you first so. Thank you for having me. Also WanNa tell the listeners that you know and you know this you were the reason that I actually became a certified sex therapist. I was at a talking I think it has to be almost twenty years ago maybe two, thousand, five, four, something like that. Yeah. And I was doing a talk on sexual abuse and. I. Remember this is what I remember. You came up to me after and you. Appreciated the talk you were very gracious to me, and then you very graciously. Let Me Know Van Battle. That it was missing sexual health information and that I didn't have a good sensibility about it understanding you didn't say those words but. I. Remember it like yesterday, and then that became my journey into becoming one. So thank you. You're welcome. I'm so happy you took that journey me to realize what looking back I really always did have a sexual health sensibility, but it was covered up with all the sexual trauma work. I did the sex addiction quote unquote work I did, and that's all that's all gone not that sexual trauma I still do that but the sexual health part right there of course. All right. So can you talk about? Why did you pick this topic to be your? Book? Well, this goes long way back when I was in my master's program for social work I went to Catholic. University in Washington DC. And Our masters program or or thesis was supposed to be an an article for publishing. For publication and I knew I was going to be a sex therapist. So I was trying to find a subject that has something to do it's six. But I was going to. Catholic. University. So I had to be mindful of that and I couldn't shoes. You know something about orgasm or whatever. So I decided to do something about sexual abuse and my adviser told me that I need to really narrow it down. So I thought okay. I'm going to do something about insists because then sounded more interesting something that I haven't heard about that much. and. She said, you need to narrow it down even more. So I thought. Okay. What haven't hi heard about at all. And I thought. Okay. Mother. Son insists it probably doesn't happen. And so I'm just going to find some resources that say that it doesn't happen and that will be basically my paper is going to be an easy easy peasy. Yes I started. Researching and I found out that was very wrong that it happens. People don't talk about it, but it happens and I started writing and writing and writing and became a lot bigger than a larger than an article. It ended up being a book, the small book but a book. And a very good book and It doesn't stay imprint very. Much, right because it's not widely solid after is that true? It's. True. I. Mean the first edition was published by Decipher Society in two, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, hundred. Ninety Ninety five longtime ago. and. Then in two thousand, six, they asked me to. Add more to it and make it. More, up-to-date. So. I did that and then I took the rights back and I decided to self public. So the new edition is them understand insist. The unbreakable Dante broken to persists is. The wounded I myself so published. And I. think that's Great. You do that and I don't mean that when I say that it doesn't stay in print. It's not because of the content because it's great content, it's this is not Assad after topic in fact, you'd probably already know this when you Google Mother Son Incest, your book comes up and then thousands and thousands of incest porn sites come up right right. So people have ARATU sized this which is a sexual. Fantasy and we can talk about that too but. The actual, the actual idea of mothers doing this as I started out in this beginning is just not even talked about in fact, I. Always say I used to love watching Oprah was on what twenty five years and her whole she would have multiple shows every season on sexual abuse multiple never was there a show until I? Think the season before the last she did a segment on mother son incest was a segment and it was short and it was brief and you know I mean Oprah I know she's pop culture, but she was still very smart about her show. You would think that there would be more about that but even she or her producers didn't think of it as much. It's true. I mean I have not seen that but I know that was one of the first to talk about childhood sexual abuse I. Remember it vividly in the eighties when she came out on live was t- on TV live I, think it was and It it. Yeah and you hear all the time more and more. We always hear about when women have been sexually abused by male perpetrators but you rarely hear or less. So with men abuse of obviously by their mothers by female perpetrators, would you agree sack? Yeah. I. Mean. It's getting better. You hear more about it. But it's still rare. Why do you think it is I think it's because mothers are so taboo to talk about negativity. But what do you think? Well for sure I mean first of all day get a woman will will be the sexual abuser is also hard for people to to accept you know first of all them women don't have penises. So people think okay. If you don't have the penis, you know how much harm can you already do? And besides women and not that interested in sex. You Know It's all these myth and they love children and they're so gentle and all that kind of stuff, and then if you can accept the fact that women can do that. Mothers is sort of like another layer I mean mothers are like you know like holy. No way they can do anything like this. They loved children he'll do anything for the children and It's just you know. I'm thinkable. Do you think and if so, how do you think mothers do it differently than fathers or women do it differently than men? A main first of all, they don't have penises, right? Right exactly. Although. A lot of the sexual abuse perpetrated by men. Does involve penises, either you know there's a lot of different ways to sexually molest. Children Great Point but women have the. Advantage Silla speak of of. Being Seductive. Of. Taking care of the children. So there's a lot of hygiene. involved, and so a lot of the sexual molestation can be. Disguised by. Taking care of the children and cleaning them and bathing them and you know touching them sort of like because sort of you have to. There's also You know when when the children are older like teenagers perhaps or like around puberty the women. Mothers can ask that the sun you know to help her. Get dressed and zip her her dress and all kinds of things like that. That usually you don't see with men. That makes this point that's what I hear in my office. It's often most of the stories are she was taking care of me. She was it was in the bathtub she'd come in. was in the TUB or she'd be on the toilet and she would ride the toilet and she'd come in those kinds of right. At night in sleepy together in the same bed and cuddling. That could be another way Yup I've had a male clients say that to me to that dad was You know they had a fight or he was out of the bedroom where he was on a trip and based on that she would bring him in and and so would you say that I would say this but I'd like your thoughts. You're the expert on this that when men do it, it's more overt when women do it. It's more covert exactly because when when they do it ended the guy, the guy of I say guys yes. Of taking care of you and bathing you and cleaning you and hugging you and all that kind of stuff. The kid ends up being very confused because. The mother is supposedly doing something really nice for them and taking care of them but it feels weird feels like something is wrong and they don't know what's going on. Right, the experience is it feels like it feels weird than so they described that and they can't put it into words. Exactly right. So as a therapist, we have to help them find those words and that's tricky because it's like finding invisible man in the room. Right, and you also have to worry about putting any ideas in their heads debt were not there. Yes. necessarily. You have to kind of work very thin line there. and. Sometimes, it can be so over you think yourself I think as a therapist. I'm listening I'm thinking Oh my God that's totally sexual abuse and they're not seeing it that way like the mother saying I've had this I don't know if you've had this were men say my mother asked me and my teenage years to show her my erect penis to make sure I was growing properly. Grabbed me and said Oh my God. You're so much bigger than your dad like that right and it's so inappropriate and they don't know any better. Kids. Right, they think it's my mom I should. They dismissed the fact that it would be anything negative right she loves me she. You know she wouldn't harmony she whatever she does does because the way it's supposed to be even if it doesn't feel good. Yeah. What would you say? What is there a kind of motherly love that crosses over into incest behavior? Well. I think the the the crossing over is is when the sun? Begins to feel uncomfortable. And the mother doesn't care doesn't pay attention and doesn't care. Because there are a lot of behaviors that could be normal. You know in many cultures in in many homes, you know every every relationship, every household act differently Every relationship is different every country's defense. So it's hard to say you know you can't do this and you can't do that. Of course, we're not talking about the. Overt Sexual Abuse. But I think like if if a mother hugs her teenage son and design is sort of squirming and doesn't know what to do it himself and obviously feels uncomfortable. That's when the mother the adult has to say, okay he doesn't like it. I should back off I shouldn't do this anymore at least for now until he grows up and it's okay to hire him again or something along those lines. So I think it's the responsibility of the mothers did doubts to really pay attention and see when the kid is comfortable and an act appropriately. So I think that mothers who have healthy instincts as maternal instincts, she would get that and see that and catch yourself but the mothers who don't don't right. And that that is the problem because most of the women who Are Perpetrators. Of Mother Son in says. Women who are very needy. And they just they don't think about anybody else. They don't pay attention I don't think. In most cases, they don't even do it on purpose. They're just so needy and they want the kid to hug them and they want you know they just need something usually no. partner around. and. So the kid becomes the the partner. Right, it's really based on a whole. She's trying to fill in herself in is could also be that she was sexually abused in some way. Is that correct? It's possible. I don't like to make that reference debt everybody who was sexually abused ends up sexually abuse others right because. Happens but it doesn't always happen, and so I I just don't like to go there. It's like a correlation. Right, I agree 'cause people get freaked out in my office if I was sexually abused as at me and I'm going to do this to my kids and I have I say exactly what you just said, it does not automatically. And that's one of the reasons why the men don't come forward and talk about it because they're afraid that if. People find out that they were sexually abused that they will be immediately accused of sexually abusing others. Yeah. That makes sense. You say the five misconceptions about mother son incest include mother son incest means intercourse voice cannot be victims of sexual abuse. What harm can be done without a penis you already said that motherly love cannot be sexual and of them must be crazy. I love these these are really important listed on purpose. Do you want to expand on any of those? First of all the mother son says, mains, intercourse I. Think I mentioned that in the beginning. When people think about sexual abuse, they immediately think about intercourse. When people think about sex, they immediately think about intercourse but sex and abuse can be so many other things. And because You don't hear a lot of cases of mother and son having intercourse her say. People think okay. Never exists does happen because you never hear about that but there is a lot of other ways to abuse a child. And and it's it's the experienced only a lot of the guys I talked to right because that wasn't the case she may not overtly touched him in a certain way. Genitals, it may not have been like you say intercourse. So they feel like you say they feel crazy like how could this be and a lot of time in therapy to get them understand that mothers don't do that with sons. Exactly. And does all of these covert. Sexual. Touching and behavior debt people just don't. Make sense of that doesn't sound like that was incest that was just my mother was like that. You know that that's the way she was. The second one is boys cannot be victims of sexual abuse. And that's It's another one that People think. That, because boys of supposed to love sex, you know the more the better. And there're supposed to be strong and. You know. Maybe, men can do something to other men even though they people think that's where which is not rare right but. Digested, women can do that and I'm going to do. The next one would harm can be done without a penis you know it's all combined. You know men cannot be abused boys cannot be abused because they're supposed to one I wanted. So you know I'm not talking specifically about mothers but you know if if anybody. Suggests for the kids to have sex? They most likely will want it because kids love sex sender. So preoccupied with that and if it's a woman and if it's an older woman, you know it's like, wow. You know it's great for this kid and it's just all these ideas that people have in their head that don't allow them to actually see what's going on that it is abuse that has happened and that the the boys can be very miserable because of that and they have nobody to turn to. and. No words for it's alliterative. Know why they're miserable exactly because they're supposed to be happy about it. And then we have the motherly love cannot be sexual, which we talked about already that you know who can even fathom that mothers can do anything like that. So it must not exist. And the last one, one of the must be crazy. Is I think the one that. To, me makes the most sense because that's what I used to say you know if it happens. One of them must be crazy because it just cannot happen. It's impossible. But it does happen. So how do you know what kinds of ways doumen manifest as that they end up coming into your office there's certain types of behaviors or problems that are dysfunctions that occur. Well you know can affect many a lot of different ways but I think mostly is the way of. Having attachment issues and how they relate to two partners. A lot of them end up being attracted to older women and some of them like much much older women. And they come to my office because they they know something is not right. They want to have a relationship with somebody their age do want to have kids but they're not attracted by them and doesn't do this doesn't for them and in their fantasies and their pornography that they're watching the watching these older women. And you know they feel really bad about it. And I think it's important because I think this is such a shift in our culture to the younger people in gay men and straight men and by men and men where they're they're attracted to older people it's not always related to sexual abuse or some kind of inappropriateness, but it can do. Exactly. Right I mean you know the older woman is a cougar right and I I actually wrote this article. I thought it was kind of clever. It did not catch on I thought if women could be older, women can be cougars older guy can I be a coup gay but? Not Get John. I try to put some humor in some of this because it's so dark it's so it. Isn't it? It is. It's so sad. It's so sad because my mom of even though this shouldn't be this way dads can protect children to and men can protect children but mom is expected in our culture to be the protector. So when she's the perpetrator, it's so it's it's shocking. I know people cannot even believe you know when there's a situation where the male partner abuses to kids. They can't believe that the mother let it happen. Yes right. So. She actually did something right and in this case when Mom's doing it, dad's letting it happen. He's turning away right or is not there or is not there exactly. Earlier, you said about mothers cuddling with their sons in bed. What would you? Would you know you can't make any specific ages but when is it inappropriate to keep doing that with the sun for Mother? First of all I think the mother has to like I said before be very mindful about how the kid reacts. It could be not even related to to any sexual aspect if the kid is not comfortable, the mother has to know. To get away and not do this. But I think definitely winded when the kid gets into puberty. and. You Know Hormones Dora. Going crazy and every thought or every touched. Gives a kid and erection. You definitely do not WanNa cuddle your your son at that at that time at that age or sleep with the sun because then the being with the mother in having the mother attached you or you touch the mother. Becomes associated with erections with sexual arousal? Yes, and then it's all messed up. That makes sense and I like what you said earlier that touch doesn't have to be physical. You know I've had men talk on my office mom wore a sheer nightgown with nothing underneath mom would run from the bathroom to the bedroom without anything on some people you know there are nudist families right and there are people that. But it's her intention behind it. Would you agree? Right, that's why I keep saying she has to be mindful because like you said our families where they walk around into nude and that's normal and everybody's fine with that. and. They can continue to do this forever. But if they get a kid that is uncomfortable about it getting erections all the time when they see their mom. You know they have to change their ways. I. Don't know if you remember this but a while back I was I buy your book I give it out to my clients Am by the way y'all say this at the end to your book is available on your website www dot Dr. Milan Milewski d. r. m. I L. E. S. K. I. Dot Com. On Amazon you sell it there too right Yep. Okay. Do you remember me showing you this forum where hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of men talk about the fact they loved having sex with their mother? They loved what she did and they continued it into adulthood. Yeah. What do you? What do you think of that I have to tell you? I'm talking shocking. It's shocks me and shouldn't but it does what do you think about it now I am I have gotten a lot of emails from guys who were very upset about my book because they said that. You know what they had with their mother was love and it was a wonderful relationship and how dare I call it anything bad. And INA. I. Think it's part of the denial. You. Know I think a lot of guys who have been in these situations. They have to explain to themselves in some way they have to live with and themselves. So the best way for them to to explain it to themselves is that it was just a wonderful experience and their mother loved them in ways that cannot be described and they had the special relationship and you know. Which I'm sure. Felt wonderful. You know on a physical level. But emotionally I think it messed them up. You know I had the privilege actually it was to Dan. Savage the sex educator on caster. Looking for somebody to write about Oh, he had a somebody who is the problem was the guy. had been sexually abused by his mother he enjoyed it and admitted that to his girlfriend and she. Turned off and he let me. Speak on that but I don't think. to Oh that's right. We both were I'm sorry I. Forgot you're right and so right what I would not have known that was even a thing though if it wasn't for that Amazon form. And you know we have to make room. What do you think of this? I think we have to make room for the fact that there are some people that do enjoy that that the mother and the son do maybe they do have a special relationship, I don't know what do you think? Well I mean my philosophy is that somebody does not see what happened to them as abuse. I do not. Know. Try to convince them of that right here because you know their defense mechanism is working for them and and it's doing good I'm not gonNA. Mess it up for. Them. But if they come to me because they have problems because of that's than we have to accept what happened in order to move on. To change things and what's happening in their adulthood is one thing but I always say to people if you're five and the perpetrator is older than you as a teenager or an adult young adult whatever that like you said, it is abuse whether you want to call it that or not. It's not consent children can't consensus adult sexual behavior right? I mean legally leave their five years older. It's abuse. Yeah Right. Very good point. Yeah. We're getting close to the end I. Wonder if there's anything I didn't ask you that you wanted to make sure we talked about. I'm sure there's a lot of things but the one thing that. Came to my mind when you talking about the women that the mothers rang around in see through lingerie. Reminded me of one of my clients who I was working with for many years. And he he came for other reasons. And after years of working with him, he mentioned to me one day that his mother did that. And she used to leave the door open when she went to the bathroom. And a sitting how come. You never told me about that and he was in tears. He was crying it was so hard for him to admit that. And the point that I'm trying to make here is that it is so hard sometimes most times I think for men to admit anything like that, and it may take years years in therapy for them to even say anything about that unless they come in for that reason. Right, and sometimes it's not even on the forefront of their mind right example environmentalist given connect to it right Is embedded in. It is so painful and I'm glad that's the point where ending on because that needs to be said, know that people need to understand that you know because no-one thinks of mothers doing this not even the victims think of mothers their own. Yeah So I WANNA. Thank you so much. You know you're the author of Mother Son Incest. The unthinkable broken taboo persists and it's available in soft cover and as an e book on her website www dot d. r. m. I L. E. T. S. k. i.. Dot Com Dr Milewski. Dot Com. Thank you so much. Thank you and people don't know this but we're doing his sons zoom because a covert and I can see you you can't see me because I'm in my robe and I wasn't prepared and you look as beautiful as you're always did I need probably was looking like everywhere because I don't see you. Look Great. You're really do thank you. I WANNA. Thank you Dr Hani for being my guests and if you enjoyed my show please don't forget to rate review and subscribe and also follow me on Instagram and on twitter at Dr Joe Court D. R. J.? O.. E. K. RT I'll see you next time take care and be safe. Thanks for listening to this episode of Smart Sex Smart Love. I'm Dr Court and you can find me on. Joe. COURT DOT COM THAT'S J. O. E. K. O. R. T. DOT com see your next time.

partner Dr Joe Court Joe Oprah Maryland Son Washington DC Dr Hani. belitsky private practice Google TUB Dr Milewski Decipher Society Dr Hani Assad Mom Dr Joe Court D. R. J L. E. T. S. k. puberty.
 Hard Brexit Tories: a party within a party?

Today in Focus

27:58 min | 2 years ago

Hard Brexit Tories: a party within a party?

"They. Today. We talk about the powerful group of Brexit. Supporting Torian pays who have had a massive influence over Theresa May. And the guardians Joanna Wolters on protests against the billionaire Sackler family linked to America's opioid crisis. I can tell you been covering for awhile because he clearly speak fluent Brexit. So yes. Yeah. I do say it's people when you talk about other new stories and people come to make did you see this happening? The news ago is about the backstop if not identify can how much about it. Backstop isn't the only piece of Brexit vocabulary? You've heard of no deal single-market customs union after but what do, you know about the E R J? Is a minority consented posse. All you all you endangered holding the conservative party to run. Its course. Christian of holding the conservative party will the contract to say how many government ministers are in it. Because it is it is essentially a group of members. The hardline anti e u awkward squad that if destroyed every leader for the last forty years on now running the conservative party from top to toe. Some call the European research group of Tory MP's a party within a party that organized powerful and absolutely determined to achieve a hard. Brexit. Critics say they've been calling the shots in Theresa May's e negotiations. So what do they do now that she has given parliament the power to block? No, Dale and delay Brexit if it's being delayed, which is my suspicion as a plot to stop breaks it all together. Then I think that would be the most grievous error that politicians could commit from the guardian. I'm Donna today. Focus who are the ER Jay. And will they force a hard Brexit? So done with two hugely significant interventions on Brexit from both Jeremy Corbyn now, Theresa May, prime minister came out, the fractious cabinet meeting went to parliament and has now promised to votes for as if her deal falls again in March asking this house, if it supports leaving the EU without withdrawal agreement first of all vote on no deal. And if that falls, then a vote on delaying Brexit bring forward motion on whether parliament wants to see a short limited extension to article fifty tell me about who Theresa May is under pressure from. Well, this is a big move by the prime minister because she's basically ruling out no deal done. Sabir is an associate editor at the guardian. Reporting on politics previously. We'd also no deal was default alternative, if Theresa May a deal through Mel under tents pressure from the remains from the people wired about no dealer in cabinets as people have rod who's the work and pensions sanctuary David gore Justice century, these people finally saw stood up and being counted around a pressure. What was clearly a fractious me because I was opposition. From the other side lessening credibly significant step the default sumptious had been that. No deal will be what happened if trays couldn't get deal for now, the prime minister saying just the reverse actually I'll extend I will extend fifty rather. I'll give MP's votes extent outsca fifty. And as you mentioned in cabinet Theresa May has given way to the remain is a small amount. But also came under intense pressure from those of her ministers his campaign to leave. EU, and it feels as there's a bit of a pincer movement going on for those MP's because as well as Theresa May, essentially taking no deal off the table. Jeremy Corbyn is now suggesting that labour will back a second referendum. Do you think that they are now coming under intense pressure? Absolutely BreX is finally gang real as we get close to the deadline. Full-size people have finally having to come off the fence the promise to deal with the European Union. So everyone is starting to find workout what her plan B is. And she's been so be dragged in one direction or another the prices on a lot of pressure for longtime from the heartbreaks to surroun- interro party. But what's today is stimulated of opposing reaction if you like from the left of her own party. Why have they done that? Why if they finally stood up accounting why they finally made the pressure tell well that's because for a long time. It was the other side of the Tory party had the argument these with the heartbreaks is conservative apply. Good representation campaigner. With high profile figures Boris Johnson. But underpinned by so determined if you like a rebellion faction cool cast within the conservative party as the European research group. The ER g these are the people who are driving the Brexit urban. If pulling the reins on on the prime minister is this what Rabeni she's now responding to rebellion against the rights and the Tory party by the left in the party. And finally, she's had to make concessions if he wants to end the uncertainty and deal with the issues he raised in his response to my statement, then he should vote for a deal simples. So the European research the E R J were behind the confidence vote into Theresa May in December. They didn't manage to top one hundred seventeen of them voted against her. I mean, that's the same number that she now needs to get her Brexit deal through who are they? Well, there faction within the Kosova party. They don't really well known to the public with incredible and at Westminster it's a caucus of around. Well, props up to one hundred and Ps shifting shifting numbers. They meet weekly twenty to thirty go alone. There's a what's that group? Some of the part of how many are in that some of the mobile ministers that they want to declare that. What do they do? They're all about pursuing a hard Brexit pure Brexit vision for Britain, and for the conservative party and right now they've been pretty much focused on heading in a direction of either very hard Brexit or no deal. Creighton rile for me. And here are the key members. Most important members Jacob re smokin Steve Baker. So Jacob rees-mogg. Everyone's heard of him. He's a chairman if the g now. The government is of the decision NAS to deliver a proper exit. But we have a government led by remains the fun to keep us tied in to the be derided as a Tory tough, but a visible and eloquent spokesperson for the ER g strand of thinking looks every inch the kind of Tory aristocrat he is he's the front, man. Their key person within the group or the engineer Steve Baker people shouldn't be under any allusions that the conservative party does face a catastrophic splits. If this plan is pushed through and vice chairman of the RG, he was actually the chairman in the past and and help so crater in his car reform, then he became a Brexit Minister Theresa May try to buy off a bit a bit more government. But that didn't work. He resigned over checkers. I think it was what does he do? Well, for example, he he's eating might not be a man who's on television very much. But he's a man, you know, bombo reporters with well. Judge text messages sang exactly what the thinks about this particular issue that particular issue or who might be valuable to go on the go on the television or the radio talk to reporters today. He also is the troops. For example, us what's up assault technology for again, telling people what to do how to vote how to organize themselves how to respond and the most famous Brexit terror in the country. Barth johnson. How involved is he with the he's no particularly involved the G in any meaningful touch day basis. You know, he might vote in line with what what what they suggest. But he doesn't particularly want to be seen as following their lead at Boris is there, I don't know what it's like, the spiritual leader if you like has no organiz ation, Rome. Frankly, he's bigger than the orgy. He doesn't need it. And he knows it say never really organized grape, which tell them members to vote in a certain way. Do you think they get more access to the prime minister than other factions in the conservative party on doubtedly? I think that it was very telling example in the run-up to the defections of the other day, the the the three conservatives who defected last week that none of them had any so personal contact from Theresa May or Downing Street or anyone senior from I think Heidi on another text from David guac, the first people that she invited into number ten with the ER g the very people who just weeks. Beforehand had called a vote of no confidence in her leadership and delighted in calling out her failings to any passing microphone on college. Green. Theresa May did not reach out to them could have easily done sewn. At least said look you go. You know, is there anything I can do. It's not a complicated composition conversation to have. But what she will do what she has done throughout the autumn was consistently concede to the G on amendments. They've been in and out of Downing Street the cabinet office and so on and so forth meeting her me in colleagues. And so she's always tried to appear to listen appeared on stand them if a r g now compulsory weekly meeting, generally Absolut, absolutely as you now one of the great traditions in Westminster fiscal Genesis hanging around outside the car door for meeting texting people on the inside who boarded the back of the class. What's going on? What's going on sharing gossip information while way leaning into the door? See if you. Can hear anything if the security will let you and waiting for the sounds of tables being banged other. Cheers, and so on and so forth to to measure the tone. So I have not heard of them. I guess in the end people don't try on the kind of anatomy of Westminster to the great detail, the Westminster reporters do, but I think that is starting to change it started to change, partly because of the critics Philip Hammond pretty much call them extremists back in December. I think what this vote today, we'll do is flush out the extremists who are trying to advance a particular agenda. We've got device L with criticizing this week. The actual referendum itself was done with them in mind. The article fifty letter was sent with them in mind. The motions have been delayed and written with the G in mind. He's blaming the all sorts of things that I think is so stretching the below bit. The fact that matrix of ask fifty when she did nearly two years ago. The fact indeed that we're even having a referendum in the first place. When when you're a skepticism was an emotional. Force in the conservative party, but the yard geo there existed was a lawless organize news now. Suddenly, we're all talking about the European research. Great these Tory is they're all over the news in one way or another. Whether we realize they are not why do they come from take us back through the history. The history of the Jews quite interesting because it was although it was dates back to the nineteen nineties and a whole era of John Major and Maastrict's that evening despite doing everything bus stand on its head to persuade Tory rebels to fall into line. The government was evening defeated in Commons vote on an amendment to the Maastricht Bill the restoration of the mastery treaty, greater integrator, European integration. Possibility down the road was the mind joined the euro. Of course, we never did during that period. John Major's government was dealing with these Tory rebels who incredibly unhappy with the drift of direction of policy. The then pro European pro you policy, if the conservative government of John Major they were no not reflection by John Major as my allow to use this word. You are. Okay. They were known as the bastards. The verb means yet further delay to the treaty's ratification. But more significantly the Tory rebellion is a kick Matete for mister major in that era in the nineteen nineties the beginning of the European conflict in the party, which we see today most European research group, and in the J back then in nineteen Ninety-three as its very first researcher was Daniel Hannan now, a Tory member of the European parliament and widely considered to be one of the architects of Brexit. When you talk about the now, we're not really talking about the actual organization. E R G has become kind of shorthand everything everything that commentators imagine to be the extremist takeover of the Tory party. But if you disregard the Franken ER g that is taking shape in people's minds and look at the actual historical one. It was from day one. It was conciliatory the idea was to build a new consensus. Behind a looser relationship with the EU when did the dream become Brexit all the way up to the renegotiation. If a UK prime minister had been able to come back and say, I have retrieved some powers from Brussels if Cameron comeback with one power back. I think that would have been enough because people would event said, oh, it's not a ranch. You know, it can it can flow up or down. We can have a different kind of relationship. I mean, I think back to once having lunch with what we call a significant member of the today back before that renegotiation, and they said to me yet. We're we know were backing reform. We want reform when I look back at it. Now, I think you never believe that there was ever going to be a reform. No, I think it was possible have someone other than younger being in charge. It could have been a very different story. I mean, I think David Cameron didn't play his hand as well. As might have done. I think he was asking for the wrong things digging in on the wrong issues here in Brussels. We're going to have a conversation dedicated to Britain's renegotiation of its position in Europe. And I want to see real progress. Yes. In all of the four areas that I mean, one very federalist p friend of mine from the continent said to me shortly afterwards, he said, I I wish we had spent a tenth as much time listening to your concerns as we did on the Greek crisis is just none of us solve this coming sit. Tell me about the European research group now it's carried on with the core functions that it had in my day, which is producing research a lot of it really, quite detailed and granular. Although is almost never given credit for doing that. Because half the country is still stuck in. You guys have got nothing positive to say, it's almost a standard rule in politics that people never really listen to the other side. They instead listen to what their friends claimed the other side is saying it's it's driven this rather ugly polarization that we've seen over the last two and a half years. It's something I didn't see coming in his terribly terribly regrettable. Do you not think that some of those MP's within the at the moment? Are banging the drum for no deal. It's as if that's what they always wanted from the star. No, I really don't think. That's right. I know that that is often said of them, and you know, sure, you can probably find one or two people who have crossed with the whole thing that they'll say that. But no, I really don't think that that is a fair characterization of members of the ER Jay say, they'd rather see no deal than have us remain in accustomed eating. So to say no deal is preferable to a bad deal. Should be completely on controversial statement. Right. I mean, we can only imagine hypothetically a deal that would be worse than no deal. Right. Everyone listening can only imagine if the EU and to give an absurd example imagine if the EU said, right, okay. The only way in which we're gonna leave leave is if kind of hunger games, you have to send to people to compete in a fight to the death. Of course, we can imagine a worse deal. Right. So the so the question is where do you draw the line at what point is the deal so bad that it becomes? A worse thing the no deal. And obviously that's an issue on which people will legitimately disagree. And do you think Tobias Ellwood is right that if it were the J we wouldn't be talking about the prospect of nodal. No, I mean, I think I'm afraid this being a tendency in Brussels not really in the twenty seven national capitals. But in the EU institutions that is kind of half wanted this outcome all along because they are fronted by the the referendum result. They're angry about it a slightly vindictive sense of right. Well, you know, if you guys wanna leave we're going to show, you will that means, that's that's not something you here in Warsaw or Rome Copenhagen what most of the national leaders. Want is a brisk business like Brexit that looks after the economic interest of their own countries. Of course, eighty right? But there are plainly people in the commission who would rather see all sides suffer than what post to you succeed and trees, my has taken quite a gamble now. I mean, if her deal. Falls and MP's rejete no deal. Brexit will be delayed. Presumably this is all about getting the air Jay to fall into line and back the withdrawal agreement. I don't think they will. I think if if there is no movement by the EU on the backstop. I think most of them will take the view that. No deal is preferable to that. And that even the risk, and is is not certain what would happen. But even the risk of of the whole thing is still less bad than being permanently in the backstop. I mean, we've waited the better part of half a century for this getting it right is more important than what particular data happens on. What do you think going to happen? I think it is probably just more likely than not that the you will move sufficiently to allow a deal to be done. And I think if that is the case, then there will be a very slight deferral in Brexit just to get the requisite legislation through. And so you'll be heading to Brussels. Well, I have I have made provisions for being there in April, which is always talking about because my in June would be the election. Anyway, it's always easier to cancel them to to stop booking hotels and flights. So I've I've told my staff that they should be prepared to work the extra month. Many see yesterday's news in parliament as a blow to the ER g because MP's could now take the hardest option of a no deal. Brexit off the table and everything could be delayed, but back in parliament and Sabir says that Theresa May still finds the idea of reaching out to labor to make Brexit happened unpalatable, which means the ER J on the right of her party remain critical when it comes to votes, she'll hope that this latest move might push them to woods backing her Dale. So you've talked about the power of the E R J you've talked about how. Well, they organize in parliament how well they get their people into the media how well they operate essentially a whipping system in order to guarantee votes going through. But it feels as if it's checkmate for them right now, if the options coming forward are that no deal won't happen. And the that could be second referendum is that fair or do you think they're still a powerful force? I think the long term the arguments with them. But there's two things going on the God decide is this a moment where we Bank Brexit, where we say, we've pushed the prime minister towards the hardest Brexit we can go to we've provoked reaction from the other side of the party that now looks organized straw. Do. We actually say we can vote for tros most deal if she can get some kind of concession on the backstory, if they can get that this might be the moment where you go. You know, we cash chips, we Bank Brexit. But but I. The idea that the RJ of been checkmated or they're they're a spent falls Ono not a tool. This is the most organized force in the conservative party in a lot of heroin law adherence almost displayed strong support. It's association turn the country with anti EU worldview, there's going to be a leadership election the Tory party. I would imagine the next leader will come from this strand preservative thinking, this is the coming force and conservatism watch the space damn thank you very much. Thank you. It's another massive day in parliament do follow all the reporting by Dan Sabir and the rest of the Westminster team and do follow under sparrows politics. Live blog out, the guardian dot com. Coming up, the Sackler family have long been seen as famous belon- purpose whose name is linked to artistic institutions now that becoming synonymous with America's opioid crisis. Seventy five percent of Americans believe that poverty in the US is an unsolvable problem. But what if we can prove them wrong, you can make a difference? Find out more at stand together against poverty dot org. Welcome back. Now. The guardians Joanna Walters on a growing backlash against one of the richest families in America. The circle family is worth about thirteen billion dollars. But not very much is known about them. For the general public. Then name is attached to many many, cultural institutions in the United States and Britain. They have a wing named after them at New York's Metropolitan museum also in London. They've given money to the national portrait gallery to the Tate and also academic institutions that very well known in the philanthropy world. But they're also becoming increasingly well known in the world of big farmer because they own one of the leading pharmaceutical companies in the US hold Perdue. And it produces Oxycontin, one of the most infamous prescription painkillers on the market question that I've best strongest pain. Medicines are the opioids, but these are the same drugs that have a reputation causing addiction and other terrible things. In fact, the rate of addiction amongst pain patients who are treated by doctors is much less than one percent America's been experiencing. What's known as an opioid crisis? Seventy two thousand people died in the United States of drug overdoses in twenty seventeen and forty nine thousand of those were from opioids a significant chunk of that number was from prescription painkillers such as Oxycontin and became nicknamed heroin in a pill. And so people have really been asking question, why have individual members of the Sackler family, not being personally held responsible? The company has been sued many times and the company took a plea deal on a criminal case in two thousand and seven and was fined six hundred million dollars after admitting mislabeling Oxycontin, but the family members were never charged really until now a judge in Boston heard the first of what will be many arguments in a huge lawsuit against a giant drugmaker Purdue pharma and the case is shining. A spotlight on the powerful family behind the drug pendulum has swung towards the victims and towards public opinion and away from big business more than one thousand cities and states have sued Purdue pharma as well as other pharmaceutical makers and pharmaceutical distributors and all of those lawsuits have been gathered together in a massive court case in federal court in Cleveland, Ohio. Oh, and so we're starting to see something of a year of reckoning individual members of the Sackler family have now been named in some of the leading lawsuits in these legal cases. Families and individuals who've been victims of addiction to opioids or have lost loved ones have thought to organize and the highest profile protest has been organized by the legendary American art photography nam, golden nine had actually been through an addiction to Oxycontin. It's a very powerful drug, and it embraces I was on it for three or four years, and it takes over your entire life. And almost died of an opioid overdose. And so she decided in especially as an artist that she was going to start organizing direct action protests. We wanna see their money taken away from them. Bankruptcy would be good prison would be good. I think they should face criminal charges. They're right up there without job. And so the very first big protests around about a year ago, she and two or three dozen fellow-activists invaded the Sackler wing at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. They threw fake prescription pill bottles, and they started protesting using the name. To the Sackler families. Got us a deck that. Since then they held a direct action. Protests up the Guggenheim activists released thousands and thousands of pieces of paper, and they were fake prescriptions for Oxycontin, and the idea was to mimic a lizard of prescriptions. Which is a quote from Richard Sackler one of the leading members of the family. He'd said the launch party for Oxycontin that the drug was going to be so successful at the launch was going to be followed by a blizzard of prescriptions. That would bury the competition. After some of the latest court documents came out, the Metropolitan Museum put out a statement saying it was now reviewing its gift policy. That's a major shift. More people die of drug overdoses in this country, then killed by car crashes. So it's absolutely huge other countries. Look to American say, we mustn't go through what they went through on the other hand corporate forces, very strong, and there's been a worrying increase in the prescriptions of opioid drugs in the United Kingdom. And I think an organization like the national health service. That's the body that needs to stop this becoming anything like the norm writing a prescription for an opioid should be the last resort and public does need to be aware of that. That's it for today. My thanks to the to Dan's, Sabah, and Hanan and Joanna Walters. Today's episode was produced by Rachel Humphries. I'm Calia and Elizabeth Casson sound design was by Akzo Kukuchi. The executives of film may not Aniko Jackson see tomorrow. And just before you go. I want to ask if you will consider supporting the guardian we're an independent news organization without shareholders or billionaire owners, which means I have to ask you today in focus listeners for support today. More than a million people are helping to secure future. And you can join them. Just visit g you dot com slash Infocus. And you can also find that link in today's episode description. Thank you.

Theresa May Brexit prime minister Tory party European Union Brussels MP Brexit Dan Sabir Britain Jeremy Corbyn E R J Boris Johnson Metropolitan museum America Kosova party David Cameron Sackler Brexit
Formation of Ethically Aligned AI Standards - with Dr. Karachalios PhD, Managing Director of IEEE Standards

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

26:54 min | 1 year ago

Formation of Ethically Aligned AI Standards - with Dr. Karachalios PhD, Managing Director of IEEE Standards

"This is Dan Fa Gielen you're joining me in episode. Three twelve of our special AI futures Saturday series, as you'll recall from the last couple of weekends this I, a twelve part series is about the future of governing artificial intelligence. We're going to begin with the early phases of governance, and we're going to build all the way up to what that's GonNa. Look like in the long term and how I might radically transform how we govern governor. Even humans interact with machines. We're going to be stretching things into the future. So this is GonNa be a lot of fun and today we're still in the phases, and we're speaking with someone who has expertise in exactly that. Constantinos are. Is the managing director of the I aaa. Standards Association the I triple E. for those of you don't know they've been around for over one hundred years developed standards for things like Wi, fi and countless other technologies among the largest organizations of their kind in the world and Constantinos plays an important role there before that he was with the European Patent Office in his experience included establishing the European patent offices path. Academy Constantinos is a PhD in energy engineering, and a Master's in mechanical engineering from the University of stood guard in in this week's episode. He speaks with us about beginning the early phases of developing AI standards and policies for particular individual use cases in this episode talk about using the data of children for example for marketing purposes so essentially. We're talking about baby steps. Steps towards actual policy last week's episode with the D. With Corinne. We talked about beginning with AI principles. This is about kind of inching a bit farther and finding those first places to find a policy fit Constantinos does a great job of describing it. He also paints a picture of what that might look like into the future. So this is an awfully fun episode. Episode. I had Constantinos on two years ago. I've supported the TRIPOLIS ethically align design ai work in our editorial coverage here to merge dot com in the past, and I like what they're up to make. Sure you don't miss any future episodes of this series or any of our their podcasts by being subscribe to the newsletter. Go to E.. E.. R. J. DOT COM. COM DOWN IN THE FOOTER OF EMERGE DOT COM. You're going to see an opportunity to enter your email address. You can opt out at any time. That'll make sure that you get all of these episodes in addition to all of the new research, new white papers and other articles that we come out with about the return on investment, of Ai, the use cases. In the future impact. Subscribing emerge dot. com if you're not already without further ADO WE'RE GONNA fly into this episode with Constantinos from the I Tripoli. You're on this special AI futures series. So constantino will start off with the topic of global governance artificial intelligence in general. There's folks that argue for it or against it. When do you think global governance might be a good idea or bad idea? Under what circumstances? So I think many people now started to allies, and now there are many more. They were three for years ago. We have to really have a closer look at this emerging technologies and systems, so that not new but that. Is New and perhaps Performance it is getting better and better, and you know that I'm very cautious to use it if any tentative. supporter of this technology. But. Let's say let's keep it for baby. No! For the sake of. Talking, about allegories, make decision making systems area okay. Systems at the sound call extend our intelligence, they help start to make sense of big data, entry, coconuts, patterns, and so on, and it can be very helpful in the same time. It can be useful so far Let's say for other reasons like mass surveillance and control, and so on so this is really all technologies technologies that can be used. To do a very practical. Daska to recognize. CAN BE USE survey people for political reasons. So how can you deal with this? In the same technologies can be used for so it is the. Let's say that domain of dual use technology. Yes, this is. And there are many. Companies who want to do that, I think. And also increasingly more and more governments who have promised to the people and governments of the level of municipalities talk about the public administrations can be at the level of municipalities or the level of. Let's say regional governments, national governments and They're using intensively set systems for prediction for Planning Forty Solo case on for providing services to their citizens sense on and. They want to so that they do that, I think. They. Promise, said some of them. They declared their principles like the city of New York with Ezekiel Vienna. Finland the Phnom, Saddam, so we see a lot. They even in a an association of CDC deals would really care about these things and try to coordinate their efforts so just to come directly to your question, they promised. Diversity is that they are doing that I? Think, but you know this is a question of Caesar and his wife. It is not enough the wife of Caesar is a good wife, she must be above censure. It must be also it must be also some called demonstrate that it was evidence. He's a good guy. The wife of seizure must be above century. Yes, indeed. These, things are known and such that famous divorce, but yeah, so what does that? What is it? What is it? The question, how can he say players who really have good intentions so that people that are good intentions are really putting my. Mouth. An increasing demand market for tools that that doing that, I think. And this guy who sees? Engaging with, public. Actors always a private sector actors, and so on, and we decided to do something, but I can talk a bit more about this, so my question is that he's a need for local governance. Okay. At the level of starting at the level of municipalities, it becomes other liberals of states and the European Union. We should fund the lion. The new head of the commission had really promised. Plan with a days are not getting there, but we souls Politika. Let's a fancy feed something has. To happen, so my one sentence answer to your question is. This time for action. And at every level the different actors, they kept us the share of responsibility, but it is share of responsibility. Nobody can assume their full responsibility, and this is Eddie the difficult thing, but also the fascinating thing here, which enables really more flexibility and more, a agency over our actions for easterns. Legislators legislate. Some of them have been doing for recess. What should happen with the data of teetering online and cows? Should they be treated Agua? Algorithms take. Data and using them to make not an addictive to platforms, and this is happening, so there are legislator who sold his and say okay. We have to stop this, so they passed a law that you come and say okay for this law to be implemented. We need really a call that a relation and they work on Saturday jubilation happening. This is not feature. But they cannot go down to the last detail. Let's means we the technical community and the private sector. We have to come up with our our. Standard Sitcom days accommodations. Glad we see is practical, and they would be a good practice and. And so on that means we have to work together for this whole thing it is. This later that you later, the technical communities the private sector. We have to come from bottom up to meet the others who come from top down and then. System that will at least. least respect that is of the most vulnerable among us, because this is not happening now, and we cannot continue like this and other centers at music is at the time of innocence is over. We cannot anymore humor did no. Let's say it is not feasible and so. We know, we should do something so. My. Yes for the governor's now whether can be a global one. Of course, this is more difficult. Yes, yes, this is a kind of three t and can be take time, so might take. He's and of course supportive to the efforts of when they were part of his. Initiative very and gates. And of course we will try it or not formalities informal, but we have to make progress at global level, but I believe, and this is about doing, and this would be as abuse to Wendell's efforts is. Let's try to solve the problem of municipality because of the municipality level. The level of New York City of. God. Some innovative cities many around the world. A lot of them and contact with him. How and we govern the application and development of a? At this level because sixty percent of humanity, they live in cities, and if we can find good ways to govern this systems, the municipal level, then we have a lot of problems would have sold. It can be done. Okay can be escalated the level of the state. It becomes globally so we should not give up. Let's say the effort for Global. Governance but. At the same time start from the bottom because the bottom is what's happened and there is not the diminutive here. That bottom is ready at the same time that. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Does it, also your. Yes yes. I'll try to clarify where we've gotten to, so we have a lot to cover here but I. Appreciate you lending your perspective. It sounds like clearly unfamiliar with the I. Tripoli's where we you know followed, and and been supportive of what you folks have done. Unethically align designed for our listeners who are tuned in Constantinos, referring to window, while like who is working on some efforts around potentially global a governance, unfortunately, that event has been pushed off this year. Constantinos would have been nice to see you out in Prague, but hopefully we'll. We'll find another time to connect. I'm GonNa Nutshell your point here for the audience. Audience and see on the right page and they. We're going to build from here, so it sounds like for you. There are near term considerations around day. I know you're using the use of data for children to to help. Algorithms engage them, which could be quite addictive, which could be maybe we think manipulative and not good, and of course as many different perspectives there, but regardless that's one issue, so we can talk about a singular. We can talk about issues. We believe in issues that we can stand on. We can anchor down to a more local level and find a way to really turn these things into. governable, enforceable, legislature, and then, and then of course like you said there's an ecosystem, so we need the standards bodies. We need the the private sector to come together, and then to be able to build technical frameworks around what what the legal frameworks are there as well so it sounds like starting, there is important for you just as a bit of a lay of the land, you talking about data for children, what are some other near-term a applications where this kind of local governance for you is a great place to start? What are some other good examples I know? You guys are looking at a lot of different cities here now. That he's a forest Tennessee. The creating of Sun Boxes at municipal eleven. With. Industry and also other possible applicant. They can use and this includes. Data sets and algorithm systems clues. Expert is and so on and tell can organize a kind of a Komo's at. UNICYCLE Levin with some root for engagement some what six can come in who things can be taken out and used under the conditions, and then are some. Let's say frameworks legal frameworks. Had Been Theoretically worked out in the basket. Now we can start adopting him and day. We have been in contact with some big municipalities advising them how to do it and some of them. They have gone deep down his fake. Now the asking for order is it. You can get them implemented. This is one possible application which is governance because this sandbox. Good Governance. What are what are some of the range of use cases occurring in those sandboxes? I can think about managing traffic I can think about determining jail sentences I can think about a jillion potential near-term accessible use cases. For a city like New York for instance. Of let's say go decision making systems and lot more of them. Let's say it's not about them. It is about systems that industry can be used to solve problems. Can put some of the systems what you're talking about now about municipal municipal. Services we have were doing their work which is. Let's say developing tools that can assess the quality of the systems, regarding some fundamental requirements have emerged at the top of the. principles. For instance transparency for someone. In the top of all principals out on the world, another one is responsibility accountability, and to Chinese fitness and the lack of bias. This three thinks cover a lot now. How can we prove that? This is used by a big city at Ely? Fulfill some level of quality. It got city big requirements. expandability though this ability accountability. Venice and the reduce affair bias. And not dust by taking some. Some checklists because. We need to be more thorough. Their SCHOL can been developing at a Tripoli since. Four years developing standards at all these things. Have accelerated, and we have created now system. It is a kinds of certificates. She sent me this. System. Vegas auto very detailed with a let's say some five criteria which are miserable. And people should not seek out. Not all of them should be used or unnecessary to be used for system. We have thought this through. And, not only this criteria miserable with a and can be assessed the level of their fulfillment, and not all the. Yes, no, but also. And we these we can have a pretty good picture of the quality of this algorithm AAC systems. Case just came with can is to a bad that. Is Not a one off because I mean three with these systems is that they taint behavior? It may sound logical today. Next Day can go rogue and. Do know them the man I know for sure so that means they have to be tracked and monitored. So and we have done this I believe. His Daddy's quick also published presently these about this now we do not say it won't be I typically, who will do this case because we cannot scale it, but we can make this specifications, and our expertise is a tacit knowledge, and all that we have available to organizations and institutions. Who can be this? Set fires, and this can be the big consultancy called or A municipality is the. Fight. I'm following. Yeah. I was just gonna I'm a little wary at time. So I we have having will continue to cover some of the work on the I Tripoli. What you folks are doing? They're clearly standards are part of it as you said if we're going to start at municipality level and we want to believe hey, are these decisions being made in some ethical method? If we can take a lot of time in a lot? Lot of experts, one thing I know about the i Tripoli as you pool a lot of experts into these efforts, if we can come up with standards, actually represent those values that is a place to start. Do you see the municipalities as being a borderline necessary precursor for national governance different regards or DC it could come from either direction. What's your perspective there? We've come a case. We have received destroyed. Ain't both from governments municipality. And we don't make any distinction. We give priority to the public sector, but we have received those from very big companies who wanted to use? The stories we have an expert is to assess the quality of their systems at to make it visible to the market or to the citizens. This is good news I think it is I think again. It's part of the ecosystem like you said right. We have regulators. We're going to have people that are kind of advocating awareness. We have schmucks like myself that are just getting. Everybody's perspective on the line. Who has something smart to say and trying to get a lot of ideas out in the air, so people can think about where they fit in so i. think there's there's a bunch in the mix here, but standards is certainly part of it when you think Constantinos about getting to. To some semblance of global governance it. It feels to me like something like okay. How we handle our legal cases. Maybe America will do that on its own. Maybe Norway will do it on its own. Maybe Europe is going to want to be on the same page. Maybe they don't need to be on the same page with China something like autonomous lethal weapon something about human rights. There are people that sort of thing, okay, there should be some sort of broader set of rules around how this how this comes about and other people do argue against that that there really isn't a place for global governance writ large. Are there topics that you think deserve such governance, and if so how? Lot of things deserve governance, but they probably globally yeah. Yes, yes, yes, but again I mean. We do not agree globally on anything right now. That's true. That's true. So. This is why I would start the practically. Let's start with people want to do it. And they wanted they feed. That is any of governance, and then do it there. Because there are also people who say or interest and lobbyist who say we don't need any governance the market. The jungle will solve it all the big anybody who did this morning. One of this is good happy. and. This is what prevails right now as they -delity. As matter of fact this what I'm saying, it sounds modest, but it is not that means. Let's start at a level where we can show that good governance can work, and once we have established some good examples we can go against the people of the Dengue Guy Tales. There we go I like that. That's an interesting. That's an interesting approach. You're saying yeah. The jungle, being the state of nature so countries companies. They're all self interested. They're all GonNa do what they do. If they're not breaking laws, let's let him go. Victim I made the point. Is They break on existing laws? Many. Because the law is. Some defense against the jungle basically donate it. Doesn't need the global conventions we don't need any global organizations anymore does let the jungle pervade? The show, this is what we out. and. Voices on both sides I mean I think there's plenty of people in Europe that frankly think nothing of innovation, and only of regulation right so I. I think there's people that are a little too far on both sides of the coin, but yeah, if we look at the state of Ai Governance Globally today you're right, it is. It presently doesn't have really much at all and I think what you're saying is. If we're GONNA start, let's have traction somewhere where we can actually measure. It gotta look at it and Brag about yeah I think, that's a an interesting sort of. Of Taken? And I think one that there's a strong argument there in terms of hey, if we can prove this if we can show how we've made better decisions about you know, sending people traffic fines or determining jail, sentences or using data in certain context, and we really genuinely feel better about the way we're leveraging these new technologies, and the people are behind it, then maybe that will want to expand to a national level that are want to expand to even at international level in some cases, and so the Petri dish I guess is, is the theory ear yeah? So, that's that's I. Think very interesting. I think that's an interesting. Take when you consider as you aptly said Constantinos. The world doesn't agree about very much right now. There's a lot of things that folks are kind of bickering back and forth about. Do you think that international governance will become more important when technology becomes more powerful in other words? Are there certain thresholds of power and capability here when international governance won't be a nice to have, but will be a need to have in your mind. So again I'm in favor of roads. Of rules that we as free people re decide and depose up on our set of people. This is an invention of democracy. Yes, and I'm against the rule of the dangling so I'm in favor of rules and also rules in technology. They're very important. Because in the field of science technology is a major actor. Dusted tool. It is, it is much more than it is a social technical system. It is not just technical who have throw. For us as technical people, we have to assume part of responsibility. We have to start if electing about the context in which who are doing what we're doing. Day which it would be used what we're doing. We cannot anymore just assume that we are just good. People solving technical problems, and there are other people who are doing doing bad thinks this is partly through, but partly we assume are artists, possibility and do a better designed from the beginning beeld. Some mechanisms in the systems are so complex that. We can really get some control over them. And this is part of our responsibility, and nobody can issue out is supposed to be easy. It is ours we can assume that this possibility of the legislators or that you leaders, but we assume hours this point. Yep, you did mention democracy there, so you? You seem to you. You've gotTA team here. Rooting for and I'm unabashedly with you on that front as we wrap up here. I'm thinking about. The takeaways are for folks that are involved. Involved in governance, he'll policymakers or even business folks. It sounds as though part of your advice guidance is hey. Let's really think hard about where we would want to double down where we don't want to allow certain violations of certain values to happen where we do want to harden our edges, and then, and then let's actually get something measurable there, and that that early progress that some people can stick a stake in and say this actually happened. It sounds like you're brunt. Takeaway here, yes. Very really we have chosen an area where we think it is extremely sensitive, extremely important also, this is respect that I of. Online! Yeah Nice to have a beachhead for what you guys are doing i. think probably is what is quite important, yes. Probably Future. Yeah about protecting. Let's see. About respecting for Childhood Yeah Yeah. Totally disrespected I. DO think that finding caused that a lot of people can get behind is going to be part of the tricky process of getting the concrete examples that you were talking about, and so I think actually you know another interesting takeaway for the audience. Constantinos is for the folks tuned into. Think about what are those facets of how data is used algorithms or leverage decisions are made that essentially everybody could get behind to make the world a little bit better I think there's differing opinions and I have to respect that and we're GONNA have people on for with all kinds of opinions, but to really hash that out like. Like you had said if we can find something, people can get behind now. We can actually get some concrete examples that sounds like a good takeaway, so my point is get from principals to practice, and let's choose feed where most of us can agree. Hey, I think that that is the perfect closing note Constantinos and frankly I hope that both the private sector and the policymaker world can. can agree to, if nothing else at least that last statement so I know that's all we ever time, but thank you so much for being able to join us on the podcast. Constantinos by blizzard ways that hope to see you bye. So? That's a wrap on episode. Three of the special. Ai Future series. We have another nine episodes to go every Saturday. We're going to be dripping out new episodes with. Guests on this topic of Ai Governance we're going to be moving more and more over these episodes towards governing a in the future when it becomes vastly more powerful, that's great voices ahead to be sure to stay tuned next Saturday this coming Tuesday. We're getting back into cases as you know Tuesday. We talk about use cases. Thursday. We talk about making the business case the return on investment in actual deployments. So enjoy next week's episodes as well and I hope catch you weekend to I've you've had some ideas about this futures series and you'd like to share them with us. Go to E. M., E. R. J., DOT, com slash, P., o., d., and then the number three. That's pod three. That's GONNA. Send you to a one question survey. Literally a one question survey to get your thoughts on what you think about this series. You WanNa see it as. As a separate podcast is you don't like it in the business podcast. You WanNa see more episodes like this on the I in business podcast I'm really interested in what our listeners want. Almost every chain we've done to the podcast based on consumer feedback, and this is no exception so I'd love your thoughts on that. If you'd like to fill out the survey, otherwise stay tuned for next. Tuesday I'll catch a year on the A in business podcast.

Academy Constantinos Constantinos Tripoli New York City Constantinos AI constantino Ai Governance Europe University of managing director Dan Fa Ai TRIPOLIS European Patent Office Standards Association R. J. Caesar
Hour 1: Duke Drops Another One

Get Up!

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Hour 1: Duke Drops Another One

"Message and data rates may apply to become okay for men to be Lazier softer fatter. We need to bring the men of this country back to greatness, and it's easier than ever with ageless male max, a patent pending formula within ingredient that helps boost your total testosterone promoting greater increases in muscle size and twice the reduction of body fat percentage that exercise alone. Plus an amazing sixty four percent increase in nitric oxide, which can be handy in the gym and in the bedroom. Take your manhood to the max by trying your first thirty day Buttle free just pay shipping and handling not ten days not fifteen days, but a full thirty days supply free. When you text the word dash to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine finally a formula that boosts total testosterone if you'll results with ageless male max or two in tents, please decrease us for your free bottle. Text dash to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine text D A S H two seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine. With john. Or should I say without? That's what do kids and they were shallow themselves. What to help a lottery thinks you'll see him in one minute. What did you hear what Paul Pierce said about LeBron yesterday? It was stunning. But guess what? It might be. Absolutely, right. Jalen will discuss as we continue an America theme is a whole bunch of problems decisions suspension. How about then Cowboys? We'll answer their question and anymore. I get up starting right now. And we're that we wish you ain't very pleasant. Good morning from our studios in New York. Delighted to have you Texas here. Asking is back with us, Dan Maria, and I was looking right at Jalen as I was discussing Paul Pierce said about LeBron. We're going to have a might today. Like, I've never seen a lot. Pretty sure you agree with what he had to say. Jalen Jalen was in studio a full minute before we started. That's exciting. Excited to get into that topic. But let us Mark with Duke Marie you've been around this for the better part of the shoot likes. And so they were out there last night at where they traditionally have struggled in they're playing without back guy. And the struggles would continue you'll find it. They find open looks for R J Barrick, Jalen, and he could not not them down. That would do struggle not knocking operate points out seven for twenty one on the floor by tech, terrific dot taking care of the ball. Exactly. And you get out in transition Wong. Mrs another miss from Barron. Here he was one of seven from the floor in the first after four points Duke down three at halftime later. Still down three. Barry can't knock down the long range shots cake into the whole top shot here. Ducas within one later. We're tied at fifty nine and Virginia Tech. What had big shots all night long about what piece of feeding with a corner. Three and tech is up by three now under five minutes to play. Virginia Tech's lead is five. Carry black shirt wasn't could move sending camera tish flying black all the twenty three points, Tim boards. Big time slam right laid off forty minutes for them. He's up seven Duke not going away just over two and a half to play Mark. We bolden. Flying with four fouls. But look at him still aggressive down low goes up and over and gets the rebound puts it back to because with into next possession. Barry throwing it up folding throwing her down each scored, fourteen time seventy buzz Williams says hold on don't think let's get a little rain out of the timeout. Tie outlaw. Again, they would make their big shots from the outside outlet score eleven vodka Cup three and suing Duke possession. Do they have an answer? They get a pretty good look here. J camera tish. This is the shot. They want doesn't get it to go black shirt gets the rebound on the other end. Now Virginia Tech is gonna look to put it away. They don't get it to go. But you mentioned it lecture plan hard all night long. It's a big offensive boards in the end. It is bought tack a winner. Again, let the celebration begin seventy two. But here from the Dookie camera at it. Obviously we used to have it on their on. He gives us everything. And we know we're we're on adjustment without avenue. And I mean day by day. We're we're getting there. If you wanna go through things don't have to make all these adjustments. But we've had to make number of them overall. Our kids have done a good job with them. And it's just that time of the year where you get worn down our guys played hard man, they played hard and toughen day. Didn't lose Virginia. Virginia Tech one. There's big difference. Yeah. They Virginia Tech won a tough game. Should they pointed out that Ducas Lofton Blacksburg now three straight years? So this shouldn't be stunner the hokies made a tough for Duke to get up and transition that just nine transition points after averaging division one best twenty one point seven per game in their first twenty seven, so let's take it to the table here. And again, Maria, you're sort of my personal do expert. Embedded with them for the last two weeks or you hear him say we're getting worn down you see RJ Barrett struggling last night. What can you tell us? First of all, congratulations, the buzz Williams playing without Justin Robinson, and they're still able to pull off that win against Duke. But I think the biggest thing that coach K is pointing to we talk about it all the time. Freshman hit a wall at some point and Duke is not only hitting the freshman wall. But they're being forced to do it without Zayn Williamson. He saw RJ bear coming back onto the court. I was told that he was thick early on. He had to go back and to the trainers athletic training staff had to get them back together for the second half. And you could see it almost in the numbers. He finished with twenty one points after going one for seven so his illness was affecting them and a lot of the players were actually sick when they played against UNC as well. So kind of flu running through that team do Kafondo way to give self together. Zion's going return before you know, it they may win the ACC championship in the tournament. They may win at all. But these are first world problems. Trust me coaches around the country aren't complaining for Duke because they still have three. Four all Americans that they tried out there. Every night about them being sick about them hitting a wall about them being tired. The biggest thing that jumps out to me about. Dukes basketball team is where's Trey Jones. Yeah. So we know he locked down defensively, but on the offense of side, he's been giving them nothing. He's last couple of games without sign in particular. And look we talked about their fatal flaw, and they have won. They can't shoot the ball from the outside. No team has ever shot the three as badly as they do and won the national championship. But we saw it again last night. I think coming into that game against UVA. They're shooting at like twenty eight percent from three and the first time that we've ever seen them really knocking down shots from long range was against Virginia. And they were completely unstoppable. It's a completely different team. But what you hope in this case Jalen, and if your coach K that through this adversity the teams learning because at the end of the day, I don't think it's about the ACC championship. It's about winning a national championship. When you've got that many blue chip on your and also one thing about Zion being outed gives other guys a chance to get minutes and coaches get a chance to use them different lineups that they would normally get a chance to use. So it's going to build up. Let me ask you this. Do you know who Jack white as I do do, you know who Alex O'Connell is the those are the guys that have to knock down shots for them. Those are guys who have to step up and hit threes. And there there might be named Judono back at home. But that's who coach K's relying on. On from three right now and also green, and we talked about this a couple of weeks ago when Duke struggles they're gonna look to Cam reddish late. Yeah. Make a big shot that happened. He had to look missed. He won the game against Florida state with that big shot that I'm gonna get you into the NBA here because this wasn't a game of the night. But it was the most interesting game tonight, Celtics and raptors Kyrie irvings teams struggling from the jump pick this thing up in the second quarter. And I wanted to watch when Kyle Lowry is pulling up an shots like this. You know, it's going to be a good night from way downtown Jalen Bank, rappers up twelve I was really disappointed in the body language at the Boston Celtics effort at the Boston Celtics that Cari, Irvine seen disinterested gang little chicken wing. There is that an offensive foul that call I do not like that call great acting by Danny green urban was frustrated and like it he had a bad night three of tendrils. Now. Look at this here. We're going the other way Leonard give me a big slam up making either Celtics offense really struggling now. Closing seconds of the second watch this here as Jason Tatum. He'd dry. He gets stuffed he's waving at the referee and frustration because he got called for an offensive foul, Nick and nurses, saying give it a technical. He deserves technical. And so on further review big do call the technical there. So he gets the call that he wants Tatum. Can't believe it Brad Stevens had these thoughts. Everybody. That kind of night for Boston. He may have a point. But that's not what decided this game team got destroyed. Third quarter rafters up eighteenth. And look at Leonard underneath the while Lynn career highs and points and rebounds, really efficient for the raptors this Larry at eleven assist Leonard had twenty one points and how about PASCAL. Got them down here tonight twenty five point eight four records one one eighteen ninety five Brad Stevens want. I thought we were just how played in every which way. And I don't want to take away from Toronto. But. Thrilled about how we played. No. The reality is is that we're taking a lot of shortcuts and and not being a solid as we have been in the past. We have to be a lot more connected as a team. It's been a theme for a while. Just pensively Kasmin take shortcuts. It's all to you. See then how do you fix things like that? It's up to Brett. Mortga said that you guys are playing together is that a fair diagnosis? As markets is the pain. Is it your respect? Is a tough time for the Boston Celtics chew and five in their last seven they've been played in every which way they've been have scored by twenty four points in the paint by twenty four points on second chances and by twenty six points on the fast break during that span. We're gonna talk more about them in a minute. But let me first show you what was the best game of the night, Oklahoma City and Denver. So there's a big game between two really good west conference jeans, first quarter, nuggets up ten Jalen. How does is they get get this one to go with an exciting game to watch. It's great to see. Isaiah Thomas playing quality minutes for the nuggets scored eleven point. And here's your guy need coli Yokich showing the range hitting the free Denver's at thirteen point aft timely now we're sequence in the third quarter. We're going to talk about this at some length because you going to get young fan reach out right on the court, and touch Russell Westbrook. Westbrook's not happy with it. I think Westbrook candles. This extremely well. He goes over. He has a calm patient conversation with the young man and with his father. You'll hear Russell's explanation of it in a moment. Meanwhile, let me get back to the game here. Closing seconds of the third quarter. Paul George throws that have been good that we was not having a good night thunder down thirteen after three Paul George edges. Twelve points in the first three quarters in the fourth. He would heat up thunder trying to make a comeback Paul George step back. Yes. He'd finished with twenty five hundred get with eight and they're still coming. We're tied at ninety seven just over six minutes ago. This time Westbrook twenty two points, fourteen rebounds. The thunder of the league later in the fourth your nuggets Jalen trailing by one Jamal Murray. Clutch they needed from the corner and he gets nuggets out built out debt, greedy. See we'll Barton plan will to go with yoga's Melik veasley playing quality minutes Murray had twenty and how about the nice feed from Yokich. Cheers, so skilled another three Murray nuggets up by six hundred down six over minutes ago. Westbrook is going to turn it over. He's frustrated and doesn't like the call. But it isn't going to matter yoga walk off to a standing ovation thirty six points, ten boards nine six the nuggets are for. Forty two and eighteen but Russell about that situation. Give me. So I told his dad, you know, just be careful, man. You can have your son just hitting hitting Ren people on me. So. Just let him know. Like, you know, what I'm saying? Just kinda control your kids. Just simple responsible for his kid watched games. There have fun. Enjoy follow fans though, you know, too much leeway for the fans to be able to touch the players and get away with it. And then you can't react. You know, and do the things that we need to do to protect ourselves. So it's important that they understand kids, whoever it is dad mom's that, they can say what they want along as you know, respectful, but the touching is to me is offline you don't know that the kid, right? When it first happened Nana non did not turn around as a kid. But initially, you don't know that. But you can't do that. I can't you know, what I'm going to happen a stance. So, but it's got to be some type of Rohr some type of boundary said that he can't allow that. I'll just say I think personally Russell handle that perfectly extraordinarily well Maria. Now, again, you are always in these arenas. You're right down there on the court. And you're seeing this interaction. What's your perspective on what you see there last night? First of all, it seems like the seats are creeping closer and closer and closer to the court as you're able to sell more courtside seating. But I mean, my initial reaction is that he's right. I mean, there should be some boundaries and rules or if a fan does touch a player, then maybe you need to be escorted out. And at the end of the day. You're there to watch them. I know it's like you seem like it's a spectacle or something, but they're not animals you can pet necessarily just because they're playing a game. Does it mean that they deserve to be touched? If you come near my understand protecting yourself, but he handled it correctly. And I think that this is a great lesson for every fan to learn that that's not a pro. I think this is an isolated incident. I don't think there's room for anyone to panic. I think the fan and player interaction in the NBA is what separates that league from the NFL in particular. You can have that personal experience, which is what the NBA players. Popularity Trump's those in every other sport. And it's not even remember got a technical for tossing shoe out near fans. Right. They did recent that, and we will talk about that. But what I would say is to your point. If that isn't a kid, and then I would favor of having the fan thrown out you touch a player you're sitting on the I get it. But there has to be aligned jail. And you cannot I can't just reach out of a, hey, good job out there as an adult if it's a kid I'm willing to give a literally we weren't both ways. Because let me tell you like this when we're up twenty and I'm eight for eight from the floor, and I'm falling out of bounds and fans wanna high five me and touch me. I don't mind, right? So at the same time, there are thousands and thousands of basketball games being played. This doesn't always take place. Russell had a situation in Denver previously would fan and it was a little more contentious because it was an older fan. It was a hostile situation. But overall the player interaction in the NBA the absolute best in professional sports is not even note. No debating that very quickly. And we're. Going to have more time Zach Lowe in here a little later to get more into Boston. But the Celtics just got waxed. Last night. You hear the comments afterwards? Kyrie gimme a quick assessment on what's going on with boss quick assessment. I said at this Desa few weeks ago and say, regardless of the standards, regardless of the records the Lakers don't look like a playoff team. I'm sitting here today to Celtics say making the conference finals, it didn't it ain't happening. We talk about words like connected shortcuts, not playing together. Kyri would look this. Interesting in also said hurry plant coming back to Boston next year. He not going back to Boston next year. So that's my short soliloquy about what you have to answer to you. They won't make the conference finals this'll be Caray's final user. I don't know that I need more than that candidly. Zach Lowe and here, and we'll talk a little more because right now, it really look mess. Right. I mean, the the southern the has to everything was like, oh, that's Brad Stevens. Oh, you know. That's the opinion of Marcus smart. Like, I will not be commenting on anything else. Same. I'm not going to connect the dots. Well, let's let that be David fizzles problem. I can't be with the Nega. Again, we'll have much more basketball as we go. But let me get you now to the NFL where yesterday the league announced that Cowboys defensive and Randy Gregory has been suspended indefinitely reviling league's substance abuse policy and the terms of his conditional reinstatement pride last year. He had missed thirty thirty two regular season games, including the entire twenty seventeen season for multiple violations of the league's substance abuse policy. Let me bring Adam Schefter in for the very latest on all of this as we get set for the combine here. What can you tell a chef de as we look at the Cowboys right now, they have so many big picture questions. Well agree. There's a lot going on in Dallas as usual and the news yesterday was that Randy Gregory has been suspended indefinitely for basically violating the NFL's substances abuse policy. Now, look there have been talk about this at the start of the season which the Cowboys denied. And then again at the end of the season. There was some speculation about Randy Gregory at that point in time. I'm gonna players suspended for a fourth time this being indefinitely. You have to wonder if he'll be able to return to the sport of football, first and foremost, you hope he's okay as a person, and that he gets the healthy needs right now to battle whatever issues. He's got mentally physically whatever it may be. But again, Randy Gregory's NFL future is clearly in jeopardy and also another Dallas defensive lineman. David Irving who scheduled to be a free agent. This off season is also going to go through processes so season where he's going to be facing suspension as well. So couple of Cowboys lineman whose future is very much in question greening. All right. And then shefty we have some of the more commonplace issues surrounding the Cowboys. They got a bunch of contractual decisions they need to make let's run through those starting with DeMarcus Lawrence. This is the player that is at the top of their priority list. And with good reason you're talking about a guy right now greenie who basically is playing off the franchise tag last year. And if they can't get a long term deal done in the coming weeks the Cowboys. Would be expected franchise him again. But they do not want DeMarcus Lawrence to walk out the door. Stephen Jones said yesterday, he's confident they'll get a deal done. But it is not gonna meet easy deal. As DeMarcus Lawrence has a lot of leverage coming off the franchise tag last year. And with the salaries being what they are in the NFL ask for some of the other players Dak Prescott another player. The Cowboys wanna resign. They made pretty clear yesterday that Dak is a priority that they believe that they'll be able to get a deal done this off season. You would think you'll be similar to a Derek Carr type of contract twenty five plus million dollars a year. He's got one year remaining on his contract. They don't want to take it to the end. They don't wanna have to use it on him. They want to get the deal done with Dak this all season, I Lawrence then deck, and then they'll be the matter of Zeke Elliot who they also want to resign. He basically is in a season where his contract ends after twenty nine thousand nine there is the team option for twenty twenty which calbos, of course, will pick up, but they want to get it done. And they believe that. Girlies contract that he saw last season provides the framework for new deal. And as if it weren't enough to resign DeMarcus Lawrence and Dak Prescott and Zeke Kelly. There's also the matter of Amari Cooper, really is one of the reasons that the raiders trade him, they weren't going to recite them they knew it was going to be difficult to do an Amari Cooper is in a situation where he's going to want to get paid in Dallas. And they're gonna wanna keep them long term. We saw what he meant to that offense. But again with all these players there's so much to do in Dallas and be very little wiggle room. Very little cap space for this team to go out and get other free agents because the free agents they want are their own. They want to make sure that they don't get to the open market greenie really busy time. We'll get back to you or their shefty at the combine with a lot of news from there. Thank you very much. Meanwhile, let me get the baseball headline of the day and that is Rockies third baseman Nolan. Arron auto set to be a free agent after the season instead agreeing to an eight year contract with two hundred and sixty million dollars that could potentially lock them up through the twenty twenty six season. There is an opt-out clause four hour Nado after the twenty twenty. One season. This guy's has versatile as they come. He's one of four infielders to win at least four Gold Gloves in a season with thirty home runs. And one hundred RBI is the others are Mike Schmidt. Johnny bench and our own Mark to Shera. We bring in our baseball insider, Jeff passan, and Jeff we are sort of at that place. Now where everything is relative to how does it affect rice Harper? So we talk at length about the Renault deal. How does it affect Bryce Harper? Yeah. Everything in the world apparently revolves around Bryce Harper at least the baseball world. And when you look at the average annual value greenie of Nolan Aeronauticas eight year two hundred sixty million dollar deal. That's thirty two and a half million dollars right there. If you multiply thirty two and a half by ten which is the number of years Bryce Harper wants that's three hundred twenty five million dollar contract. He is going to want to beat that average annual value, and he is going to want to beat that three hundred twenty five million dollar number which is the record set by Giancarlo Stanton. The question is what is his market looking like right now, it's clear that the Philadelphia Phillies are willing to go long term, the Los Angeles Dodgers on the other hand are willing to go shorter term, and maybe willing to give opt-outs early on in any potential deal. It's a fascinating thing that finally seems to be barreling toward a conclusion. What does that mean quickly? I feel like I've asked you this every day. What does barreling toward a conclus-? You mean when does the end of this income? Listen, I would love to say that I know when Bryce Harper is going to sign, but there have been indications to clubs that he would like to get it done by the end of this week. Does that mean that it's gonna get done by the end of this week? We're on day one hundred seventeen right now, I'm not predicting anything this thing could go until July for all we now have passing well done. Thanks very much. We'll see you tomorrow. Thanks grading. More on that. As we go. Meanwhile, still become RJ Barrett is now the star was I on sideline but Schettino be considering him over Williams for the first pick. We'll discuss it. And our quarterback tells you which quarterback should go number one in the NFL draft. And then I'll tell you whether or not he's right. All that's on the way. It's get up on ESPN. Get up is brought to you by Geico fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. We have a huge half hour coming away here on ESPN with get talk. Just a few minutes. We got Jim bills getting set with his thoughts on whether or not RJ Barrett. Could be the number one pick in the draft. And then right after that who's the best quarterback in the NFL draft quarterback. Dan, are Lobski will let us know. And then should the Lakers sit LeBron the rest of the season. That's the question. We've got the answer. Jalen, I are to yell at each other. That's coming up next hour, but speaking of answers, here's a little sneaky, hembo, time shortfalls, okay? Virginia Tech has beaten do can consecutive meetings for the first time in program history. True or false. That's the question. The answer is net. This get up on ESPN. I don't like what you did -nology truth. Brought to you by cold. Truth. You will certainly send any text about your supervisor to your supervisor. What's Janet's fangs? Did she lose that? With a weed whacker? Oh and sent wait. No, no, no, no, no truth. It's so easy to switch and save on car insurance at geiko dot com. Janet, I think my phone was hacked or something. Gogo fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Back on get up with my favorite part of the morning when Jalen gets the question wrong. We let me with this true or false Virginia Tech is beaten Duke now in consecutive meetings for the first time in program history. Jalen is that true or false? I love court. Stormy number one, number two. I would say that. It's regalia tech has been it consecutive me for the first time program history. That is true. Okay. Perfect. It's false Virginia Tech has done it before. I most recent time was nineteen twenty one Maria. All right. Making twenty one never give up. Let's go back to taking on Virginia remembers ion still out second game straight and mild knee sprain. RJ bear we need you to pick up some of the slack. Only thing Jalen is he's struggled in the first half one for seven four points before going into the locker. This is what I love about sports because just yesterday. Everybody was saying this guy should go number one in the draft Virginia Tech. How to Mona Scott report treated him like a number one? He struggled in the first half. Let me say this though, he went into the locker room with forty seconds to play in the first task he with filling ill came back. And this is what he does not down the three he's able to pull Duke within three with that jumper. That's the crewmen of his game right there Maria their ability to go right next to finish up who he's a terrific prospect finding Marquis Bolden for the land. And right now Duke looking to get a win. Remember, they haven't lost on the road at all this season bar quiz. Barclays the Braga to. Lucked out and get it fast back out to bear any knock down. He ends up finishing or fifteen after going one percent in the first half. Twenty one point do loses on the road for the first time this season, seventy seven seventy two an RJ bears numbers. Let's go through them. He's beneficient inside the art without Zion. But he can't say the same about out five yard, which is a watch said about Duke general shooting threes over the last three games bear to shooting twenty seven percent from three and seventy seven percent on all other attempts. And I'm delighted to have Jay Bilas with this on the phone for couple of quick minutes here on get up. Jay, thank you for doing this. And so let's start with this. If I am a huge fan of Duke this morning. How would you assess the level of concern? I should have about this team right now. Well, green I would say your level of concern should be when is going to be back, and we'll Duke be able to shoot the ball consistently from game to game. Because that's really the issue. Virginia Tech was laying off trae Jones and back in the middle of the lane, and and basically packing things in to try to take away drives to the basket. And then the other thing that that Virginia Tech did to do 'cause they didn't turn the ball over and allow due to get out in transition. But was I n Williamson in there. Do do. I believe that Duke is is the better team and Duke is the best team in the country. I do I it's more a health thing than anything because everybody's gonna get beat from time to time. But I do think healthy Duke still the best team. Can we talk about RJ baron for just a minute? The absence of Zion. A lot of people looked at this opportunity for him to really shine as great as he's been. He's been somewhat outshone by his higher profile teammate to this point. How would you assess his game last night? Okay. Barrett has been outstanding all year long. He's been leading the ACC and scoring. He's been a fantastic playmaker. And has had unbelievably good games throughout throughout the course of the year. It's just as you said he's playing with what the NBA scouts are calling a unicorn now Zion Williams, and I have not I've said this consistently from the beginning of the year. I've not closed the door to RJ Barrett being the number one pick. I think he's built for the NBA. He reminds me a lot of James harden and the way he plays and can get to the basket as and as a finisher. And I think he's an improving shooter. That is going to be a good shooter in the NBA. I I don't know that Dianne Williamson is going to be that. I think you'll improve in it. But I think R J Barrett's already much better shooter. And and I think he's trending upwards, even as we speak. So there aren't a lot of reasons exile Williamson number one. He's an amazing player. He brings some things off the court that that will excite people. But I. R J Barrett is going to be an NBA all star for for a long long time conversation. We've had here a lot the last few days. Jay, thanks a million for doing this. We'll see you soon. Thank you. All right back to baseball. And some snakes big news. We've been talking about the implementation of a pitch clock which would hold both pitchers and batters accountable for game speed and owners have been threatening to install this as early as this year now as a part of the negotiation with the players, it looks like the pitch clock may be delayed in exchange for other things. Jeff passan explain. Major league baseball on Tuesday sent a proposal to the major league Baseball Players Association offering to get rid of a potential twenty second pitch clock until the expiration of the current collective bargaining agreement in two thousand twenty two it comes with conditions. Of course, as part of the proposal, there would be three batter minimum in two thousand twenty as well as a July thirty first trade deadline and no trading in August and limits on position players pitching. The major league Baseball Players Association has yet to respond, but should do. So in the coming weeks. All right, Chad. So sneaky is the operative word here. So the owners say here's something we could implement unilaterally if we wanted to we won't if you give us a bunch of stuff that we want. What do you make of that the owners are so smart and they've done it the past five to ten years the owners are slowly clawing back. Some of the things that the players had the leg up on in previous negotiations. So few years ago players want an extra day. Okay. Off after the all star break because it wasn't long enough owners. Like, all right. Great. But we're going to have a salary cap now. Okay. I'll take this is one of those things it's almost like a bait and switch the owners throw something out there that they know every player is going to be and not every player most players are going to be against, and it's just going to be negotiation leverage for the next few years. The owners played this perfectly which I agree with. But let me make a separate point. It doesn't mean what they want to get from the players. Now isn't the right thing is in the best interest of the game. And here would be mine. Message to players and as one who grew up at the game. And I've loved the game all of my life, and it would be this. If you love baseball that would you have to recognize is that rob Manfred, and the people who run the sport are telling you with their actions, we need to do this stuff. We cannot have different pitcher for every hitter in every single inning. Especially when we get later in the season. We have to move things along it isn't in the best interest of the game long term. And if you love the game of baseball, even if it doesn't. Fear with your routine and things like that. Which I get you have to recognize this is what the sport needs. I clearly agree. Greenie. This is the thing. So max Scherzer won most dominant pitchers in baseball. Arguably the best pitcher in baseball comes out against it. And he's very vocal. Well, listen Mexicans making thirty million dollars a year. He's got a routine, of course, max shurer is going to be against this. But this rule this twenty second pitch clock is not for max Scherzer. It's for the next generation of pitchers that if you actually want people to come to your games and watch games on TV you need to have a little bit better pace. So the next generation of players can get thirty million dollar contracts. And the actually that's when you played did you feel the pace of play was a problem on issue? Absolutely. By the end of my career. I'd sit at first base and go let's go guys throw the pitch. I mean, I'm not saying it out loud. But in my head, I'm saying this is too slow. I'm feeling like the game is screeching to a halt. With the pitch changes with time in between pitches. The mound visits we've helped a little bit with the mound. Visit. It's hopefully, we won't have pitchers in and out all the time. So baseball understands this has to be done. The players are going to fight it because that's what they do best. But I think the owners realize they're going to get something for this. I'm sympathetic to the metro is just using him as spokesperson for that side of it. I get it. This is that we have done it all your life, and it works, and I'm successful at it. I don't want to change it. But I think you have to recognize if you love the game. And I believe these players do love the game that that is in the best interest of the game long-term there won't be a game. Or at least it will not be what it is today. Twenty years from now, if they don't do some of the stuff, I really believe that and rob Manfred his job the Commissioner of baseball's job is to protect the game for future generations. It's exactly what he's trying to do. I with you. We'll talk more about this a little bit later. Meantime, did you hear what Paul Pierce said about LeBron James yesterday? It was stunning. But guess what it might have been? Absolutely, right. We're going to talk about that coming up next after their worst performance of the season. The Celtics are sinking. We know. The main reason why they're struggling. Jalen figure out how to keep them. A float talk about that. As we roll on on ESPN. Jim behind and Syracuse were in North Carolina for a game Tuesday night and earlier in the day on indata county, New York District Attorney William Fitzpatrick said the investigation into the fatal crash involving behind is nearly complete and speeding was not a factor behind was driving home after a game last Wednesday when he swerved to avoid an accident in the road and it fifty one year old whore. Hey Jimenez behind continues to cooperate with the authorities and Jimenez funeral is Thursday. Jim behind for the first time, he's on the road taking on North Carolina. And we take you straight to the second half down three as UNC Kobe. This is a name you need to know because he's an all star freshmen in the highlight is all about him and his hair. Gobi white. He had seventeen for fifty six over the last four games. But now he has everything the lamp is good. He's fouled. He gets the free. Throw. You see goes up five then fifteen minutes left to play white the garrison Brooks. And that's good. Now UNC is up nine. And here's some great ball movement. White hit on the perimeter knocks down the three ROY Williams says he's the best scoring point guard that he has ever coached. He's got some pretty good ones. And again often the referee those the ball. And of course, who's there to get it? It'll be white finishes with the dunk on the other and take a look again all the official who gets accounted with with the assistance. I'm going to go with the official North Carolina. They get the win ninety three to eighty five UNC, Duke and UVA and a three way tie at the top of the North Carolina remains on the to line of coding to the Joel Nardi after this win against Syracuse Duke Energy, Tuesday as the top overall seed, but slip behind Virginia and zag after falling to Virginia Tech. But I want you to see what happened in this game between number twenty two and Ohio State because it was enormous controversy. Second. I was down eleven Connor McCaffrey is going to run into by Keyshawn woods McCaffrey is going to get called for the foul. He would argue with that. And get get a technical called on you, take another look here McCaffrey somehow called for defensive felt so it is arguably a terrible call McCaffrey goes back to the bench to fans or cheating at him. Chanting him they calling him daddy's. Boy, his dad is the coach Fran McCaffrey later. I was down fifteen. Fran McCaffrey is going to get a technical arguing with the rafts. He is visibly upset. The father son duo bolt hit with technicals. Ultimately, Ohio State wins the game ninety two seventy. But after the game, according to the Toledo blade and the Columbus dispatch coach McCaffrey screamed following officials. Steve MC Junkins down a hallway in the arena. I'm not going to read the words, you see them on the screen. You see what he is reported to screamed in the direction of the officials. We will see if there is any further reaction to. That meanwhile, another college hoops doubleheader tomorrow night starting at seven it's never in Michigan fresh off their loss to Michigan state. They're taking on the Brassica. There's a pack twelve rivalry matchup USC and UCLA in both games or on ESPN and they're on the ESPN app. So you could watch from absolutely anyway, back to the NFL the combines underway. And a lot of eyes will be on that man that's Dwayne Haskins at the throw on Saturday. He is currently Mike number seven on. Mel kiper is big board. One spot ahead of another quarterback Tyler Murray since two thousand eight thirty two quarterbacks drafted in the first round twenty one of those players through at the combine including Baker Mayfield. Josh Allen Josh Rosen and Lamar Jackson all of them a year ago. So let's talk a little bit about him. Let's bring our quarterback into the conversation. Dan, Orlovsky if you watch the show, you know, I love Haskins. I thought he should have won the Heisman show me. What you think of this guy on the there's a lot of talk about his talent throat where but what's on tape? And what's going to be talked about at the combine this week is always processing information. He's a problem solver before this. And then during the snappy attached. So I'm just put her is just on Dwayne Haskins as I let this play initially watch him just communicating to receivers down there. Why is he doing that? Well, it's because ofensive for Ohio State only have five guys in protection in Washington in the Rose Bowl lines up with six guys right up at the line of scrimmage. Do. Simple math. I've got a problem. Right. So he's communicating receivers. Like, listen. If one of these guys blitzes you've got to give me an answer. So I love that before to snap of communicating to guys we got to have answer to this problem as we transition to like another angle I want to show. Now, we get into the snap at how he goes into. This is the opportunity for me to strike so Washington's really just going to play cover three and the safety is going to go back to the middle of field. When you're playing cover three you really as a quarterback think I got a tech. These seems this is the weakness of where you wanna go after Haskins doesn't outstanding job put her is at that free safety because he's going to move that safety with his eyes. Is he's going to be staring in this direction to the right side of the field. Now are getting this safeties right now. Splitting s in Ohio State. Right. He's right at the bottom of it has Ken's moves them to come back and throw that shot, and I'm going to go back to this safety because he's going to Haskins is gonna want to throw this post backside that sake these no longer in the middle of that aspirin. Yeah. He's now been moved. Where's that both caught just about at the bottom of the s if he doesn't move that safety this guy's hospital? So you've seen a kid. That's what processing information purported Bax is like, okay. This is pre snap. I gotta get an answer post nap. Let me move you as a safety. I want wanna show one more because I love this. Okay. So first of all this is what interpretation looks like he's going to try to get this cross or go into this this receiver for a house. They were here. Just as crosser. You see you see that guy in the picture right now. Greenie, no, not he's already growing. Yeah. Is is not in the picture right here. Three defenders for Purdue. But Dwayne Haskins as a quarterback is already started the throat that's patient and accuracy for quarterback. So like this is a kid the combine this weekend. He is going to wile executives with how smart he is. And how he can -ticipant throat anyone who had access to his last four games of the season. Maryland, Michigan north western Washington knows how good he is. You've been there with these guys with him and Kyle Murray. How do you think this process plays out with the two of them? One thing I will say, and I was at both those games that you just drew up for Dwayne Haskins. We forget that he went through the beginning of the season without a head coach. And remember, we talked about the freshman wall and dealing with all this and frigging the Lakers, and whether or not the youngest handle it his coach wasn't there. He had a completely different voice in the beginning of the season production never dropped off you talk about. How smart he is? And how he can read all the progressions like it never was a problem for him. And sometimes the run game was not existent. And you know, what a stat that? I love about on the most he led the FBI in fourth quarter. Touchdown. Pets thirteen. So when they need it as best he brought it. Yeah. I get that. There are other guys duly his exotic things he checks every -solutely, but notion that he wouldn't be the first quarterback taken makes no sense to me. Now speaking of another quarterback that Prescott entering the final year of his rookie deal because he wasn't a first round pick. They don't have that fifth year option on him. The Cowboys are looking to sign act now to a long term extension is off season after he led them to another postseason appearance. They have benefited greatly, of course, from this contract where he's been making so little money comparatively. He got just one point nine million dollars in campaign over the last three seasons combined seventy eighth among quarterbacks in that span that we heard shefty earlier this morning telling us to expect to see him get a deal kind of like the Derek Carr deal twenty five million a year. I think they'll be some people look at that. And say is Dak that good. What do you think he deserves it? You know, if you look at his first three years, they're very similar guy. Like Russell Wilson wins touchdowns. Interception. He throws interception. Every one point seven his touchdown for or excuse me. His interception percentage is one point seven. If he continues to keep that on in his career. It'd be the second best all time behind Aaron Rodgers. So he's got thirty two wins and forty eight starts. He's going to the playoffs. Two out of three years. I mean, this guy is proven right now to be a very good starter. I think that's one of the questions though. Like there's one thing to rely on history, and what you've seen. But also, do we believe in the expectation that he's going to be the franchise QB that takes you to the next level? Well, yeah, I mean, I get that. But he's been good to really good in certain moments with an offense. According to a lot of people like man, you've got to get up to speed can kill in more really take him too that next level. So he's been good with a little bit of an outdated offense that doesn't fit his skill set. What is he going to become now that gets a little bit more of a modern offense around him in really utilize all of this talents. And okay. Well, if you believe that I believe Dan for sure. We only going to get paid that is LeBron James. Let's talk the Lakers because they'll look to get back on the winning tracks tonight against the pelicans after suffering back to back losses to sub five hundred team and dropping ten of their last fourteen games. Overall, Paul Pierce? He had some interesting takes on what the team should do for the remainder of the season. And Laker fans may want to cover their ears. Our Lakers was shut LeBron down. What did like no seriously? I mean, he's getting older he has to do too much for them to win. I mean, just looking he puts out a triple double in a can't win. I mean this imagine if he really goes out, and it really exerts himself, and that's the go toward this season. Now, I mean, this was a wash coming into it. They weren't contending. And when you're LeBron James on they weren't considering from the jump. Wow. Talking about getting a lot of people going and look it's hot take as we say. But Jaylen does it make some sense Paul Pierce as my brother, and I love them K, wait to see him in a countdown, cruel riday Chauncey and Michelle Beedle. However this. This is a not take we all know that the Los Angeles Lakers should not will not play bitch. Lebron James for the rest of you. That literally makes zero sense watch me one because the Bron James signed a four year deal with the Los Angeles. Layton, his goal was to help lead them into the future. And if we can't maximize the young players already on the roster find a way to parlay them into Anthony Davis once that does not happen in all star break progresses now. It's about everybody getting out on the floor plan at their optimum level. The Lakers don't need to be trying to get a lottery pick they need to be trying to get into play. But they can't. I mean, the point is at some point they're going to have to come to terms with what they are. They lose to Atlanta. They lose to Memphis. They lose to the pelicans without Anthony Davis at some point the writing is on the wall. And maybe the best thing that could happen to them is if LeBron's the groin injury that he had to kind of bothering him a little bit again in the next thing. You know, you shut down for the well if you remember you're talking to. The first person in theory for the national media said the Lakers wasn't going to make the playoffs. The door has been blown open and everybody come in with these takes the bottom line is they got a chance to back to the play offs. Based on the parents are free fall in the clippers. Don't wanna make the playoffs. And we'll see if the kings are ready. Let me ask you this. What is making the playoffs in two thousand nineteen mean long term for the Lakers. If anything if they are the the last thing, they gotta go play, the Golden State Warriors, and you're gonna get swept. Anyway, what what what are we doing here? Like, what does that help, you know, with a bunch of rookies young guys that you're trying to trade away, and whether it be their playoff experience. I guess that's great. Also now says all. Expectation legacy a lot. I really sitting at this table. Even a smooth Saturday. We're going to be AC losing to perjure onto the warriors grinding he saying. And they don't have to win the war. And they everybody says they should make ploughs you're yelling at Steven. He's not asking you to answer to the question. What does it could be the significance of making it to the playoffs? They haven't made the playoffs in the last five years. It'll be progress trade way all of their players after night. He's antennas that progress is what hap- quickly I'm on the phone with you. And I'm trying to do your players. Look a lot more attractive when I see them perform in the playoffs. Then when your team makes it to the lot of AB, everyone can see what's going on. You have a valuable. Help them. Now you Ingram. Let's hold this on. We'll continue to convince jail. He's wrong as we ought to remind. We've got a double header Wednesday starts involves into Celtics. Well. Well, there is the player. They're not connected. Taking on. Then we go to Staples Center, and we'll see what is happening with the Brown. And the pelican late everything we're talking about it. Meanwhile, still to come here. Much more on the Brown and the Lakers much more on kyri in the Celtics coming off their worst performance of the season Zach load, Swain seven a Jalen necks. Tuck in.

Jalen Jalen Dan Maria Virginia Tech Los Angeles Lakers LeBron James Duke NBA Celtics I. R J Barrett Cowboys NFL Duke Zion Williams Paul Pierce baseball Virginia Dak Prescott Dianne Williamson ESPN Dwayne Haskins
Are White People Scared of This Podcast? (w/ Irene Tu, Comedy Central)

Asian, Not Asian

57:08 min | 2 years ago

Are White People Scared of This Podcast? (w/ Irene Tu, Comedy Central)

"So we so far. There's five Asian guys together uh-huh stealing place everyone. Maybe you can look like opium Hey what's up everybody. Welcome to Asian Not Asian podcast. A podcast or two Asian guys now from Asia. Talk about American issues. No American cares about and it's not GonNa Win Cookson Network Network Listening Party and Canal Street market those guys on Instagram at market and at listening party presents. Also if you listen to on your bones spotify whatever please take a screen green shot and then put on instagram stories. Post antagonise at Asian that Asian pod and. Say Something Nice about us we need it. It's been a tough week. I really really need it Today's topic topic will be about hater. Haters Haters Aka. I won't have an open discussion about whether it being a minority is advantageous just in various industries especially something an entertainment entertainment. Because you know I had a very interesting thing that happened this week so this has been happening to me. I guess like the last three years and I just I guess I just wasn't listening 'cause it never really hit me. The way did this week but ever since we start as podcasts we started doing live shows. People see that like I don't necessarily think successful but other comedians. I guess that were successful. And we're having a conversation with female comedian and this person awesome is white and she was like pitching all his podcast angles to me and I was just being honest was like why do I feel like that's been done. You've got to kind of make it you. I don't know anything and then got to got frustrated. Certain points it was like well. I can't just make a podcast about being Asian like you. I can't I can't talk about Asia and get get successful. Yeah yeah and I was just like Oh like do people think a thank you because we're not successful at all but but also like Oh. I didn't realize is people thought of this like that. Yeah I think while we I think we're blinded but love you know we get allow from fans and some of the comedians that we'd like who've been on the show they give us a la La but There's a lot of haters out there who think that we're not really working hard. We're just kind of being Asian happening or we're just talking about pay and stuff in it and I guess like two other two things. I want to mention that. It's all kind of related. I remember specifically like five years ago before I saw very comedy lives guy. He was a writer very funny. He actually got me into comedy and he's a writer. La Now and he. We met up a couple years ago when he was talking about. He's having like an existential crisis. He's he's a white guy and he's having an existential crisis about himself as a writer because he was like Oh like like legit. My agent told me they're not looking for Sri White guys right now for writing positions and at the time I felt bad because I do think he's funny he's guy and I was like. Oh that's that's quite a while Bro. Whenever there's been like that and then also we have friends kind of like quitting because they feel like they're not getting the respect that they deserve a lot of them R. J. White guys you know and I don't want to have a conversation about it with everybody here on the podcast today because I want to dive into it you know? Is it really just everything coming to us. Just because we're Asian you know like have you had people say that shuts you see. I've I have and you know to to be fair. It's never been where somebody was like sort of accusatory about it. Every you know off handed thing but I think that Kinda reveals a little bit about how they are thinking thinking about you know quote unquote success or finding your thing or or or getting traction. That's the Nice thing is like we. We got traction. And we're pretty new comedy so like people were saying and from the outside I mean fuck our fucking podcast hazard agent twice in it. You know all the one of them has the word not not also cancels it out so I think people look at us and toward a wonder you know what is it they did that. We're not successful but like help them help them get something kept. Maybe maybe they just can't fathom fathom Y I two straight Asian guys that are getting stuff what it is don't deserve it I I know I know how much hard work on this and I assigned to see. What kind of rub me the wrong way like Bro like you just sitting here like complaining like invited me to bars and stuff like I don't even go out man eh? This is what I do. I plan for gas. I do I do bunch of research like I do put in a lot of hours into this so like I don't know maybe the Asian thing is relevant but I would hate for that part of it to be dismissed but I I want to have this competition with our guest today. Yes this is a good friend of mine from the Bay area. She's been on comedy Claustrophobia. She's also been on vice lands. Show funny how superseded have on the show please welcome to the show Irene to hey having on the show I think you're right into him. It has have you ever gotten comments like that. Yeah usually it'll just be like kind of jokingly and conversation station but no one's ever straight up in like no but even but even even the jokes though right. Yeah I feel like that's just been my whole life where I just laugh it off Mike and then I just leave. What do people say exactly? It'll it'll be like straight white guys usually just been like oh like you know. It's so hard and there's like you you're getting stuff and I'm like cool. I walk out of that conversation at something else to do. I don't like to engage. Would it be conflict Yeah Yeah Yeah just doing your thing. Yeah I just like I would. I'm not like a people pleaser but I just don't like to like yeah. Rub people the wrong way would rather just leave just disappear behind. I think I I think I am. That outweigh ninety nine percent of the time. But I think with this specific project because she like brought the podcasts specifically that was the thing that hurt just annoying because like doc okay if you WANNA play that logic of like all year just Asian so people come to you like okay. You're a white woman like they're more of you like Asian people make up five percent of the population right. And why do we have make up. Like I don't know at least seventy five relations so here in America in America yeah everywhere everywhere. Nobody in America Arcus was like you could just start talking and people are like. Oh I know what this is whereas we start talking like the way we do. I feel a lot of people were like. What is this Asian people talk like this like the way that we do at least in outside? I think like heavily Asian populated areas like the Bayer. And I think people don't really know what Asian people are like and stuff like that so it hurt baby. Yeah I think that You know it's like it's like some like I I'm guilty sometimes of like saying Oh man I wish I had a going to have a podcast where I just talk talk about dating or something like that but like I. I'm not dating anymore. It's too late for me right but I also have to catch myself and say. Hey that's sort of that's sort of doing the same aimed being attributing it to like some small aspect of their personality or life looks even sometimes and I realize that there's a lot of work you need to you do in order for that to happen and that's just sort of like little like little Hook that you see that ends up you kind of drawing you in but then there's actual you know I mean if it's good it's got it you know if we were we can't just be like picking duck you know like yeah yeah yeah you know what. I'm saying like Subaru. Just yell it and people will come to see that. Nation thing is. Subaru's is a Japanese car. All right but I didn't know like we liked them or anything but see that's the thing is like I think you like him because you're you were industry racing for a while but like if you're not into street racing because it's so funny because you say Subaru ups an agent thing. I think it's a lesbian. I think it's a white thing is is it lesbian because you're hiking and Denver. I don't know it's lesbian. Car Known Lesbian Y Y flannel of cars. So because it's like off offroad he can fit a lot of shit it's brought. I don't know what they're also the long. Yes they value which I feel like like is a lesbian thing I like I should I should i. Should I should quantify my Subaru Yelling Subaru. WRX That's now you know all right. Fine yeah see. That's what now we're you know. We have to have a discussion about Subaru. We can't just talk about Asian. Yeah car we can't even just talk about Subaru. I mean because you do a renewed who comedy in the Bay and I live in l. a. now and people to know that. Oh Yeah Yeah yeah well then you live in La going back and forth a little bit. I I mean the same thing basically I just I mean. There are a lot of Asian people in comedy shows in. La Audience members audience members. I'm talk not usually at the shows that performance I think there are super super in the outback. Okay Oh that's so lesbian. Gosh you know I. There are like more like Asian Asian Asian people in the audience there But like I do a lot of Alta shows so a lot of Asian people. Yeah that's that's that's that's interesting too because a lot of Asian people for content and they'll just go to any agent show. They will really go to it. Really comedy just like Asian thing. I want to talk about this because we feel it but we don't really not a vocalist. I feel like this is someone's happy New York work to just come but it doesn't mean they're going to like your shit totally. Yes I yeah. Sometimes I'll do like an Asian show and they're like really excited for the show but they're like I'll do my set and I won't feel that good about it. Yeah because I'm like I don't think I did that. Well like the SA- very supportive. But I'm like. They didn't laugh in the way that I wanted them to laugh. And I'll I will have like Usually if there are like Asian people in the audience they will come up to me after the show really likes that But it's still not at a large margin of the audience. I think to be fair about what some other comics might think. You know just branding something as Asian may get you sort of like an initial little blip where you're like. Oh this is like you know Other Asian people will hear the the whistle. And start going to not to check after support but in the end ultimately when you're at the show you have to like still like what you see in whatever way you know be good or you like the whatever that person has to offer because it's not it's not going to be sustainable right. There's only so much you can do ultimately the ultimate product because you know otherwise I just have a just make another crazy rich agents. You know what I'm saying. Make another one. That was on that trip that I think the success of that showed that it wasn't just Asian Asian than had kind of this other thing going on that was like more whatever so I think like to your point. There is a lot of people who really I I asked you this question before like I was like are there too many Asian shows now like in New York I asked. Yeah are there a bunch. Because I haven't done a single one since I've been here. There's A. There's a lot of sketch shows shows. There's all like okay I would say that. There's there's Asia Af and then they're just like there's a couple of like Asian theme shows shows And then there's just like I. There are other shows run by Asian people that I would call them. Asia our show even our show now is like it's funny because it's wasn't an Asian show before but now because of the podcasts on like the people who come are fans and now you do get a lot of Asian do now. It's it's become so we have all sorts of we've always before the podcast. I would say at least thirty percent of our audience. Numbers were Asian. And I didn't know where they're coming from. I was just like I guess they cr four and asked names and they want. There's definitely I don't know. Maybe maybe that's like thing I wanted to talk about this. Do you think that like this is a dangerous area but I'm gonNA bring it up a lot of white guys will complain saying it's like it's harder for them now here to hear two data points that I want to just bring onto the podcast to see how you react. I know somebody who writes for publication and this person said to me that they will not write about like a project if there are more than two straight white guys trying to highlight a POC eligibility to you know these other groups of people and so that's good for me buy it did it make me think like I don't know it's yeah. It didn't make me feel good. I I mean I I like when people do that. But also don't say out loud that they do that You know what I mean. Yeah Yeah Yeah like I Have produced a lot of shows when I first started doing stand up just because that was the only way I could get state MM-HMM I wouldn't get booked a lot when I look for started. I wasn't like one of the cool kids or something so I just like did on my own shows and I always wanted to book more. Women are People's colored. Whatever and I just did it and I've never I never said it like that was just the thing that I did well? We got it on recording so well you know. Now I don't book those shows Come at me. I do think that it's I feel it's like it's like now the four okay. I don't want even say there's a even playing field but like the the what I think. Some people perceive of as being a disadvantage is just fairness. Yes I was thinking about Randall. Said remember when road at render. Oh this was on here is like equality means you have to give up some shit. Yeah so now. It's like when you go on auditions addition. Maybe it was for ten straight white guys and now maybe it's for too short. Why guys to black women two black guys two guys and two Latinas right right and so that means they just lost eight spots right? That seems like this. They lost but like really is just fair. I mean I mean you. Just one of my favorite shows friends. Yeah says six white people in it right and New York City is not six white people uh and and if you wanted to make a show that was like really representative of New York you really representative New York. You'd have to have a bunch of agents a bunch of Puerto Rican Dominican. Yeah you got you know you gotTa White Girl sure throw a white girl in there or throw a stray Dudin here. But they're not the only ones and for a long time. It was just only white people and now that like it's like I'm not again not saying it's level at all eve a little bit of an extra yes like Oh my God. Really when they say they feel at a disadvantage. Now really what it is now we have to compete. I Ah Yeah you just given to me is this. I think that's kind of what it comes down. But but it's interesting because like from always is being at that top coming down 'cause everything's relative right so if you had it so good and you come down a little bit it sucks. It's hard to it's like being ranch. Yeah Yeah Yeah I go. I have to do something I was at this This design like Conference thing there were giving giving a talk and it was like they're like explaining how they these designer towards explaining how they started their their companies and it was it was too white dudes and one was older and one was a little younger and I was sitting there and at one point. We were both like they're both on stage and it was like this is so odd that it's it's in this day and age in this day feels really acute lease strange because like we're sort of more attuned to it in this very likes sliver of time MHM to have like two white dudes but it is. It is weird and it's as strange as like having only one of one one kind of person. Yeah you know but this is sort of like just accepted. It's like they kind of got called out on it during the thing. Button it it it. It is weird for a long time. You just accept except that this is the standard you're going to have to white dude or whatever it is and now it's like you know because you look at the audience. who was their audience? Silence was not only white. Dude there was there all sorts of people but like the people who are sort of rise to the top is like. There's a certain kind of person very it's very strange and I. It's funny too because I think sometimes it Why people are are really sensitive because for example I joke like you and I can never be booked on the same show right because then it becomes an Asian show becomes a new nominee Andrew? Get booked on the show all the ANDRO four. Yeah you yeah. He's the best. Maybe because he's dude. I don't know I get mistaken for a lot. I don't know if that's really relevant for listeners may look identical so but I I feel like it's very you know if you have a show where there's there's like four dudes and one black dude it's like okay but if there's a show where it's four black and white white dude that's the other thing to bring up is like when people more like. Oh you're just getting that because you're gay get black or Asia. Whatever I feel like they are dismissing idea of like dude? They're given a chance chance right now. But if it doesn't work out they're going to stop booking US immediately. Yeah it's stressful. Because I'm like oh I better really nail this because otherwise it's never gonNA come back. Yeah it's like it's like the wave is here and they're giving us they're investing but if that waved is back to normal and what's normal right nothing just like straight wide use again you know so I feel like they always have that like default mode locked down for us. That's like this. We don't know we don't know we're GONNA do with it but people are very sensitive. I want to bring up his alley Wong thing because I feel like this is a very sensitive topic for comedians and caters to right. Yeah Yeah I think so. L. Along the she has a book out and she's doing a tour. Yup Ali like how do you know her person. She moved away from San Francisco before I started open furnace up because I know you open for people. I am a big Fan. I would love to open for but no I've never opened for. I do know her opener. So Oh who is who opens her. Hsiang Wang and Kevin Comu- oh I love you know. Kevin Person on the PODCASTS. Yes which which I personally Shang. Then he's like I personally will. Not You know really feels like that. Sometimes he and I went to cal together and I saw him when he first started. Like any won't do the PODCAST. I don't think he won't I think he's doing his the message back to him does he hate me for some reason. I don't have his number but if I ran into him I will. I'll mention it okay. I miss him well he lives in. La So yeah so she has a book out and jazz and the way. It's sort of like it's a bunch of essays to children who her two daughters who are very young but It's very funny. And there's there's there's an there's an article essentially just an interview and then I'll just read it in the book you bring up. This is the interview asking all. They want In the book you bring up question that you hate getting so of course. I'm compelled to ask it. which which is what is it? What what it's like to be an Asian American women in comedy? What bothers you about this premise? And how do you answer when it comes up so so basically I think people ask you this question. What's it like to be an Asian American woman comedy and then all along always says she doesn't like it? She has a very good response. But you know it just read this so that question comes up so much from Asian American women again this is all they want. Speaking big clearly wanted to be in comedy. But this is how you see yourself is this. How you reducing yourself off and upsets me when they asked that because it makes me think that's how they see themselves as an Asian American woman and also is just not very good question if their goal is to pick my brain and get some insight insight on how to succeed a much better question is how do you cope with failure? Or how do you write a great joke. Not what is it like to be an Asian American woman. Comedy underlying question. Is this assumption. That being an Asian American woman is a weakness. If you see it as a weakness it will be a weakness. Do you get that questions sometimes. Oh sure your different versions of Edward Life how you feel about it how to respond to whatever that took a minority. That's your thing joke about it. I don't like getting any those kinds of questions either mostly because I don't like getting interviewed like I'm on this podcast in which I'm getting interviewed I hate it. Ah I don't really know kind of usually just don't answer the question on Kinda skirt around and tried to wrestle. What don't you like about it just because I never feel like when I'm doing comedy that I am in Asia comedy in that moment S.? I never feel like that in my life. What if one accent? I totally get it because I feel that way to people asking about that shit because comedy is literally the only place where I'm like not Asian. Not that I'm afraid of being Asian but if someone says I've heard this before Audino me they'll say he's a comic and it's the first time in my life where he's like. He's Asian Dude. They don't give a shit like this world where you just jokes not what it is it usually. It's it's you just want to be known that's funny exactly. Like oh he's funny right. It'd be weird actually if it was like Oh you know. He's an literally. Nobody says that in comedy context and when I first started picking up on this I was like. Oh it's like literally the first time I just feel like everybody else environment and there's something that really feels cool about that now that I don't I don't not matter being Asian or or whatever but then when when people outside of comedy try to bucket you in this thing your life that's not what this world is so beautiful about this is like it's like it's a binary. Broke your fucking writing jokes. I'm not thinking like Oh what would me as an Asian American right about In my jokes like I'm just like Oh what's funny. Demere one that you know like of that filters through like through like Ooh what did I do. Today's Asian American can woman. I've seen Hsiang Wang. Imagine Mike very good friend off. I've seen him interviewed by the Taiwan Taiwanese publication. Because I think he's he's there's something like that. I like how you feel about being towers American comedian and like I just saw him like he just had no thoughts about that specific question because he he's he's not writing jokes like Oh. This is the Taiwanese angle. Because that's not really his reality you also is the silliest jokes too yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah. Yeah he's a he's a silly American American not a silly American comic. He's always joking about balls. And so yeah I but I do too like we all have Asian jokes either arrests. I met you in two thousand sixteen comedy festival when I was worse comedy. Yeah I was like. Oh here's your so dope. I actually think we're wearing the same shirt is providence and then we hung out again at sketch fast us and I love yourself because you fucking mean into it. You know and I feel comedians. Who are not in our generation like the ones above? There's a group of them that will purposely not do Asian jokes. Because maybe at that time it just didn't make sense for them to do more accents. I don't really do any. It's either zero. Oh or the happiest shit you know what I mean. It's like now I think the Modern Day Asian comedians were like it's both like sometimes. I'll joke about trader Joe's or like a joke about Asia ship but it's like back from a two thousand nineteen straight Asia male represent straight wrx. So yeah I mean I don't know she's this is great man but I will say I mean it is nice if someone in the audience does I identify because like also like an Asian American woman. It's cool that you're doing stand. Santa Blake that's cool. Yes because you know you didn't get to see that before so I get it in that angle but we are to just be like you do comedy and your this thing and that's what I want. It feels like it feels like a lot of like a big burden. Oh yeah that's a lot of pressure you know it's like Oh you're representing all of you know and it's like oh I'm not that funny also. I feel like we get more criticism. Yes for jokes. Oh Yeah I mean I. kind of do edgy material. Sometimes I'll do take words. Some people don't like it or what I m people get very mad at me. They're like this is bad for the community. Of God's is my take it's a joke it's not me saying this is good. This is bad the always bring up the community. That's why like which is I've never. I've never really felt like part of any community necessary. I'm like an only child so I've been independent since day. One claim me as part of. Yeah Yeah and like I'm I'm you know gay. I'm Asian woman but I'm not like part of the community I've never been like I'm a leader of this community. I'm like yeah I'm just those things my thoughts and I don't WanNa feel like I say something like well. She said that now die mad and she's making us look bad thing. It will be very strange if you're if you were in a was in community like you're part of this I didn't I know what that word means community. What is the community? Then and then you're like I'm going to do comedy to like or like the community selected to do comedy and you now have to represent us like a champion at the end of some kind. Yeah you would. It would not work and you would. That person would be so unfunny you know represent this whole thing becomes like branded content in comedy. Also here's the difference. We're not comedians are not like rappers. We don't represent shit like Compton or whatever like is I've been watching this show and nephews could rhythm and flow. It's a it's a reality show. It's like American Idol Bopha Rappers Sofa. Wow it's really good fan of Cardi B. still funny my favorite comedian actually Uh but all of them are like maybe really about representative community at. It's a so weird because in comedy to your point it's like like that's why sometimes like Asia Book. I get a little uncomfortable because like oh I'm glad you like my shit but like Joe. I'm not not all my thoughts are with you know what I'm saint like. I'm my own person. I grew up in Ohio. I've got my own group of friends like I'm glad you vibe with seven minutes I did up there but just know that like I may not agree with you and everything. That's why like I'm always so hesitant to like really deep into this like Asian identity as a comedian because it feels dangerous once you fucking go in there. I feel the the the only time that I really try to rip the community is. This doesn't happen so much anymore. But maybe maybe it doesn't another way to chose but like when an open mics there was a whole sometimes opened my spontaneously. Some Weird Asian Jokey Shit will happen and just continue going for a little while just because and that's the only time I felt like I gotta represent this dance circle right now. Yeah Yeah Yeah. These jokes yeah show like if somebody says some age I love it when a comedian before me goes up and says something kind of occasion. 'cause all my God oh that's my last left represent you know correct to rectify. Yeah it was like okay. Well let me do my thing but you know it flows into do my point of view which then becomes just like my regular shell in all right. We're going to give a quick shout patriots subscribers and the way we do this is if you have donated on Patriots this week or the last couple of weeks We give give you a shout out if we're talking about a patriot. We've website where you can donate some money to us on a monthly basis and you get rewards like bonus episodes you get you get. Dm's you can pitch race news all kinds kinds of fun stuff so check us out on Patriot Dot Com Asia Asia pod but onto the game will reduce your ethnicity and occupation. ooh major major major. Ager Colorado's yeah. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA. We're going to get shot because we weren't racist enough. Who are raising? We really weren't and we. We have plenty more to give. We got a feedback academics. They said Hey. Boys will launch a crank that racism up to eleven and we said Yes sir yes sir and the tiny Hitler Moustache appear that advice from Trump's oh here we go vin new win. Oh God I know I know who this guy is really so I just thought that's the way you react when you hear new win. Oh God fucking Vin which must be like a very common thing for you all the time. This do went to college with me and be where you describe describe. Can you just remember that. He gave money. No No. I'm GonNa Roast this okay you come to our show is he gives us ten bucks. That's all I'm saying. You know first of all ten dollars. Let's face somehow scammed Patriot And I know this is somehow we're losing money. We're giving him UH I don't know he's he's he's good as thanks for Love it for the money. We're not really sure if they're paying you you're paying us via and you went to Berkeley because we know you Vincent Vincent Cabin Sag. SAG CABIN SAG cabin have cabansag coban. Coban sommelier was eight. Philipino thinks what was his first name. Vincent Vincent Vincent Cousins Vini. He cared see here. I think he's half Italian had half Filipino and Spanish name realm. They don't have vincent that's not a thing. Maybe but I could see like a Filipino. Mom being like Vincent Vincent Vincent maybe watching Sopranos or something. Maybe what's his major. I'm going to go just straight up. Just economics yeah nod now. This guy seems like a bio guy to me five bucks. Why so you know what five bucks? That's you're right. I think he was an economy. Major right he did the math. He drew a curve. He did not not GonNa last long can afford this next. We got Andrew Tran. Andrew Tran Vietnam another via another Vietnam. My God this guy is Yeah I'M GONNA say he works in analytics yet. Why Guy Yeah? I don't know the I would trust an email from amateur and if it was like hey the regression looks wrong. I'd be like I believe you the Andrew. Hey thanks so much for that regression man. I read on an like a interview. Did a little bit of your open here. You are being interviewed. I'm like Oh did I say that. I'm not sure if this is your open or anymore but in this at the time when you interviewed by like I think it was UC Berkeley Association. Or something you were saying like your opener you address the fact that you can Asian boy that you're gay and all this stuff and then you say something new new. I don't want to do that anymore because I wish I could. Just get into my material that has nothing to do with that shit addressing it. Do you feel like you're there now or it's it's a I am honestly very sick of it so I kind of don't do it now but I also like trying to put together late night so explain put together not about your identity. God you represent. That's that's all right now. I'm like a take a late night. Book Asia Shit Coming Community coming out with the bonds. I like community community with Roy semi right. I'm a sellout baby Ninjas yeah this is the one thing I want to talk about. Is You know again. I'm this is a really interesting experience for me and help you to. Because we'll do the podcast and stuff fans will come up and they'll be like this person. You should get this person and a lot of times. They'll just recommend like anybody WHO's Asian which is fine because our podcast is called Asian Asian. But like I do one point want to appeal to the masses. You you know I got. I want to beat like these America. I don't think necessarily like if you're white you can still enjoy. These are some of your Asian. Assure you guys have non Asian listeners. Always always on you but I feel like the fans like. Don't know that we're trying to do that. I think are fans think. We're just trying to wrap the Asian thing thing and I'm like I'm hard won. The title of Your podcast does have the word Asian twice. Yeah I don't know maybe you're not talking about this. We go we go back and forth and and I sometimes wish we didn't at the same time I do because you know it is. It is like you have like half of my like the other day I did a show and I did only Asian Shit and I connected with this audience like never before I was like and it wasn't an Asian crowd. No it's a fucking Asian wasn't it was. It was very Asian crowd but I think that I was talking about Asian stuff in a way that they had not heard about it before. And like it was like you know when Mario gets the star and he's invincible. I could do anything at that. We have a whole lot of level and it was like really nice and it was like Oh this may be how it feels to be like a mainstream comic just talking about parking or whatever the fuck it is talking about and it was really cool and I don't think it's a one. Fuck what's his name. He's very famous Italian comic. uh-huh Sebastian Maniscalco his shit with his crowd. He's God yeah you know and not a lot of times. I don't know what the fuck you talking about. But he has got his thing. I don't think gets a bad thing we try to think. Oh it's like bad to be a quote unquote agent comment. There's there's some comics were like that and if you're funny again it's like I recognize that you know that guy's funny it's okay and if it's not my thing that's that's okay too. Yeah but I do think the way to become more. Broadly accepted. I guess yeah is to just like put our our own point of view on everything because then eventually you just know Mike and fool me. Yeah you know and we happen to be Asian Asian and we can talk about agents podcast Mike and fumie Monday an acronym for our listeners. And we call him an old. Yeah I saw that uh-huh confused for a second. I was like mark we could do. I mean we could do that and I think that's the thing. Is that like I think we eventually kind of eventually but like we do try to. If there was like a subtitle who'd be eight or not Asian featuring me you know. Yeah and I think that's the way they think I'm okay. It's interesting because in stand up we came up not doing Asian routes because no such thing existed. I was just so like right like we talked by Asian ship. Okay but like we we wrote from Non Asian people basically I can do a non Asian Room in fact I might do better in a non Asian. Yeah I like my my audio crowd is like cool young minorities. That's I think they give me the most but the like I feel like my standup has broader appeal. Just because AH doing it longer or I've been trained that way but with this podcast I do think the other Non Asia you'll like it but I personally don't feel like we're there yet. We're not there yet but I think people scared of the name Asian. I don't believe that I think that it's like people. Don't okay like if you're we're GonNa if you were if you were to say let's go eat Asian food tonight. That's like met means a certain thing. Or if you like if you say the word Asian that means a certain thing and it like it's it it generally doesn't mean funny things right doesn't mean funny. I'm just I'm being. You don't think automatically funny stuff you know what I'm saying but if you say like us let's go. I'm just saying there's there's there's a there's like urban rooms is a thing a thing right and when you watch today's Miro he'd be make all sorts of jokes that I don't I get it but I don't I didn't I didn't live that life. I didn't live a life of like uh of of being in the. I'm not from the Bronx. I'm not I'm not Jamaican you don't get plenty but I I still. I still like like the content. I think the thing with the name of your podcasts hot cast. I think it's just people that our nation feel like they might not necessarily get what you're talking about right because they don't know what the podcast is yet. Oh it's like Asian I wa. I'm not that Asian. Maybe I won't get it. So then they start. Listening to someone has never listened to pass. Before I agree. I agree and I think that you know you can get into. There's a mirror because even though you don't know what it is funny is is just it just seems like they're having a good time just to saying we got to change her name to win. LLC that's more Asian to me you have to have the Ave. Our liabilities are limited. Okay not a C. Corp Not Oh god I feel like you should just name it Mike and Fumie or Fumie Mike at some point. That's fun I wanted to be all the white people. That's what I'm saying. I just I believe I'm optimistic. Asian I I believe the way to get to them using the same name that you have now or just why okay. So it's like this is so strange. Why people or scared of black people when they're crossing the street but they're scared of Asia in podcast form like what like what this is like the crossing of the street that like look at the rankings the clutch purse or whatever? You know what I mean. But that's what I was saying that there's not like a Asian funny thing because there his it's hard for people to think Oh Asia people can be funny money and have a really interesting conversation. This is fucking is that people don't think people are funny the thing they just think that you're gonna be talking about like like eating dogs. We talk about love. We do love talking about rice. We do I mean the first episode is called the Rice Cooker to our detriment. I guess another thing but when you listen to the episode. It's very. It's not about how he doesn't like his his partner. My Porter do where do you keep your West good I'm GonNa ask you this. I don't have one of my apartment. I know it's a problem. Just okay I don't even I don't even have the full bed in my apartment. I just moved by just I mean July. So it's really like my problem is now this is funny. See you now. This is this is teaching meals. But I'm saying okay like when you were in when you were living in the bay three years ago. Where was your okay? I've never had a rice cooker in my apartment. I don't think what does that even mean regularly Hughley at my house. I have a rice cooker. I don't I just don't buy stuff. If someone gave me a rice cooker I would totally use it every day. It's very inconvenient until I make rice in a pot which I've done rose what I'm saying. That's why you WANNA cooker. I don't usually buy rice and cook rice because I don't have a rice cooker. What do you eat at home? UH-HUH I mostly eat out or I'll make breakfast food because I can make breakfast. Food like salmon to make a lot of eggs. I don't know well well. We got together. I feel I should invite your for dinner. Erased bet expensive. We we lost. We lost our listeners. But see this rice cooker. Conversation was was funny and we got to know a lot more about you but like that but I'm lazy but part of this funny and the you know you know you're you're alone need friends and you don't know how to take care of yourself this from the rice cooker it brings people together and that's the thing as soon as people see rice cooker. They're GONNA be all they're gonNA make race jokes do but like we use it to get into other things. And that's the whole point. That's my frustration has like why people will happily consume like black or Latino Nex media even if lead into the watch. There's a there's a skit show could black astronomer shiners trying to me. It's A. It's a very very funding hilarious. I mean maybe it's because I just have more international background like like that word was not scared me. I'm like cool. Comedy slacker astronomers showers. I hate speech space phobia but yeah. I don't but I think it's because they think people aren't funny interesting topic to be funny now. You have to name her podcast. Asian people are funny. That's a funny fogcast. Listen to our podcast funny. LLC else everything that you you're like this is an Asian podcast but also it's funny funny. Yeah Walk On. Somebody can use cases we're back with our guest Irene to and we are going to do everybody's favorite segment it is. Dust raised news today. We have an article from the L. A. Times headline read Asian hair and what we talk about in La barbershops. And I didn't you know this whole article was about like the barbershop. Culture begins with the writer talking about using haircut at this like Colombian barbershop or something like that and then he explores this like Asian barbershop. That is in Southland. I don't don't know where that is either. La It's okay so there's a in the southland which is what they call in California. Oh so I wanted to use his article to just kind of deported. Talk about Asian people and hair yet. Because is this person talk specifically about like how. When he was younger his mom would give them a bowl cut like he wasn't able to achieve a lot of the haircuts that you wanted like he remembers taking a picture of like Brad Pitt or somebody to his hair stylist? who was probably the Latino? And they're like Oh. We can't do that with your hair. Yeah Yeah and I remember. That was like a big thing for me to when I first moved here because I have very thick Asian hair yeah and it grows out like a fro- and I always had such a complex with it when I was I hated my hair rounds. A kid my mom would always say why people have hair like cats Could just change. You can just change it with your hair like whatever direction you don't even need Gel. I just wanted to so that'd be stuck with me and my hair is not like a cat at all so I I would go like barber. Shops or whatever replaces to get haircuts at new always turn out a disaster. Some amount would cut it and stuff and then I don't know I just had lots of experience with hair to long term like figuring out how to get my haircut. Were to go. Oh and stuff like that and I wanted to ask you guys. What has your experience been with? Your hair's with their respective hairs was selecting a hairstylist. Or Barber was. Is that a a a an important decision in your life that it take you along with them to find somebody like weird relationship with because for the first nineteen years. I had really long hair at like the classic. Just straight down. Imagine Don Imagine uh-huh just imagine the worst haircut on me ever and that's what it is. You could find it on facebook okay so I never went to a barbershop growing up. Obviously because I just had really long hair and my mom would just you know do a little little trim every like six months to a year and I never really cut my hair look like that and and then I cut my hair shorter when I was nineteen. I did like a like a shoulder length. I because I didn't want to go all the way afraid And then I cut it shorter and then I had to like figure out how to get that cut. Yeah so I never really experienced like barbershop culture because I really do that like I went to salons first and then I did go to a couple barbershops. I usually try to it. Looks like Queer friendly barbershop thing. Queer haircuts Yeah Oh total. What does that even mean like a gay haircut? You know when you see someone you're like well. That's a gay haircut lady but I could have this haircut that you effort. Yeah I don't understand what all your there's the different queer haircuts. I feel like there's some that some that you could not pull off but it's like also like a lesbian haircut. Yeah Yeah there's some like mine that we both have. The same stores are the same size but I think the thing for me was really I was. I wanted to get a short cool haircut but I didn't want to masculine like Tom COM Clearness comes in so. It's yeah it's like it's like you know it's like You know I wanNA look like the. The haircut has to be like short like a little bit masculine. But I don't want it to look like I. I went to the army. Who who who? When was it? How when you got your hair cut short? who was? It was an Asian person. Was it just the go-to Queer Salon. I went to a salon that another queer person who is not Asian. I liked her hair so that I went to the same salon that she did and then I actually didn't like the haircut that I got because why people don't really know how to cut exam so then I did have the problem where every time we'd come here it was I've never ever. I don't think I had ever had an Asian Barbara or hairstylist. Because I don't know every time I went to a salon and barbershop was like a white girl away so like sometimes the haircut would look good but more often than not it would not look like either either they were like. Did it know how to do my hair because my hair is like I have a lot of hair is really just so my chair like every time they like. You have a lot of hair and I'm like I know they'll have to like thin and out or it would just look too masculine or I'd be like this is what I want like. I showed them like a Justin Bieber. Haircut tall one not the one he has now. Yeah with the CAVENAUGH and I'm not the one now not the original bieber haircut which was like not the Mo one mo not the Baldwin after that one that looks like my hair now so I'd like show them that and then they'd usually so because you're here now have a guy I I have a I have a girl I guess. She's sort of Asian. was I mean I don't I'm GONNA mess it up so I'm GonNa say this person knows how. How's the cut agent here? This person knows knows how to cut hair all types of. That's that's hard to find. I I remember my. My Dad weren't living in Ohio. He was like we were on the road and he was like I gotta get haircut and he went to a black barber and they rejected originally they were just like. I don't know how to this. I feel like we were talking about hair. It's okay to talk about biology and not be racist. 'cause it's real. I don't think that I think if you could could Asian Harry can probably cut white hair shells again. The analogy cats here but Yeah Asian hairs a different things. I don't think you necessarily need to be Asian literally. I read that article too that it's basically just like if you have experienced hair after you get used to your like. Oh that's what this is like so like my person that I go to. I think she does does have like a bunch of Asian class but also a bunch of like white clients whatever she just has experienced cutting with all different types of hair and she's also queer and like knows a lot of people so this is what I want and then she'll she'll cut it and I like the way it looks all the time because it's like well it's like I have Asian hair and also I want. That's what what age where you're like. I'm finally like kind of okay with my hair Maybe like two years ago. So it's yeah. Yeah man me to really did I. Just I didn't know how to tame it and then when I go get haircuts because I do not attainment. I don't know how to give the proper instructions. Yes yeah so my barbara now always talks about like some people are bad at giving us orders and so then you get a bit better. And they're mad the key to a good haircut regardless of what Kinda Harry cutting is like. Can you give me the instructions because most likely like you don't you don't have complicated haircuts as Jordan aside. Keep the top kind of long whatever but if you say that it doesn't necessarily exactly exactly exactly. Yeah Yeah Yeah. I don't. Even I started my barbara started using the buzzer like recently but he just insist for the longest time aside all because Japanese people they don't they don't use that. Yeah I mean. It's a very complicated journeyman. I don't know what about for you might i. You guys are inspiring to get hair back. I mean when did you decide shape at all like about ten years ago before I came. Oh so your wife knew before you went. Oh Yeah I have like a headline like and I'm having this this whole kind of like usual suspects flashback moments. Now where I'm like remembering all these key moments in my life of getting haircuts from with different people like how I I always hated my hair. Yeah none of those people were one guy was Asian. I kinda liked his hair what he did. Yeah but but I was was a constant quest of just like trying to find someone to give me a haircut that I would like. Yeah I don't think ever again except for this one dude ever liked haircuts. Which is why I just deleted my hair? I have hair because I remember I mean once I I went to the salon in like a student did it but like it was like a very good school or is it New York Nimble. No No I think it was. It was in worse though when you have a student because it takes an hour took so long I really did not like it and so the cheaper but it's not worth it. I went to an you know I guess you. Would you call it an urban barber. And the thing they did. Okay Yeah what the thing that was funny as they see the edged me also you have a straight line. I was like all along here. I felt like a like an John was like crazy. And I've had like had like tons of haircuts from lots of of white people in Texas and yeah. I always hated going because like I. You know you're supposed to talk to the barber. I did not want to talk to the barber around with them. Very nerve wracking and trying to think my hair's wavy right which is weird. That is weird super weird. And that's just like I always when I was growing up to. I've mentioned this before when I was growing up I wanted like Asian gangster banks. Do you know what I'm talking to this. Asian Asian Cool Asian guys gangster. Guys would have like like a short hair like you guys but in the front their hair would be really long. I think they talked about that. In the article yes. They had really long. I've never seen this before zip zip definitely for a long time. It was like the coolest another thing that was really big. Is the step haircut. You guys know what the step is. The step is like is it literally. It looks like a step in your hair so it was really short and then like it gets long like longer layers for women. It might be but I. I cannot imagine what this haircut looks like steps like. How do you step? It's called step. Eric is like shave. Really shaved short and then like not quite a short around like the next next level up above your head look good they look terrible on me God Asian do it. It worked with this kind of thing. Look up step haircut haircut. Asian normal haircuts. I don't I think it's a thing. Might I think you're Barbara. I'm literally just saying normal as I remember. I started going to a Chinese Barbara. Whenever I guess 'cause I was very stingy and like if you like Japanese or Koreans alliance very expensive? It's like fifty bucks or whatever it sounds like I'm just going to buy was like fifteen bucks but I think as an adult. Yeah man you got to pay what you've got to pay fifty dollars for a haircut. It's GonNa be good. It's not good so if it's like twenty five bucks whatever so be it like if I want to feel good after. I think it's worth that that extra money very simple for me. Kinda give you one zero you fuck that up. You could just cut your own hair come on shaving shaving my mustache. Well sometimes not even joking I can you know I it. He's look great but yeah so it is complicated. Oh can you save so much money though. Oh my God I mean you know when I was getting like fancier haircuts from the Guy Elijah I loved it but it was like and I was like fifty dollars not including tip every. Let's say at least every three weeks. Yeah maybe because like straight guys will make you feel bad for paying for haircuts. But I'm like people do that sued. I mean now persons of interest and like cool. I know but I remember 'cause like I taught long. I was like Oh my haircuts forty bucks like what. We're like so offended that like what do spend fifty bucks on mustache oil Yeah Yeah Yeah all right college. Though everyone's trying to spend a lot of money it was like a cool to not spend money and I didn't cut my hair that often when I was in college and then I saw photo recently I was like Oh my God. It was terrible. Porcupine they are. Everybody thinks listening again. Get our guest. Today was Irene to Irene. Work in and guests find you can find man social media at Irene underscore too. That's T- you and if you know the person who took my handle Irene to please find them and kill them because they took it. They took my instagram and twitter. Handle never ever use it. You mean they took it they have it and I can't get it. What is yours not explained Halo? Yeah well he s Roy Asian go find find that to go find that too. You can also find us on Instagram at Asian that Asian pod and I'm also on at the Abbey does. The and you can find me on that nice pants bro. Come to her next. Hack city comedy show. I don't know when it is because every third Wednesday check out the link and our instagram bio. Oh you're canal street. Market eight o'clock for House every time guys good deal and please if you listen to this on itunes review five five stars and say something nice and if anything else important coming up Now we have our stand up shows. Now that's right. Well we will be having I've show soon Check it. Check the links are BIOS because we're trying to come out to California and maybe a couple of spots along the east coast asked about corrine later. Yeah cool venues that we could podcast. Okay all right. Thank you. Thank you Irene by this this episode of Asia. Not Asian is presented in partnership with Listening Party follow the crew on Instagram listening party presents and at Canal Street market.

Asia Fumie Mike La New York writer Subaru Asian Barbara America Instagram Irene Ohio representative spotify R. J. White opium la La Vincent Vincent Vincent SA US San Francisco
Leveraging AI's Strengths to Get an Edge in Business - With Abigail Hing Wen

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

22:49 min | 1 year ago

Leveraging AI's Strengths to Get an Edge in Business - With Abigail Hing Wen

"This is Dan for Gela. You're listening to a an in industry this month. We've been focused on the theme of gaining a competitive advantage with artificial intelligence in business and there have been a number of different approaches that our previous obvious guests have brought to bear on one that we have not heard thus far is taking advantage of which actual capabilities have the most traction today looking at. What's what's working in? NLP looking at what's working at the level of the science and being able to wield those tools I as fil opportunity areas business. That's more or less what's being advised by our guest this week in the I industry podcast Abigail win as a long background in both law and tech out in in Palo Alto She's a graduate Columbia University of law school and she's also the CO chair fairness transparency and accountability expert group at the Partnership Partnership on Francisco. Abigail speaks us about which a- technology seem most promising and how business leaders can think about those technologies analogies that have existing tractor that have a lot of good presidents of use and wield them fruitfully gain advantage in business. If you're thinking about getting started with a in business listen you're considering what does it take to enable. Lp What does it take to get machine learning off the ground and make sure to download our beginning with egg. I report this is our free. PDF report not not to be confused with our our larger paid report on a similar topic but are beginning with Ai. report is a free download which availability merge DOT COM that's E. N. E. R. J. DOT dot com slash g one so that's stands for begin. EEG WANTS ALLERGIC COM SLASH BG. One you're thinking about actually adopting any of the technologies. She's that Abigail is talking about or just want to know what to take to actually do so. That would be a great place to stop just wrapped up that resource and hope that many of you enjoy it so without further ado let's typewriter. This is Abigail King. When you're on a an industry so abigail first question is just kind of kick things off off? I'm interested in your take on how you see. A is being able to be used as a competitive advantage clearly. VC's investing in this stuff for a reason. Companies are leveraging it for a reason season. What do you see as kind of the competitive edge So in some industries may not actually matter for while there are a lot of industries that are solving problems without a and. I know you've heard it. I heard even on your podcast folks say that is a problem looking for solutions to solve but that said There are a lot of great minds focused focused on solving problems with Ai. So I think the big ones right now are efficiency gains making everything faster and more immediate for better user experiences a recommendation algorithms Are Getting better and better more personalization our movie into more interesting territories with natural language processing on visual recognition reinforcement learning. There's all kinds of rate technology. Great Research being done in the field and recognizing like the where these things are going to be. Eligible to. Your field is really important items. As you had mentioned you'll be different sector per sector. You know completely agree with you. I think if you run a you know if you run to restaurants that serve fried chicken you probably don't need higher data scientists right now if if you even have a two hundred person manufacturing company it's extremely questionable as to kind of wear and how much I would be relevant You talked about efficiency so maybe we can poke into that. I know some folks would kind of think of efficiencies like well you know. Maybe that isn't a competitive advantage. Because sure everybody's GonNa spend a little bit less time in the monotonous customer service stuff on the you know Monotonous internal enterprise. Search stuff on the. I duNNo. Insert anything else. You could save a little bit of time on Do you see ways where efficiencies could be real kind of stepwise improvements real ways to create a competitive moat To pull away from I'm from competitors as opposed to just kind of lifting of all you know lifting of the tide if you will on as kind of everybody gets a little faster as ai becomes normal or or do you see a deeper edge to that so a great question. I think again it depends. It's actually a question about industries like where which industries are more ripe for exploitation station of efficiency gains I as in the publishing industry and there. That is a space that actually could use a lot more In terms of you you know analytics and data and even at the basic level not even using artificial intelligence The people who are thinking about using AI for recommendations but there's still a lot more in terms of the marketing of books or algorithms around you know independent bookstore like independent bookstores are doing books in the hands of a buyers. I saw that I think when you look at an industry like that that has traditionally not had a lot of technology. Ai An in some ways. Like actually Sean Technology in a on January one that there could be a place to hack but but on the Hansman challenging. Because there's a reason why independent booksellers have intuition around putting books directly into people's hands and I think that's really hard to replicate an algorithm. Okay cool so books. The book selling world as one potential example. I know you had another her in mind here. Abigail what's another maybe interesting. One where those efficiencies could really matter competitively right so I don't know if we categorize this exactly efficiencies concedes but translations for example we've been doing translation work for a long time again without a I but it's getting better and better and better and so when you think when you take each so these areas of development and project them out and think about like okay what could be the ramifications translations were as good as translation than you can scale up a global workforce sweep. You can hire people in other countries. Could be almost seamless in terms of working with them and reduces friction between cross culture indications. And you can hire you know anywhere that there's an inexpensive workforce or the right skill. Set that you're looking for so I think it's really exciting to think about like. How do we had we imagined on the road? Take take that existing technology now and scaling back like what what would look like if they were perfected as they will be at some point. Yeah what and I think. We're seeing already so so much of that translation space Being kind of conquered by a I we're also seeing all those translation companies with their crowdsource workforce's forces being now used in marshaled in ways that are you know labeling data sets right not just translating documents now these big distributed workforce's people that understand multiple. The languages can be used to do all kinds of other stuff to help to train. Ai Systems out. I guess I'll run an idea by we talk about translation you mentioned efficiencies you mentioned recommendations When when we talked to VC's a couple of years ago we did a big series in the bay area? Talking to folks at Floodgate Excel and a whole bunch of the big firms one of the big takeaways takeaways. And and you may or may not resonate with this was that it kind of feels like the mot- the genuine kind of competitive advantage of is in sort of really dominating eminating data in a relatively maybe starting with a narrow space to the point whereby you have so much of that kind of data on that Jeff. It's really your product improve really quickly and it's really difficult for people to use a product isn't yours because of how much better it is and in so doing you're going to collect more data because you have more users and you can just spin that flywheel until you pull an Amazon or Google and of course. It doesn't have to be that big. You could do that in. Let's say you know h VAC equipment if you could implant plant I o T in HVAC equipment in office buildings and you could kind of data dominate You Know Electric efficiencies with an office building that could be like a you know a mini super supernote with regards to AI. We've heard it articulated that that kind of like real pulling ahead in terms of data collection very niche beginning with niche areas is kind at the beginning of a genuine moat as opposed to okay. Everybody's a little more efficient. I don't know if I haven't advantage or not What's your take on that? So that's a really interesting idea. I certainly have you know we talk a lot about the impact of data and financial services. There is no way a human trader can compete with. Hey I and all the financial data that has access to and processing that healthcare is another big space where again having processing the data. There is a huge huge advantage and an individual mom-and-pop shops are not going to end in jail. Dr Zuhdi these practices are not going to be able to compete But so interesting. You're talking about an idea that efficiency being scaled up so much that no one else can can. How trade efficiency are or the functioning of the product right? So I don't know Amazon is on Amazon. I'm sure is is more efficient but but it's also just better recommendations right my user experience better. So let's say the efficiencies weren't improved. They've we've seen so many buyers like me that they know exactly what my checkout flow should look like what my up social be my email follow up campaign should be and they're going to make more money and satisfy my needs better just from user experience or not even necessarily efficiencies I guess that's the the VC's dream I just to clarify so those cases in the PC world. I think what you find find is if you have first mover advantage and there's a natural marketplace. Then you know then you become an Amazon or a lift And you could create a marketplace. It's not I don't think that there's so. Many I see so many technologies like duplicate of across startup companies. That are all pretty good. And I don't know that there's going to be one technology ahead of everyone else but being able to move faster out execute your competitors is probably worth kee than actually having the perfect technology. Yeah Yeah I think it's it's unlike most folks are not gonNa pull an Amazon. That's for sure. Even within their specific on niche maybe in talking about you know you've mentioned a few times Abigail. I think it's a great point. That a lot of this really depends on what sector you're in What what kind of industry what? The business dynamics are what the norms are there with customers. One I imagine a lot of our listeners who might be thinking of themselves. Geez you know when I look at my own business and I try to think about which of these applications You know might provide a competitive advantage on the one hand. Sometimes these people just need a low hanging fruit application to Kinda get used to what looks like an enterprise to Kinda get their bearings about how this stuff stuff works because it's so different but maybe at some point they have all a bit beyond that and they get to the point where they sick man where can actually pull us ahead. If you're you're going to go through a thought experiment with business folks about that if their brains during that topic where would you guide them so i. I think it's going to depend on again. A new set of tunes depends on what industry or the size of the business. I think you know. Obviously a lot of the tech companies in Silicon Valley are already thinking pretty hard about this but it. We're talking when you buy a new a company. That's not that familiar with some ways. I think it's great to get educated about what's going on in the field. They should be familiar with You know if especially their data heavy company that they're bringing someone who can consult on like what is what are ways to potentially export your data for money or exploited for efficiency agency gains but also being aware of like what are the applications of AI. Actually feel like that's an easier transition like what does it mean to use Google home as part of something like a smart chat lot in as part of your business and not necessarily have to go to the fundamentals of Ai but thinking ahead to the next step so robotics like a you know. There's advances were Opening I has a hand. That can solve a Rubik's cube. So what does that mean you know can you. Can you adopt this company. Natural Angelina J- processing with God. That's huge can. How can we make more efficiency gains in your customer service or in many processing documents that you're using he was D- right now? So I think maybe focusing more at the application level and less on the technology would probably be easier entry point for or like companies. That are just not familiar with with a and what's going on in space in. I guess that Kinda leads us into our next question which is a more of a kind of foundational question which just how business leaders can set themselves up to have a competitive advantage with with a into the future again. We're very much kind of against the Hammer looking in for a nail philosophy. I think we've would never tout the prevalence of the idea that we should run around looking for places to plug in. Ai because because that's cool but if we can find a fit if it's the right technology to gain an edge in certain critical initiatives. That's that's important but of course enabling I as I'm sure you've seen plenty of you're working involves kind of a lot of ground level work. A lot of you had mentioned educating yourself so getting leaders up to speed. It involves improving data infrastructure. It involves a lot of different things that enterprises are even mid sized companies. Aren't yet used to if you think about what leaders should be doing now if they want to be able to take advantage of. Ai As as it matures and as they mature what some of those foundational things That might not involve rushing into. I but would help them set. Be Set up for success later on so so I think that the role of the chief data officer is growing. So I think that's one thing to consider like with my company benefit from chief data officer somebody who's really committed to thinking about Exploiting the data and maybe there sorry person existing your company who can take on that role or remaining hire an outside consultant to take a good hard. Look at what you have going on I think thinking about examples of the past is not even a competitive advantage. Kapiti wiped out Britannica Encyclopedia. Britannica right. So are you an industry that potentially attention could face some similar threat and you know we compete is application of the Internet. It's not it's not actually next-gen so that's kind of an me when I think about like the applications that are coming out. I think it's worth delving in you know thinking about where is going and decision making and Strategy Game Theory So for example Google deep mine and opening I have both You know solve world world champion Chess Games go off ago there's a Otani I has skull open five or and and they've actually be a team of five five and five but due to so these are very complicated strategy games involving real time interaction action and a lot of these problems. They're solving are actually more complicated than a lot of the business challenges in the real world so if I were to point business leaders towards one area to think about I think it'd be around that decision making game theory like well how is your competitor going to better decision-making because of they eye end-date applications that they're using yes. We're GONNA brainstorming on from that strategic decision making level. Where can they I give us in? Edgeware might our competitors tab that and then also you had mentioned assessing data assets having somebody who can really mine and take account of and assess the health of the accessibility Ludi of our data assets to help bring some of those ideas to executive leadership and present them as as worthwhile ideas. I think for both of those. There's a really important title something you mentioned earlier on about kind of getting up to speed getting educated on this technology Data scientists obviously need to get educated on the industry sectors sector. They move into if you get a PhD AI from Carnegie Mellon. And you go into a you know. Auto parts manufacturing plant. It doesn't mean you understand autoparts Khameini facturing at all. You now have a learning curve when it comes to a person that's used to auto parts manufacturing Dana have a learning curve when it comes to what. Ai could do where I could be useful in terms of making that osmosis happen faster. which would you mentioned before in both these topics you just brought up? I think kind of hinge on that. What's the practical advice you know? Is it going to events is it. uh-huh studying higher level competitors What do you see? That's Kinda working for folks WHO WANNA get up to speed. I think it's a combination of both. I feel like conferences now unattached industry of their own. And they're really good conferences out there. Some are more one than others but I think finding conferences that are specifically industry focusing your areas areas is always a good one and maybe if you're trying to get up to speed you can go to more and more general and so I'm going to say next week. which is a fantastic research conference in the space and for me I I enjoy going to this one in particular because I get to see the breadth and the depth of of all the research? That's going on in the field but I don't think you know if you're running a supermarket you need to go to a conference like that but seek out the ones that are relevant to you I think self I think studying is great but again you know it's a there's a lot of really in writing that starting to be put out popular journals magazines so I think at that level that's probably finally Forbes obviously fortune they put out really great material in your podcast is fantastic. I bought a lot of really great raping cures here. I do think it's hard to get this information From a lot of it is is changing changing very rapidly so it is in real time conversation like your like your podcast and publicly Murphy Publications. I think with time time. Ai Books come come out. Like they're obviously very many good ones out there. A one of its new dawn. So that's something to be aware of certainly and and I think you know it's it's challenging. His you had mentioned to stay ahead of that. You know science also I would imagine most folks in the functional business leader category might not go to a they used to call it nips. I don't know what it is now. You know they're they're not going to care about that kind of stuff They're GONNA be interested a little bit more kind of sector specific things but I think you bring bring up a good point that maybe being able to find digital channels that are reliable consistent You know educate you from a business perspective be relevant to your sector could be a nice place to start as well I guess the two nutshell your your point on setting this foundation just to see if there's anything else you want to add as we wrap up here And one of them was to sort of assess where might data where might. Ai enabled us to make better decisions to move faster to to to Yes dear the business more effectively given our data given what I can do and maybe what could be doing for our competitors and how can we sort of compete with them. That was one point. A second one was kind of that taking account of data and having somebody accountable for that job on any other kind of last points. If you think about folks tuned in who are really saying what can I do to set myself up to to win with. When I'm ready anything else you WANNA throw in there before we wrap up so I would say I would? I would reiterate the point that decision making strategy getting. I'm good advice in that space. especially if you know more that can be market. Strategy can be go to market strategies in product strategies. Like all that I think could be very powerful. And you WanNa let me show that. Your competitors aren't aren't maneuvering in that sense I think the key areas to think about other areas that are really hot right now and potentially ripe so natural natural language processing vision recognition reinforcement learning robotics And then the Game Theory. I think all this these are the key areas says that are are kind of at the leading edge and the more you know about the more you'll be able to think about make those connections about how they can apply to your business cool so I I like this Kinda last point here. It sounds like what you're saying. Is the areas where. Ai Is really has traction now where there's real teeth where these applications are developing quickly those kind of capabilities tune into those tune into what's moving quick Because that might be what helps you kind of stay out of the pack right so maybe not even so much as quickly They're further along right. They've they've advanced. What's in their space? Yeah they're more established capabilities that have use cases. It seem more plausible so why not begin there. Because that's maybe where you'd find the plausible advantage right right and you know I say point to your attention especially to what is what is the power of deep learning on your data scientists chief data officer to think about So for example we'll google mind has a A product that they were able to solve the protein folding problem. There there. Sorry let me let me start over. On the Sun Tzu people deep mind as a product Alpha fold and there have been very close to solving the protein protein folding problem. That's a research problem. That's been around for forty years and their program was able to solve thing predict accurately predict the protein structure. Take on a sequence of amino acids or something like twenty three out of forty five Compared to like human competitors which are only able to predict three so in this case it that'd be a case of Santa And and so does the kind of thing. I think it's important to be thinking about that for your industry like okay. Who are the big in? Clair's moving in a developments in the space could potentially impact liability cool so thought experiments for those of you who are tuned in Abigail Abigail. Thank you so much for being able to share your ideas here on a in industry folks. Thanks for having me appreciate it. So that's all for this episode of AI and Industry again if you're interested in applying any the AI approaches that Abigail talks about in this episode. Be sure to go to emerge DOT COM. That's your J. dot com slash beef. EEG One for beginning with Free PDF report about an eight nine page report on essentially what it takes to get started with NLP with machine learning with actually seeing real traction in the business environment armant with those technologies emerge dot com slash. Biji one next Tuesday. We're going to be speaking with someone else who is a at a very large company the CBS in fact I was never interviewed anybody from this domain but the media world has a lot of interesting. Ai Applications you're GONNA WANNA stay tuned in as we died. I been next Tuesday. So I'll look forward to continuing our theme on the competitive advantage of AI. You're on I in industry.

AI Abigail Abigail Google Ai Amazon NLP officer Abigail King Gela Francisco Ai. E. N. E. R. J. Sean Technology Columbia University of law sch Palo Alto Carnegie Mellon Floodgate Excel
Sex Talk With My Mom: Cougars, Confidence & Grieving The Loss of a Spouse

Sex with Dr. Jess

42:42 min | 1 year ago

Sex Talk With My Mom: Cougars, Confidence & Grieving The Loss of a Spouse

"You're listening to the sacs with Dr Jess, podcast sacks, and relationship advice you can use tonight. Welcome to the sex, with Dr, Jeff Podcast I'm your co host Brandon wear here with my lovely other half. Dr Jess, how you doing good. Let's see how lovely. When's the last time you talked about sex with your mom? Nineteen Ninety Four Sixteen Probably what did they talk about? I've said this before it was a one liner don't come home with a kid. And I also went to a Catholic school even though I'm not Catholic and we've learned about the rhythm method. And abstinence what did you learn about the rhythm method? I don't remember very much which is scary and they just said I mean especially time. To your partners or you know the the person with whom you having sex time there period which essentially. Kind of erodes away any sort of hookup culture or anything like that also. Requires. Quite a bit of communication to understand your partners period. I just wanted somebody to touch my junk. Did you get that no I mean if I count myself. Yeah. All the time but you're pretty good at it. Right? I was I thought I was excellent. So What if your mom came on the podcast you think she talked sex with us I think she would what would it be like? What would we talk about? I want to say that it would be awkward but I don't know how awkward it would be and I don't know what we would talk. We talk about our sex life. We certainly wouldn't talk about her sex life. Now that wouldn't be fair. Yeah I mean? I. Don't know how open my mom would be about having this conversation about what she hasn't hasn't done. Well, the reason I bring it up today we're going to be talking to the host of a podcast mom and son team their podcast. It's it does very well, it's called sex talk with my mom. So you're going to get to talk to mom about sex just not your mom about sex and not my mother. I'm cool. The one day as she get my mum on the PODCAST Lot's Giggling, she would giggle a lot a lot and then she'd talk and talk and talk and talk. We wouldn't give her headsets then she wouldn't be able to hear, right. Before. They join US I want to say thank you to. Let's get checked dot com. You can check them out for at home testing for a range of options from vitamins to thyroid to iron to Cortisol to Sti Test Ovarian Reserve tests. All of these tests you can do at home including testosterone has they mail you the package you send back the sample and you check online. So it's let's get checked dot Com please use code Dr Jess D. R. J. E. S. S. at checkout. Now let's dive in to the topic at hand sex. Talk with my mom, we are joined by Karen Lee, and Cam. Canley Hosa show called Karen Lee. Love. It's all about dating sex and cougars, and she created the show after becoming a widow and re entering the singles world. She has also written two books. One is a cougars guide to getting your ass back out there and the other is fuck games, date cougars but the you is a little asterix in case anyone's looking forward and her son is a Chicago Brad E. Base Comedian Cam has appeared on America's got talent, Silicon Valley and modern. Family. To catch up on those episodes I've got to go look for his his role there. He actually graduated from Stanford and then he went to clown school which I wish I had done very cool and then ended up starting this podcast with his mom about sex Karen Lee and Cam are joining us now from afar and were were so fascinated and inspired by your story because they can't possibly be easy to have a sex talk with your mom twice a week. So you have to tell us how you both got started. Yeah. I don't know why nude would want to do this actually. Honestly. Know, it actually brought us much closer. It has led to some crazy experiences, but it is not a very traditional path that we've taken. Since the path has been taken, we have found that there are a lot of followers. That want to take the same path with us which is great. That is true. So we we get into you like why the hell we're doing. I mean we were always very open Talking about. Anything personal it came up growing up. The actually start with like private talks that you would have with my sister and I'd be like I want to get in on that. and. Then, eventually cans WanNa talk late at night. That's what they wanNA talk tonight and. Mike Eleven o'clock, I'm a night owl so it worked out perfectly. and. Then eventually, my friends got got in on this and they would go to her for like any relationship advice or just to tell her funny stories. So, we had a very open dialogue and then when I was seventeen. My Dad was murdered which kind of flipped our lives upside down. and. That it was it was a moment when we really had to make a decision whether this is going to pull us together not or or whether this is going to be something we can deal with and. Kind of shirk away from on her own. Some decided to do together. Was a pretty immediate choice. You, want to take it from here. Mom. Okay. So I'm about six months later as you might have guessed, I got really horny because I hadn't had sex in a while and I'm just lightning this up here Jessica. I love it. I love it. All right anyway So. What happened was I started dating again and I thought well, you know what? I need some help need I looked on Youtube. I couldn't find anything out there. That would help like forty something year old women. who wanted to enter the dating world again and so. I decided well, you know if you can't beat them join them, I'll just go ahead and start my own youtube channel. So I decided to start a youtube channel. Four women who wanted to get there s back out there again. Either they're divorced or day era widow like myself, and so I got very little response. Say I don't even know what that point women in their forties and fifties at knew how to work youtube. Desire to work youtube anyway at turned out there mostly eighteen to thirty, five year old horn guys that were loving what I was talking about and wanting to. So I started leaning into that and interviewed Porn Stars in sexologists like yourself and and it became a pretty big sensation. So I decided well, I still want to help those women I wrote a book. and. I redefined the word Cougar to be a confident older unique, genuine, assertive, and racy woman, and I wrote a book called a guy to getting your aspect out there. So, here's where Cam comes into the picture again. Yeah. So This is obviously very traditional upbringing and. I didn't really know how to deal with all this awkwardness. So I was doing stand up at the time and I was like, why? Why don't I just start incorporating this into my act and I at first like one joke related to my mom having this. You know sex dating cougar. Youtube Channel, and then eventually it became the whole act. And I was like, okay, there's something here we should just collaborate. Since we're talking about the same stuff at this point and we made this podcast five years ago called sex talk with my mom, and then it became like a twice weekly show. And where we our goal now is to just open these conversations around sex and anything you typically wouldn't talk about the parent. Mainly because we know what it's like when you lose a parent, you miss out on you. It really puts everything in perspective about. How there's no reason to live with with such shame when you live such a short period of time, you know talking about it you can really except parts of yourself that you you might shy away from. And you learn all you must. Better. You must understand one another so much more deeply and with so much more vulnerability because you're talking about a topic that is often. Off Limits. So how how did you get over the discomfort? Of speaking with one another and how other people learn from that. I mean it started simple. We started with like masturbation. And then There was awkward to talk about it. I felt my whole body resisting talking about it. And then slowly became like that became comfortable and there was a new. Level of There was a new boundary created maybe anal and we're like we're never going to talk about anal. And then we talked about eight. Here we are now. We don't just talk. Sax. It's not. It's. It's everything that is to boo everything that you normally wouldn't talk about with a family member and the more you do the closer you become it's difficult but and it's awkward but we found that it really helps. Our relationship but the rest of our families relationships. So I, I have an older. Daughter and a younger son. And more all extremely close I'm very comfortable talking about any issue because I think in part of this podcast. Well, and I think you know having uncomfortable conversations shows you that if you have an uncomfortable conversation, you will survive the relationship will survive I. Think oftentimes, we avoid it because we're afraid of a consequence. The negative consequence that they that we fear his is so irrational. So when you talk about, you know speaking about other topics, you talk about you know sensitive approaches. So Cam I was reading that you know you're not into hookup culture and so I think that when people hear, Oh, I host a podcast on sex with my mom and we talk about anal and we talk about master. Clock with my mom. A lot of be sex talk with my mom and I'm like, no, it's not sex with my mom at sex talk with mom. Sex. Talk with my mom that's a whole other topic sex but that's not what you're doing. You're just doing the talk, but you know you say you're not into hookup culture a difficult as a young man to bring more sensitivity to dating and sex and has this conversation help to help you to find you know your own sexual values. I think it has I mean. I've always thought of myself an anomaly because I would compare myself to friends in college who are just like. Fucking for sport basically whoever you know whoever they could possibly have sex with they'll do and and I was always like this feels. So fucking weird because emotions get involved and their emotions are involved inevitably it's like hurting people I mean I was really confused by it. Honestly I still am confused by it. and. I think that having these conversations like with or five years like interviewing people like every week we interview one guest in just hearing where they're coming from in the type of sex they're enjoying or the relationships they're engaging. It gives me a perspective that I might not be the strangest person out there that I'm not just the ugly duckling. Now, we found that a lot of people relate to cam who who initially thought they were going to relate to me, and then we're actually switched to they relate to camp. That's a really I think that's a really beautiful outcome because it shows that we're so multi-dimensional right now I can have all the demographics in common with one of you but my my approach emotionally might be like the person who I'm far different from an e Cam when you talk about emotions and sex my approach is that no human interaction none whether. You're walking down the street and passing somebody or driving in the car, and you're trying to cut them off or having sex. No human experience is devoid of emotion. Now, that doesn't mean that we have to always tie sex to love and romance and long term commitment. But there, there are always emotions involved in a mole is worried that in hookup culture which by. The way I fully support, of course, people should be allowed to just hookup casually but even within casual sex emotions are involved. You know it's the reason I was talking about ordering a coffee and if you go order a coffee and the Baristas route to you, you have an emotional reaction, right? No Matt, and if they're really kind to you, you have an. Emotional reaction and so sex. Of course, any interaction with another person can't be without emotion. So how have you tapped into your emotions? Have you found way to better express your feelings as a young man who is often prescribed emotional I don't WanNa say ineptitude but emotional almost like a blank slate you're not supposed to feel so much. How have you found your language? I Yeah I mean I pick the PODCAST has definitely helped in that way like. I'm able to talk about uncomfortable things that my mom. I could definitely have an uncomfortable discussion with someone I'm dating like I just told someone very recently like it was our first or second date, and that was like it really scares me to date you. In for a variety of reasons, but you know I it is there's a if there's A. Like a disparity between what like my penis wants in what my my brain is telling me like. I really want to have sex with this person but at the same time I, don't know if we're going to be a long term relationship, it could really create attention there. I think I'm more comfortable saying that now than I ever been, but it's still a scary conversation tell someone. That's a really powerful statement to say you know this scares me I think that North Americans in particular don't like to. Admit Vulnerability. We feign vulnerability in a Lotta ways in many ways, but we don't really say like this is really scary for me. How do people that you're dating respond when they find out that you host? podcast with your mom when you talk about sex and your relationships knowing that you know, is there the concern that this is going to be the the subject never future podcasts? They're probably like, Oh, you gotta take me home to meet Mama. They WanNa meet her. So badly, this has been like an issue There's a lot of there's a lot of interconnectedness to that. Yeah, it is a really tricky situation. In You know I tried so many different approaches to this I've I've tried you know just talking about my perspective and trying to leave them out as much as possible inevitably. Sharing about something intimate that I you know. I wasn't comfortable with. Like, okay. What if I tell you about all everything we're GonNa talk about on the show and like okay you could do that. Then I do that and they're like Yo lead to. Way More challenging conversations sometimes for the better sometimes, it would lead to conversations that open things up. But AMC getting to the point now where it's like, it's just not worth it. If like talk about a relationship, you had a year ago just leave everything current out of it just because. Inevitably. Affects the relationship at hand. which I don't really want. And are people intimidated by the fact that you that you are talking about sex with your mom like are they? I don't know do they get intimidated by the notion that maybe you have a closer more vulnerable relationship with one another then you might have with them. I think that might be that definitely might be true. But I don't think they're comfortable sharing that with me. Yeah. The vulnerability piece of having to say they feel insecure and then there's the. There's also the western notion that you knew the person with whom you're in an intimate relationship that has to be the closest, and that's certainly not the case for many people I hear so many people especially straight girls will say that a straight women will say, Oh, you know I wish I could marry my best friend meaning they feel closer and more emotionally connected to their best friend with whom they have a platonic or non sexual relationship but there's nothing wrong with that. You know people fulfill one another's needs in different ways and that's why I'm so. You know And really admire the way the two of you will talk and and be close and not be threatened by breaking taboos because this is a real this. Yeah. This is such a taboo and like you said people saying sex with my mom or you know people do the same thing with me they just say sex with just and you know. And and I get it that they're just people are uncomfortable with sex. So they have to make jokes about Saxon and that's fine. I. Mean you're a comedian. So hopefully you're you're good at making. Jokes about sex and anchoring lease. So you are you self identify as a cougar. I do because I when I became single I was trying to figure out like not that I needed a label but I people would say, are you a melts? You know what? What what's going on here and I'm like you know I would like to identify with something but I the only thing I can think of is the word Cougar if I was going to have to choose one minute sounded like a mature woman is like a hat ma'am it just nothing really like rang true. So I Use. That term and use the Acronym and just said. Would define myself as a competent. It's basically a confident woman. With experience and it just the phenomenon of younger men like being so attracted to older women is fascinating to me. I was I was I mean I? I became newly single forty eight something like that and Nine Times out of ten, the guys walking up to my table at a bar would be when we can walk up to people bar Younger, guys I was like, wow they got some Paul's walking up to me. You know that takes a lot of nerve. Right and there there's a big appeal I mean you've probably seen the data about milk porn and how commonly searched and. I've actually talked to some some porn actors who have said that they they don't even like the term myself not because they don't embrace it but because it just sucks for women after a certain age automatically considered a mom so you're either virgin or the horror but. Some of the desire from porn isn't necessarily about mothering. It's really about the ability to nurture or sexual mastery. Or some expectation of dominance and teaching. So there are all these different layers to it. Yeah. Now is that something that you WanNa take on? Is that too much pressure. So if you have experienced with large age gap relationships with a young person, a younger date, you might feel like it could be fun to teach them but is there a point at which it becomes burdensome? While for one thing I am living with a man, I'm younger considerably younger than me and we've been very committed monogamous relationship for twelve years. So I I don't. Date younger guys anymore in terms of new new younger guys and for another thing. I did just complete and and published a book called Fuck Games, day cougars, which you know is a compiler of all like texts or comments and questions and answers over the years of doing this Youtube Channel for young and all the other social platforms obviously for younger guys that are checked older women and vice versa. and. The viability of a relationship like mine you know I. It's possible and there's plenty of people out there doing it. And do you think there are lessons to be learned? You know when you say Fuck Games, date cougars do you think older older daters are older people and listen I use that term huge amount of subjectivity. Some people to some people I'm much older data to other people you much younger person Do you think there's something to be learned? Are Folks who are older more honest? Are they less likely to play games? I would love to see people of all ages embracing this and not playing gas the one hundred percent that is the main. That's why I called Fuck Games. It's. F Star ck just in case anyone wants to find it on Amazon a little plug for the book but I think that there's such a huge attraction to that aspect of the the no nonsense no-hold-bars no game playing I mean relative related I'm sure there's some game plan but for the most part, the the comments are all over the years like where can I find this older woman because it's so attractive to have someone who doesn't play games as a straight shooter who they can learn from you know notches sexually but and like you said and also nurture. On that person as well there's a lot of benefits and it over the years I've gotten so many thousands I mean. Thousands of people. On Youtube Channel because of that attraction all over the world and so cam, what have you learned most from from your mother Hack good question. She's like get your list out. I I was just thinking about the other day. She so I grew. This year I've grown the most. Not with regard to my sex life in talking with my mom but actually with regard to running a business with my mom. In. One of the things that she's taught me in that way is that. Just don't be scared to. Ask for exactly what you want. So often will have an idea of like, oh this is an interesting way to improve the podcast. Maybe we can get that guest, and then I'll see my initial reaction is now they're never gonna WanNa do this or that person way we can't do that that it would be inappropriate and she'd be like on just do it. You, have to lose. Is. Like that mentality is something that I'm hoping to. Emulate in my life to. The nth degree and currently have you always been of that mindset. So you know I'm like you Cam a little bit hesitant I'm definitely a people pleaser. Embracing the fear of rejection currently is this something that you've grown into because I do think so many women are taught to. Make, other people happy and you know maybe that makes us take fewer risks. So is this party personality or is this something that you've learned over time? I would say initially in that, of course, is in my book as well. I was very introverted and shy, and I wouldn't let like my my parents used to talk about how I let the kids on the playground take my San Pale away from I kind of like A. Girl I don't know when this transformation happened but I I would say happened maybe when I went to college and I went during. The. Late seventies and it was kind of a free for all sexually and became much more confident my sexuality then. I. I ended up marrying my college sweetheart We had an incredibly strong communicative relationship for twenty four years. So I. Really I felt like I felt really good about myself and and luckily I was never put in a position where I didn't feel good about myself. And I think it Kinda like I got the nickname of of a bulldog basically, but I follow I follow. You know other people that. Have a similar mindset. The five second rule by Mel Robbins. Five seconds before your brain tells you not to make that decision and. I follow it. I just let it literally like five, four, three, two on walk up to that person and talk to them. Don't be shy. It's you're gonNA miss every shot you don't take. My philosophy is pretty pretty strong about just being That being the person that I said people should try to emulate the positive strong. You know independent woman that unfortunately a lot of women are taught opposite and I wanna I want retrain their brain. Yeah. I'm I'm working on that now you mentioned that you married. The love of your life and This project much of your work was born out of that grief. Do you have any thoughts for folks who are dealing with grief in terms of building relationships finding yourself on maintaining relationships? You've done it in a very creative way creating project together as mother and son, but you have other kids with whom you don't have these type of projects. So you probably have some general advice on you know moving through grief. Moving to grieve as tough. There's no question about it and grief doesn't go winner Linda linearly It's not a straight line up to the you know comfort level that you want to be. It's going to be like a roller coaster. And I would say just make sure to take care of yourself Pamper Yourself Don't accept any shit from anybody don't settle. You don't need to have a boyfriend. You don't to have a girlfriend you you. You can just be who you WANNA be. Take it, take it slow and just be just follow your gut. I'm a big believer. If there's a billboard out there I would write follow your gut on that billboard. Just I think that you're GONNA learn so much more from your mistakes than from your successes and I think it's important to just really believe in yourself and don't take any shit from anybody. And just take the risks I mean life is short. I. Love It I. Love It. Now, you obviously started this podcast also to help people and so what parting words of you know advice or insight would you offer based on all of the learnings because you know having interviewed hundreds of people over the last five years you've you must have learned so much about sex and relationships that you didn't begin with. So what would you leave folks with to kind of shift the way they think or behave with regard to relationships either apparent child or intimate relationships? Communication Communication Communication. It's all I can say, don't be scared to speak up you know listen to that voice inside and communicate and listen. There's the thought that would be my well. I mean cam interested to see what your take is but I think this is what we've learned from so many. Like you said so many interviews learning from. Like Yourself, Jessica and. I don't know if you don't you don't listen to your inner gotten you'll let people walk all over you. You're going to be a doormat. So just communicate. Yeah. I. I definitely. Agree with that it sometimes I like to think of like. You know the outcome in which you don't share what you're currently feeling, and you just kind of suppress it. That sometimes can help me make take the risk because. It's either like it's going to manifest in the future in a way that is way less controllable and pleasant. It in then you put yourself in their shoes and you're like, okay. Would if I were in their shoes, someone with doesn't want to be with me or they you know they have something challenging to tell me. I'd rather they just tell me and as opposed to like muscled their way through hanging out with me or something like that. I took the negative approach but like. Basically. You know. It's way better just to say what's on your mind and inside of you that just holding vacuum and that usually can lead to good things. It's all really insightful and I I think it's applicable. Mike questions a little later. was there an episode going back through all your podcasts that really went into direction that both of you were like Whoa you know what I mean if people were going to go back and listen to one wizard one that you both were like. Wow generally mean in any direction. There's a lot of. Wow. was. was there one that stands out the most for each of you? Man. Yes okay. I'll go first. This, happen pretty early on. A. Phone sex operator on the show out. Meals. Are you. He is. So I she mentioned Dur- The interview it was going along really well, she's tells about her life but how she got into the whole thing and she mentioned that when she's pod kiss. She tends to have an orgasm. In so we're getting toward the end of the podcast. and. There was no orches-. By the way we weren't in the same. Separate locations. Right. It was actually very similar to this where I was able to see my mom but I couldn't see her because she wanted to remain anonymous. So I I mentioned that you know what's going on with orgasm. and. She's like Oh you wanNA. Hear me orgasm and it was like sure it's so she came on the show and it was so intense in. I was just looking at my mom. By far the most awkward. Thing you can do. It was really paying. uncomfortable. For a while too it wasn't just like it was not faked either there was definitely some. Squeaking and Oh my God it was. It was what? I love that and I think that's an Kerley. You want to add a different episode Oh yeah. Well, we'd had a million There's been incredible comedian so we will after I asked us off and we we play a game called Maradona. Wait let's say game call. Mom Doda? Don't ask that we only play it every week and I can't remember it. Well we pick out. Questions normally. A mother would never ask their kid. So we've interviewed some unbelievable comedians and have come up with these craziest stories but thing that I guess if I would recommend one right now and it is a crazy one we would I'm sure you've heard of this it's a do it. Yourself Kit called Clone Willie Yeah, will you make it a replica silicone replica, cover your penis or your vulva. And So we sent a kit I was boyfriend and Cam was living with his brother. And We decided to each record, our own versions, of us, making these kits, and then we'll come together. Right, we we had to do it by certain deadline because they were sponsoring us and we were recording ads for them, and we had to test it out before recording the ED. And I did not have someone to test it out with so. I. I it's a two person job. It's just you and your brother. I had my brother there who's Dating thing in the kitchen is trying to get the bathroom. Asked him. Is this. What do you think of my size of my Dick and? used. To answer that question I mean it was I. Plead the fifth. It's lovely. It's lovely. It is such a hilarious episode because you hear myself and my boyfriend doing, which is also hilarious and then you hear calendars. flirty. Yeah and then you hear my brother just having to stay in the kitchen. Hold a permit. But anyway. That struck when you said is there one that made you uncomfortable yet hilariously funny. I would say that was that was definitely one of them. Go back and listen to those two for sure and we encourage everybody else to as well. So it's sex talk with my mom. I, took a quick peek. So you've got the phone sex operator with live orgasm that's episode Twenty and twenty two. So from your early archives and then folks can go from there to the clue once they know you a little bit better they can make it a family affair with the brother in the kitchen I picture him around. Right now anyway, I picture your brother around a cauldron sort of and there's like smoke coming out how? How old was he like twenty two claiming he was a young kid. I love it. I love it. So folks highly recommend you go check them out sex talk with mom as well as Karen Book Fuck Games date cougars, and from there you'll find all of their personal handles as well. I understand your comedian cam looking forward to getting to know more of your work and I really appreciate your time today folks. Much. U. S extremely insightful question Chaska. Really thank you on the show. Awesome. So next time we'll get me get the rest of the family here. Got Store. Stories I'm not sure they're going to want to be out of the. Story. All right. Thank you so much. This is such an important conversation among families and I wonder how much we leave out of potential connection because we leave out parts of ourselves we we feel we can't talk about our sex lives. Our relationships are the way we party the way we hang with our friends, and this is what the people with whom we oftentimes have the longest and most meaningful relationships. Our lives and and everyone that we speak to and what you've been saying for the longest time is communication opens so many doors and strengthens in law lot of instances strengthens and his so much to so much benefit to maybe we need to celebrate awkwardness maybe we need to. Just encourage more. Not Feigned but real awkward encounters because I sometimes get asked about Oh. How do you take the awkwardness out of the first date and I remind people awkwardness is the fun of it. But do you agree with that when people are on like if you're concerned about how people will think of you or like are you concerned about like different political views when it comes to to sex like I'm just thinking if I had a conversation with my parents about what you know I've done or we've done I, don't necessarily know how they would feel. But at the same time, I would feel better just getting it off not getting off my chest but you're talking about it. You feel good telling your parents about our sex life. I don't know that it would feel good. It wouldn't bother me this because this is who I am. This is what I've done, and if you want to know part of me is it's not that I don't care but this is this is how identify and. Rather. Know what you think because if I value this relationship I don't. Know that I want to be judged negatively you're not I mean to be fair. You're not really open about many things with your parents, but would you say that's accurate must be listening to this podcast? Yes well, it's interesting because I think about. Also the privilege. So we're a couple that we've been together a long time. We've got this really good relationship. So if we were to share with people like family that we've done things that seem edgy or that many people would be judged for or that might even be considered risky to some people because we've got this long term relationship and couples privilege I think we might get less judged. But let's say we were to break up then they turn to those subversive then they turn to those edgy experiences and say, well, they did this. But because we're together and we're probably GONNA stay together it's just let's hope so. I think we've got something really good or maybe they would turn the tables and blow our minds and be like with stuff they did. Club been there eighteen times been there sixteen Juno Steve I was there last Friday tell him I said, what's up Steve while I was just thinking about in this conversation how we can open up more sex positive conversations between parent and child and I do think it it is. It begins at a young age, but it's never too late and I think about some of the specific ways we can be more positive more open in our communication around sex, and some of them are very simple ways for example. Using the names of body parts and not trying to shroud them in shame and secrecy from a young age being more positive about our bodies and body image to begin with. Because when we're negative about our bodies, it can be. Really contagious for the young people in our lives you know if we treat our bodies with love and respect, they're more likely to as well and you know we can use less judgmental language around relationships. You know I think of someone. In our family. Okay. It was in your family and they said I remember them. On a slut and I was like, really it's just honestly it was a supermodel. So I don't even know how they know that she's a slut. But just the negative language reminds me that I'm not gonNA. Open up about things to you because I don't WanNa be judged in that way and we we do it we and you know if I think about parents, for example, talking about other people's relationships with judgment or in kind of. Remarks and how that affects your kids willingness to open up to you whether they're twelve years old or forty years old. And you know teaching young people about atonomy over their body and giving them permission to experience pleasure whatever that is right I even I think about food brandon. And York is that the statements? That's the whole thing but I think about you know my Mama was taught me to eat with the Queen. So they're from Jamaica they had the British influence Very Racist Lens over what is appropriate and what is inappropriate. But one thing is that you choose silently you chew with your mouth full and I was thinking what if we gave permission to people to just eat their food in a way that frigging feels good for them like how I eat a crab just gonNa say I hear you moaning when you think You like it could be crab, it could be a desert and you just like On they just give her a minute just she needs a minute and it doesn't matter where we are restaurant home friend's house the MON is coming. So mom I can eat with the clean, but sometimes, I don't want to eat with the queen. Maybe the Queen's that was honestly do you think the Queen's food? Is that good anyways? That's some blanchet. I'm I'm a British in. Yeah I'm. Like come on just put some garlic ginger in it, and then we can talk about your kitchen stuff. caramelized onions at least. So yeah I just think we need to give people more permission to experience pleasure and give our kids and our family members the space for that and I think those you know obviously cam and Karen Lear doing it on the next level and you know all the power to them. So I'm glad we had this conversation I. Think it's a reminder that I should have my mom on the podcast. We've heard your uncle big Mike. Go back and listen to that episode with Uncle Mike. He's been with my anti failure for it's got to be more than fifty years sixty years they were teenagers. Yeah and he's just amazing and he talks about what makes what makes it work for them and it wouldn't necessarily work for us. But it works for them. So no K plans go back and listen to Uncle Mike's podcast have my mom on the podcast in the future and we'll leave it at that. So folks if you're in the market for STI testing and you should be if you're sexually active if you want testosterone test thyroid tasks, a Lime Disease Test Omega three tests they've got them all on. Let's get checked I have unique. You are try L. G., C. DOT com slash Dr Jess that's tough. Just go to let's get checked dot com and use the code Dr Jess Dr J. E. S. S. to save at checkout. Interesting conversation. Brandon. If I bring my mom on the podcast would you bring your mom on the podcast? Sure seem podcasts. No I only have three Mike's. I'm sticking by that story I only have three months. That's it one. At a time folks thanks so much for listening. Please subscribe share hang out follow us on social media. I'm at sex with Dr Jefferson this guy is. Very, brandon why did you pull away? You know. I I like to follow you. I think you're you post some great stuff. It's his real estate profile profile, but still it's mostly topless l. fees. How I sell real. I wish it was. All right we're out. Have a great week folks. You're listening to the sex with. Dr podcast improve your sex life improve your life.

Youtube Cam Mike Eleven Dr Jess Karen Lee Brandon Dr Jess D. R. J. E. S. S. testosterone Jessica Mom Doda Chicago Catholic school Cortisol Jeff Uncle Mike Porn Stars WanNa AMC
#153 Robert Creighton

First Class Fatherhood

35:04 min | 2 years ago

#153 Robert Creighton

"Yeah. Lace? Welcome to first-class fatherhood. What do you hear what you say? Welcome everybody episode one fifty three of the podcast. I am happy as always to be here with you stopping by. This is your first time listening to podcast, please get over there and bang NAT subscribe button. You do not want to miss all the action. That's coming your way right here. I glass fatherhood. All right dads. I had a very special guest. You guys today? If you're a little bit confused by my introduction there that was of course, James Cagney who is my favorite actor of all time. And today, I have with me a first-class bother who portrayed Cagney on the stage in New York City. He co wrote and created Cagney the musical Robert Creighton is here with me, and he'll be joining me in just a minute. Robert currently performing in Disney's frozen on Broadway. So this is going to be a lot of fun, please stick around for the interview, I was introduced James Cagney at a very young age, my father who hadn't even he was fifty years old. He used to be a stand in for Eddie Fisher back in the day. And he's the reason why I love all the classic movies. I have already introduced Cagney. To my kids, and he was my favorite of all time. And for those of you who have maybe never heard of James Cagney. I would definitely recommend reading his autobiography Cagney by Cagney. It's a phenomenal book. He is known for being one of Hollywood's tough guys he played a gangster in so many pictures and just the way he fires a gun in the movie. He does it with such Nessim with such passion that it really it looks like he's trying to throw the bullets out of the gun. He's the best actor that I've ever seen. I love all the pictures did my favorite Cagney movie of all time is angels with thirty faces where he plays. Rocky sullivan. His most famous movie, I would say is Yankee doodle dandy where he plays Broadway legend, George m Cohen that usually airs every fourth of July. Some sure you've seen that or heard of it. At least I always get a chance to stop by and see Jimmy at the cemetery. He's buried in the same cemetery in New York as my parents, which is the gate of heaven cemetery. Whenever I go to see my mom and dad, I always swing by say a little prayer for Jimmy and his wife who were buried there. I also always go and say Hello to Babe Ruth whose buried in the same cemetery as well on a little side note there. But he was also born on the same day as my mother, which was July seventeenth. So there's a lot of connections there with Jimmy. He is definitely my favorite actor of all time. I am a huge fan of his. And he was just a street kid who took nothing from nobody. But he could dance like Fred Astaire. He was so talented. He could carry a tune with the best of them. So if you haven't ever heard of them, I highly recommend you check them out. So James Cagney has a very special place in my heart. And today's guest Robert Creighton is a very big Cagney fan as well. So this interview means a lot to me I could easily do an entire podcast here with Robert just discussing Cagney. But we're here to talk about fatherhood. So let's get to it and stay tuned. Because at the end of today's podcast, I'm going to be dropping a name of one of the bachelor's who's going to be joining me here next week in honor of next week's finale of the bachelor, I'm going to be having to bachelors on the show while one was actually the winner on the bachelorette. The other was on both bachelorette and became the bachelor. So while I'm going to drop one of those names at the conclusion of today's episode. Please stick around for the entirety of today's show. So keep it locked in you, dirty rats for the interview here with Robert Creighton, Allah glaze, and you're listening to first glance fatherhood. Two. Remember me to herald square. Tunnel again. He's second street. I assume. I cannot say thank you enough to all the listeners out there. You'll hear a word from my sponsors in the middle of today's interview if you'd like to help me make first class fatherhood, Ed free, please consider becoming a supporter of the podcast by hitting the link in the description of today's podcast episode. Right. And joining me now is a first-class father. You can see him performing in Disney's frozen on Broadway, which is currently playing at the Saint James theater in New York City. He also wrote and starred in the off Broadway production of tag, neither musical it is so cool for me to say Robert Creighton. Welcome to first glance fatherhood. Thanks to talk to you. Okay. Here we go. How many kids do you have? And how old are they? I got two kids. I got a seven year old boy R J Robert teams, creating the my dad's number one number two. He's number three and daughter. Samantha who's five? Okay. Very cool. One in one what type of sports are activities at into. Well, you know, I grew up in Canada. So I'm a big big hockey fan major hockey fan sort of a religious thing for us. And they're both skating at the moment, which is really fun. And they both loved that. My little girl does. Mastic twice a week started out a couple years ago, actually, and just, you know, dipping tow, but she's pretty good at it. So they invited her to come to this next level thing. So she goes for a couple of hours twice a week. And that and she's a ham like dad, so she's in a musical theater class to singing, dancing, and my son. He played quite a few different little sports soccer soccer programs a little T-ball program. But you know, what his big thing is art. He's visual he draws and create things and paint. And he's got a real gift that he did not get from my wife, or or me, he's really got something and we've been seeking opportunities for him to develop that, but artistic things are is Israel a passionate. The moment is pretty cool to watch. That's also now do you get in there and coach at all with the soccer teams or do you? Enjoy it more from the sideline why you know, what I haven't done. It yet. But I absolute look forward to that. Like that even before I had kids. I was something. I always thought I'm really going to enjoy and I will do that. As we go along. My what I do for a living is a wacky schedule. And so it's made a little challenging so far. But, but I I will figure that out as we go because I really want to okay, please, Robert take just a minute here to hit my listeners a little bit about your background. And what you do. So. Well, right now, I'm playing the bad guy in frozen on Broadway. Play the Duke of Wesson in the Disney's Broadway production frozen, which I'm having a lot of fun doing and primarily. I'm a stage actor this my eighth Broadway show and very fortunate to always what I dream to do the kids. So I get to make a living doing exactly what I moved to New York to do. So I'm really consciously grateful for that and done a bunch of episodes like TV stuff that shoots in. New York had a recurring part in the good fight CVS streaming show in the first season. And. Yeah. So I make my living as an actor. And right now when I say, my schedule as wacky are H shows week that we do, you know, six days eight h of the week. So it's a lot. And you and I have a connection we we when we were setting this up. I know you're big James Cagney fan. My big dream is an actor was to create a story about a musical about James Cagney. One of the great film legends of all time from the thirties and forties and fifties. And that was the before frozen. That was the last thing. I didn't New York we ran from fourteen months five hundred and two performances off Broadway in this James Cagney musical. And now we just announced Friday that were we go to Utah in the fall with an expanded cast instead of six and the cash there'll be at least twelve now, and we're planning to bring it back to New York to a Broadway theater in the next year. So very excited about that. Yeah. That would be amazing. Robert, I can't believe they have not made a major motion picture yet about him. So more on him and just a second year. When did father who committed a picture for you here? Robert and hadn't fatherhood change, your perspective on life. Yeah. You know, kids are. Seven fives. I said, and my wife, and I will have been married. Ten years later this year. I long before I became a dad. I mean, even as a teenager. I always knew I I have an son. And I always wanted name. Robert James, Creighton, the third, thankfully, my wife was amenable to that. Because that was something that I always had thought of and we started pretty early in our marriage, you know, wanting to have children a couple years, and then and then RJ came along. And I remember what I live in New Jersey on the cliff looking at the city, and my wife, and I went for a walk, and we said she we sat down a bench at one point looking just leading city glorious day. And she literally said she said, well, I'm about to make it more glorious. You're going to be a dad she said, it's just like that stood up. And it was like is are you telling me, and I was I was beyond excited. So that was my first moment of knowing I was going to be a dad, and then it, you know, it's a cliche to say changes everything. But it really does. I mean, especially as an actor, you know, always hustling and thinking about my career, and and me, and you know, it's a very sort of. I'm the product when you're an actor, you know. So it's it is by nature a. Too much focus on yourself and having a kid instantly shifts the priority instantly shifts, the perspective instantly shift, the focus, and for me also instantly. I was always motivated, but I'm definitely motivated now because I. I want to create a life for my kids that that they can have the opportunities that I had, you know, growing up to develop my towns and stuff like that. Which means I have to keep working and keep moving forward. So they can have that kind of life. So it's definitely motivational to yet. It really is something that's so hard to explain because fatherhood really needs to be experienced to be understood in. Appreciate it. Totally alley. And the other thing is I always say, it's the one thing that can never change in your life. Like once your father your father? I mean, you can you can get married and be a husband. But why people get divorced and then your husband anymore? You can be an actor. But you can you can that can change in a heartbeat. You know, everything else is temporary really when you will it down. But once you're a parent, you're once you're dead. You know, no matter what your relationship is like with your kid or what you're always a debt and. That's something that I love, you know, and I. It's been an amazing amazing journey now. It's so fun as they get to be five and seven and see what their passions are what they're interested in having conversations, you know, where their their their perspect- their perspective on the world starting to form. And and I love that part. I took my little girl yesterday for for Christmas. I gave them each three little I call him. Daddy, coupons and I made up so they get a daddy date for breakfast for an ice cream for nice cream date breakfast date, and then my son, and I both love movies. So he got he got a movie, and she got a Starbucks 'cause she thinks that's really fancy whenever she gets to go to Starbucks. So yesterday warning we went on our Starbucks date left, my son and my wife here. And and and I asked you what do you wanna be grow up when she said, I wanna be cooker. I said chef like show. She said, yeah, I want be shop. And and then she said I wanna. Puc restaurant food that fancy food. I wanna cook restaurant food and give it all the poor people in New York City. I was like. And you shouldn't said anything made my heart, happier. Because that was like, yeah. You're you're getting it, you know. And she's she's got a real perspective on the world, and we live in an apartment. Now. I said, what do you what do we get a house? What would be the three things that you'd like an house and she said dog for saying, which we don't have a backyard, and and then I coached her and said how about a pool she said. Yeah pool. So, but anyway, my point to that is now we're getting old enough to have these conversations and learn about their perspective on the world it's forming and and you're trying to in a way. You know, when I thought about being a dad to I always thought about, you know, helping them to mole to mold their mind and teach them the things that I believe are important in the world, those kind of things, and then really what you learn. As you go is there, of course, there is that. But also, they're they end up teaching you the things that you need to learn in your life. You know, like to increase your patience, and to, you know, be able to put their needs before your own, etc. Etc. And the teaching really goes both ways in in a very big way. Yeah. Well, said all right. I have to be honest with you here. The first time I saw the coming attraction for the movie frozen. I thought it was going to be a big flop. It turned out to be one of the highest grossing Disney movies of all time the highest grossing Disney movie, heist grossing animated movie of all time. Yeah. That's why I'm not a movie critic, what is it like for your kids? Robert. I mean, it's got to be exciting for the kids to have their father playing frozen. But how do they feel about you being the villain and have they seen the play? And do they give you any kind of criticism about your? Formats. Oh, that's funny. Yeah. They've seen it four times. We were we were out of town in Denver for a few months. Didn't the show and played it in Denver before we moved to Broadway, and actually my wife resigned from her job. She's a great job in advertising your resign that June. So she could come out. We didn't wanna be apart that long so they came out, and it was wonderful. They got to know the cast, and they came to the show several times out there. And then we got to New York they were there for the very first night the very first preview, and they and then they came on Father's Day last, June, which was great. So they've only seen it twice in New York. They wanna come all the time. But I said you can either you could come every night, and we live in a cardboard box, and, you know, eat Rama noodles or you can come once in a while. And we can actually have a home living 'cause we don't get caught for the show and Broadway expensive. But they yeah. They I think they. Love that. I'm in it. They're getting old enough. Now, where my son will say that you have to go to work tonight. Or, you know, sometimes you get a different jobs. You're not gone at night, you know, because I five nights a week. I'm not here putting them to bed. So I'm here Sunday and Monday nights, we have a Sunday matinee and my weekend is sort of Sunday night Monday. And then I go back toward Tuesday night, but side from that those moments they understand that. That's what I do enough my schedule, and we car about a lot of other time. But I think they love it. I'm in it. They they their friends at school some of them have seen it. And so the, you know, the moms get very excited about it and stuff like that. It's an they get they get a kick out of that. But yeah, they they would go every night. See if they could they they enjoy it. And I like taking them to the fear. Not when they're seeing the show, but just backstage and stuff and getting no actors are a lot of fun. So they. Run around occasionally to the dressing room and say hi to people stuff like that. And they that that's a really fun thing to be able to expose into. Yeah. So cool. Robert. All right. Many parents have kids out there who are aspiring actors what type of advice. Do you have in the parents of kids out there who are really trying to make it to the great white way? Yeah. It's do you know, it's a har-. It's not an easy road. Because it's like sports, you know. I mean, there's so many kids dream of being a professional athlete or professional actor on Broadway and very very small percentage. Get to make a living at it. So it's it is hard road. But if that's your passionate, that's what you really want. My advice would be to first of all building a big foundation of training. And I always say the wider and stronger, you build your foundation of training the higher you can build your career. So in other words, if you wanna be on Broadway. These days most people thing and dance and act. It used to be you could be great singer, not really dance, and you'd be okay, or you could be a great dancer and not really think so. Well, and you could still do good enough to answer you could still make it. But now there's the competition is such that you need to be good at all three. And you can't forget the acting part of it because that's what that's the basis for at all. But I would say your training wide. Make sure you're paying attention to all three of those elements, and then take every opportunity that comes your way. Whether it's a skit at school or getting up at your church and singing, or you know, community theater all those elements benefit this this foundation, you're building. So you're you can actually build a career on top of it. Yeah. Great advice. Robert. It's time to get an important word from our sponsors. And then right back with more from Robert Creighton, I'm out of lace, and you're listening to first-class fatherhood brand Louis when it comes to choosing a product that's better than the rest. There's only one label that matters to me. And it's brand Lewis. I don't wanna be wasting time sifting through the hundreds of brands at the big box stores only to pay a premium for disappointing quality brand this cuts out the middleman and delivers just what matters high quality products with pronounce ingredients all at simple, fair prices. And if you're a parent like, I am you're gonna love the premium diapers organic baby foods for your family pet. You got to check out the protein, I pet treats. Plus every time you check out at Brandis. They donate a meal to someone facing hunger to your partnership with Feeding America right now. I glance fatherhood listeners can receive free shipping on orders of forty eight dollars or more at Brandis go to brand list dot com forward slash listen and receive free shipping on orders of forty eight dollars or more don't waste a second longer. Go. Oh to brand list dot com forward slash listen and receive free shipping on orders of forty eight dollars or more. So you can enjoy the high quality products that you deserve today. Seek keep taking your kids in a bowl game is one of the greatest experiences in all of fatherhood. And now I class fatherhood has partnered with seatgeek, and you could save twenty dollars off your next ticket purchase by using the promo code first class. That's one word first class. Maybe you want to go to a Broadway show a concert Seekie has the best prices for a wide variety of events. It's a slam dunk deal dads get over to WWW dot seatgeek dot com and use the promo code I plans to get twenty dollars off your next ticket purchase seat dot com. All right. I know you're from Canada. Are there any aspects of growing up in Canada that you feel like your kids are missing out on by growing up here? I know it must seem silly to you that we just had a couple of inches of snow and they closed all the schools, but have the kids been to Canada. Do you still visit do you have family members there and everything's still? Yeah. They love going up there. I'm the youngest kid till they have a lot of aunts and uncles and cousins up there, which we enjoy and my dad my dad's small town family, doctor just retired at age eighty four last year believe it or not picky six years as a doctor up there. And they they uh they love going up there, and my wife is from buffalo. So as I said to her that was really good on the resume because we go visit her family, and then we drive to more hours up to see my. But. I'm getting them into our we'll say hockey was such a huge part of my life growing up. I mean, my first dream out was to be the goaltender for the Toronto Maple Leafs. That literally was what I wanted to do. But if you met me, I'm Cagney sized by six in other words, and so that dream really wasn't happening. Even though I was passionate about it. But I am I am excited that they're starting to get their skating now getting exposed to that. And I think that's a real life enhancer. They know a lot about Canada whenever they say the alphabet. They you know, when they were growing up. I would explain to them that. Well, yes, it see. But we also say said we have my daughter dicta distant snacks that you can only get in Canada. So everyone who knows me knows to bring those particular all dressed Christopher's, which you cannot get here. But that her my number one bribing tool for my daughter or older crisper. So they I keep them in supply here. They. Definitely know that they're both Canadian and American and I four years ago four years ago this month for years this month, I became a US citizen as well. So I'm a dual citizen now and. Yeah. And I would say I'm very I'm proud Canadian. Like, I I always say, I'm so grateful that I can live here. Because it's where my dreams were housed like I wanted to be on Broadway. I want to live in New York. So my dreams were here. And I'm grateful to be a part of this community and here where there's so much opportunity. But I am very proud of you Canadian in in. I like how they I like their place in the world as sort of a leader for inclusion and for diversity acceptance and all those things I really I'm proud of that part too. And and certainly when it comes to sports, you know, the Olympics unless unless basically I'm Canadian when it comes to sports so unless it's the NFL of a giants fan. But yeah, the kids are definitely growing up with a sense that they belong to both. They sometimes talk about. How the three of us are Canadian. Mommy doesn't get to be Canadian yet. But, but yeah, they know they know that they have both sides of it. Yeah. Awesome. And I definitely have to reach out to some of the NHL guys. I haven't done that yet. I gotta get some of them on the show here. And yeah, I've I've gotten to interact with a lot of hockey players through when I was working at Toronto one time. I ended up I got on this little circuit of hosting being like the MC for golf tournaments for celebrity golf tournament and hosted these NHL ter- and the guys were so much fun. I mean, just great guys. So you forget the hockey players on definitely all right? We are both huge fans of James Cagney. You, of course, Qorogh created and starred in a musical about him. He's my favorite actor of all time. What was the origin of you doing this play? And what was the reception? Like is there still a big market out? There of people who are interested in seeing the old time legends of the silver screen like James Cagney. Let me tell you something one thing. I didn't know it was my personal passion to create this show. I did not know how many fans are still out there. There are like five Cagney Facebook groups that are thriving and have people who are they've Tae of his movies and aficionados all the details of his life etcetera etcetera. So there are those people, and although it it's getting, you know, the timing is such that the people who are real fans of his are getting older what they pass it along to their kids. You know? But one of the things I learned about. In creating a biographical musical is that you have to tell a story that people who come to see even if they're not fans of the of Cagney himself. They can still relate to that story and being gauged with this man's journey. And I think we really succeed in that. That's something I'm really pleased with and proud because people come never heard of Cagney, and they get very emotionally involved with his journey to the world. And he was a guy who stuck up for the little guy. He believed injustice he supported causes that were. At the time. Like, he he donated money to help discuss a boys, which were a group of young African American men in can't remember where it was right now, but they got falsely accused of a crime and they needed defense and he paid for their defense. He supported the cotton pickers striking con pickers in the San Joaquin valley in there, you know, fight for their rights and things like that. He was the first vice president of the Screen Actors Guild when he was doing films at Warner Brothers still making four hundred bucks a week. But he's one of the biggest movie stars are making millions of dollars any lily walked out of the height of his career, and that's not fair and through a year long court battle he won came back with script approval and making real money and all those things so he he was a fighter for Justice. Then like bullies stood up to Warner. And when people come to the show one of the things I'm so excited. About bring it to Broadway now is because I this is the way of talking about cag-. Maybe I think all the best thing about the ideals of America sort of persona fide in him, and in his journey growing up with nothing in the Lower East Side, and then becoming you know, one of the biggest screen legends of all time, and the people impacted all the way, and whether wherever you fall, politically, I think people come out uplifted by the show and feeling like hopeful and uplifted, and that is why I think his stories that are relevant now, whether you knew him from his nineteen thirty films or not very well said and his story is a great testimony to the possibilities. Available to everybody in America that you can actually you could come from nothing and make your way to the top of any profession that you choose through hard work relief and persistence on that do you have a favorite James Cagney film. I know you're from Canada, maybe cabins clouds or something like that. You know, they show up. They won relative to what you just. Said they shot the fighting sixty nine in Canada and using the Royal Canadian Air force and Cagney was given by them. A bracelet. Fact, I'm talking to in my bedroom when my jewelry box right here, the given a bracelet. I I'm like, we're on TV. I'm gonna go get it out. So you can see it. But anyway, giving a bracelet and this woman from New Hampshire bought it in auction years and years ago, and she came to the show drove down she even saving her money to come down to see the show. She read about it online cetera. She came down and at the end the show she waiting, and she was like in tears, the biggest hug, and she said, I want you to have this. I've had it for twenty years told me the whole back story of it and gave it to me and I cherish it. But it they the air force gave it to Cagney. She got it at an auction somehow, and then gave it to me after the show. Oh, thank you for telling story. But the answer your question. It's it's a tough one Yankee doodle dandy. Everyone's gotta see one of the greatest movies of all time that doesn't lift you up and and at the same time making what a what a phenomenally incredible dynamic actor Cagney was there's nothing that will do the roaring twenty. He now out that's one of my major favorites. He did with Humphrey Bogart's Eddie bar out one. Yeah. 'cause he's only thing movie funny, tough, he's romantic, he's he's everything in that movie. And I love it angels dirty faces. Of course, you know. And then like you say there's some of the little obscure, I love taxi or speaking Yiddish all the time. He was so proud of the fact that he was the only gentile Screen Actors Guild member who was fluent in Yiddish. He's very proud of that I'll tell you what surprising to me Robert is that he only did one film with the great ever G Robinson. It was a little known film called smart money, which is. A great movie bars. Call off is in it as well. I'm just amazed at the studios never paired Robinson and Cagney together. Again. I don't know. I wonder I wonder about that too. I wonder if they wanted to keep their personas separate, you know, 'cause sometimes they get I mean you, and I don't know, but people who are on the periphery of older films. They get them confused. Sometimes, you know, maybe maybe the time they were they had some similarity. So they they wanted to keep apart. I don't know. Yeah. I can go on and on here about James Cagney and all his films. I know you can as well. Listen you've had so much success. You've made it to Broadway. What's coming up next for you? What kind of goals, you have yourself a future? Well, first of all my next big push is to bring Cagney to Broadway theater 'cause every time we've done it. The word of mouth is such that and people leave so uplifted, and they tell their friends, you gotta see this show. I feel like if we can get it to Broadway theatre where there's nine hundred people seeing it tonight and going to tell their friends the same thing that will happen when we were doing in the year where there were two hundred people or two hundred fifty people going out and telling their friends, so my big push right now is to get that to a Broadway theatre. I think we're going to do it. And then for me personally as I said, and as it relates to what we're talking about today being being a father. I mean, a career where doing H shows a week is, you know, it's my passion. And I love it. And but ultimately five years from now, I don't wanna be doing Broadway all the time as my only source of providing for my family. So I'm really because I don't wanna be that. I wanna coach literally I wanna coach soccer team. And I wanna do those things. So my my big push at the same time is to get into more TV and film. So I can have a little more flexibility have weekends have the ability to still make a good living doing what I love. But have more time to be a dad. So that's my my five year plan is to move into something like that. And I'm doing more writing as well have Cagney now, which is great. And after we get into Broadway. It will go into the world and other people will do it and that'll be that'll be wonderful. And I wanna create right more things like that. So those are the those are the next step for me. Also. All right. Let's get tagged the on Broadway. That would be so cool last thing I'm gonna hit you with here. Robert, I love to ask all the that. I get on the podcast what type of advice? Do you have that new dad or for that about to be father who's out there listening? Yeah. Gosh, that's a whole. We could talk for these. Same outta time about that stuff. I guess well, one of the things is and I'm into it. Now, my kids when things and you can say to yourself to the dad is it a big problem or a little problem? I think that is what I would say just remember that question. 'cause I ask you when something seems very dramatic. See my five or seven year old like the world is coming to an end. And there's a meltdown happening. I say now I understand you're set about that is a big problem little problem, really. And you know, the same thing you can say to yourself when you have a new child or your belt to have a child, and you're stressed about things or you know, and you don't have don't feel prepared or whatever. Or or something happens in your you say to yourself is it a big problem? Little problem. Ninety percent of the time ninety five percents time. The answer is in the big picture. It's a little problem. So it's not worth the stress rings IT that you might give it you say, hey. Is this mind get you? It's a little problem. There are big problems, of course, and health issues that you have to dress in a major way. But, but generally, there's a lot of things that you think in the moment our big problem. But if you step back and say is this a big problem or a little problem? The answers often it's a little problem. It might help you move through it a little more easily. Great advice. This has been a lot of fun. Robert Creighton, I have to say, thank you so much. Give me a few minutes of your time. And I have to tell you that not only do I thank you my mother. Thanks, you my father. Thank you, my sister. Thanks you. And I thank you. I love it, man. I love it. And and when we get to Broadway, I want you. They're opening night. Brother. Come on. No doubt. I will definitely be there. I pray that you do make it happen. I would love nothing. More than the bring my family to New York City to watch Cagney on Broadway. So best of luck to you with that. Good stuff. All right. I'm going to wrap things up and just a minute here. Back to wrap things up here on first place. Fatherhood. I gotta give a special. Thank you. Once again to Robert Creighton giving me a few minutes of his time here. I hope you guys enjoyed that as much as I did. Please get over to Twitter guys draw me a DM on Instagram. Let me know what you thought about today's episode. I always loved to read your feedback. If those of you who stuck around to the end here for the announcement in honor of next week bachelor finale, one of the guests that I'm going to have is going to be trista pick on the first ever bachelorette. Ryan Sutter will be joining me here next week for a special edition of I the so please lock it for that one. You may wanna tell you about that. I know my wife is a little bananas for both the bachelor and the bachelorette. So if that's your thing Ryan Sutter is a first-class father. So he gives a great interview. He's got an awesome story. So don't miss out on that. And we're going to close out the week with a bang tomorrow. It's a frogman Friday. We got former navy seal Chad Williams joining us here on the podcast, so tune it in spread this podcast. Around to every father in your neighborhood. That's all I got for you guys today. I'm Alex lace. You have been listening to first-class fatherhood. And please remember guys. We are not babysitters. We are fathers, and we're not just fathers. We are first class fathers. Sophie. Joke. Sometimes I open. No.

James Cagney R J Robert New York City Robert Creighton Canada hockey New York soccer New York Babe Ruth Fred Astaire Screen Actors Guild Jimmy Warner Brothers Eddie Fisher Rocky sullivan George m Cohen Hollywood Starbucks Broadway
Hour 2: AB's Path to Oakland

Get Up!

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Hour 2: AB's Path to Oakland

"Hi there. Julie Foudy here. Use was silly enough to give me the green light on a podcast, and it's called laughter. Permitted. We talk to these awesome trailblazers in sports about the joy and chaos of life such as Kerri Walsh Jennings. Simone byles Mia Hamm, so gig, comfortable loose soon after permitted and so is best singing support for laughter. Permitted comes from ally. You and settle for a two star spin class a personal trainer, would you? So why settle for Bank that treats you just like another number? Ally knows you deserve better and their mission is to be just that. And with ally Bank. You'll get interest rates up to twenty times the national average you can chat with real people twenty four seven, and they won't nutmeg you with hidden fees allies team actually cares about doing right by you and your money so go to A L L Y dot com for more ally Bank, member FDIC. See Domus sportscenter nine five thirty after Auburn, South Carolina, Keith in j will chronicles ions return, plus flashback, five eight of the most historic upset in the history of the tournament and NFL free agency deals that made the most sense this week all that more sports sportscenter after the SEC quarters on ESPN and the ESPN app with that. We welcome. You back to our studios in New York Chaim pack today with Jaylen and Frank Vogel, and the Dan's Orlovsky and Grazziano Mike Mayock coming up in the next hour. But we are busy today. Coming to you live from the seaport district appear seventeen brought to you by chase. And we get up with Zion. He was back and better than ever last night is highlights or what minute away if you haven't seen this. You're not going to believe what he did. And as I mentioned the man behind the ranger revival joins us live in half an hour. Explain how he got Antonio Brown out of Pittsburgh and gave up so little plus it's the worst word sports and may not apply to at least one and maybe two NFL teams. The worst part of probably works. We're ready to go. We're ready to get up with you starting. Right now. And Jalen it starts with that. Man. Zion. Williamson missed five games. But now he's back, and he's got a custom made pair of kyri force in time for last night's game against cubes as long as he was going to play basketball. Do he was going to be in some Nikes anti what he didn't miss a beat look at him here right away. He's flying high interest in steel go the other way with the big town slammed up with the right hand the left. There is how much we've missed that. So you see it again Ducas down a deuce and RJ. Barry started up in no goods ion is there for the offensive rebound. They're up by four now watch on here. This is a very controversial moment in the game. With a big jam? But keep watching that Frank Howard at Syracuse appears to stick the foot out as ion is running by now, you also then hold the handout is that was trying to hold them up there sort of tough to say we're going to talk about this in greater length in a moment. Nothing was called on the play down. Here's ion if he adds this to the repertoire, forget it that was the only shot until outside the paint the entire night Duke was up six now later in the first half off. Steal RJ Barrett. Throw it up throw it down. Absolutely. In transitioned that tandem has been terrific for the blue devils AUSSIE and there'll be one and two in the draft. It was six at halftime. The second half we go to the ball game Duke is only up to points. Trae Jones throw it inside Zaire with our the power to hold a man off with four. And then here comes my favorite of the night from line look at this touch. Jalen, and it's also great coach understanding that you've got to take advantage of the backside of a two three zone particular use your body down the catch the get office. A Reed touches ridiculous invinci- blue force. He's not twelve for twelve from the Duke is up to six and how about on the defensive end. Jalen underrated defender for those slow caught up in the lobs and the don'ts, and rightfully so this is one of his best attribute the ability to contest and block shop almost hits his head on the rim. Again, then here on an offensive board that would complete his scoring thirteen thirteen for the night twenty nine points, fourteen rebounds Duke now trying to run out the clock a little bit. Up by eleven. Oh, yeah. They have RJ Barrett to throwing it down not once but twice is nice. You'll see another dunk here. Baruch which four Twenty-three Duke will get another shot at Carolina tonight. They win in Zion return by a dozen last night. So the people who thought I wasn't overturn. They were smart like hollow play would do teammates. And it was great to be back say to those people who question he'd come back. They are entitled to their own opinion. Appreciate Dan put by I can leave my boys. Hey, I've seen a lot of great players there. I'm not saying he's better than those guys. But he's a different player. He can do things that nobody has done in this game. I mean, Charles like, I've said is it was close, but this guy's bigger stronger. And I mean, he's crazy different type of player. There's not guys like him. Now, they're candidly haven't been look at these numbers. He's averaging twenty two points on almost seventy percent shooting from the floor will be the highest field goal percentage by twenty point score in the last fifteen years markedly higher than that of Blake Griffin. Who currently has that Mark. Let us go down to Charlotte. Jay will has been down there. Four state Williams in the arena last night covering all I want to start with the game. I want to start with ion again perfect from the floor just spectacular and his return. What impressed you the most about him last night? You know, I got a great conversation with Ben Wallace. When I first came into the league. And he said to me if you play hard J for thirty five minutes, you'll end up getting fifteen points, ten rebounds and seven assists. Just why playing hard by showing effort that Susanna Williamson is you combine that greeny with the skill set with his intention with the emotional energy brings it a game. He once again proved to you even after taking four or five games all that. He is the first pick in the draft hand down easily because this is a kid coming back from his first name he has twenty nine simplicity rebounds, five steals. And he's still trying to find his way. That's something scary about Ziya Williamson. That's how talented he is. I agree with you completely. Now to the scary because there was a sort of scary moment last night. I know it upset you greatly. I want to show it again for everyone and make sure you get one more chance to see it. This is a moment that takes place in the game the tripping incident as being called the Syracuse, Frank Howard sticking the foot outside and dozens go down watch it again, you make up your own mind. What you think you're seeing there? I want you to. To hear from Howard's coach. This is Jim behind after the game last night. Talk to Frank. I looked at the video. There was no trip involved out there. I don't know who is talking about that. But it was a bump. And that's it. You know, it was nothing. They're trying to manufacture something out of nothing. You said I'm trying to triple. I don't get it. You know? You know, he's a hell of a hell of a player. You know, have a lot of respect for them. You know, I'm not only four years to get to the stage star trip beaten. Thank you. Okay. I should point out a lot of people were talking about this last night. And j I know in your initial reaction, you were definitely one of them as you sort of said here this morning. What is your reaction to that incident? What behind said about it? Greeny saw it wasn't something that was manufactured last night. It wasn't something that he was caught up in a scuffle in the just happen. He tripped him. He tried to trip him. Now, I've been analogy for you might be extreme. So if I walk into a store, and I saw looked a couple of items, and I walk out of the store in the cameras. Didn't catch me in the clerk at the front desk. Didn't catch me is I didn't steal anything from the store. No. I did. So something from the store just didn't get caught. And we caught red-handed last night. Now a couple years ago greenie whether it was Florida state being verse incident was Louisville being the second incident or along being the third for Grayson Allen, I stood up for that multiple times saying that that was wrong. I called it out. I took a lot of heat for that from do people and from other people, that's fine. I appreciate things when it's not right on going to say it last night was an example of that. It was not right now. Ziya Williamson at Ballin. A her were jealous. This morning is would have been a way bigger story. Just because he didn't ball does not mean that it didn't happen. I call. Now, I'll call Frank how're to it's black and white. It's there for you to see right there on a tape. I actually agree and we'll get to Jalen on that in just a second. Let me quickly ask you though, with Zion back playing the way he's playing he will finally get his chance to play Carolina. You'll see tonight nine eastern on ESPN who to expect to win that game tonight. I think Duke has a legitimate chance to win Carolina is probably the better team because they've had a chance to play together, consecutively. But I think as his team plays almost full force. They don't have Marquis Bolden. But still you saw was Williams thing to do last night. You saw RJ Barrett and Zaia Williamson on the court greenie as a guard it allows me to apply so much more pressure because I'm a guy behind me that can erase all my mistakes, they are different team was on waves on on the court. I will take Duke tonight that plays like that. They could beat anybody. Jay. We'll well-done have a great weekend. We'll see in here next week. Let me take it to the table again. Jalen and Frank Vogel or in here with us this morning, and for those who do not see your comments again briefly this morning, you agree with Jay you believe there was an attempt to trips I on last night. Absolutely. A young people make bad decisions. I was one young person that made many bad decisions as anybody out there. But we can't act like he didn't try to trip Zayn like it's foolish to say that he didn't try to trip. He clearly tried to triple now. Since he didn't fall it gives everybody a chance to now try to justify it or say, it didn't happen or question the intent plate so much basketball. Coach you've been around the game, forever, athletes know, their bodies, especially in the heat of the moment. He clearly tried to triple just didn't fall usually the same thing as we watch that tape over and over know. You know, you definitely tried. It was either the moments thing. I don't think that it's been blown up and made too big a deal love. But he definitely did try. Okay. So the good news is designed didn't go down. He's not hurting. He played brilliantly. Let's talk about that. You heard Jay Wilson he solidifies himself as the first pick in the draft candidate. He was that anyway. But as you watch him, what's the one thing that jumps out to you, the most that says that guy's going to be a great pro. Well, obviously the physical talent that he has stands out right away. But watching him play his instincts his shot making the cut around the basket when you know, what stood out to me last night hippie level the effort that he plays it how hard he plays and the way he can impact the game with blocks field offense of rebounds. Those are the things that, you know, just just put our icing on the cake to physical ability gentleman. You miss a month? You're supposed to be winded. And he looked like he looked like he didn't miss a step. He did. And you know, the fascinating thing about him as a player, and as a prospect is usually the God, that's the largest. And the most physical shouldn't be the most athletic and highest jumper. Yeah. Usually the guy with the most talented, most talent isn't always the hardest worker on both ends of the floor. He has that. And so that's what makes him a unique talent amongst those that we've seen in a lie have to say it again, I have been team RJ, which is to say that I believe that wells iron will be number one. I have all along said, I think R J Barrett will be the best pro I changed my mind. I fell in. And there's just no way not to the touch around the basket. He does everything it's not just the strength. But the almost a freakish athleticism to the way he makes that one little put back with that left hand. He has a a softness of touch if he develops any outside game. There'll be no way to think about his jumper. Unlike Ben Simmons, it's not broken. So he really works at it and win basketball becomes a full-time job. I think he can improve at it. But he's going to also be dominant defensively, we're not just showing his law. Yeah. We're showing his steals. We're showing his blocks we show on offensive rebounds. Like this is a phenomenal young player. No question, again do Carolina tonight. You'll see on ESPN right now. Let's get up and go. We got a ton of things to get to another. Jalen, another loss for the Lakers to the raptors. Lebron played thirty two minutes scored twenty nine points. But they lose this pretty much the script the rest of the way. This is the script arrested away for the Los Angeles Lakers. It's one thing not to be in the playoffs. But it's another thing to be two and eight. Your last ten games. We know that they've dealt with injuries in particular to Ingram and to ball. But this team just looked like one is basically melanin in the season. But it's great to see the Ron James off their performance as opposed to being shut down. Yes. If you bought a ticket to this game still got a chance to see the great LeBron James. So I do appreciate that as well. Matt let's get the Kyrie Irving we showed you this highlight earlier his second career triple double Celtics come from behind to beat the kings. Is that a good sign for Boston that he puts a triple double up and he took over that game late in the fourth quarter. That's the only sample Boston greening every time. The Celtics play always looked down to see how many assists career because his ability to unlock the floor for everybody else and make them feel involved throughout the first three quarters then allows him to close the game. Instead of the other way around. Let's go to the Pacers. They are one of the truly remarkable stories. They lose Victor Oladipo you figure. Okay, they're done think. Again, they beat the thunder last night Wesley Matthews wins at on that back. How have they done this since they lost? The depot for they have an identity when you wash the pace play each time. They're contesting shots to fighting over screen. They're blocking out doing the intangible, and they have some young talented players. You see vows Turner there by Donna Vida's way. Quality minutes of bonus has been terrific for them in the trae coming over from Casey. Wesley Matthews shooting in his different the pace would not be an easy out in the first round. Now, they refuse to go quietly into that good night. Give them credit to the NFL. We get up and go let me unveil the fishery a jet says he has no regrets regarding how all these things played out. Adding all the stars kind of aligned to the jets, Dan or Alaska. Do you believe that that he has no regrets about sitting out a season? Whatever it is that cost him. I really believe him. He's talked about his admiration for Curtis Martin. He's talked about that the jets for the team that he actually wanted to go through. So now, it's his opportunity. Go be the face of the franchise essentially, put the money where your mouth is and go become the guy that starts to turn this franchise moving forward absolutely leading the jet back to the Super Bowl after fifty years. Teddy Bridgewater has decided to return to the saints. He will back drew Brees rather than go for a starting job in Miami. Dan Grazziano is that the right decision for him to me? I think it is. Because Miami apparently was not offering him enough money that justified going there and being a starter. He didn't want to end up in a quarterback. Petition with someone else replaced by a rookie this year for next year. He goes back to New Orleans where he knows his role where he's comfortable where the happy with him. And maybe his career takes off from being the heir-apparent drew Brees. There were worst lots and life than that. And then there are the giants. They lose built back earlier in the week as everybody knows yesterday signed golden Tate to a four year thirty seven and a half million dollar deal. Do you like that fit? Dan orlovsky? I do not this is more about the giants. Then golden take very good football player. But he's not a guy that you put on the outside and be one on one pressman coverage. He does nothing to help saquon Barkley taking people out of the box. You want to get into ball bond space wide receiver screens bubbles use them as a running back at some moment. So I don't see this is going to be a great fit for the giants. If you're going to build your offense around running the game running the football was take one Barkley and show, we sit back, and we look at this thing. And you say the giants look going into a full rebuild. Do you believe they believe they're in full rebuild mode now? This. This move makes me feel like they're gonna try and take, you know, make a run when they got rid of Odell Beckham. This was like Dave Gettleman going Alexa, who's the next available free agent wide receiver and this taped up, and let's pay them. You know, it's very interesting move again because you got rid of so many young stars. If you were going to go and full rebuild mode golden full rebuild mode and go get a ticket flour and a young receiver that art will throw him some money and see if he pans out, and he could be part of this rebuild for the years forward. Goldens, not that guy. So that suggests I want to bring in the what I think is the ugliest worded sports. And that is the word tanking suggests the giants are not taking you said that yesterday to us and you'd written on ESPN dot com. The giants not committed to taking a quarterback this year that will make people think who are they taking the season. Are they waiting for two? Are they waiting for Herbert to kit out of Oregon, whatever it may be the dolphins? Are they doing the same is taking a thing? The NFL is becoming the NBA with super teams. And and guys forcing their way out of contracts is taking a thing in the NFL. I don't think it is. And I think it's because most teams really don't have the stomach for it. We talked earlier about the Cleveland Browns, and what they did in terms of massing premium draft picks they were already at the bottom. You know, they didn't have to tank. They were already down. There. I what I look at the giants. And I covered the giants. And I know how their their front office their ownership feels about this. I they don't believe in the idea of not trying to win the game. Right. They believe. Truthfully. Did that our fans are buying tickets to paying for parking all that kind of stuff we need to put a product out there. That's representative. So I don't think you go full tank in the NFL. I'm interested to see what Miami's plan is whether that's a total hair down who plays quarterback for them. In terms of the giants. They want to rebuild. They have collected draft picks three picks in the top forty this year. So they're doing it sort of the way Cleveland did. But I don't think the doing it to the point where they're going to be okay with going and the doffing why people sit back and look at Miami. And startlingly, quiet. I mean, what what do we think is going on there? I see them as a full tear down tank types. That's what they gave their head coach Bryan floors of five year deal, though, he was the only new coach this year that got that five year. You have no idea who your quarterback is we sit here and March fifteenth, we have no. Idea who the dolphins quarterback is going to be at least this year. They might be the only team in the NFL that can honestly say publicly, or privately we didn't have our quarterback is there's a lot of holes on this football team. And so it makes a lot of sense for them to look forward and go, you know, what we're going to move in a way where we're going to try and struggle purposely, try and struggle to build capital in the draft. I'll say this the difference in the NFL compared to the NBA's usually the NBA the top two three picks. Those guys hit more often than not they end up being really good players. The NFL we see busts early on all the time. And it's more dependent on ten other guys that point it's not so much that those players aren't good. It's they go into bed situations. Bad coaching those things beget each other. It's sort of a vicious cycle. And listen if you want to talk about the architects of tanking, if we believe the Browns tanked Sashi Brown was the architect of that the process, the legendary process and Philadelphia Saint presi now those teams are good and neither one of those guys those jobs. So be careful what you think about doing to your point though about the difference. Is between the leagues right in the NBA? The idea of tanking is to get as good as possible first round draft yet right only two rounds in that draft the point of the NFL draft is to get as many picks as possible. So you can move around and make trades and play a percentage game. You take ten guys. You got a better chance of finding a couple of building blocks. And if you only take four so I think if you're talking about Miami doing that it's not about losing as many games as possible to get as high as possible. It's about using the assets you have that our values he intake and get her picks with them. So they haven't started to do that yet. They could. But at this point, we don't have a sense of their. I'm not from New York. I'm from Connecticut. I'm a new Englander. But I just cannot see the giants doing that to their fans. There's just no way. That's why I feel like they're going on where Miami they might be able to get away with it rid of a player here there. Get get away with it and turn it in a year or two. That's why tanking dirtiest word in sports because ownership never goes with, you know, ownership never says to the fans like, hey, we're gonna we're gonna do this. And in the meantime, we're going to suffer to we're going to lower ticket. We're gonna lower concession price. And then when we get good again, we'll bring him back up stick with us. We're with you in this process. You never ever see your point make more people that go through the sucky part of the tanking usually don't get to recollect the back end of sasheba of it. Yeah. Exactly. And I said, San prestige obvious Emmett Sam hinkie Prestia is like the best management of sport in Oklahoma City, but the point remains, and I think you know, what I meant and I would love to expand on that further. But right now, I insist we talked about God. Tiger Woods was on. The course yesterday. I tell you what this today, we're at the Players Championship, Keegan Bradley, not pictured played great. Tommy fleetwood. Not trick played great. Tiger Woods very much picture. He was thirty six even par on the front nine here. He is in the par four tenth. That's one eighty one. He's going to leave it just about there. He's got a birdie putt from seventeen and a half. Eat made a lot of birdies yesterday. Six birds on the day after day. Here's one of them that would get him to one under par. Now, he goes to the one of the most famous holes in golf par-three seventeenth playing one Twenty-one yesterday. He's going to put this one on a string and that is a risky play here. Stop stop. Please stop police that come. It stops. And that sets them up for the opportunity for another bird going to show you two shots at this watch the crowd when this thing goes in. He would make total of one hundred seven and a half feet putz in round one yesterday watch the crowd two under seventy. Heisel would brings excitement to this. Like, nobody else. He's on the course right now, he has even par. He just started. Today's played one Holden part that I'm told the plays very slow out there this morning. And so we will see you seeking Bradley's up to a good start already today. If I remember serves he'd be two under there through three holes. If I have that. Right. And then I got a little candy for this yesterday as well. Or last gate you ever have this moment. This is Ryan more again, one of the most famous holes in the world the par-three seventeen. This thing's going to go win so fast. Even see who that thing. One in hit the flag right hit the flag. Drop dot greenie never had a hole in want me. Neither tell people I do all the time that I've never had one. I as you see there thick and goes in. It's a remarkable moment. I've been in a group where one was made I've never made one my par-three to have a hole in one on that. The absolute best one great day still to come Mike may ten minutes away from the raiders. How'd you get Antonio Brown out of Pittsburgh and give up so little we'll ask and? Is back and better than ever. If you didn't see what's ion did last night and his return. You're not gonna believe it. Stephen a ways in as we can tell you. You're watching get up on ESPN. View japa- were coming your way here on get up including Mike Mayock general manager of the Oakland Raiders may have been the busiest team in NFL free agency this past week. He joins us live to explain how they did all they did. And then Stephen a Smith weighs in on the return of Zion. All that and more in our next half hour. Stay with us get up on ESPN. Geico presents unhelpful home improvement how to a slippery bathroom floor can result in expensive hospital bills. So today, I'll show you how to cook a serious fall by filling your bathroom with thousands of plastic balls. Just nail a piece of plywood across the doorway and dump in two thousand multicolored plastic balls, you could try to protect yourself with a bathroom full of plastic balls or you could get liability coverage through the Geico insurance agency. Visit Geico dot com and see how affordable renter's insurance can be high. Greenie. It was an unprecedented night here in the Middle East. Something the region is never experienced before the world's largest humanitarian and sporting event of the year kicked off with the opening ceremony that twenty nine thousand nine hundred Special Olympics world games here in Abu Dhabi on Thursday night. Welcome desire ED's sports stadium on Kevin Godley hours ago over seventy five hundred athletes from one hundred ninety five countries experienced a dream. Mhm come true representing their nation during the parade of athletes, the US delegation with over three hundred people here, including angel Athena's. The New York state champion powerlifter who has autism was nonverbal for much of her youth and abused in the foster system. She was adopted when she was eight and is now flourishing angel won four gold medals at the USA games last summer in Seattle, and the reaction Malaki Nydia cores face says it all not long ago, he was chained by his mom at a refugee camp in Tanzania. She thought she was protecting him from ridicule and harm. She learned about Special Olympics and soon after Malaki chains came off and the sixteen year old is now a star in athletics. And we've got plenty more stories coming your way for the next week on get up as we highlight the best of the inclusion movement at the twenty thousand nine nineteen Special Olympics world games in Abu Dhabi back to you. Greeny. Kevin. Thank you very much. We get back to the National Football League here. I'm looking forward to watching as much of that as I can as far as the NFL is concerned, no shortage of moves for the raiders. And of course, none of them bigger than Tonio Brown sending third and a fifth to the Steelers in exchange for one of the most productive players of all time. And of course, Batman needs a Robin to the raiders also signed former chargers receiver tyrel Williams, Adam Schefter reports four years forty four million dollars twenty two guaranteed. They've spent even more to get left tackle Trent Brown. Shefty reporting. That deal is four years sixty six million thirty seven million almost guaranteed for him. And that wasn't all they also signed former Rams safety lamarcus Joyner to a four year deal. Dan, grassy outta who happens to be sitting next to me reports of that deal is forty two million dollars with twenty one million guaranteed. And I am delighted to welcome the general manager of the Oakland Raiders, Mike Mayock who joins us here. Mike every time you and I have talked. It was back in your days at NFL network. And we're talking about scouting guy. Is and all that sort of stuff. And now here we are having an entirely different conversations. Take us through the process of how the Tonio Brown deal goes down. I think a lot of fans would be interested just know from the moment, you identified that as a possibility to the moment got done. How did you do it? I think the important backdrop greenie is is that I had several conversations with Kevin Colbert from the Pittsburgh Steelers and told them we had no interest in trading any of our three first round picks. So we didn't even think we were going to be in the Tonio Brown sweets sweepstakes. So we ended up that Friday when the buffalo deal fell through for Pittsburgh, and they reached out to John John reached out the million I called Kevin. And I basically said Gav what's up? You know? We're all right. He said would you give to and I said, no, we did the best. We can do is three. So ultimately, we went back and forth and settled on a three and a five contingent upon getting a be signed. And then the difficult part really began, you know, the negotiations with drew Rosenhaus who did an unbelievably great job being. Persistent not letting this thing fall apart. I went to bed Friday night. And the deal was done. I mean deal was off the table. We could not come to financial arrangement got up Saturday started making calls again Drouin, I kind of got into it on a bunch of different things. And ultimately, he moved a little we moved a little and by the end of the day. And it was a long day. We got the financial piece on. So we didn't really even go into this thing. Michael thinking, we had a chance at Antonio Brown. And the end you come out not with him or not only with him. But with really one of the most aggressive teams that we've seen in the National Football League season through free agency. And we just ran through some of the names that you've got Trent Brown, the Marcus Joyner tyrel Williams, take us to the strategy there. What was the thinking? And being as as you guys have been with the money. Yeah. I think part of it is it Mike anybody can spend money. I think the challenge is building a team, and that's kind of John, and I have talked about in the situation changed things a little bit. It gave us less money throughout the rest of the depth of the roster. But it was an opportunity. We didn't think we could pass off. So when we got a b the next priority was we really felt like we needed to tackle. We've got dirt card quarterback. You've got into Neo Brown at wide out. We really felt like we had to protect our quarterback who's taken a beating the last couple of years and entrenched Brown. We've got a kid. It's still twenty five years old. He's an ascending tackle compla-, either left or right side. He Michael he's the biggest human being I've ever seen in. I'm used to being around a lot of human beings. He was nominated in the playoffs. We watched them against the chargers. We watched them against Kansas City to teams in our division. We got a block every week we loved what he did. So we feel like we should up the path protection. Tyrel Williams was something. We we didn't think we're gonna be able to make that deal. He was a goal heading into free agency. We thought because we signed a b we wouldn't have the cash left to do the deal. We were able to come to an agreement with him. Again. He wanted to be here part of it was he wanted to play with AB. I mean, it was really exciting to see there's some energy around the Oakland Raiders right now players want to be here. And we really needed to address our defensive side of the ball and Joyner. We thought Joyner was the best nickel in this entire group. And the great thing about him is in base defense. He's a free safety. So we think we've got young players. They're all in their twenties except B, and to be honest with you, we think AB can play seven eight more years, and from now you go to the area that everyone is always associated with. And that is the draft. If three first round picks included number four overall. How would you describe your thinking going into this process now and how you are planning on attack in the first round of the draft? I keep telling her guys and they're tired of me saying, and I said the same thing in free agencies. We gotta be nimble. You know, we got to be prepared and ready to move in any direction. You know, we've got four twenty four twenty seven and thirty five which is at the top of the second round. So we look at those four picks in I don't know how it's going to play out greenie. But we gotta be ready to go in any direction. And, you know, do we move up. We move back. What are we going to have to deal with at all three levels of those picks? And if we sit there and pick it four twenty four and twenty seven we better be ready to go and get three great football players because the the key here is we can't miss. We've got to have good football players that we can plug and play day one and a quick final thought for him. I just have a moment left. But a lot of people look at the situation they look at these high profile acquisitions they look at the contractual situation with Derek Carr. And there was sort of a feeling there's a lot of pressure on him to play big this year. When you hear that? What do you think I think he embraces it? He he's been a part of talking to a lot of these players around the league, you know, the players talk man, and I can't tell you AB was all excited about Derek Carr. They played in the Pro Bowl together. Tyrel williams. I wanna come play with Derek Carr and ABC's there's some energy around this team. And I think our car has embraced it. Mike mayock? It is great to hear your voice again. Congratulations on a really exciting week. It's been fun to watch well done and we'll check in again sometime around the draft. Thanks for doing this the next Michael. All right. Mike Mayock again. The raiders have been extraordinarily busy reminders. Sportscenter comes your way tonight, five thirty eastern time after Auburn, South Carolina, Keith and j chronicling zion's return to the court flashback Friday. Most historic upset Nancy double A tournament's history. And the NFL free agency deals that made the most sense this week that's on sportscenter after the SEC quarters on ESPN and the ESPN app as you are probably aware. There is tragic news out of New Zealand this. Morning where forty nine people are dead and many more hurt after a gunman opened fire at a mosque in Christ Church. Bangladeshi cricket team is in town there. There is something of a sports connection there there to face the New Zealand team they were on a bus arriving at the mosque for Friday prayers when the shooting began they fled the scene, and they are reported safe the team manager for Bangladesh said, and this is a quote, we must have been about fifty yards from the mosque. I would say we were really lucky had we reached even three or four minutes earlier. We probably would have been inside the Bangladesh team has cancelled the rest of its tour of the country. We will take a short time out Stephen Smith will join us next as we get back to sports you're watching get up on ESPN. We are back on get up and Jalen rose the performance of the night without question Zion. Williamson coming back after missing five games. And look look he never missed a beat white from the job. Look at him. Go the best at college basketball convert from Capac converting defense into office with a big time slam with the opposite hand hit a brand new pair kyri fours on last night. And he looked comfortable right away. Look at RJ throw it up in Zion. Throwing it down on the maze athlete. Greenie to speed the power agreed finishing showed. You the entire repertoire Duke is a close game all night against Syracuse last night member they lose this game. That's going to be the only one he gets to play before the tournament that the play of the night to me for Zion. Look at the lettuce not rebound threes. That's the way to attack zone offense rebound and opportunity that that is that chosen such touch ended out. He would make his only three point attempt of the night. He was blocking shots. He was thirteen out of thirteen from the floor and Duke wins by a dozen. They move on what they were. Play North Carolina. And you see it here. Zion per play rank by defense thirty zone eleven against man is the only play you see the numbers there. He's just been ridiculous. He has been simply unstoppable, and he did not appear to have missed a beat. And we are delighted to bring Stephen a Smith into the conversation. I take a sixteen minutes away. Why are you looking at us like that? No. I'm looking at you. Okay. What did I say all those highlights? Yes. Scene in a play was the put yet. Here's here's why. Because I know he can jump out of the I know he comes from the weak side and blocked. I know that he is physically so strong that he looks more like like three technique than he does a basketball player, but the soft touch that he shows you there that freakish athleticism and the ability to do that despite the brute strength. Greeny, Mike Greenberg pillow of the sports sports community. If you have been here for decades all the things that you've seen this guy, grabs rebound and without coming down. Softly puts it back. Yes. Without coming down going up. And that is the play that out of your mind like other than all those ducks to steal the breakaway dunk the block with head almost hit the ramp. All right to how you with base was at the rim. All of that stuff gets shoved aside right for nice soft because it was like he was holding a baby bird, and he was returning to the nest without touching the ground. Jaylen see what I'm saying? We'll see what to say agree. They don't see what you're selling out of control. Okay. All kidding aside. And I don't even know forget it. But just how do you what words that we're using to describe Zion Williamson now? Well, he's phenomenal. He's a man amongst boys. I think that's the phrase to us you could see Syracuse. He's wanted to writ talents that we've seen in college basketball that literally has instilled fear in his opponents if you look at win he gets the ball down low. You're starting to see guys that just moved out the way his power is very very evident. And even though it wasn't to that degree who I'm about to mention, you know, we've seen a lot of great talent Melo as a freshman with sensation, obviously. But I think about Chris Webber and what he was with you as a freshman the fat fop Chris Webber when he came onto the scene as a freshman college basketball. He had that kind of presence not Powell but that kind of presence. That's why I was trying to tell people like Zion is wonderful player. But who is going to start over Joon or see with? No, no, no. Now, that's not worth sending you everything doesn't come back to the. Well. I understand that. But let me ask you this. You set an interesting thing earlier today as well that he doesn't shoot a lot from the outside. He made his only three but his shot is broken. It's is a bad shot. And so it's not something he's developed, but it is something that he might be able to develop on the next love. So when Ben Simmons got drafted people thought, I was crazy because I was like, I think this shoots with the wrong hand if you notice when he finishes at the who or when it's a clutch situation or as little runners or floaters to all with his right hand. But when he goes to the free throw line, he shoots with his left hand in his jump shot his broken. Now you look at a guy like Zion. You look at his mass and think that guy can't shoot because of opportunity. No, his shot isn't broken where he can get in the league when he's not going to class at the he can develop a shot. It looks really good exam is going to be elevated version of Blake Griffin to some degree. When you talk about a LeBron James. I see Ben Simmons is being a jump shot away from being LeBron James. I think have been Simmons develops a jump shot. Sofa? I mean, it's a rap, but give me I don't know. I mean to satisfy ugly, but they do have imposed the no more. They do have him being more aggressive with his mid range game you see him shooting Florida's. Now, you see shooting a ten foot shot. Now, I didn't see that last year. I'm seeing that. So the is level of improvement. But if bins talk about the Greek freak and Anthony Davis, Kevin. If Ben Simmons develops, a jump shot, this hopeful Philadelphia, I'm just telling you it's on that on that kind of level in the won't they Zion is, of course, he's the freak athlete, but he's coming into the league at a terrific time positions basketball, so very dominant prevalent Truffaut wherever he goes, you're going to mix and match opportunities. So he could take advantage of the guy he's going against. So usually as a coach, and you correct me if I'm wrong, you could put them in matches where he's going to be the bigger guy. You can put them in matches where you're going to be the faster got. So you can math the fact that he's not a knockdown shooter Vogel of your coaching the team that drafts him. What is the first thing you're thinking to yourself? He brings me. This is what I'm using him for immediately. When it comes in the league here. It'd be nineteen years old. Well, the word everybody keeps talking about is the presence that he brings to the table. Just by being on the floor last night. It just changed the whole game. It changed dukes hold demeanor gave them confidence. And that's what it's going to do for for any team. And he gets to by. I have to ask Stephen aid to weigh in on the moment that got a lot of attention here. And there's been some dispute in the morning on our program here. And this was the moment last night involving Frank cowardice Syracuse that show that guys if we can't hear because this takes place in the first half of the game last night and just watch speed after the dunk that sprang coward of Syracuse. He reaches the right foot out. Then the hand goes out there almost as trying to make sure he didn't do anything here. There's been some back and forth. Stephen as I know you're aware of whether or not this is a dirty play reaching up to try and trip Zion there. I'd love to get your perspective. I don't think it's I think you should be it like I heard somebody sad though. I don't know if it was Jay was by down think you should be checked it. But. I don't think it's definitive awaited. Coach bay hop said that he wasn't trying to do something. Clearly, it's not just that his leg was out. I think the most incriminating element is when the foot goes up if you look at his feet it goes up. And that's where the intent comes in the question because it's like, okay. I I'm here thinking that you know, you go on to defend the guy you leg was in the wrong place at the wrong top until you keep the speed up when he kicked his feet up. It was still on the ground is he'll was still on the ground. But it's put went up. Why would you do that? Now that looks for more incriminating because I didn't see that. What initially. I've done dirty plays. I've gotten flagrant fouls that is a direct guy trying to trip somebody else. I don't want. To mince words, I'm not going to sugar coat who win and where he tried to triple. Now, the difference is he didn't fall so say he falls, then we're having a different conversation. But since he did not fall now people can elevate where. They feel like it's going to be. This Jalen, you know, what would have been worse if he stepped on his foot you sent him saying because then obviously you anxious or something. Chipper you full, but you stepped on his foot, then all of a sudden, you never know what kind of damage he could have done. That's the thing is we're all watching him come back here and play and again playing like he didn't miss a beat. He played over thirty five minutes last night. And I think as many minutes he's played in any game this year if I saw that correctly from hembo, a little bit earlier, it didn't look like he missed a beat. But obviously if he steps on somebody's foot, or whatever it is the whole world will come out saying, I told you so he shouldn't have been out on the floor. There's no question, but you can't worry about that. If you're sign Williamson. I love the fact that he's playing finishing out the season excited. We'll see what he's going to be able to do any NCAA tournament. And look this is not the first time that somebody thinks shot at a guy that's kicking your butt in a basketball game. I mean, this happens all the time and. With the staff that I talked about earlier it's both fourth most minute quickly because you watch all these games if he's fully helping you watch them last night. Do they become the team to beat the NCWA tone? They are the team to beat because you just mentioned it Zion. Williamson is terrific player in college in a terrific prospect going for RJ beer, but two guys nays. We have not sit all day been many people talk college basketball on this show. I haven't heard Cam reddish his name. I haven't heard Jones two point guards name. Well, those two guys are going to have to play better. I was getting rid of say that they got to play bit. That's why you have heard it enough from them because they consistent up and can't reddish. Your game is too good for you to be inconsistent. As you have been. He's got height. He's got lake and he's got a shot. He should be better obligate Duke over the field. But I will tell you this. I am sick and tired of us talking about Duke and not talking about North Carolina. It's going to be in to see what happens tonight they beat them twice without Zion. But North Carolina wit coach K coaching team USA get into all world, recruit and ROY Williams still there. Still winning many championships this millennia still competing with these boys. North carolina. I got a lot of respect for what they do. They don't have. Xian's at nine o'clock. I have to let him go the yelling at me Steven show. We talking about do is that that's the only t we talking about it. And he just not talking about here. Stephen again, get finishes up here. And then and then I takes, gene. Gene, seven minutes. You're going to see them tonight. You'll see all this action tonight from from from Charlotte, Florida state in Virginia than Duke and Carolina. It's on ESPN, and it's on the ESPN app. So you can watch from absolutely anywhere. Can't be getting by Monday. We'll be breaking down the brackets, right selection. Sunday comes and we will be here. Monday morning telling you who's going on in Zion. Invitatinal we turn our attention from free agency to the draft with Ryan Clark Louis Riddick and how about the warriors in bucks proving. They're the best in the league. We'll do that in more c- Monday back in a moment. Back on get up. It we'll wrap it up. Right. Where we begin with the biggest star in sports. That's what this kid has somehow becomes ion Williamson in his return spectacular last night against Syracuse thirteen of thirteen scored twenty nine points, fourteen rebounds do goes on to play Carolina tonight. And if you're wondering about the star power of this kid, the Duke game last night did double the television rating that the NBA games did last night. So it's almost impossible to overstate the star power. So they play Carolina tonight. You'll see it on ESPN tonight. Nine o'clock eastern time. My football guys, you're watching right? You watch last night. I'm watching tonight milk western about it who's going to win tonight. Jake, I want to say to do blue devils. I think they'll find a way to get it done the way zion's plan that that rejuvinated enthusiasm navy brought back to the lineup. What do you think? What do you look into see tonight? Well, I think Duke too. But the thing that people realize Carolina hasn't phase Zion yet really other than thirty seconds. So they're going to be a form. Yeah. I was I remember bemoaning last week that kid will never get a chance to this. Great rivalry. He'll never get a chance to play in it will now he gets that chance tonight. You guys have a quick pick. I saw Duke two and a half point favorite. If I'm not mistaken, I went to uconn. So I'll never choose to. I'll take care of. I don't see anybody beating coach K three times in one sees it has not happened since the early eighty and when we talk about fabulous freshman. Kobe white has to get mentioned he's and for USC issue. Carolina has been completely overshadowed as has basically the rest of the country by Duke between now and the next time. We see you. It will be selection Sunday Monday. We'll have all of that broken down for you. Plus, all the football and a whole lot more habits horrific. Weekend. We'll see a Monday. I take starts now.

ESPN Zion National Football League Susanna Williamson basketball Jalen South Carolina Duke Duke tyrel Williams Syracuse football giants Mike Mayock Antonio Brown R J Barrett Jay Wilson Stephen New York NBA
Smart Sex, Smart Love  Kate Anthony on Should I Stay, or Should I go?

PodcastDetroit.com

26:43 min | 1 year ago

Smart Sex, Smart Love Kate Anthony on Should I Stay, or Should I go?

"You're listening to the PODCAST, Detroit. visit www dot podcast detroit dot com before information. Welcome smart sex smart love we're talking about sex goes beyond the taboos and talking about love goes beyond the honeymoon. I'm Dr Joe Court. Thanks for tuning in. Low and welcome back to smart sex smart love. Thank you for tuning in and if this is your first time listening to my show, welcome. Today I'm joined by Kate Anthony. CAIN is the host of the critically acclaimed podcast, the divorce survival guide podcast, and the creator of the ground break, Breaking Online coaching program. Should I stay or should I go which helps women make the most difficult decisions of their lives using coaching tools, relationship, education Geeky, nerdy neuroscience and deep self work. She's widely known as an expert communication, co-parenting divorce and emotional intelligence in addition to her online online programs Kate also privately with clients all over the world. Based in Los Angeles Kate is here to talk about saving or splitting your relationship, and asking yourself the hardest question of all. Should I stay or should I go welcome kate? Thank you so much for having me Joe every time I read. The should I stay. Should I go I think of that Song You know what I mean. I didn't know what you mean. Actually my one of my colleagues. We've been doing a weekly facebook live and he started playing at and I was like. You know we're going to get in trouble and. We got in trouble without flag by facebook. Yeah you're using music that you're not import right right exactly exactly I. Well! How did you come up? How did you come to to greet? This? Should I stay or should I go and What is it originally well? It really originated with my own experience. I had been in a marriage that was not great. To say the least more a you know about ten years and I was asking myself this question all the time. Should I stay? Should I go? What should I do? Should I stay for my kid? Everyone says stand your marriage for your kids like all of this stuff and I. And I kind of wanted a burning, Bush I really wanted someone to give me some clarity about you know. All the options right the and I eventually asked a friend of mine. He was the only person I really knew who had been divorced before. Besides my parents, and he turned to me and he was very kind and I said. How do you know? How do you know when it's time to go? And he said? When you know you'll know. And I was like that's not. Helpful! It's been like three years and I still don't know. And you know turns out. There was actually a lot of truth to what he said right when I knew I really knew, and it was like a frying pan hit me upside the head in a moment of clarity when I. and one of the things that I knew was that I had to leave my marriage for my son. Because the what we were modeling to him was so toxic, and so unhealthy and I knew that my son was going to grow up to repeat these patterns. And I knew that there was. that the most loving and kind thing I could do for my child was to get out of this marriage. And for to allow each of us the possibility to create something healthier. Because my ex I really brought out the worst in each other, and I knew that we were both probably better people than we were in our marriage, right? So, but at the same time I still felt like I needed more answers than just the one that I knew in the flash of clarity, and as I began my work as a coach. After I got divorced, I started digging more deeply into this question, and why people get divorced, and why people are dissatisfied in marriages and I sort of came up with a framework for all this all the stuff you need to know. And That eventually became program. Think that? What do you think of when people say? I'm staying by marriage for my son. Leading would nappy for my son. My son needs a stable house. No matter how I'm getting along with a partner. What do you say to people? will say that you know what I say is the relationship that you have right now? One that you actually want for your children. because. We grow. We do tend to recreate our childhood homes in our future relationships, and so you know. Are you okay with your child being in exactly this kind of marriage? And you know for people who are really unhealthy for whom it's really toxic. The answer is. No. You know and then I. Say okay, okay well, then. Let's look at that right. What are the reasons you think you're staying for your son or your children? You know and one of the reasons. Is that you know? They think people think that two separate homes are A. One unhappy home is better for children than two separate homes. And you know there's a lot of data and a lot of science to to disprove that theory. That actually children from divorce it in which at? Some only one of the households has to be. Should be or can be you know nurturing and safe even if You're another reason that people say. Is that they? They want to mitigate. The toxicity so their partner is emotionally abusive or anything like that or physical abuse, totally a totally separate issue, but if there's emotional abuse happening and Verbal abuse or just toxicity. People think that if they stay, they can mitigate that. They can see your authoritive control the environment and you know what I say to that is. You're actually giving that an okay. You're actually signing. Often answer co-signing with that behavior by being there if you take them out, even if the other parent continues to be toxic and verbally abusive, if you create a loving safe nurturing space for your children in your home, even if they're only, they're fifty percent of the time. It is far better than them. Being in that city one hundred percent of the time because there's no safety there. were. Total sense to me. Yes, yeah, it's hard. It's a hard decision. I'm not saying like you know. This is like flipping a coin choosing what flavor ice cream you're having. It's it's hard to get to that point especially, if you are in an abusive relationship, right, your self esteem has probably been whittled down so much so that it's very difficult to feel that you can create such a such an environment for your child on your own. You know so. There's a lot of work to be done there, so let me ask you something. Because I I one of the things you said like you talk about, and I've always wondered about is another divorce rate I've heard that? The divorce rate for second and third marriages is higher than for first marriages and actually remember thinking well. Second marriages are probably better because you've learned so much from the first, but it turns out. The second marriage is is the main one that is doesn't work out. Is that right? Yeah it's kind of sad. We get worse at it. So The divorce rate for first marriages is around fifty percent, right and then. For second marriages, it's about sixty eight percent, and then for third marriages. It goes up to like seventy four seventy five percent, divorce, rate and so. Really. The the reason that I think this occurs and from what my research. Experiences is that we get rid of the partner because we think they're the problem and we don't do the work on ourselves. You're out. What are part was right so we're trading out on this goes to. That's exactly the same thing that was talking about earlier. which is that we recreate our child's than homes in these in these future adult relationships right and so if we don't do the work on ourselves to heal that. Then we're just gonNA making the same choices over and over and over again and he's going to. He's going to look different. You know he or she will look different. Though we're different, close will have a different job. They will present differently and you'll think oh. They're completely different, but you are the common denominator Internet relating all your relationships, and so if you're bringing the same thing you're actually, you're usually making the same choices unconsciously about your partners are. Under underneath right? So they could have a different job. They could make different money they could have you know all sorts of different outward appearing. Differences but underneath whatever dynamic relationship dynamics you bring, it's going to be the same. So we keep sort of trading out our partners thinking that there is a problem, but if we don't do the work ourselves, we will continue to recreate these patterns and I. think that's why you know. We think Oh. This one's going to be better because he's different. Mike loops did it again. I had a couple of my office. While A to my, who's who without its fourth partner, and it was exactly the same situation they were upgrades. Might one was better and better by he was doing exactly what the same themes that he came to me years ago with and I partner. Yeah, you're right. He hasn't done his own internal. It's what a great response that people are looking outward rather than inward yes and. It's again. It's hard work. It's hard work to look at. Why am I making these choices? When and it's also, it's also. It's a lot easier to point the finger, right? It's so much easier to be like. ooh. She was crazy or he was an asshole or anything like that. But the bottom line is. You know our our stuff is our stuff, and we make these choices, and it's so. It's so much harder than to look at Why am I making these choices? What is my wounding? That is having me make these choices, but it is so much richer and so much more fulfilling and. So much more free, because then he actually get to make healthy choices, and the other side of that is like. Wow, yeah, that that makes sense. Why do you think or what do you think I'm sorry are the most important things. A woman needs to address when trying to decide whether to stay or go. So my program I haven't run a program. Or should I go gone. It's basically broken down three categories if you will and the first is the internal work. The first is really that I'm getting in touch. With who who are you right? We tend to not. Really Know Right. Who Are you? I'm a I'm an architect I'm this I'm okay, but who are you really? What are your values? What are who is? What is it? Does cordy you? What's your wounding? What's so all of that Inter work? And then I think it's important to do the the cultural work. what is it to be? In my case, I work I work with women. I work with with Hetero women, says Hetero. Women generally speaking just because that's my area of expertise. Because that's that's what I am. And so you know. What is it to be a SYS- Hetero relationship in the twenty first century? What does that mean right? So You know we have all these these conversations about you know, bury the mental load, and all of that and that's real right. That is absolutely real and. Does is. Do you leave your marriage because he's not carrying his quote weight in the household when that is actually something that is fairly universal. As studies have shown time and time again. They just did another Gallup poll about it. There's long Pew Research Studies. This you know this is. This is the fact of being in a Hetero relationship in the twentieth century. Right, so we have to look at all the cultural aspects. WHY ARE WE SO tired? You know what is it about the fact that the public schools the public and private school system essentially relies on on women's Labor. In the form of PTA's right to run their systems right? No wonder we're exhausted. So I deal with the cultural issues and then the interpersonal right, what is effective communication? What is the science of Communication? How do we? How do you deal with your when you get triggered communicating through that? How are you owning yourself and? An effectively communicating through you know everything. So I think that those are those are the three main things that I deal with right. There's the inner work the personal work the interpersonal work then there's the cultural exploration and it's a lot. A lot it's a lot. Yeah, it is a lot but I think it's important right I do think it's I think it's really important for me to say. Wow, you know i. have this history of doing this and you know. My therapist has been really amazing for me in many ways because he talks to me a lot about when I go in there and try to pathologies myself I always do this thing and I'm always like business. And he's like yeah, 'cause. That's what women are trained to do. That's how women this is a this is a man to. It's I I love. You know you really breaks down like. What. This is this patriarchal cultural phenomenon that you are playing out and you have internalized. Have we internalize this and that doesn't mean that we can't make different choices right? We can, because we can make the choices around our internalisation, we which then by the way will help make the changes that we need to see culturally in in our societies. Right, but it has to start internally. Gets Different From It. I know you don't really work with men, but if it is different how? Yeah, I! Do think it's different for my experience again i. don't work with men, but I hear from them a lot and I talked to them a lot and I. do think it's you know when I talk about smashing the patriarchy. Which I do a lot You know I think we're in agreement on this Joe. Patriot isn't serve man either. Not. Not Serve men so. I think that the work that I would love to see men do and I think the work that you do with men. is really opening up to this that that this is this is bad for all of us. And helping men. Come to terms with their emotional needs and their emotions, and you know what their specific needs are relationships in how to be present for other people's needs and emotions and you know God. If we could all just come to this from a softer place, it would be, it would be a miracle. Right would be you even said. that the term toxic masculinity needs to be a rebrand. What do you mean by that? Yeah, because I think that when we talk about toxic masculinity I remember having a conversation with my son, he was like he was thirteen at the time. I think twelve or thirteen, and I said something about toxic masculinity, and he ran out of the room and slammed the door. and. He was so angry and I was like what. We need to have this conversation is important and he's like you think men are toxic and I'm I'm going to be a man and I was like own. That's not what that means and I realized that that's what most many year. Yes and they get defensive and they dig their closet and anything else like they're done with the conversation on entry, so if we were to actually talk about it in different terms. Give it just a different name. Than I think more men would be open to the conversation and would realize that this isn't about them. Being toxic, and this is actually coming from a place of love like I love men. But when I talk about toxic masculinity, people think I hate men. Yes right the ago. To one of the first associations people make it's really not really true right exactly, so I think we need to just talk about it in different terms and talk about it. I think a little bit more expansively because you know. When we when we label something, it becomes very reductionist and I don't think that that's healthier helpful to anyone. No I don't either. And you said that you had a very contemptuous marriage or contentious marriage model, but you had a stellar divorce in explain how you were able to create that. Yeah, well, it was very volatile. And like I said we were just a bad toxic match and we had been since the beginning. I was trying to get my childhood. Wounds healed through him, and he was trying to do the same, and it was just this constant, sir, toxic, pushing pole and. And but you know the thing that we did in our marriage was that we were both in individual therapy. Almost the whole time we were both. We were in couples therapy for years. We were group couples therapy for years. Off really drive yes. Oh, yeah! We were both in twelve. Step programs right so and we're also doing other personal development work, so there was a lot of work being done to try to save our marriage. And you know it didn't work because this was not a salvageable marriage and. and I also think we were doing it. At different different degrees of commitment. and. You know but when we called it quits. I think we were so exhausted and we were so kind of relieved to have the pressure off. That in mediation, one of our one of our meters was like so how because we were having so much fun and we were talking. We're bantering and we were it was. It was really a weird experience for mediators. They were like what the Hell is going on, and we were like a an and my ex said you know we. We tried so hard to make our marriage work that I think by God. We're just GONNA try. We're just GONNA. Make our divorce work. And all of the commitment that we had to to all the work that we had done. We just put it to work to use in our divorce. And the single, most important all the communication tools right, we were in Imago therapy together for years or group Imago therapy, and in our very first meeting with a our mediator We have dialogue. And he had never heard of such a thing he'd never seen such thing and he was like, and it was about whether or not we should who should keep the house and I you know gave all my impassioned. You know things you know reasons. I should keep it. And he mirrored me word for word, and he summarized, and he empathize, and all of that, and then we flipped. And I heard all of his reasons that he wanted to keep it in at the end of that. You Know Twenty Minute Imago dialogue that we both you know we've flipped each took a turn. I said okay. You're right. You should keep the house. Army guys what? So. You know so. We took those communication tools into our divorce and the and then the single most important thing. That happened. Was Our mediator said in our very first session? He said to us. You have one decision to make right now and that is. Do you WANNA put your Chil- your your son? In the middle of your divorce or the center I'm in. In. The middle would be pushing poll right? We're using him as a pawn at the center of it means single decision gets filtered through the lens of what's best for him. That is awesome. I loved at distinction. That's very good. Isn't it great and it was, and it was clarifying it was like in a minute. We were like him. Obviously, WE WANNA put him in the center and he said Okay when things get tough. We're going to bring an end. He did every time. Things would get contentious or we would be arguing over something. He would say okay. What's best for your son? And my friend, a Ben Health on, or if you know the Benecke from are happy, divorce Nan ben talks a lot about. Two plus two equals equals four right, but if two plus two might you know might equal. Thousand for my ego. Right, but if it equals four for my son, that's what I choose. Right and it's really about taking ego out of it and really removing removing the desire to quote win. And really looking at what is for my child. What's best for my children? Is this. I love everything. You're saying and I. Believe in one hundred percent I think this is very very very hard and very different I think you're above, and beyond what most people do. Don't you agree I mean. I do I do a lot of people out there doing what I do. and you know at first you know my my work. It's more complex than longer I'd do it because I, I hear these stories and I experienced things I think. Oh, God there's so many layers to just so many layers and I wouldn't serve people if I didn't. Sort of sort of attack all layers right and didn't dig through all of this stuff because all that matters. Yeah yeah, it really does. What would you say? We're getting closer to the end of the show what would be the up things you want to? People to leave the show with knowing about the work you do. Oh Wow That it's you know that it's hard, but it's worth it that if you are in a position of think of really struggling with should I stay or should I go that there's first of all? There's help available. There's a community I have run a facebook group with over two thousand women in it that are just that are struggling with this exact same thing and every time someone posts. Someone's like Oh my God. That's my. That's my experience. I can't believe that someone else feels that way. so you're not alone. And that this is a deeply complex time for. Ships. And you know we're trying to make a lot of changes culturally, and it's impacting all of our relationships as the entire system shifts, and and tries to change and grow, and it's It's causing a lot of. It's causing a lot of tension in relationships and. Sometimes, that means a relationship to end. Sometimes it doesn't. It just has to be done a different way. And The skills are are so important you know doing the self work is so so important. I can't stress it enough. and so I want people to know that there's help available that it really is out there. Now what if they have a partner that unwilling to do? The work on the other side can be done. Honestly I don't think so. I, if your partner isn't willing to, if you if you've been saying to your partner for you, know years and years hey I'm unhappy. And I think we need to go to therapy together because I I'm like I'm like I. Want Myself to I. Want my work to be sort of like the last. Stop Right. I go to couples therapy, but if you have a cup if you have a partner who is unwilling to do the work and unwilling to own therapy or unwilling to go to couples therapy. You can do all the work that you want. You will outgrow that relationship. You will move beyond your current circumstances, and some of scared of that, but I mean. What do you think Joe I? Don't think so no I know. There's a book about couples therapy for one I. Don't know the name of it I have on my list reading, but she feels you can do couples therapy, which just one person and I don't know that you can do uncoupling with just one person very well I don't think so right. That's I mean I. Yeah, I, don't know. I'm interested in that. Totally. I know it is. It's gone through all right so people where they can find you. You know they want to continue the conversation. Join your groups. Yeah, so Kate Anthony. Dot Com is my website. My on the homepage there are links to join. The group listened to the PODCAST. The podcast is the divorce survival guide podcast. It's on every place. You can possibly listen to podcasts. yet we were just I was just recommended by the. New York Times last week so go. Crazy. Yeah so yeah, the podcast and my facebook group you can. There's a link to join, or if you're on facebook and you search should I stay or should I go? My group will come up. This is so helpful I really appreciate. Coming on the show very helpful for people to hear and need to hear, and maybe we'll have you back and maybe won't be able to get you back at the New York Times. Recommendation, you're going to be on Oprah who knows where you're heading. Oh my Gosh! I will always come back to talk to you Joe. Hundred percent I love. You so much cake being on the show and I'd like to thank everyone for listening and to not forget to follow me on instagram and twitter. Dr Joe Court D. R. J., O., E., K., O., R., T. and please rate review and subscribe to my podcast. See you next time. Thanks for listening to this episode of smart. Sex Smart. Love I'm Dr Joe Court, and you find me on Joe Court Dot Com that's J., O. E., K., O., R., T. DOT COM and see you next time.

partner facebook Dr Joe Court D. R. J. Kate Anthony Joe I New York Times Los Angeles CAIN Bush Wounds Joe Court Dot Com instagram Mike loops Oprah Army Chil T. DOT COM
Episode 255: Focus on YOUR economy.

Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

17:55 min | 1 year ago

Episode 255: Focus on YOUR economy.

"Hi I'm stubbins. I missed celebrity assistance. Certified lifestyle manager and time management expert. You can find me at take. It easy conscientious dot com and thanks for listening to the Rockstar real estate real estate. Podcast show dot com good afternoon. Paul Andrew go here. Toronto REAL ESTATE UNFILTERED IS THE SERIES REAL ESTATE. Podcast show dot. Com is the channel the only channel that you should be absolutely tuned into subscribe to addicted to right about now just getting back from my two hour walk and I've always done two or three hour walks for most mornings for most days for that matter For almost twenty years is just been what grounds me and what gets me out and and it's all over the city. I'll just decide. I'll jump on the subway. I'll Head over to high park head over to Leslie Bill. Head of her scarborough back where I grew up Rosedale Forest Hill. Togo head up to Markham. Sometimes the point is what? I'm doing that. I'm focused on connecting with people building my relationships and things that I'm doing on my walk include breathing exercises right now with everything that's going on right now in the world. You might not feel in control. You might feel like a lot of things are happening to you. So here's what you need to do to help you get through this period. So as I I was speaking to Another agent this morning and I've been speaking to various people about this for some of us. This what's going on right now. This pandemic isn't the worst thing that's ever happened in our lives. It's bad and if you look at it on a global basis and if your consumed by media reports and you're checking twitter and facebook and all that stuff all the time you'll think that you have whatever it is that is out there. It's just part of the mentality of you are you are you are exposed to so if you are thinking about nonstop cove in nineteen. It's very easy to get consumed into it. I can't say that I haven't felt a little bit more aware of how feeling And I hope that anyone of you listening isn't dealing with it or won't have to deal with it Or is recovering from it. I don't want anyone suffering from it I want you only to think of And it's not something I invented. But it's something that's sort of has helped me over the years and one of the things is there is no sickness. There's only the pathway to health so on that note the same logic is that there is no poverty. There's only the road to prosperity he. It's really what you put in your mind right now. That's GonNa make a big difference for me on my walks. I Call Them. My my whim walks have been doing these for many many years. What I do on them. Is I practice deep breathing and meditation as I walked part of. It is inhaling as much as you can without X. hailing much. It's a very very helpful breathing. Exercise helps you develop your lung capacity even helps you control your output of Adrenalin. Which is something that has been proven to be helpful and keeping your immune system at its at its best which wouldn't hurt right about now to be focusing on things that can control so what. I'm suggesting you do after you're finished with this or while you're listening to this type in Wim Hof W. I. M. H. O. F. Breathing. That's the first little task I have for you today. How that relates to my topic focus on your economy is very simple. It's time to disregard everything else. That's going on around you. There is a shit show. Everything is on fire every possible if you look in any possible department of business of stocks and real estate. Everything's on fire as assume that you have no control over it because you don't you didn't have any control of it before and just to give you some reference. You really didn't have any control over being born did you. And you're not GonNa have any control on when the our last breakfast. The only control that you have is on your moment right now. So that's why I put breathing in your economy in the same category. You have control over what you do right now. There is not a hell of a lot going on in the world. That is gonNA keep you distracted from this goal. You might never have this slow of time to actually stop everything you're doing and put yourself in the position where whatever you're going through right now and I know some of you were going through the worst hell of your lives. I don't wish this on anybody. I've been at a point few years ago where I was very very very low and I had to figure out what I was going to do to make sure I never got into that position again and I made some significant changes in my life at that time. Not Knowing a few years later we'd be where we are now so I. WanNa make sure what I want for myself what I want for myself I want for you. I want for all of you. There's no point in me going through what I did and not bringing one of you to of you or hopefully many of you up with me to make sure that whatever you're feeling whatever despair whatever lack of security you have right now. Because that's the one thing that probably connects us is that there is a universal and it's not necessarily money but there's a universal sort of aim for having some security in life to know that you've got the ability to overcome whatever's going on right now. Some of you are in jobs where you might not have a job to go back to. You might have to start over again so you might literally have to go back and look at what happened during the depression. The Great Depression and see what people had to do to survive. Then hopefully you'll be in a position where you can look at what your strengths are and you can build from that. There's a lot of resources for everyone right now in terms of maybe exploring another version of what you do or maybe something totally different from what you do. You might not really have much of a base to jump off from or you might have a really good place to start from. I don't know I would love to talk with each of you about if anybody needs to let me know. I might have some ideas for you. I might be able to have you on my show. I'd love to do that for you so what I want you to do. Though is I do want you to start by downsizing your expenses for many of you this week and it's happening in the city Toronto. Gta area it's happening like wildfire. And I'm seeing it and they know where the buyers were coming from. Some of them are downsizing from very large properties to smaller property. Something where they can possibly pay off when they sell their larger property so some of them are starting right now because the way money works is a lot of times. They don't have a process where high net worth people. They don't wait for things to be perfect. They will just side. I WANNA move and I'm doing it now and they'll have the money to be able to do that and a lot of them are in that position. And I've seen several of these moves in the city right now. So for that reason I still need your listings. I don't want you to be in a position where your not clear and you're not being given the right advice. I'm even seeing people on twitter talking about. They don't know what to do when their clients are asking them to sell. That is not who you want in your corner right now and I'm talking about putting you in a position where you are not dealing with people coming through the property and talking about a virtual selling experience and one hundred percent hands free. Your focus is to get your place as clean as possible. Sanitize I put the big ribbon across the front door. And that's it. Nobody goes in until there's an accepted offer and this has been proven before and this is something that happens in new construction every day. By the way people buying off plans they never get to see anything until they move in. It's just a matter of translating the process to this and I've been doing this for years so there's no point in re inventing the wheel when the wheel is not only ready to go. But you're listening to right now the best way to a get your property market it and be make sure that your property is property properly dealt with as well all the way through from the beginning to the end not taking in not leaving anything out of the equation. Because I've done this before. Think of the analogy of having an experience pilot. Would you rather have won with seventy thousand hours or seventy hours? I think that's pretty clear. So I'm that pilot with the seventy thousand hours. I think it's something to that effect of of of Real Estate Hours. It's time that you get the benefit of them. So the other thing that you want to do is if you go to the link you'll have to go to the anchor link which is right off of anchor dot. Fm backslash Toronto realestate UNFILTERED. That's the only place I can get you the link. I can put it up on my twitter and I will do that as well. Which is real estate realty? Podcast E. R. J. R. E. A. L. T. Y. Podcast one altogether one word. Twitter Dot Com backslash realty podcast and. I'll put the link up there as well free to be able to sign up to download what's called the anti-budget right now. You need to go into downsize mode so some of the easiest things to do just like with schoolwork which is thing we're dealing with as well a whole new way of doing schoolwork sometimes to get the most the most boring stuff out of the way. I which helps you sort of get past. That same thing goes with budgeting you. Don't WanNa be sitting there thinking about having to re-budget your whole life and keep this going for months and months and months. It's not about that. If you do it right you can. You can do it pretty much once. A quarter or maybe twice a year by using the anti-budget. It's a completely different way of doing things I've been through like hundreds. I think probably hundreds is accurate different kinds of budgets over the last five or ten. You're just getting to the point where I know exactly what my out put is each month. What my income is. My income fluctuates in real estate. And anybody who's in sales will tell you the one thing you can control is your expense and if you know what they are and you can figure out what you need and what you don't need then you can be in a position where your income has dropped some you quite a lot. Your expenses obviously have to adjust as well and you have to figure out exactly what you're paying and there's also really important tips that I'll give you when I send you the podcast which every single one of my reports is a podcast from me. It's an actual audio recording directed to you helping you with your specific needs because again. No one person I. I'm not going to get into that thing where I simply just send you out cut and copy. Pdf reports and preprinted a pre scripted. Newsletters all have bullshit. Everybody else does that. You can find someone else to do that. That's not what I'm doing. I'm doing something much more one on one relationship building. Because that's what this is for. That's what that's what this is for me so again. Today's the day the first of April focus on your economy. It's the beginning of Q. Two for twenty twenty so a couple of things going on. If you're renting you should definitely find out where you stand. What your what your situation is. What sort of savings you've got an and how long you can sustain number two if you own a property. This is the perfect day. This is the beginning of this quarter. This is the perfect eight head over to my website real estate podcast show dot com and this is where everything is so even the reports. I'm talking about everything just goes there might as well. Just go there over there. Sign up for the Toronto. Gta Portfolio Protection Program right on the front page. Can't miss it that way. I can give you an accurate baseline of what your properties worth today. So you'll know as of today relatively speaking. Here's what your property might be worth and there's always a bit of flex on them and then you'll be getting literally real time. A I artificial intelligence driven data updates on everything that's for sale everything that's sold and also what isn't selling or it's or would I call the unsold which you don't hear much about but a lot of those places you're looking at you'll be driving by. You'll see a bunch of sold signs. A lot of those will be unsold science meaning that they will not be going through and simply because of the fact that there's a million things realistically there's one hundred things that can usually go wrong on a normal transaction. He you've just in the last couple of weeks I'd say another hundred things have been added on top of that without exaggerating. So there's a lot of things that can go wrong if you're not aware of this and if you're not prepared about this which many of the People. I've seen many of those signs or newer people some people that have not gone through this before like I have. It's not a good chance. Every one of the signs that you've seen for me over the years from two thousand three to two thousand four during the SARS epidemic in two thousand eight two thousand nine during the financial every single one of my soul signs all firmed up all closed every one of my clients got what they were supposed to get. Okay when you see my signs now all over the city the difference between my signs and and most that you'll see a big giant red heart on my sign and it's been that way for a while but the point of the red heart is to tell you that the people who sold that property with me because of them I was able to donate five hundred meals to the hungry and to the food insecure in our city which without having to say it is of course more important now than ever so my goal. This year is to do that for five thousand. I WANNA do five thousand meals. Donate it so. I need to make sure I help. At least ten of you move my goal is to help fifty of you move every year. So the ten part. I don't think should be that much to ask considering that I will make sure that you are under my protection program. My portfolio protection program. And you'll get the tutorial on what exactly you need to do differently. There's a different order of how things work. It's a very specific formula. You need to be following to make sure that you're not in the position where you lose control of your transaction because many of you will because you don't know the order of things you just some people just haven't been doing this long enough. I have let me help you with it. Whether you're a buyer seller or renter if you want to reduce your the price that you're paying in rent if you WANNA look for price drop some in my rentals another great thing. The sign up for on my website is price drop alerts. You'll actually be able to get the next The rentals for the price range you want in the area you want and hopefully save yourself a couple of hundred bucks a month that you'll either put into debt reduction or possibly into firing the landlord for good as in buying your own place which with interest rates right now. The way they are. I can't be the one to tell you that it's the best idea ever. It's a hard time right now. I know you probably aren't thinking about it. But that very often is the time to make the hard decisions. Sometimes when it's the hardest time to make the decisions is the best time to do it. So stay strong practitioner. Breathing stay healthy. This will pass. This too shall pass. It's something to say to yourself. It's true I've been through a few of these where I felt like I was going through a roller coaster again and I've gone through them also on a personal level so this particular one isn't the most turbulent one I've been on and I hope it's going to be the same for you when you look back and you realize that you've learned something. Something good came from this. Hopefully this podcast was one of those things that got you there but from here on make sure you head over to my website. My reports link is actually right there. So everything you need real estate pod cash show DOT com.

Toronto twitter Togo Leslie Bill Paul Andrew Rosedale Forest Hill scarborough Markham facebook SARS Wim Hof W. I. M. H. O. E. R. J. R. E. A. L. T.