20 Episode results for "Quinn Myers"

June 2, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:47 min | 2 weeks ago

June 2, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening welcome to chicago tonight. I'm peres shuts. And i'm brandon friedman on the show tonight. Pardon my french. Republicans were screwed on the map. Illinois legislative leaders talk redistricting ethics and the first session without former speaker. Michael madigan clearly fell on way too many deaf ears. Lawmakers in the senate has an elected school board bill. In chicago's mayor is not happy about that and more as follows politics more. Rental assistance is available for chicagoans. We hear more about how to fly in gear is going to rise and i hope to be a part of five hundred dollars a month for a year no strings attached gary indiana launches a guaranteed income pilot program and from new england. Church to chicago museum behind the journey of a giant. Tiffany stained glass window. But first some of today's top stories honoring chicago's first permanent non-indigenous settler john baptiste. Point to saba has a point of contention at city hall today. The mayor elaborated on her plan. Having something permanent is really important. The difference between what we're proposing and just remaining street is we intend to activate those areas of the river. Walk year round programming to educate both tourists but also a residents about who disable was what his and his wife what their role is a history of the city of chicago and some older people will explain that later. Have cold for renaming outer lakeshore drive but the city council ordinance has been kicked next month's city council meeting last week mayor lori. Lightfoot introduced her plan which would pool public and private dollars to create public art projects ado szabo park and programming along the would be do saba river walk and the annual do saba festival. Today the mayor said parts of the plan would require city council approval but not all red line. Writers will notice less crowding on trains and shorter commute times in about three years first. Riders will notice a lot of construction officials. Broke ground today. On the historic lawrence to bryn mawr modernization project which will rebuild the one hundred year old stations at lawrence argyle berwyn and bryn mawr red line stations the upgrades will include adding elevators wider platforms and rebuilding tracks structures for this section of the busiest line see ta. president doorbell. Carter says making the entire system. Fully accessible is a major goal with the completion. This work we will have four more stations that are accessible that will not accessible before currently cd percent of this system except assessable. Same percent of our rail system I've established a goal that we're going to get to one hundred percent fit. All of the stations are expected to be opened by the end of twenty twenty four state health officials report. Four hundred and seventy eight people who have been diagnosed with covid nineteen cents. Yesterday and nine people have died. A total of one point three hundred eighty three million people in illinois have been diagnosed since the start of the pandemic and twenty two thousand eight hundred forty. Two people have died. The state's test positivity rate remains under two percent today at one point eight percent and now to amanda finicky with some legislative leaders on the session in springfield amanda for after several late nights and an extra day on the legislative calendar state lawmakers wrapped up their spring session. The final days were fiery at times even without longtime house speaker and gop. Fo- michael madigan twinning us to discuss. What the general assembly did and didn't get done our house. Republican leader jim durkin and senate republican leader. Dan mccown keep. We did also invite house speaker. Chris welsh in senate president don harmon. Who were unable to join us. We will hear from governor jay pritzker on tomorrow evening. Show so let's get started with a leader. Mcconnell republicans have slammed the new legislative maps in two senses. Tell me why well. It's based on faulty data and it was pushed her in a partisan basis in which republicans were not even invited to participate. And we couldn't have participated right now because the data that's being used is survey date. It's not even the real census data which will not be available until mid august house speaker. Welsh says that these new maps that are passed for illinois house and senate districts ensure that all illinois will be represented. But here's some of his speech from the house floor. Look at the diversity. In this tagger golo represent the state of illinois versus. The is the strength of this great state leader speaker. They're making the point. That diversity is really on the democratic side of the aisle leader durkin. Can you respond to that. I think that Those words are strong in the headlines. But it's unfortunate that the speaker thirty over this Of his members have lied to annoying is the of their position on fair maps paint on it. They have all voted for it. They had the opportunity to jewish this year but they turned their back all the citizens of illinois in believe that they should be in control of drawing legislative maps to their advantage. And that is what has happened. Each one of the democrats top to bottom if reverse their position on whether or not the legislature should draw maps as opposed to independent mission. Something that i have been promoting in. I've pushed for number of years. This is about power and control and what i saw. The other night was nothing. More than what i've seen in the past with mike net again so the the playbook is still there announce up to the governor to live up to his promise to own citizens to veto map that has drawn by elected officials politicians. Legislators which is what happened. So i want the governor to be straight up with all my citizens in live up to the commitments that he made us a candidate. Continue to ask questions of him about that. Now each of you of course complaining about these maps but are you planning to take legal action to stop them from taking effect leader mccarthy. Well certainly all options are on the table but right now the leaders right what we should be doing is encouraging the governor to follow through baker. That governor pritzker is reminiscent of candidate pritzker. He was on the campaign trail and he promised time and time again to support an independent map-drawing process and veto maps that were drawn by politicians. Picking their own constituents. This is his golden opportunity right now to prove that he wasn't lying to the people of illinois now leader durkin. You've already brought him up and that is of course former illinois house speaker. Michael madigan first session without him. What was this. I post madigan session like expected a lot more. There was a lot of know. Ramona's words set in january Also agreed that this is a time for us to go from the past and work together On issues of the day that sucker budget engines public safety and disappointed. I expected more from uh speaker. Welsh it really. Nothing has changed from my perspective. And i will say that the way the maps redrawn in the ratio probably five to one democrat bills call over. Republican bills is even more partisan right now under speaker welsh in has been under speaker madigan more. Partisan those are some pretty strong words. But let's move on to the budget. The governor does say that he is going to sign into law. The spending plan that democrats did approve over. gop opposition. He did have more to say about it. Let's give a listen. Republicans like to bad mouth the state and yet they're the ones who wanted to your responsibly. Spend one time. American rescue plan dollars to paper over our structural deficit. In contrast we democrats are investing in priorities will grow and revitalize our economy improving our fiscal outlook dramatically and reducing tax expenditures on the wealthiest corporations leader mcconnell like you to respond to that. Is this new soon to be budget. Fiscally responsible no of course it is one of the biggest things that we have right now as we have tremendous significantly more revenue than we were expecting over fifteen billion dollars if you count the unexpected revenue at the state level as well as the extra money that's coming in from the federal government and the issue at the end of the day is how do we made sure we get through the covid. Pandemic a lot of the economic impact that was associated with that is due to governor. Pritzker is due to the mitigations. Put in place the lockdowns the where he was discriminatory really in in the way in which he did those you know he would let walmart be open but a small business was forced to close layoff people and now we have a five billion dollar plus deficit in our unemployment insurance trust fund. This is what pays those bills really for people who have been laid off of work and the the this budget only puts a very small amount into that fund. Help make that right. So what we're going to be faced with is very significantly increase taxes. Perhaps the biggest tax increases on businesses in illinois history. Coming down the road over the next three years which is going to hurt us being able to really try to climb out of the hole that the governor helped put us into along with the pandemic leader mccarthy. I don't wanna get too far into this. But you did mention the mitigations of course more surgeon. That plan changed from the pritzker administration as the pandemic war on his actions. Recently in terms of mitigations in the store ben appropriate. The biggest problem that i have at the end of the day is he is is still doing a go. It alone approach here. We are over a year and a quarter into the pandemic and he decides all sorts of issues on his own without allowing the general assembly to have any sort of input on how it is that he's doing that. I understand giving the governor abilities in authority for emergencies on a short-term basis when we have tornadoes fires things of that nature but this is a year long plus these continue to have huge aspects of state government and frankly everyday people's lives with him and his pen and that's really problematic from my perspective yet. The general didn't really take any action to take that power back during this session when you when there was the opportunity to do so. Let's move on now of leader durkin. You have voted against a cps elected school board measure. Republicans in the senate did as well. But how does that square with your and republicans commitment to local control. Something we heard a whole lot about during the era well. I think you'd have to throw the chicago teachers. Union to this into the factor. They have done nothing except disrupt management of city hall. The minute after mayor lightfoot was elected into office. I don't believe that you should take over the chicago school board. It is a dangerous dangerous situation. They're unique from any other school board in any other union. Andy at school board union in the state of all. I do believe in local control. But i'm not going to give it over to a group of activist who have nothing but they're only desires is to win Mayor's office in that. it is their their sole function. And i just can't give him. Nor do i have faith that they would be right for for the chicago taxpayers. And also the kids. But i'd like to mention whether think based in the budget. The governor believes it's fiscally responsible. Then he has to explain why we're giving legislature a pay raise. Why we're doubling the district. Office allotment was necessary and also explain why he's using a billion dollars for democrat pork projects which is nothing more than a slush fund that came out of the federal recovery act. The governor needs to explain. It will begin asking those questions tomorrow now. Litter may county. The primary was moved to june in recent days. How does that timeline change things particularly as your party is going to be having to kneel down a nominee four governor. Well it's certainly a challenge but the real question is why is it that they did that. And and it's obvious they were unwilling to draw congressional maps Using acs american community survey data. Because there's a very stringent rules at the federal level. Every congressional district has to be exactly the same size but the the thing is is that they then went ahead and drew a highly partisan map for the state legislature in order to meet the june thirty deadline that they had to be able to exert their control. That's what this is about. This is about maximizing control the state and their willingness to put off the primary and unwillingness to draw a map using acs data shows. How bad acs data is for this purpose. The senseless himselves have said that. This data is not to be used for this purpose. Keep leader durkin and another measure part of the budget so expected to sign into law will allow the state to have some sort of vaccine lottery. We don't have a lot of details but from what you are aware. Is this a good use of state dollars. There's a lot of holes in this is much like you. I'm not aware of it. We were shut out of negotiations with before but vaccination batteries just doesn't smell right. It doesn't seem right. I think we should stay on the path of encouraging people to get vaccinated as soon as they can continue with a public service announcements. But this is a budget that was presented to us eleven. An amended budget was presented to us eleven thirty in the morning the other night so quite frankly gains to their question. Eleven thirty just before midnight. I think you may be. But i understand that a couple of days. It all runs together. We think very much each of you for spending some of your time here with us after all of that those long hours so once again republican leader jim durkin of the house and senate republican leader. Dan monkey we appreciate it. And once again governor jb pritzker will join us on tomorrow's program. Now paris we go back to you thanks manda. The city's providing another round of rent and utility assistance to chicago landlords renters. The emergency rental assistance program provides grants of up to twelve months unpaid rent and three months of future rent. Payments tenants who apply must have earn less than the maximum household income listed here during twenty twenty or at the time of application by august. The eviction band is set to be lifted in illinois. So will this assistance. Be able to keep people afloat as possible. Come back online joining us to help answer. That and more are carol. Oshana a real estate lawyer who works with landlords and michelle gilbert legal and policy director with lawyers committee for better housing. Welcome both of you to chicago tonight. I of you michelle. How impactful can this. Latest round of rental assistance. Be for chicagoans. I really think that this rental assistance is the key not only in preventing fictions of preventing the effects of these are victims will have the effect that the debt will have long-term not just on the landlords and but on the economy john rally and it is a a very good chunk of money on. It's all federal money on this city and the state or administering rental assistance funds right now. That are cargo. Residents are eligible. For and i think that it really will as you see there On our graphic. The deadline to apply for this program is june eighth. Carol you worked on Some county There's been state and county and city assistance coming. You've worked with landlords on getting assistance. What is that experience. ben like. It's difficult you have to have a lot of re should that some landlords may not air so for example. Of course you have to have great nieces. And sometimes they don't have releases sometimes they don't have their tenants phone number email in oftentimes. That's a case because one ten left and another moved in like it was a roommate or whoever was has no idea who this person says and the person won't call on the door. They don't won't give away their phone number or they won't get away email recused to things so it hasn't really been seamless That don't speak english very well. Also there can be a lot of snags in applying getting this assistant michelle this i don't have assistant. It'll go ahead. You could really led to The county has a county opened its program births and it has an ongoing dash one and it actually a report as of today. It's committed twenty. Four million dollars in rentals. So i mean that's a pretty great accomplishment and that's just wars to prevent all right michelle in this in this latest round from chicago. There are no upper limits on the grant. A why is that important. Well in the past rounds of rental assistance to expedite getting the money out the funders provided a flat amount so in the fall edited. Buy thousand dollars which was really good. You know landlords intended needed that money but it doesn't quite satisfy the need. So i was very happy that both the illinois housing development cargo department of housing listed to comments from advocates landlords tenants and are making here with his twenty twenty one money making specific grades in the amounts of the landlords and tenants need to satisfy the obligation. This should pay off a rent that is due and as you indicated at the beginning also will pay three months going forward to really bring housing stability to the market. All right so carolina's we mentioned to me. It's been a tough year plus for renters but that also means a tough year and change for landlords that depend on rental income to pay their mortgages or other bills. that they have Could you just tell us The scope of the situation right now for homeowners landlords building owners. Well experience the people that are suffering the most the ones that are living in lower economic areas of chicago. Said it's been my experience. Most of my own are from arizona south and westside where rents are pretty inexpensive but relatively speaking But if people are either unemployed or they are working but they don't wanna pay because really care. Have you run into a lot of landlord saying that. They believe people can pay but they're not. Oh yeah lots. Thank one lady who is Sadi's shifts a red since march. April are michelle. You wanted to jump in. That's not to minimize the very real pain that that we assume most renters are going through right now. No doubt that somebody can find wine example of somebody who is abused this process. I mean nowhere. Us senators who traded on inside information. Anything is possible. But i'm part of the county legally for housing dead and work in addiction. For every day talking to our office jockey to senator john otherwise representation. I defended a number of these So landlords who believe their Have not properly filed a declaration in violent motions to challenge. That and. i'm really happy to report that we have had Very good success in defending those motions. Usually the facts are her bragging about people who have lost their jobs turn into a ren insistently and then this has happened have had to with their jobs because their children were being educated remotely people who lost their jobs and made attempts to pay with the stimulus payments. And then just reached this situation where they had no other resource so carol with this with this latest round of assistance from the city. Obviously it's i mean it's not just in the renter's interest if they're struggling to to get these funds but also the landlord interest Do anticipate helping them. Health renters apply for this. Oh yeah they will do it l. Run they definitely wanted. I haven't but of course the ones calling me are calling me. Single tenants are no with assistance. Program is that a tenant can't apply in even if the landlord does not respond. they're still eligible but the reverse is not true if a landlord is and attendance does not participate. The landlord is not so so so potential. Snag there to work out to. Carol wants this vixen Moratorium is lifted. we expect in august What do you anticipate even with these rounds of assistance. Could there be a lot of activity in eviction court. Yeah there will. I think a lot of it is going to be people. Moving out of urban england's another one because again you're calling me you probably have a in there. Can a usually people are not calling me to complain about somebody who's broke because they know where to go. The answer we care. We'll just have a couple of seconds. I wanted to get michelle in on that too. What what are you worried about. What happens in in will be dislocation. But i don't think that we're gonna see the natural disaster that we have feared all alright. Rental assistance is going to be all right. We're gonna we're gonna keep following us and our thanks to both of you for being here and explaining for us. Carol sean. michelle gilbert. Thank you so much. Thank you and up next gary. Indiana launches a guaranteed income pilot program for more than one hundred residents. So please stick around for the details. It really is about unity where we all come together. Chicago needs to make space for everyone. It's an idea. That's grown increasingly popular in recent years. Guaranteed or universal basic income payments. Now a pilot program is launching in gary indiana. Where more than one hundred residents have started to receive monthly payments of five hundred dollars chicago. Tonight's quinn myers has more on how it works and how local officials hope. It could be a model for the entire country. Augustine lewis has lived in gary indiana since nineteen seventy six when he moved here to work in the steel mills. That i've met some people from gary that were in air force with me and they told me about the steel mills and how you can really accumulate money in fast fast way legally and They were right. The steel mill. Baid will pay your bills and have something. Leftover lewis worked at us steel until the early two thousands when he was laid off he's now retired and living on a fixed income just enough to meet expenses and occasionally support his son austin who has autism and lives near indianapolis my bills come out exactly to what my checks from social security and veterans payers in tune by one mcdonald's and the extra but starting in may lewes received his first of twelve monthly payments of five hundred dollars as part of a no strings attached guaranteed income pilot program. Being launched in gary. My spending habits will change. I'll be able to spend a little bit more you either on groceries or gasoline to go to see austin when this pandemic eases up. Lewis is one of one hundred twenty five gary residents getting the money chosen by lottery out of around four thousand applicants who had to show. They made less than thirty five thousand dollars a year among other criteria for gary mayor jerome prince. The public private pilot is about expanding the safety net for residents straining to make ends meet. We have folks who are existing from payday to pay and often times. They don't have the necessary resources to meet unexpected expenses. And i think that's when things sort of have the potential to cause even larger impediments. Or in some instances very catastrophic situations. He program is being paid for with five hundred thousand dollars in seed money from the group mayors for eight guaranteed income with the rest coming from private funding prince stresses. The monthly payments are about compassion. Not a government handout. If you were given an additional six thousand dollars a year is what amounts to would you stop working right. And i think the answer would be a resounding no this is about providing people an opportunity to better themselves and giving them the impetus to do so officials running the pilot program. Say success good mean a lot of things like letting people fix up their cars so they can drive to work or taking their kids on vacation out of states to visit family for the first time. Ever burgess people's is the director of give gary or guaranteed income validation efforts the group facilitating the pilots logistics and partnerships with the city and other stakeholders people's is also working with a control group and additional one hundred fifty gary residents who are not receiving payments but filling out surveys about their economic needs and challenges. What is it that you need in your communities. What is it that you need in your city. What do you think our federal government should be doing for individuals across our nation over the past few years. Universal income has become a mainstream idea. Thanks in part to politicians like andrew yang who have championed the cause as well as federal stimulus payments during the pandemic. People says one off. Checks are great but regular support is what's needed to actually make a difference. You have someone that's already in whole you. Give them six hundred or twelve hundred dollars. They have to rapidly pay bills or rent to keep their homes so they right back in the same boat they were in so if you give given dollars consistently they can consistently pull themselves the situation and then start building and starting over again for augustine louis. Starting over again means going back to school to study social work. He's hoping to use part of his monthly payments to become a counselor for them and their families. I've been gear is going to rise at. I hope to be a part of it. Once they get into social work. I expect to one day. Have a counseling office of my own. Where people would come to me and also be able to go out to the field for chicago tonight. I'm quinn myers. Meanwhile in the chicago city council a proposal has been introduced to us federal relief funds for a similar guaranteed income program but it has yet to advance out of the rules. Committee still to come on chicago tonight. A state bill for an elected school board advances in mayor. Lightfoot thinks it will hurt the search for the next schools. Ceo in chicago that was classic. Mike madigan why state. Republican lawmakers are so outraged about this spring legislative session in our spotlight politics and a close up. Look at the colorful and historic tiffany window. That's now turning heads at the art institute of chicago. But i some more. Today's top stories a historic moment. Today as the city's first openly gay mayor was on hand to break ground on. Chicago's first public monument recognizing the early days of the city's hiv epidemic mayor lori lightfoot paid tribute to the activists of that time we stand on their shoulders every single day in our community because without that activism without that determination to have better health outcomes but recognition of each and everyone in our community as human beings who deserve to have the full array of citizenship without that activism. I wouldn't be standing here today as a matter of chicago. And i know that the first phase of the garden was completed in two thousand nineteen with the installation of its anchor piece entitled self portrait a thirty foot sculpture by the iconic late artists and activists. Keith haring aids garden. Chicago sits near the former belmont rocks where the local gay community often gathered between the nineteen sixties nineties. The two and a half acre park along lake michigan just south of belmont harbor is expected to open to the public. This fall and as pride month kicks off. Join us tomorrow night. When paris will be north halsted formerly known as boy's town for our weekly in your neighborhood series state health officials report four hundred. Seventy eight people have diagnosed with covid nineteen cents. Yesterday and nine people have died total of one point. Three hundred and eighty three million people in illinois have been diagnosed since the start of the pandemic and twenty two thousand eight hundred forty. Two people have died more than forty. One percent of the state's population has been fully vaccinated. And getting your kovic shot could also earn you a free shot or whatever alcoholic beverage. You prefer governor jb. Pritzker signed a bill today allowing businesses that serve alcohol to offer a free drink to anyone with a vaccine. Well not quite anyone you still have to be twenty one of course and you have to show proof of vaccination. This expires though on july twentieth. The law also allows bars and restaurants to continue selling cocktails pickup and delivery. That's legal until twenty twenty four near paris. Go back to you. Thanks brandon elected school. Board advocates are celebrating the recent passing of a state bill by senate legislators that would transform the chicago board of education into an elected body and they'll mayor lori lightfoot called for an elected school board as a candidate back in two thousand nine hundred and she shared a different opinion earlier today. We were talking about the most consequential change and governance for the chicago public schools. It can't be about the politics it's got to be about the people that people were matter. Most our children this the supposed to be about democracy but what happened in springfield had nothing to do with democracy but democracy mark my board will prevail w. w. news reporter met mass in joins us now with more okay matt so this is a very complicated bill. In terms of how many members when it becomes hybrid and then when becomes all elected board. So remind us. What's in this bill. So right like you said. There's a few different parts to this site. Essentially it's going to turn this from an plane board into electric board by twenty twenty seven so the first round of that could begin as soon as two thousand twenty four when the board would lose to elections for half a twenty one member board would be a hybrid model between appointed members and elected members and then two years later during the twenty twenty six elections. That's when the board which would still be. Twenty one members at that point would become fully elected so By the twenty twenty six elections. The city is supposed to have been split up into twenty different districts across the city. Each one of those districts is going to be allowed to elect its own member to the board and then a twenty first member will run at large to board president chicago of for now remains the only board with a complete mayoral appointments so this would be a massive shift as if it is turned into a lot that we mentioned that. The mayor campaigned partially on supporting an elected school board. So why is she. So opposed to this. She's begun pushing more for permanent hybrid model with appointed and elected members. Not something of a transition into a fully elected model like this. Bill do is also said. The bill is being rushed in that. The voices of students in In parents within chicago public schools but today she also spoke about the impact. It could have the city's ongoing search for a new chicago public schools. ceo janice jackson leaving the school district at the end of this month. And lightfoot said this bill if it does to law could potentially have negative impact on that search if a potential candidate feels that an elected school board could hamper their ability to make decisions in the district so potential future. ceo could becoming into a very uncertain situation. All right matt so passed the senate. What about the house. What's next so it needs to go back to the house. It's unclear exactly when that's going to happen but sometime in the next few weeks as possible and if it receives approval air than it will go to the desk of governor pritzker for final approval. Turn into all right matt. We're going to keep following it and thank you very much and you can read mats full story on our website. That's www dot com slash news and up next our spotlight politics team dissect the spring legislative session and much more. So please stay with us. Don't ever miss chicago tonight. Subscribe to our podcast. Get a daily download. Our show delivered to your desktop or mobile device. Go to w. w. dot com slash chicago tonight podcast and subscribe another spring legislative session. Chock full of last minute bills dropping on lawmakers desks are spotlight. Politics team breaks down. What past and much much more. Welcome back amanda finicky heather sharon and peres shuts so illinois legislature. Legislators knows very well went down to the wire with some of the biggest issues of this spring legislative session. Amanda let's start with the budget so this thousand page. Bill dropped at eleven thirty with a midnight deadline as you mentioned earlier with some of those lawmakers new leadership same old leadership style. Three thousand eight. So i spoke with somebody who said that a republican who said that their analysts had a difficult time opening in on their computer and therefore even being able to analyze it in time before the votes because it was so big it is getting so part of this is just the style of how springfield operates. There's a lot of wheeling and dealing in that were journalists early deadline driven ourselves. But of course this is something that makes it difficult because i yet i can't report exactly what is gonna watch. No is this a balanced budget. All of these numbers conjugal. You know it's hard to pinpoint that but it is particularly difficult to do so at midnight when you haven't even have an opportunity to give it a glance. Lebanon reap the elected school board bill. Now that passed the senate late last night. Well past that may thirty first deadline take a look at what mayor lightfoot had to say about its impact on her hiring a new. Ceo as she also just. Because it's not really we'll see what the actual final bill looks like could have could have a negative impact. If a ceo doesn't believe that he or she is actually gonna have the ability to make a meaningful difference in the quality of education in the lives of our children. So heather. what is in this bill. And why did the mayor lose on this. Well it's a twenty one member board which as we heard from our colleague matt would essentially create a fully elected board which would restore which would end mayoral control which began in nineteen ninety five and i think that lightfoot lost this one and although we heard her say it's not a done deal yet it's data go back to the house and then governor has to sign it but it's worth reminding everybody that that lori lightfoot campaigned vociferously in favor of a fully elected school board so i think that she's had trouble communicating about why that changed why she favored a fully elected board but now she says that the city needs a hybrid and part of what she said in recent weeks. It's because the city subsidizes. The chicago public schools to the tune of about five hundred billion dollars a year for pensions. So that is sure to be an issue. I expect we will hear more about that in the coming weeks as the house gears up to come back to vote on the measure that passed the senate and heather. Now that we're past. This may thirty first deadline. What will it take to pass a two thirds majority in house which in a normal Legislator might be tall order but the democrats have supermajority and as amanda has reported all along. The democrats have marched in lockstep under spiegel speaker welsh's of eighty and i would expect that all of them will will vote in favor of an elected school board. They have voted several times in favor of the elected school board over the last several years so mayor lightfoot has a uphill battle with to convince them that what. They voted for several times in the past several years. Isn't the right way to go. Interestingly the mayor has had a lot of success in springfield curious so this just adds that list. And it's not as she has had the victories that her predecessors did in really close relationship with in particular. Ah legislators from chicago. The contingency delegation from chicago is out of sync with the mayor on this one so an ethics reform also passed but critics say it doesn't go far enough which is surprising since we know that former speaker madigan chief of staff tim makes was indicted during the session peres. Well it's not that surprising when you consider the fact that it's hard to get lawmakers to pass legislation that perhaps goes against their personal interests or their financial interest. I mean there were some things accomplished here. The legislative inspector general now has the authority to an investigation of possible corruption among the general assembly. But they make those results public unless they get the approval of a commission of current and former lawmakers. And this is how these laws get stripped of their teeth. All over the state. You know the big problem that reform groups have access or lack of action on ethics. Is that not much was done to solve this revolving door of lawmakers then going into lucrative careers in lobbying or lawmakers that lobby other units have government. While they're a lawmaker web read A arroyo luis arroyo the former lawmaker. So i mean this is kind of one of those only in illinois things so what they were reformed groups wanted was sort of a cooling off period like you can't become or ban outright but they would have settled for something like okay one year or two years after he retires. He can't become a lobbyist. Well here if you retire in the middle of your term you have to wait up to six months but if you finish out your term you end your career. You could become theoretically lobbyists the next day. So they form groups say that doesn't really solve the problem of the revolving door which is at the heart of what's going on with this federal investigation into combat. Ed and speaking of edison battled utility is asking for a rate hike in the middle of bribery scandal. Where four people have been indicted including its former ceo. Amanda is this affecting the bill at all actually comments parent company exelon while those companies will try to separate them. I think it will to people's eyes our and that includes in the general assembly released in the public. Because yes how can that not cast a shadow over all of these things. Me it particularly. It's not just got it's very law. That is cited in those documents where commented admitted to having this long running briberies him really not even a year ago was to support nuclear plants and that is hard this massive energy bill negotiations going on now and i think it's further complicated because it is a flat out you will see you can see on your electric bill. How much a big that. Subsidy is that is going to exelon profitable company. These nuclear plants india not be but the company most certainly is so. There's the corruption and just this year. Nobody especially right now has or wants to give more money out of their pockets to a utility no paris. Lawmakers also moved the primary in twenty twenty two from march to june. Why did they do that. Was you heard the republican leader of the senate mccarthy say earlier the general consensus here is because they really need to wait for that late arriving census data to come in before they draw the new congressional district maps because it has to be. They have to have equal amount of population in each map. They didn't have those restrictions so much with the state and judicial maps that they redrew but moving this primary back and this is just a one time deal where they're gonna move into june from march gives folks time to wait for these new maps to be drawn before they have to start getting stuff ready to run for office all the paperwork so it was an accommodation for that and it's hard to imagine illinois going to be very Influential in the next primary election if if the primaries that far into the summer. You've you've heard folks talk in the past should become one of the first Primary states so that it plays a bigger role in the primary because the illinois is the most representative state population wise of the entire country. So this is kind of the opposite of that now heather. Here's something that you wrote about. Just yesterday the new new term for older men is now alder person go on. That's right so older man is not a gender neutral term and a full thirty percent of the chicago city council is female and it has been wait for it. fifty years. Since the women were elected to the city council so this big elections omnibus bill would change the formal title from all their man to older person or older people and there are. Some alderman are very excited about this and one of them alderman. Andre vazquez of the fortieth had actually introduced a non-binding resolution several months ago to change the world title older That didn't really fly from with his colleagues so seemed like the next best thing but it caught many older that i spoke with this week off guard that it ended up in this bill. The mysterious ways of springfield. You've got to keep a close eye on it. Every single second surprise so both the city and the state are on track for full reopenings as covid nineteen infections remained. Low amanda the. Cdc has recommended that people don't get tested if they think they have the corona virus This refers specifically to those who have been vaccinated but could the infection rate. Actually be higher. I'm no epidemiologist. Know but i mean so theoretically yes but clearly the. Cdc is leaking this because just sort of recommendation because that is not really suspicious. More and more people getting vaccinated. We've known that that was waiting to bring things down. This is the psa journalists we we like suit. Of course we're being is objective as possible but in this case it's all over axiom okay. So earlier we talked about the bill offering a shot and a beer. was signed today by the governor and the governor wants to give out lottery tickets as incentives for folks to get vaccinated heather any evidence that these kind of tactics might work. Yes so. Ohio was the first state to institute a vaccination lottery and they saw a forty five percent increase in the number of people who got vaccinated after the governor announced that maybe could win a million dollars or if they were in highschool a full ride to a state university. So it's clear that there are some people who are waiting to make it worth their while and starting on june tenth if your favorite watering hole is participating in this between the hours of six pm and ten pm and you are a legal drinking age you can bring your vaccination card in demand the boozy drink of your heart celebrate at least the end of the pandemic for you hopefully personally sounds like some people be making plans then so relative good news for the start of the summer. The number of murders over the memorial day weekend was three relative good news. Take a look at what superintendent david brown said about the work of violence interrupters some of our neighborhoods that are increasingly more violent than others. There two to three four o'clock in the morning with ours kaga police officers intervening in ways. That chicago police officers can't know how do we know. Violence interrupters and community partners have been active in years past. What is it that made the difference. This past weekend for that decrease in murders. Well i think we have to wait and see. The summer is very young. it was not hot. It was in fact cold this weekend and experts will tell you that summer violence tracks sometimes with the temperatures. This weekend is supposed to be very very high. So i know that superintendent david brown and mayor lightfoot are also sort of focusing on those efforts but the mayor's strategy to address the stylings has put more money toward sending people who have been a part of the gang life who have criminal histories to go back into the neighborhoods to talk to the people who are either involved in these sort of confrontations. Try to mediate a solution. The mayor sees that as a potentially more effective way of reducing violence than just simply arresting and throwing people in jail. It's very unclear whether that will make a real difference the summer after we've seen just a really steady increase in both shootings and murders truly since the beginning of the pandemic in march twenty twenty. And of course the bad news is that shootings though are still up for that. Same period of twenty twenty twenty twenty. Excuse me amanda. The legislature passed a new gun bill but narrowly the session. What kind of impact or are they hoping. That'll have actually come sorry. The house passed e the senate festivals fame bill and so we are not really left with major changes when it comes to gun licensing. This isn't even see that demand for guns sore. You're even legislators and they say they want to protect themselves so they're hearing from people want to protect themselves frustrated that they can't get that point carpet miyata legally carry a gun and then you have. Critics are saying wait a second the people who are the ones that are perpetrators of these shootings that we see in much of the violence in chicago are not paying much attention to the states. A system to apply for on license. And they're not particularly worried about that so this is most certainly to me. Something that is interesting given that guns are are not a partisan issue it is generally more of a regional one in illinois in yet. We've talked a lot about these super majorities that democrats have and still after years after the more mass shooting the really sort of closer looking at tennyson wise in the state licensing system. Nothing's jinked paris. Could this help potentially with chicago's pervasive gun problem. Or is that more caused by illegal gun. Yeah i hate to be pessimistic. I mean maybe it could cause a small dent as i understand in one of these bills. There's a provision that would require background for private sales but having covered this in the past and talk to County and federal prosecutors is really no way to track the paper trail of gun transfers and There is no paper trail is the thing. And so there's no really prosecute that and the guns that wind up in the streets in chicago the majority of them were not purchased. Here i mean. There are many purchased in cook county or downstate but purchased in indiana or purchasing wisconsin where there are much more lax rules in terms of purchasing in background checks so as long as those border states still have the policies. They have it reasonable to assume that. It's still going to be pretty easy for these guns to get in the hands of of people. Misuse them and quickly. Before we go ahead of barack obama's in chicago this week of course to top the presidential center. Are you surprised that he hasn't been here more to to drum up support for it when there's been some opposition there has been and i think we are really seeing the fact that this is now a done deal building have olive approvals in place. The legal issues by and large have been resolved and several months ago. The city started working on sort of the underground utility work concerns. The road work. That needs to happen before an official groundbreaking can take place which is expected later this summer or early this fall so we're starting to see that. Pr push take shape And it has always hurt the chicago in in my heart. That barack obama has not been back home as much as we had thought that he after his presidential term will portrait is coming soon. So there's that in the meantime my thanks to amanda vicky heather sharon and peres shuts up next a luminous glass addition to the art institute but first a look at the weather talk it is a heavenly depiction of a beautiful place on earth. It's also a fine work of art and one of the newest acquisitions. At the art institute of chicago producer mark batali visited to explore in illuminating landscape made from light and glass just one radiant work transforms the grand staircase at the art institute. Of course it is twenty six feet high and contains forty eight separate sections of stained glass. It was made by tiffany studios and completed in one thousand. Nine hundred seventeen tiffany studios was the four most studios four stained glass and really helped revolutionize the medium here in the united states. They were creating new types of glass new combinations where the natural effects of the landscapes in the scenes that they were depicting is coming through the material. This isn't a work where the surfaces are painted. This is really nature realized through the medium so in its scale in its size in the intricate combination. These last types. There's nothing like it. Acquired from a church in providence rhode island this masterpiece and glass to picks a new england landscape. Not a scene from the bible like you might expect. This was a new direction. That tiffany studios was forging. Louis comfort tiffany had a vision and was interested in landscape. The certainly wasn't something that was common in religious settings at the time. But you start to see them exploring the connection. Between nature and spirituality here that is connected quite literally through the psalm verse. That appears across the bottom of the window. But it's also something that sitting in that space you would've looked up into this kind of natural world and ben moved in that way in the church. The window was positioned high above the altar in its new setting. It's more approachable. The work is attributed to agnes northrop. Who worked in the so-called women's department at tiffany studios. She was the foremost landscape designer for the firm. She was doing these special one of a kind commissions and we can kind of see her hand in the composition in the flora and fauna throughout the scene. She would have been the vision behind this but then you would have had other people that were know chemists who are mixing the glass formulas to create these spectacular nations that could achieve these natural effects. The glass arrived in good condition. But it is over one hundred years old and needed restoration and careful installation. Other architectural treasures. Share the space with the monumental work which is lit from behind by led lighting the sky. Light over the staircase as highlights throughout the day late change. It's never the same in any moment that you're looking at it. So the light coming through the mountains down the waterfall. It's different from perspective throughout the gallery. It also is different throughout the day so to me. It's a singular work in this space and yet it looks like it's been here all along for chicago tonight. This is mark fatality. Neither the church which remains open nor the art institute will say how much that window cost and the church wanted stewards who could restore it to its former glory and place it where could be seen by more people and the art institute wanted a unique piece of american art. So there you go. It's called the heart. Worm hartwell memorial window and it's now permanently on view and that is our show for this wednesday night. Please join us tomorrow. Night live at seven one on one with governor jay pritzker and his assessment of the spring legislative session and a new skateboard program created during the pandemic in chicago. Youth the chance to shred at local boys and girls clubs and now for all of us here at chicago tonight. i'm parachutes and i'm brandis friedman. Thanks for watching. Stay healthy and safe and have a good night Closed captioning for this program has made possible by robert a clifford and clifford law offices pleased to give back to the community through numerous charitable initiatives.

chicago illinois senate Michael madigan durkin jim durkin mayor lightfoot michelle gilbert governor pritzker michelle lori lightfoot gary madigan quinn myers legislature brandon friedman general assembly john baptiste
June 29, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:50 min | 1 year ago

June 29, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening welcome to Chicago tonight. I'm Paris parachutes and I'm Brandon Friedman on the show tonight. A debate over the Supreme Court's of Washington ruling after a violent weekend, local outreach workers tell us how they're trying to help. Investing in communities, one brush stroke at a time. When you can and can't do it, force preserves starting next week, and a local flew food blogger behind the website. Black people eat, but I Paris back to you for some of the top developments from today. And thank you Brian is the city is released police video and other files related to an October incident when former Chicago police superintendent, Eddie Johnson was found slumped over behind the wheel of his car. City. Video appears to show Johnson slurring his speech as officers check in on him Johnson was fired last December by Mayor Lori lightfoot, because she said he lied to her about what happened that night and Inspector General report, found he had been drinking driving and socializing with a female companion, who was not his wife, and we have more on this story on our website and we'll have more tomorrow night on Chicago tonight. Chicago Police Department announces it is beefing up its presence on the street for the coming fourth of July weekend this after yet another deadly weekend of gun violence. That's all fourteen people fatally shot including a one year old and a ten year old police Superintendent David Brown, says an additional twelve hundred police officers will be on the streets in hotspots starting on Thursday. This follows a similar strategy deployed during summer holiday weekends. We'll have more on this weekend's gun violence in just a moment. South side neighborhoods are getting some badly needed. Public Investment Mayor Lori. lightfoot announces his eleven million dollars in public grants the south side neighborhood of Auburn Gresham. We'll get four million dollars for a healthy lifestyle hub which includes a healthcare facility and fitness center, and the North Lauderdale community will get seven million dollars for Mount Sinai Hospital's surgical an ambulatory, Care Center the eleven, million dollars is part of a seven hundred fifty million dollar fund to distribute to projects in several west and south side corridors over the next three years. Some relief for bears season ticket holders team announces that they can get a full refund for the twenty twenty season, and still be able to renew their tickets in the same seats for the following, Season Club says it is still hopeful to be able to stage home. Football Games with some fans in the stadium, but mayor lightfoot has not yet indicated whether that will be the case. The bears I scheduled regular season home game is September twentieth against the New York giants. And now back to Brandis with more on proposed solutions to the spike in gun violence brandis. Paris by any standard June has been a brutal month for gun violence in Chicago this past weekend alone fourteen people were shot to death in Chicago, including two young children one year old, sincere Gaston in Inglewood and ten year old Lena, numerous and Logan Square this morning. Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown spoke about the weekend's violence. are struggled to make sense. Of the reckless gun violence. That continues to take the lives. Of Our young people. Throughout the city. The guns and the cowart. These evil bastards. Behind those guards. Caused the senseless loss. Of Life of life over the past weekend. Tonight as part of WTO firsthand initiative exploring gun violence in Chicago, we take a closer look at what's happening this summer in the city and efforts to curb the violence and he'll communities joining us are Vanessa Perry to reef director of training at the Metropolitan Peace Academy, which trains street outreach workers, Mauricio de as a west side street outreach worker for. Chicago and Ramon Hooks a southside street outreach worker for target area. Development, corporation, Mr Hooks, and Mr which say just graduated from the Metropolitan Police Academy last week. Congrats to the both of you on that and thanks to all of you for joining us. So. Let's let's talk a little bit about the difference in. The some of the numbers from June. Twenty, nineteen to June twenty twenty, so comparing the same time period, June first and June. Twenty second there were two hundred twelve shootings in two thousand, nineteen, compared to three hundred and sixty six shootings in the same time period this year, that's an increase of one hundred and fifty four shootings seventy two percents, if percentages helps, which sounds very significant. Ramon. Let's start with you. Please you do street outreach work in the communities that are most affected by violence. What are your thoughts on why this June has been so violent? Besides the fact that the pandemic that we all been locked down and don't say it has a is. There's no one thing. The fan damage being locked down the social media people been on now making up these coming up with different types of our, no, saying Argh, with people might comment on somebody's Beige, and they don't like it, and you know what I'm saying in his old historical beefs. You know saying India's newbies when someone is shot now. You got a whole nother B is is there's no one thing you know what I'm saying is like we find it all fronts right now. You know what I'm saying. We are here at dawn. Best can and I'm telling week. Is A new. Every day. What are what are your thoughts on why? This June is so violent? Ramon pandemic, just having just these speaking, you know whoever it is. The quarantine the current teeth, keeping people. You don't secluded their. You know their thoughts running you. Everything's. You know bodily. No put them there. WanNa go out, so it's the same thing with the social media. Everything at all comes together because. On the social media especially right during this foreign team is exceeded of past I mean everything goes for one somebody CDs not on I'll reach workers. We try to do what we cannot social lead us to the best of our knowledge, and to get information on there, but one fantasies are part. We can again no more than that so when they come outside especially right now through this space forward. They're getting Tacoma side just a little bit and get the taste of this warm air. People just don't know how to act and then DC one or not in the street and all. This! And we'll have a number. A number of children have been among the victims this month. We've all covered this journalists for some time. was there not code at some point you know between you know for example if you're out on the streets, and you see a member of the opposition with family members. To with hold your fire until they are alone. Did that code not exist and what happened to it, Mauricio. Along generation after generation kids and you know they came about to where they just don't. Like I I look at it, you know they don't respect the code. No more. There's no more law. There's no more respect for the families for children very now it's just about being gung Ho, and whoever's went you? They're going to get shower too, and I. Don't know where it is wh. Where did he? To shoot anybody which you know like. As a former gang member, it was like you didn't do that. You couldn't do none a day couldn't do nothing night. Then you know, and that's breaking respect, and now it's just it's just ridiculous. These guys. I'm shooting. Just stop the shooting just. Put the Grade I. WanNa come back in a bit to you know to the work. All three of you are doing to get folks to stop shooting and to put the guns down. Vanessa period reef. Let's come to you. Though what do you think the mayor should be doing to prevent violent violence both in the short and the long term? I think that putting more efforts toward the St Mary's community that we've discussed as a really good way to help support those who are critical to making sure we de-escalate the balance in our communities on grading trump more trauma informed communities that means, and what that looks like an action on creating a community healing spaces. I'm reading spaces of empathy and safe spaces for a children's who find his refuge are right now. We have a lot of our babies in our arms. Young people in those that we are talking about. About that are these evil bass, or so to speak on what has happened, so then what have they been? It's also the leads to want manifest. This type of behavior is negative behavior to have such a negative impact on our communities. So how do we have those conversations with them about the trauma? They've been exposed to to where they are. Now I'm manifested in such negative behaviors and having such a negative impact on our families in our communities, and so I think that as a leader. That's a huge lift you know. You don't have one. Acidic solution however I do believe that if we become. Create, more trauma informed city, using that lands to be more empathetic and understanding about what we're saying and how we approach what we're saying in our communities. That's very. And obviously what you all do is a very huge lift. Ramon Hooks talked to me about what outreach workers do after incidents of violence to prevent more violence. Will we. We first we try to find out the information. You know what I'm saying. We'll saturated. With. Education than the name was known was going on. Because note, mopey can be shot if they don't they not aware, or they may be in the middle of a was also we. We gather information a fan. The bodies involved and we try to mediate situation back. No saying Gidon ease bodied to maybe stand down or get them to a safe place where we gotta talk about. No said mediating in a in a in a way where no more shooting goes on that we is mediation is going on that people don't hear about. It could be much worse. You have mediations going on with EGWU LA- down. You know what I'm saying and allow us to go and deal with other problems in evernote. non-aggression agreement well once that we both agreed not to go on each other's throats in shooting. Vanessa paired reef. Tell us how the Peace Academy works to prepare outreach workers for this kind of work. Definitely so as eighteen weeks of information and subjects and topics that are central to the work of the street outreach professional, so we'll learn how to be professional l. they'll. Standards and competencies are related to of outreach work. How to communicate appropriately. What are those the Dan and live with the street outreach worker, so we cover and those eighteen weeks central topics that will help them, and even enhance their already unique skill set to go out an helps you restore communities and Vanessa. Do you think this summer will continue to be violent? Team the instances of violence. However, response can be different. We always have to create a solution space response and an asset base was possible. We see here in our city and our assets that our children need that human resource human resource integral to making sure that we heal our city. Lots of work to be done lots to talk about unfortunately I'm afraid we'll be talking about this more this summer. My thanks to Vanessa Perry to Reef Mauricio de as an Ramon Hook. Thank you. Up next parachutes is officially back in the studio and shares highlights from our Kovin Chicago series, but first a look at the weather. Chicago has seventy seven official community areas, and over the past three months, parachutes and our team have visited forty two of them as well as twelve Chicago suburbs and Illinois cities and towns. All told we've covered when I say we I mean them. We've covered five states to tell this story. In addition to Illinois, we've been to Milwaukee and Kenosha Wisconsin. Gary Indiana Davenport Iowa and the rest of the quad cities and Saint Joseph Michigan. Parachutes is back with us now along with producer Quinn Myers in the Chicago Tonight Studio for the first time in more than three months. Welcome back, guys. So. Paris guys before we talk about some of the takeaways from the journey. Let's take a very quick look at all the places you've been an assist from our Amanda Finicky as well. Why on Earth am I here. I'm Brandon Friedman here in our north. West Side Studio and I'm parachutes reporting live from Chicago's Chinatown Community for on Divine Avenue one of the most diverse neighborhoods anywhere in the country. We are just outside the south. Shore Cultural Center. The predominant message here in Little village is all hands on deck in beverly on the South side from the uptown neighborhood from East Garfield Park from north suburban. Would Chicago's Chatham neighborhood from just over the Wisconsin? Wisconsin border in Kenosha tonight. I met Chicago police headquarters from boy's town in the Lakeview neighborhood. I am back in the little village neighborhood on the southwest side to talk more about the uproar about what happened right behind me Saturday mornings from the Austin Neighborhood Albany Park Neighborhood West suburban Aurora Illinois and I'm Amanda any key live from Blue Island from Chicago's Montclair neighborhood? I mean heck wish tonight. Brighton Park suburban Cicero Auburn Gresham. CHICAGO'S O'HARE. O'hare airport from across the border in Gary Indiana in Wonky again from the lakefront here in Rogers Park Hyde Park Belmont Craig in the South side communities of Roseland and pullman. McKinley Park Kankakee from north suburban. skokie Logan Square on the city's northwest side from Englewood from outside the State House in Davenport Iowa from Edison Park Marquette Park in the broader Chicago Lawn Neighborhood Saint Joseph in south western Michigan in the loop Aurora headed toward relief. Relief Ville were in Lakeview right now in the near West Side Illinois medical, district in Pilsen on the city's southwest side, didn't River North Area bridgeport North Lauderdale South Chicago parent from back of the yards from Evanston, in Brownsville historic neighborhood from portage park from woodlock from Chicago's Buck town and wicker park areas. I'm in edgewater Indian, Oak Park in the West suburbs, from Elgin and we're back tonight to see. Chinatown spring back to life. That's the travelogue. Paris Quin. Okay, so let's take another quick look. The maps I one that encompasses the entire series from Kenosha to Kankakee Davenport to Gary and Saint Joseph hundreds of miles traveled to really get a picture of the people and stories throughout the region, and then this map shows just how much territory we covered in the Chicago area, and as I mentioned, we reported we. We feel like I'm taking all the good credit you guys. Thanks. I agree in forty two of the city's seventy seven community areas. So you covered a lot of ground. How did you guys go about putting this together? Every day? Well was really old, fashioned shoe leather reporting, which is what was fun about brands, and we really did want to focus on some of the overlook neighborhoods in Chicago, and so we Kinda wake up in the morning. Make a million calls. We didn't really have much of a roadmap, but then it just came down to being in the neighborhood, walking around seeing things knocking on doors, talking to people than they would refer you to other people in the get sort of a tableau. What was happening in that community? We also had one point there was A. Food Bank Line Brighton part that was about a half of my long. Get our cameraman. Felix had spotted, and we're thinking well. We really gotta go shoot tag. Here's another food bank that Quinn had spotted. Near Cicero I believe I'm starting to Hilton so just being there and stumbling upon stories, and you know there are few examples of. That are unlikely stories we got there was a pharmacy. We found in North Lonsdale after the George Floyd rallies and we figured well. Maybe he has a story about a neighborhood unrest, and he gave us some interesting insight into police community relations, and then one of our first stories. We were out in little village again I was walking around I, saw this little locally owned pharmacy, and he told us how he had sort of reimagined his store as a place where undocumented immigrants could go to get information Malkovich. People are panicking because they don't know. What to do. So we're here to give this information and. To direct people. And we will try our best if there is A. Criminal activity going on I. Don't call the police I find out who's calling the shots and then once I do that. Then I do with them directly and I've learned through my father that you get more respect that way because community saying okay, we appreciate that you're not to please you willing to deal with us one on one. I don't have any problems, so if there is a problem I know who to talk to, and then they take care of it. Yes and we tried to book two interviews for every show. We talked a lot of local Alderman state senators local officials, but we also really wanted to get on the ground. Social Service agencies community groups people who actually know what was happening in their community and could see how was being in some cases severely impacted by Kobe one thousand nine. We heard from people like Tim Eagle. At the Roseland Community Hospital, who when we interviewed him in May was pretty outraged, because his small neighborhood hospital still hadn't received any of the states, a Lotta Ram desktop here. That's the drug that has been shown to help. Treat severe cases of covid eighteenth. Randy's Aveer is here in Illinois, but it's nowhere near the new roles and Community Hospital I. Guess we didn't qualify and I. Just WanNa I can't understand why that is. We had the sickest of the sick and we have people dying. We have a thirty seven percent morbidity rate for those who, in patients who are admitted cove in nineteen so you? You have the most vulnerable patients that could benefit from Rome desert. The disparity here is unquestionable. I'll African Americans are dying at alarming rate where seven percent of the population sixteen percent of the deaths. Here in Chicago disappear should be here. Here at roles and Community Hospital there. They're also situations brands. Where a lot of this didn't come together until the very last minute, so let's go back to that controversial implosion of the Crawford. Coal Plant in little village. The local Alderman there Mike. Rodriguez had come under fire because he didn't give residents much of a warning about it, and he had okayed it, so we tried to get a hold of him all day to get him to comment at six forty five. He calls, and says I like an opportunity to address your audience and here's what he had to say about it. I obtained a commitment from the developer. To inform the community of what was about to happen. I acknowledged that once I finalized my research and knew that the city had given this permit, and there was no way we could delay or Cancel the process. I have gone. online and let folks know what was going on. It was a mistake. It's a mistake I acknowledge. It's something that will never happen again on leadership. So you went out and interview people all day, and then put it together while prepping for the show. Yeah, that's kind of the process and you know. We had to set up the interviews. And then we went and did drive on. Some of these communities are pretty big, so it's a lot of ground to cover and then. Once we have all that in the can I kind of sit in my car. Quinn sits in his car. We're working on her laptop. We're cutting video were writing. The scripts were getting it ready. And we're done it about six fifty nine, just in time for the show to start. Yeah, and one really fun challenge. I was finding out figuring out where we should go every night. Where should we do the live shot and we tried to neighborhood landmarks when there were some, so we picked everything from the south shore. Cultural Center to the Porch, theater and portage park to the givens castle, and Beverly Chicago's only castle. Castle to the Chinatown Arch and sometimes we go live from events or gathering spaces. You know something that was happening around the city. This is out of the community discussion in Evanston just a few weeks ago about funding the police where people gathered in small groups to talk about what the ideas were and kind of build an action plan and we were as you can see about two hundred feet away or so. You guys did almost all of your live shots outside in the communities that you were on, but of course that means you guys into running into the elements a few times well, it's amazing how long winter lasts in Chicago. House spring. Never arise just goes right from winter to summer, but we always knew that it was freezing. Most of the nights we got lucky with the rain. A quin you know would get a backup plan inside somewhere. Whether looked ominous. There are few times that we had to do that. Other Times. We kind of rolled the dice on the weather to some mixed results especially here when we were in south Chicago trying to get the skyway in the background. Peggy I'm sorry to hear that. We're GONNA we're. GonNa leave it there. As the weather gets a little more income in here and Brandis. We're going to toss it back to you in that warm dry studio. Peggy, thank you so much for being out here with US and braving. and. We'll wrap it up and just a bit. Sorry Peres, get someplace safe. Now that you're back, you know that the studio is Dr. Ward known. About a month ago, of course, you've got shifted from covering not just Kobe, but also the aftermath of the death of George. Florence Floyd in the unrest that ensued. How have you guys shifted gears to cover that story? This model of reporting was really well suited for that story, because it affected every single neighborhood, and we could sort of get a ground level view of. Of how it had been affected so the day after the weekend, the most of the unrest happened. We didn't really know where to go. We decided on south shore because we just had gotten word that there was going to be a cleanup effort. We get down there. One of our cameraman Tim. Boy Did found this little store where a woman was kind of cleaning up. She was the owner. She's cleaning up. been completely wiped out. We had gotten a tip when we were down there that the jewel at seventy fifth and stony island that the managers had given up, and they were just letting everyone walkout with everything, so it was a surreal scene here as people just racing out with bags of stuff, but then other people are just clinic cleaning up, and then folks are kind of looking on distraught at the whole thing. Breaking the glass and All of the controversy that's taking place when those in their shopping trying to get this up. Cabinet off the jail. Thursday ridiculous man it is is ridiculous thoughts last night. Thoughts last night. Were you know what I don't WanNa? Do it anymore, but this morning. Due to the overwhelming help I received and everything to help. Clean up and everything I. Sutton decimal some things. So you see a lot of community support, and it makes you want to keep going yes. Yes so for that week I think it was the first week of June. We're pretty much covering protests. And we were in the protests I mean we were trying to walk alongside them, or in one case in real run alongside them with our camera crew, which went decently. Well, I think. So? We tried to get people sensitive whether we like to be there. What people's demands were why they were marching in the first place? I'm probably. The most interesting marches that we covered in Pilsen Willow village where people had organized so-called unity marches organized to express solidarity between the Black and Brown communities, after a few days of really heightened tensions in the on the southwest side of Chicago. You're definitely got your steps in ticket or steps I have to mention Soda Dr Photographers and they were amazing throughout all this. We had a rotation Felix, Mendez Michael Cox but also Damon Ranger Tim Boyd and grant banks. You know they all it takes. To keep up with this guy. All right and of course thanks to you both obviously welcome back excellent work. This is not the end of our commitment to community reporting. In fact, it's just the beginning I'm taking notes because starting this Thursday and every Thursday moving forward will be out in a different Chicago community or Chicago area to take an in depth, look at issues, affecting the people of our city and region, meanwhile on our website W. W. dot com slash news. You can go to any of our covert across Chicago stories. When you scroll down to the bottom, you'll see an interactive map once there. Click on the pull down menu and pick any of the communities. We visited to get links to the stories we've reported. Celta come on Chicago tonight. and gets the go-ahead racing and betting during pandemic. and. Sometimes people just want to write their name on the wall. reinvesting in Chicago neighborhoods through art. The county is loosening restrictions at forest preserves can and can't do. It so. That looks good and how locally founded website? Black people eats promoting black owned restaurants. And parachutes talks about his field, reporting uncovered covid nineteen across Chicagoland again but I. The US Supreme Court is handing victory to abortion rights advocates in a major ruling. The case June medical services versus Russo challenged Louisiana law, requiring abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, but in a five to four decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the law much like Texas law that the court also struck down placed an undue burden on abortion service providers, joining us to discuss the ruling are Peter Breen the vice president and senior counsel at the Thomas. More Society a conservative public interest, law firm and Andy Friedman, a board member of Personal Pack Illinois based pro-choice Political Action Committee. Welcome both of you to Chicago tonight. Thanks for joining us. Thank you? So, Andy Friedman, let's start with you. Please give us a background on this case and the ruling the arguments in this case. Sure so this case was essentially re-litigating case. The court decided for years ago. Called Whole Woman's health. In that case, the court said that Texas which had a law virtually identical to the one at play in Louisiana here today. Was a Texas required. Admitting villages for abortion providers with those are in short, our requiring anyone who wants to provide an abortion in a state to be allowed to admit patients to hospital in therefore visit the patient in the hospital The court found that it was clear that these laws were. Native for no other reason and shutdown next they provided no actual benefit to women's health or anyone's health, and the only reason they were emplaced, was because they were impossible to obtain for many providers many clinics literally only because they were providing abortions and. Two safe and hospitals weren't interested in providing these privileges, so the court found there was no question that these laws were simply there to shut down abortion clinics, and not have any safety benefits at all and struck down the launch taxes here. We are four years later deja-vu. The same law is in place. Louisiana the fifth circuit upheld it and Supreme Court said today. You can't ignore our resident. This clear violation of women's health and the the law was struck down. Peter, brained. How do you view this case? What's your reaction to this ruling? Well and Certainly I'm disappointed that the court allowed Louisiana law struck down Louisiana, law. The but the way it was done so four one force. We've got nine justices five to make a majority, Justice Roberts was the one, and so his decisions, GonNa, control and he essentially repealed. Woman's health at least a standard that had been adopted whole women's health for years ago. He said well. We're GONNA. Treat like cases alike and the Louisiana. Law was a little too close to taxes, and so he did affirm it that way, but he said we're not going into a balancing test. His words a very particularly. He was saying you know we just. The courts are not able to balance. A women's health, and then the right of a state to protect on born life versus the right to abortion. He said it. It's a his his quote was. It's like judging. A particular line is longer than a particular rock is heavy, and so he really kind of blew up what had been done in whole poll? Woman saw years ago, so it was a bit of a win, but still you're losing your admitting privileges. Requirement out of Louisiana Law. Law But it's very needs to be made clear. These laws had required previously either a transfer agreement or admitting privileges now they were trying to just go with admitting privileges. You've still got protections for women. The the point is in a botched abortion situation. Making sure there's a continuity of care for a woman when she goes to the hospital. Because you've got cases, I know of them personally where women have had these terrible complications on an. Arrived at the hospital and the hospital has no idea what's going on. So that was the purpose of transfer agreement or admitting privileges, and we had hoped they would uphold it. But again did not today, but again we still got the ability to transfer agreements and other related Andy Friedman's. He's what about know. What would the law have meant for people who are seeking an abortion in the Louisiana? Would've been devastating in the state of Louisiana, so I will add here while we got a reprieve here and we're very grateful for that, and for all the people, Louisiana will still be free to access abortion care. We want to be clear that we were already at a crisis point in Louisiana and in this country for abortion access even before the court took. Is Case Ravi Way was not enough will never be enough. We know that if you're struggling financially if you are rural if you will are low income or person of color or you, you already have significant barriers to get care, so the court here didn't job at a minimum, if followed its own rules around President Roberts admitted. We had to follow his own rules have any credibility because anything less would have been a little verse, but it just upheld the status quo, which is still not good enough. Just three clinics is still unconscionable in a state the size Louisiana so I think this was one stop, but frankly we should be talking on how we're expanding access to care, not these political ruses to shut down clinics pretending that. That we need the transfer agreements in order to keep one of the safest procedures out there to be saved, because it's simply not true, and everybody knows that those who are against abortion access to don't want people to be free to control their lives in this way were saying that we're seeing that they weren't winning. They were not overturning Roe, so they looked furniture strategy and that strategy was these. Emitting privileges type laws that would simply shut down clinics, so that was their back door to try to shut down clinics so far failed, but it was a reprieve and more coming down the Pike and Peter Brand sort. What's what's next? Illinois is a state that's you know secured a number of rights for people seeking abortions Do you have some hope based on how Chief Justice John Roberts voted in this particular case. He actually said in his opinion. I wasn't asked to overturn Casey. It was almost as if if they had asked he would've looked at it and so he left open the door to overturning Casey and row. That sort of precedent, but I think it bears repeating that in states like no, we repealed entirely our health and safety licensing, even though it had been used to shut down. Bad abortion clinics previously. Including weren't sterilizing instruments in Rockford Lincoln. Would you had other abortion clinics that had had serious health violation. Personal Pack had helped to get the law repeal altogether, so there is no more licensing requirement that allows for health and safety inspections from the State of Illinois and Louisiana. We had hoped that we would win there because it was a different record than the Texas case from four years ago Louisiana. You'd have women who who's uteruses perforated. They sat waiting in the ER. had terrible terrible consequences that admitting privileges laws would have assisted ensuring continuity of care again if you're gonNA have abortion legal, it needs to be held to the highest level of standard the same standard. You'd expect on e. surgery or anything else that you might have. This should be held to that same standard. Worst as being held to a much higher standard one that is completely unrelated to the actual safety of abortion, which is extraordinarily safe, so. Not have to. Worry come, we'll folks. I'm sure we'll continue to have this debate. It's not going anywhere. I'm certain of that, but we are out of time at this point. My thanks to Peter Breen Andy Friedman thanks to you both for joining US tonight. Thank you thank you. A year ago, nearly to the day Illinois Governor Jay Pritzker signed a law that would massively expand gambling state then the pandemic hit, and as with so much else casinos closed down. They may be down, but are they out Amanda. finicky joins us now with the latest Hey Amanda. Abraham for actually going to start Arlington Racetrack. Normally this time of year is the track's busiest because it only runs thoroughbred racing during the summer months not lately, though do of course to the coronavirus. When you have a facility that holds twenty five to thirty five thousand people, and it's since. And just see the wind and the dust bowl, and through the grandstand we have a very large landscape year three, hundred, twenty six to eight years in. It's just dust bowl in the weeds grow real quick during the summer of the Spring Rain So. It's been quite challenging in that respect Harlington preparing the grounds because that is sent to change, horses are beginning to move back into the stalls this week, and then raising his to begin later this month on the twenty third of June. July, that is the situation is different at Hawthorne race courses this row where horses run nearly year round, which means that horses as well as their trainers and owners who sometimes literally live at Hawthorn were on the grounds when Covid nineteen? Hundreds of horses were already on the grounds of residents were already on the grounds, and we were conducting races then when the pandemic hit it shut down the live racing aspect of sense, but what it did it change the fact that you had this essential industry, which is the care for racehorses in the state of Illinois and the agribusiness that follows with the of racehorses, so throughout the course of the pandemic that was going on each and every day. Because no matter what happens, you have to care for these animals. The owners and trainers didn't have however was a way to make money to care for them, because earnings come from curses when the horses run. Things were getting really tight for a lot of the horsemen, because it's a matter of almost survival, feeding myself or my feeding my racehorse, and all of these people are going to choose the racehorse first and foremost. Tell you it just a complete breath of fresh air? We got the news to get back onto the racetrack. They turn on to the puck on has been running races for a few weeks now, but one big difference from raises of old. There are no spectators from a monetary standpoint. It's not white as great, but it is going pretty well Miller. Folks are still betting on horse racing. So that means money is flowing. There's been no outbreak also nineteen. He says they've been taking safety very seriously. Has Bigger plans so part of that massive gambling expansion bill also allows horse. Race tracks to become casinos racing. Those other has the application and is waiting for the racing board for approval now you also have a law in Illinois. That's paving the way for sports. Betting rivers casino in disclaims opened the state's first sportsbook to great band bear relieve March, but within weeks time it had to shut down. Down Because of Covid Nineteen Illinois now allowing river, other casinos to reopen granted with your gamblers allowed, and they all have to be wearing masks and keeping their social distance, starting Wednesday sports betting however did not come to a complete stop over this time this month. Rivers became the first in the state to debut online sports wagering. This is a platform that allows us to play some unconventional wagers. Betting live on a game changes everything because you can bet on, will the next. You're watching results in a goal or a made basket. You can bet by quarter so it really for a lot of people who have become you know armchair quarterbacks in fantasy football measures. This gives them the best way to feel a part of the game. By bidding on each and every part of it. Is that as any sports fan knows there hasn't been a ton to bet on lately. So arranged the top sports to bet on that rivers, mobile platform, soccer, Gulf and ultimate fighting that could change as other sports return. And football is king in this country. We we are seeing a healthy amount of. Chicago bears bats. So While sports has has gone away for a little bit. The Passion for it has not and I. Think you're seeing that. In the State of Illinois. Now odds are good. They're going to be more changes on the gambling front and Illinois that law in two, thousand, nine, hundred also authorise six new casinos, including one that will go to this. How suburbs for Keegan and then of course Chicago's. Even more competitive for throwback racing in this state and I think in the nation at large with the casinos, coming back online and most stage online gaming, coming back on, and as you start to see some of these other sports comeback on with Baseball Football College football it's it's going to be a market. That's going to be tough to penetrate. Arlington, trying to penetrate that market by petitioning the state to allow socially distance spectators back in the stands. Prentice back to you Amanda Thank you. A family of artists is encouraging communities to reclaim their neighborhoods through the art of storytelling arts correspondent Angel Edo shares more. The intersection of Seventy Jeffrey was once described as the main artery of the south shore. But that since changed disinvestment and blight now stand in its place, so artists Dorian. Sylvain decided to reclaim the corner with art, so we feel that this coroner is such an important intersection for the community. The children seniors the neighbors that live here. They're reclaiming it artistically. It doesn't change the fact that this building still abandoned, but it does tackle the. The psychological. Stress of seeing abandoned properties everywhere you look mural moves a campaign executed by Sylvain in her artistic children has been working to help beautify black and brown businesses during the pandemic I love working with them. But, also about kind of passing down scales, passing down legacy, passing down ideas of citizenship, and how we as artists have commitments to our our neighborhood. They invited artists from the neighborhood to volunteer their time and invest in their community. You know a lot of our neighborhoods are in the conditioning and because they're neglected. Especially in the arts I just WANNA make sure. That I use my art as a form of protest because I think my slogan is artists. My weapon may not be out there on the frontlines fighting and you know whatever whatever the case may be I just feel like this is my way of. Showing. My Solidarity with the Movement to help advance. The culture to the level is supposed to be. It's an opportunity for anyone to come out and share their story. That's how ten year old. A Shea Williams ended up painting this. She was just walking down the street with her parents and decided to stop. Hold Dead Day. They like it if they want to. They don't have to like it so vain. Son Kahari says it's interceptions like these that speak to the necessity behind their work. Cultivating younger artists is really important and like mentorship, and having like people that have experienced that you can talk to about about it is. A big part of the game, but the help of a few students art teacher Warez Hawkins created a piece that references a poem by Paul Laurence Dunbar. We wear the mass at grins and lies so that's really applicable to what we're going through now sort of like as people of Color Facie. Really what they've been facing for Vasovagal hundred years, but now it's like the SCAB is ripped off. But at the same time, it's like that's how we always have to keep our cool, and we have to keep our calm, and we have to find ways to survive and to thrive in spite of all the crazy. Kind of bragging your spit. Mature Spirit filled. The lighter you know for Arlene Turner Crawford was about paying tribute to late civil rights activists Dr Conrad war-era a phrase that she believes embodies his work. candace hunter continued series she started when the pandemic began titled Brown Limb. Girls the figures in the peace are just about joy about sunshine and life and loving being in the skin there it's this message and many other shared at this intersection that reflected the long term impact of so veins mission. We all just want to be heard, and not everybody has a capacity to draw beautiful things, and sometimes people just want to write their name on the wall. You know but it's it is about giving people that platform giving people an opportunity that doesn't feel intimidating. Four Chicago tonight I'm Angel Edo. The Art. Initiative has since taken a break, but will resume services after the holiday weekend. visit our website for more information on where they painted so. And where they're headed and now back to Paris and the loosening of restrictions Cook County forest preserves Paris. Brennan grilling and other activities are back on the cook. County forest preserves and joining us with a rundown of what we can and can't do at the forest preserve is WTO w reporter Patty. Wesley Patty good to see you. Back here in the studio, you cozy there at home in Lincoln Square. Okay, so what can we expect to open after the fourth of July weekend? So there are a bunch of parking lot sent. The most popular deserves that have been closed on weekends. Those are staying closed through the six after the six. Those are going to be open so at places like woods Dan Ryan Woods those will be open. Picnic tables people can start using picnic tables again, and the forest preserves nature centers. Those are going to be back opened the main buildings, the grounds and trails, and importantly the bathrooms will be open at the nature centers Lasting to open is going to be the swallow. Click stairs in Hills Park super-popular attraction. It's enclosed this old time. That's not opening up until July nine, so as of the ninth, that'll be open, and that's the same day that people can start bringing grills and coolers into the forest preserves again it's. got to the swallow cliff stairs I gotta check those never been all right. So what's going to remain closed then after July six until further notice? Yes, sad news, especially because we've got so much hot weather now, but aquatic centers are closed for all twenty twenty, so sorry swimmers, no luck. Agers not closed. Though nature's open pouring cold water on our hopes to go to aquatic. All right, you can read patties full story on our website where you can find more details on what's opening up at the forest preserves after July fourth. That's W. W. dot com slash news. Steep decline in business, due to covid nineteen or property damage, following civil unrest restaurants have not had it easy the past few months here in Chicago. There's a man doing his best to elevate black owned restaurants through. Social Media Chicago Tonight's Evan Garcia met up with Jeremy Joyce. The founder of black people eats to learn more. So, Jeremy Joyce is enjoying some waffles at cleo southern cuisine in the Brownsville. Neighborhood on Chicago's south side. Everything we do is creole spikes, but it's had a southern flair. Oh look at this ya liberties. Jeremy's not just a regular customer. He's the man behind black people eats a website showcasing black owned restaurants. Further Nicole in the Black Community Pratt ourselves. Connecting people to blog on restaurants and heaven blagden restaurants increase. Revenue through media. CLIOS wasn't even one year old. When covid nineteen hit Chicago, the restaurant had to let go of two part time employees, and is now only open on the weekend. Still owner. Chrissy Harper says they're adapting. Its small restaurant, a small so customers love coming in and being able to interact with us, and we can't really do that through the door, so we really try to bump up our customer service and td literally on the phone, taking orders, but like seventeen minutes just having conversation, so we don't lose that connection with our customers. Oh! My God today. Jeremy is trying the PAN, seared salmon with lump, crab, meat and sweet chili sauce. He was kind enough to share some with me. Special de Sauce. Taste the rice. Right. It made sense no. To the actually. because. It's year whereby. Okay you? Also when he coded in. Greece offs. Black Gravy it tastes better when you heated I text her to say y'all even better than. The sauces somehow just sunk in. CLEO's is one of several restaurants benefiting from the Black Owned Restaurant Relief Fund. A gofundme me Jeremy started to help restaurants featured on his site, so he was able to raise seventy five thousand dollars. We split the money evenly among fifty four restaurants, and actually the checks in the mail, and they're going out to black on Ross to help further their business. The President of the Illinois Restaurant Association has said Chicago restaurants have seen an average eighty percent loss in revenue during the covid nineteen pandemic. Another black owned business getting help from Jeremy is the ice cream shop kill wins in Hyde Park. Jackie Jackson owns this kill wins and two others in the loop he. Is, getting the community involved with supporting black on small businesses. He's been very successful, and it has been definitely a big third in business. Since this has started since this initiative has started Jeremy's from Chicago's south suburbs since he started black people eats in December, two thousand seventeen. The site has expanded to include Atlanta Houston. DC and other US. Cities Goals is creating a black people eats in every city, a company that can truly connect the world's of black restaurants everywhere. Salmon for Chicago tonight this Garcia. In case you're wondering black people eats isn't Jeremy Choices full-time gig yet? At least he currently works at an investment firm and produces his own food blog on his own time, and up next more highlights from our covert across Chicago series, so please stay with us. This evening's presentation of Chicago tonight is made possible in part by COM. Ed powering lives. We have tremendous source of untapped efficient energy. Right here in our school. The comment. Energy efficiency program has relied for making schools energy-efficient. And we're back now. With more from parachutes on the copen across Chicago series that he and producer Quinn Myers embarked on over the last three, and a half months the to hit forty two Chicago community areas as well as twelve suburbs and Illinois cities along with hitting towns in Iowa, Wisconsin Indiana and Michigan. NPR's is here again to unpack what it all means. Means Peres! Is there an overarching theme that you discovered from getting such a ground level view of the city? Well, see this brand's I think it's a city that it's an intense pain right now. Economically health wise especially in some of the neighborhoods that have suffered disinvestment for many years. It's very clear that covert nineteen, and then the civil unrest after George Floyd. Floyd has put a microscope on the structural inequities that exists in this city have existed for many decades. They are plainly out in the open right now. It's also on a microscopic view. We discovered pretty early on that. This was hitting. Black and Brown communities disproportionately cove one thousand nine. Hundred isn't Wbz came out with that amazing analysis of just how that was. Was Happening, so I? I WANNA, play a couple. Clips speaking to that a doctrine Chatham who had warned about the risks to the African American community because a co morbidity, and then we also in Brighton Park where the CEO of community health center. There was fretting about the unusually high rate of positivity in some Hispanic Latino residents that he was testing. So I. think that there are multiple factors that are leading to the excessive death rates that we're seeing in the African American community that's connected to the corona virus, or covid nineteen, one of which has to do with something that's existed in the community for a long long time, and that is health disparities around chronic conditions that people in the African American community experience people are afraid to go to the hospital because they're afraid of the bills and we. We really need to make a commitment as a community that this treatment is going to be free for people. Now. Also, we discover the you know. The level of disinvestment in many neighborhoods is pretty stark. You have communities like Auburn Gresham on the south side. It really had no adequate health facility or grocery store. They are getting a facility announced today by mayor. lightfoot communities like South Chicago Austin. Dr Field Park where commercial districts have kind of fallen empty over the last decades I. It's not a coincidence that those are the areas that struggled the most with Cova. Thousand Nine Hundred GonNa be hit the most economically, and we met some local officials in Auburn Gresham who had been begging the governor to bring testing to get that community under control. We need a testing site here in Auburn Gresham, this number thirty one out of every zip code in the state until we have a comprehensive clan, which requires testing, tracing and treatment. There's no way we're going to be able to mitigate of the damage. That covert is doing in the communities. Let's talk about the positive things. We saw an amazing sense of resiliency in every single community here in beverly residents had raised forty thousand dollars to buy pizza and Italian food to deliver to hospital workers. We also went to Chatham where we met the owner of Josephine's restaurant. Mama Josephine Wade Mother Josephine wait. Who decided she was going to give free meals delivered to seniors all across the sell side, and then in little village. Residents had struggled so much that they were pooling their money together and buying food together. So you saw all hands on deck approach everybody coming together in these neighborhoods, and of course Paris you spent a good deal of reporting on the economic and the business impact of the shutdown. What were the biggest takeaways for you? The the the small business needs community are really essential A. They're an economic base be, they might provide an ethnic service or food. That chain business could not provide, but also they really form the. Of, that neighborhood without them Chicago could be pretty stale city, so we found a lot of businesses that adapted and I want to show some examples. There was an upholsterer and Rogers Park that switched from doing curtains to doing masks, a clothing store owner in Englewood who really wants to create this positive perception of Englewood started selling on social media and in Aurora manufacturer that went from building office shells to emergency beds. They said they've been able to donate a bunch to local organization, but also sell them to medical care providers across the country and the owner they're. Dale says once. One order came in business just sort of snowballed from there. What we do now is pretty much to keep the doors open. Keep the lights on. That's what this is doing and that's. That's pretty much what we set out to do. Owner Corey Luck said he's he is starting to use social media to sell his product now he's come up with some of the graphic designs here a bear with glasses as sort of a logo for Englewood and he's printed all this apparel. He says he never intended this. This to be anything other than a brick and mortar store, because his goal is to build community, there was very instrumental for the store to be here, so people can come to the community and see what's going on. What's actually happening in this? Within a week? The company converted its Assembly Line for making office shelves and equipped it to make emergency beds rearranged parts of the factory to be to be able to produce these beds in high volume. So. One final thought what we heard. A lot of neighborhoods was. The media doesn't take interest in us unless there's crime, it's clear that there's a much fuller story to tell in Englewood Rosalyn Chatham Humboldt Park Everywhere Brandis and the media needs to do a better job of telling those stories, and that's what we want to continue to do. We do want to continue that. Thank you Paris. It's been an incredible journey and a reminder. This is not the end of our community reporting It's just the beginning starting this. This Thursday end every Thursday moving forward, we will be out in a different Chicago neighborhood or community area to take an in depth, look at the issues, affecting the people of our city and region, and on our website W., w. dot com slash news. You can go to any of our covert across Chicago. Stories and scroll down to the bottom where you'll see an interactive map once there, click on the pull down menu and pick any of the communities. We visited to get links to our covert across Chicago stories. And that is our show for this Monday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get, Chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website W W dot com slash news then you can also get the show via podcast and the PBS VIDEO APP and please join us tomorrow night live at seven renewed calls for an elected school board in Chicago, we weigh the pros and cons, and on the Chicago River New Music inspired by them, Mississippi River. Now for all of us here at Chicago tonight. I'm Bruce Friedman and parachutes. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe goodnight. Closed captioning is made possible by Robert Byrd. At Clifford law offices, a Chicago personal injury and wrongful death, for that is proud of its partners named Illinois leading lawyers by the law, Bulletin Publishing Company of Chicago.

Chicago Illinois Quinn Myers Paris George Floyd Chicago Police Department US Louisiana Illinois Brandon Friedman Paris Ramon Hooks Supreme Court Vanessa Perry Brandis WTO Andy Friedman football
March 10, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:46 min | 3 months ago

March 10, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm peres shuts brandis. Friedman has the evening off on the show tonight. Gays are to twenty the nays are two eleven illinois state senators on what the massive federal cove relief bill will mean for illinois launch the next phase of the covert response and president biden is already looking ahead after the plan passes in congress will tackle that and more in spotlight politics could target becoming to the magnificent mile and would that be a good thing. The board approves a nearly two million dollar settlement for cyclists struck by a a bus in twenty nineteen. What exactly are nf. Tease or non fungible tokens. And how are they changing the art industry. It was absolutely insane. We check in with local bike shops and cycling groups on. What's ahead this season. After a record setting twenty twenty and a portrait a retired chicago public schoolteacher. Who now dedicates himself to the art of printmaking in the mexican tradition. But first some of today's top stories alleged kenosha shooter kyle. Rittenhouse trial has been pushed to november at the earliest the eighteen year old antioch resident had been scheduled to stand trial late this month. He's accused of killing two people and wounding a third amid a protest against police brutality in august at virtual hearing today both sides told the judge they needed more time to prepare state. Health officials announced more than sixteen hundred cases of covid nineteen today including thirty additional deaths. Illinois is now seen more than one point two million cases and twenty thousand eight hundred and ten total deaths and the announces. it is started onsite. Vaccinations for employees beginning with frontline workers like train and bus operators chicago. Police say a joint anti carjacking task force this past week and netted a dozen arrests superintendent. David brown says nearly half of the more than three hundred carjacking related arrests so far this year involve juveniles. We all need to help. Our young people make better choices and we need mental worth to show them the way a system of support is the best deterrent. And for those that do a fan. We need real consequences. Brown also announced a new release website dedicated to carjacking information and prevention. Got much more on this story on our website and now to amanda finicky and what congress cove relief package could mean for illinois perez president. Joe biden signature one point nine trillion dollar covert. Relief package is expected to bring roughly thirteen billion dollars in aid to illinois. The bill passed both chambers of congress without any republican support in this scheduled to be signed into law on friday among other things. The bill includes fourteen hundred dollar checks for individuals. Earning less than seventy five thousand dollars a year. But will it be enough to get past the pandemic what we'll do for the state and what of republican criticism that the bill is uploaded democratic wishlist us to share. Their thoughts are republican state. Senator jason berkman from bloomington democratic state. Senator ron villa volume from chicago. Democratic state senator christina cis from chicago and republican state senator donald dewitt from west dundee. We think all of you for being here with us right now and i believe some of you are still coming to us from springfield as the state senate back in session for today. Somerville avant did things begin to feel a little like they're returning to normal. It's to be with you. Thanks for having us. Obviously we have been working. Tirelessly our districts making sure that our constituents have been served over the last year during the pandemic had virtual committee hearings Much of last year and into this year However being in springfield nothing replaces Being in the capital. Making sure that we're having the conversations we need to have and moving. The bills needed move in order to get through. This pandemic have serious conversations to get to a balanced budget and move our state forward and senator what you did that saliva test to make sure that everybody was safe. Is that how things went. The shield test that was created at the university of illinois is the acid test if you will cover testing here at the capitol Staff members are required to test three times a week. Legislators once they test their tests is good for two days. Were out tomorrow. So our tests. Monday nights guys in the door and i think it's a great way to make sure everyone is functioning to safely as possible. Well glad to hear that you all tested. I would presume therefore at negative for a covid. You are healthy. Let's get to the american rescue plan. One point nine trillion dollars pulling does suggests that this is popular with republicans and democrats alike and yet all. Gop members of congress voted against the package. Sunder berkman was that a mistake will look i think washington had a debate on this gets over The question illinois is how those funds are going to be spent. And i think that third debate our states capital for me. I think the priorities of where those funds should go. We know illinois's going to receive a significant amount of money from the from the federal government. We'd like to see those runs prioritize. I towards towards our debts as second towards our bill backlog We think it's really important that those funds aren't used to simply expand our government. You know we've got a lot of families and small business owners or burden on those funds should be prioritized whether need should be used to just expand the government burden we that was going to be one of my questions. Coming up is what should illinois is set to receive about seven bill seven billion dollars. So let's go to centerville of. What are your thoughts on that house should illinois fold. This is your tasked with drafting the next budget. Well it's a great question. I do agree that we need to make meteorology gatien's whether it's our pension obligation or other dad's we need to get a hold of our bill of a backlog think those are the two priorities as it relates to our regular budget conversation. I think we also need to make sure that we aid the vaccine. Roll out aid testing eight and the other pieces of the puzzle. That are gonna get us through the end of this pandemic Just because we're We see the light at the end of the tunnel doesn't mean we're at the end of the tunnel. I would also say though that we need to look to the future. What are we going to do to invest in our economy here invest in our infrastructure to make sure that working class families and small businesses Can get back on their feet and move our move. Our state forward now senator. Visa that you want to add in terms of how illinois should spend those dollars. Please feel free to add that. But he did of course also want to focus on you because you have a background in early childhood. And i have seen the american rescue package described as transformative in bringing children out of poverty. What is your assessment. There was a real win because randy standing about forty billion dedicated to childcare specifically in about a little over one billion is coming to the state of illinois which is really critical. I mean because i think whether people recognize it or not childcare is in enabling starter for our society to function and that really aren't the brink of collapse without this particular investment the same with our schools. We really need to think about not only stabilizing our schools in preparing them for in person learning but also thinking about how are we going to reimagine education. And what are the investments. We're gonna make it. Take the lessons learned from this particular pandemic and apply them to how we are going to be preparing children moving forward to inherit the society in which we are preparing them to. So that is federally designated. Is there anything that you believe. Illinois needs to be doing is set to get this. Infusion of dollars senator petronas. I think we definitely need to think through the wrench in mortgage relief The last time we had appropriated fines Put together a program. We were able to get on quite a few getting out the door but there needs to be some very specific provisions on for various communities that did not they weren't able to access. It's difficult latino community while we looked at the numbers it wasn't quite in terms of parody with the population and also thinking about the historic housing burden. That families have Encumbered over the years his ear. Since illinois governor jay pritzker. I declared a statewide disaster declaration because of covid at the time to worry believe eleven cases in the state of the corona virus as of today the state department announced sixteen hundred eighty. Two new cases senator dewitt. What is your assessment of how the pritzker has handled things this past year. Well i think. Initially i applauded the aggressive nature that the governor took with regards to ensuring that people were taking the appropriate measures to keep themselves safe. The a directives about masking the directives of social distancing that certainly was that that preceded The business restrictions were put in place. Essential workers were established essential employers but there were segments of our economy that took a significant feeding our entertainment hospitality. Restaurant hotel industry. Over half a million people were put out a work simply because That directive was put out through executive order by the governor. I think the real challenge that we have ahead of us is. How quickly do we get those different industries and segments of our economy back up and running so that they can be productive. Revenue generated in components of bringing our state's economy back to some semblance of fiscal order. Illinois is in this phase for as the state dubs it restrictions for what we don't really know when that will be lifted sender berkman does illinois need to have any restrictions lifted. Now i'm i mean i. I think we need to start talking about quite phase by you. Know the governor's guidelines provide really big in arbitrary measures for high even get to save face five. He talks about testing being available and vaccines being available. Overseeing that all over the state on my colleagues here talked about making investments than you know in our schools with ours a small business owners and the people who struggled over the last year the best thing illinois can do is start to reopen its cottam. There's not one particular Schools start. What schools you know. There's many schools around the state that continue to try to navigate this through a remote learning bosses. That's not good for the for the school children. The cdc's been clear that the case in to say though that Some eighty nine percent of districts have some version of learning in person right now shirts some version. What does that mean. That means students are in class two days a week three days a week again. The idea here take back. Cove it and ask anyone what would be the impact on our school children. If they weren't in a classroom with a teacher in front of them learning together claverie for an entire year. There are some schools state who my school but as an example my children were in class for less than fifteen gaze over the last year. We just have thirty seconds left. So i wanna actually at center zayas because we didn't get of course to vaccinations. That is a huge thing. Are the most vulnerable people in your district getting those shots. I can say that some improvements have been made but we have a long way to go. i was just on a briefing with the city. And you know the city of chicago just said that over the past couple weeks fifty percent of the vaccines have blonde to latino and african american communities so that is a significant improvement on also. Didn't come without a lot of pressure in a lot of sweat equity from our community based organizations who are trusted messengers and have been able to quickly fashion. Stand up these vaccine sites. And i think we need to see more of that happening so that we have that we invite people into the process. We normalize it and we allay any types of concerns but ultimately we get the outcomes and we'll be keeping our eye on that as well as of course further action in springfield so safe travels as each of you head back to your district's with that are thanks to state senators. Jason berkman rockville volume christina paseo and donald dewitt for joining us. Thank you manda. And now paris vecchio. Thank you amanda. A major retail chain has quite a target on. Its back hint hint rumors that the minnesota based target was sniffing around water tower place on the magnificent mile made for some harsh backlash especially from one prominent elected official. So what does this. Kerfuffle say about the future of the landmark shopping district especially as vacancy rates soar. Joining us now with more. Is al balloon commercial real estate reporter with crain's chicago business albie. Thanks for being here. Did you do with your parents all right. So how likely is it. That target is going to go into the water. Tower them all on michigan avenue. Well it's really hard to say at this point. We know that they have looked at it. And you know the they have a big space to fill at water. Tower place may seize is vacating in a couple of weeks and so they occupy or three hundred thousand square feet. Macy's is the biggest ten in it in water tower place so the owner of the mall has to figure out what to do with all that space and they're kind of going through that process right now and argue would be a candidate and i want to get to that macy's vacancy in a bit but why so much backlash to the notion of target on the magnificent mile well on friday in in prior radio interviews. Cook county treasurer. Maria pappas has been speaking out against a target a basically kind of spouting off on the rumours the target would be going there and she. Her basic view is that it would be kinda. Come down for The mag mile water tower place. It's not You know kind of debase. The shopping strip and just to be clear. It sounds kinda random that she's speaking about. She lives right there so she seems to have a personal interest in that he does. That's a very good point. It so does that why you think that she. She was going on the radio kind of sounding off on it. Why i think that's part of it. I mean she's she makes no secret of the fact that she lives right there and she she shots water tower place You know she's obviously not afraid to share her opinions. And even if there are just based on rumors in the market at this point that you mentioned macy's vacating their. How big of an impact is that going to have on water tower. And as i understand this was in the works before kobe. Before some of the unrest that happened this summer correct. Well we don't exactly know when they were starting to talk about leaving water tower place. We knew that they were looking to shrink their space and then in january. They confirmed that they were gonna leave the shopping center entirely. So you know. They are shrinking department. Stores are having a very hard time these days staying relevant in the e commerce world so in basis no exception another retailer. Victoria's secret is reportedly leaving now on the magnificent mile. How come well you know they're facing Same pressures other retailers are facing. It's kind of Exacerbated on the mag mile because rents are so high on north michigan avenue. And it's hard for a lot of retailers to justify paying those high rents when their sales are are often over last few years. Sales have not been very strong on michigan avenue. I mean some. Some retailers obviously are doing quite well in their retailers. They're moving onto the avenue like starbucks just opened a massive rotary and former prayed barrels. Stay so this is not a universal problem. But generally speaking of a lot of retailers are struggling to justify paying the iran there ours. You're mentioning brands like starbucks. Opening up that giant grocery possibly target is that the future of the magnificent mile more of these big well known chains. Well you know. A lot of people in the retail world talk about concepts that are e commerce resistant There's a lot of talk about it. Essential giving consumers something that they can't get online. And so that's what you get with. The starbucks rose creek is an experience. That's kind of what you get at the apple store along the chicago river. So that's a big thing that that retailers are trying to offer and you know this has been something. That's been going on on michigan avenue for awhile. A lot of the flagship stores are there mainly for their their for branding purposes. There's so much foot. Traffic long mag mile like huge billboards for these brands. And we'll see if that foot traffic returns in the coming months and years as the pandemic winds down all right l. Be delun thank you so much. Thanks pierce and up next to check in with local bicycle shops to hear what they're expecting this season so please stick around good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. Black voices what do you believe. Prevents strong coalition of black and latino communities forming across the communities want us to as a nation to find a way to come together. Go down the block jetted from someone local and keep the money in the community. Joy in the black experiences magical raw bicycle sales skyrocketed in two twenty twenty as the pandemic forced more and more people to exercise in commute outdoors but the surgeon demand plus supply chain issues led to lingering shortages still being felt in chicago cycling community chicago. Tonight's quinn myers checked in with local bike shops and cycling groups about the tumultuous past year. And what to expect this season bike shops across chicago. Say they've never experienced anything. Like twenty twenty. It was absolutely insane. I've been in this business for twenty five years. I've been a bike retailer. That long and i have never seen anything like justina. Frank is the co owner of cosmic bikes in jefferson park which sells and fixes a wide range of styles. At first says last year's bike boom was really great until they ran out of stuff to sell from. How we were still chugging along. And then i don't remember exactly when but at some point there was nothing more we could get. There was a point in the summer where we couldn't get basic inner tube sizes some really basic components to do repairs on people's existing bikes bike. Sales jumped sixty five percent in twenty twenty over the previous year. According to data from market research firm and pd group that came on top of a host of pandemic related supply chain issues for bike manufacturers in chicago that translated into long waits for maintenance last summer and almost total scarcity of new bikes last year. People were like. Oh yeah this must be really great for you. Well yeah the demand is great but the demand has to be coupled with dependable supply if you have demand and there's no supply then you're spending a lot of time explaining to people why you don't have what you don't have bike shop owners in chicago. Say they've been able to at least partially restock in catch their breath. After last year's bike boom but because of uncertainty in the markets there may be another shortage this year. We can't order anymore. Bike for twenty twenty one Whatever we're getting in a now is what we're getting And they've all had actually started looking at twenty twenty two. Julian forsyth owns and operates the f. f. bikes on damon avenue in buck town which sells bikes and cycling payroll geared toward women. Forsyth says in the past when they didn't have a part she would just order it man. They would come these days she says. Bff is trying to stock up in case there won't be anything left in a few months. Bring your bike and you know you're crossing your fingers hoping that we can get the part for you if you if you need a while. The past year has put a significant strain on local bike shops. It's also been a boon to area cycling groups in south suburban all sip. We caught up with the chicago. Chapter of black girls do bike. A cycling club organized by and for women of color although all women are welcome the group's leaders lest adams says they've seen a huge surge of interest since the pandemic began. People were really getting into cycling and they were trying to reach out to various cycling groups. You know hey can join join. We had well over one hundred people join our club in twenty twenty black girls. Do bike paused group rides for safety reasons in twenty twenty but are expecting to have a full calendar this season just this week about fifteen women showed up for an afternoon ride along. Cal sag channel. Even though we'd been riding individually we missed truly miss writing With our clubs with our group in our groups with our with the komo the camaraderie across so we are really looking forward to doing that. People say i have to lose weight. I gotta get a new bike. I have to you know you have a lot of reasons and it's just ride with whatever you have come on out right now and take advantage of this for chicago. Tonight's i'm quinn myers. Let's see how long that cycling weather lasts local shops safe. You're trying to buy a new bike this year. Do it sooner rather than later and expect to pay more and you can also learn more about black girls. Do bike on our website and still to come on chicago tonight. The reaches a settlement with a cyclist drunken run over by a bus driver who had racked up over time before he was fired. Non fungible tokens. Nf nfc's making millions for some digital artists. How are these crypto assets changing art and investing our spotlight politics team looks at the covid stimulus and how the one point nine trillion dollars are being spent And the mexican tradition of printmaking alive and well at a chicago. Printing press run by a retired public schoolteacher. But for some more of today's top stories cook. County is set to have a new public defender. Sharon mitchell director of the nonprofit illinois. Justice project is county board president. Toni preckwinkle is reported. Pick a former attorney with the public defender's office. Mitchell will face a county board confirmation vote on friday. He's set to succeed. Current public defender campanile. Who had hoped to be appointed to a second six year term. Preckwinkle is so far. Stayed quiet on. Why can't bonelli wasn't kept on mayor lori. Lightfoot says she's cautiously optimistic that some of chicago summer events can return in one form or another that comes as city officials. Say they'll make a final decision on the taste of chicago air and water show in the coming weeks. Lightfoot wouldn't predict which events will won't happen but she says this summer will likely look more like a normal one in chicago. Let's be honest just because we say x. event is happening doesn't mean that people are gonna come in mass unless they're eighteen or nineteen they'll come but For the rest of us were a little more cautious It doesn't mean that people are gonna come and flock back in mass but we we know so much more about this virus how it spreads then. We did a year ago. We know in particular about outside events that we can manage these in a safe way. That's consistent with public health guidance and life. What made these comments. At an event announcing a new program to help black latino female owned companies that do business with the city to get access to financing. They recover from. The pandemic will have more details about that on our website and businessman and philanthropist. Richard dri house has died and investment manager by trade. Dri house advocated for historic preservation in classical architecture through his namesake foundation and the dream house prize awarded yearly to ah living architect w w produce documentaries about many of the prize winners and cranes reports dri house died after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage at his home. On monday he was seventy eight. The board of directors approves a one point seven five million dollars settlement for a man who was struck by the bus while riding his bike. In two thousand nine hundred. Nineteen chicago tonight. Nick bloomberg has been following this story since the crash in joins us now with details. Nick peres joseph. Morgan was biking southbound on wells approaching hubbard the morning of june six twenty nineteen when he was hit and run over by a bus. That was pulling up to a stop at the corner there now. We've gotten animation showing the bike lane. That organ was riding in a highlighted in green. The bus lanes in blue and the bus shelter circled the police crash. Report says he was taken to northwestern memorial with serious injuries and that his bike was heavily damaged as well. Attorney told us. In two thousand. Nineteen that organ had major orthopedic and gastro intestinal injuries as a result of the crash necessitating a rerouted colon and also faced blood loss in extensive road. Rash and work ensued the ta and the bus operator. Sunday ajayi for major injuries. Medical bills lost. Hey his attorney told us that. He had to stay with family in michigan. While he was recovering couldn't were he was able to get back to work some time ago this morning. The board approved that one point seven five million dollars settlement in a brief statement to wtt. W news today the c. Ta called the incident unfortunate and says that based on the facts of the case some following mediation the agency believes it's an it's best interest to settle as opposed to prolong a legal fight. And what happened to the bus driver. Nick well he was fired by the just about a month after the crash which was his third on the job in a period of a year and a half or so court records also show he'd had eighteen traffic tickets between nineteen ninety nine and two thousand five including three while he was working for the day and he was also among the highest paid bus drivers in several recent years taking home nearly one hundred eighteen thousand dollars in two thousand seventeen and about one hundred fifty one thousand dollars which could sum back pay in two thousand eighteen. Now based on his hourly rate of time. Full year's pay at forty hours. A week would come out to about seventy three thousand dollars. Wow so we made more than twice that how was that. It appears to be largely driven by over time before a giant was fired records show. You worked five hundred thirty two hours of overtime in two thousand nineteen and that comes out to an average workweek of nearly sixty hours at a time we asked. The see of the agency was understaffed. And how heavily it relied on time. Agency says its drivers. Choose to work overtime. They're not assign and in a statement then told us see workplace rules ensure that bus operators have at least eight hours off between shifts and keeping with industry best practices an operator is only eligible for overtime work at the end of the overtime shift is more than eight hours from the beginning of this will work the next day. The told us earlier today that it's overtime policies haven't changed since them were unable to reach the former driver harris nikola to uncover their good job. Thank you very much. Thank you and you can read knicks full story on our website. It's all at wtt w dot com slash news. And if they're all the rage in both the art and crypto currency world's lately and now they're creeping into other industries at this point. You're probably asking what in the world is an nf t good question. We're about to answer that. But just know they can get really pricey. This collage called every day as the first five thousand days by an artist named people is on auction at auction. House christie's with a current bid of more than thirteen million dollars. It is the first digital art to be auctioned at christie's and joining us to break down what. Nfc's are what impact they're having. Is donna redel. Law professor at fordham university and board member of the wall street blockchain aligns donna. Redel welcome to chicago tonight. Really a pleasure to be here thank you. It's great to have you. So what is an nfl or non fungible token glad you wrote down that it was a non fungible token sort nonfederal token is exactly what it says it is a unique token and it lives on a blockchain and a blockchain therefore records the the provenance of it. And who owns it from time to time as it gets sold along the way and so you have a perfect record of where it came from. Who had goes to and all the transactions from the time in which it was birthd- blockchain of course technology used for crypto currencies. So it is a authentic thing that you own and we mentioned. It's it's used in art right now. So how is owning a non fungible token piece of art like owning an actual physical piece of art. It's very different because you are. You're owning code and the code is is then manifested in an image. The other thing. I think was really going on now. Is that you're a part of community and you are buy happiness and not of an artist. You are binding yourself to that artists in the sense that they you want to be part of what they represent. And it's on the blockchain. And so i think you're seeing now right. Now that there is a convergence and a heads explosion in which is very calm. A explosive combat aviation of celebrity brands price all round and a t and for the most part manifesting itself an art whether it be visual art or music art and speaking of that. There's an t music video by the artist. Grimes that is worth four. Hundred thousand dollars purportedly. My question is if anyone can click on this and see this. What is the value in spending four hundred thousand dollars owning it. Well you raise a good question but you know the that that is that you own it and conceivably you could have some right that are embedded in the contract. Because on every nf teed there is smart contract and that contract what's in the rights and obligations of the seller and the rights and obligations of the buyer. So i may have certain rights that attached to that empty that i could then go and do something with. We mentioned at the top christie's auction house selling this piece. By an crypto artist named people. Thirteen million dollars. Why is this so valuable user keys proven artists. It was doing. Give what you would call. Non digital art amused doing tangible art for quite some time and then he moved into the digital space. He's already tested the waters in that he sold some peace on a nifty gate. Where i believe it was for about four point. Six million dollars will even even though at that time that he sold it was well known that he was going to be at christie's so i think that he became very collectable artists and christie's who took a real gamble to move into the digital world in terms of nfc's they've been in other kinds of digital are four but move into an tease. They picked this artists. And you know they did. They did a smart booth. That is a very and is the idea that like any great piece of physical art that an nf teepees of art might appreciate over. Time might really grow in value. Yeah i mean. Look i think in anything that you make an investment in clearly. If you're spending eleven million dollars you're making an investment. You're hoping that that investment will be sustainable over time and i think that's what's happening here there. Is you know the there is a lot of speculation going on on the other side. One of the things. I think that's really beautiful. Labatt and fte's is that it's on boarding people into the crypto space. You up to get a wallet you have to want maybe buy some east which is a gas currency that a lot of the entities are sold in and so it becomes a very flexible way for people to get involved in crypto currencies. Because they're interested in art or music or at are now in fashion. And so i think that this becomes a really interesting way to onboard people into what will be a greater university entry into that where we only have a few seconds left but a wear can tease expand into we talked about art the musical group kings of leon. They released their album with an nfc. What other industries could touch already. Seeing in sports with top shot they're selling they're selling entities that are moments of very famous basketball moments. Whether it's lebron making a doc or others and they're sold. I think they believe in the first couple of months over a million dollars of these of these moments so sports has a lot of fans fans want to connect with their with their superstar or their team and so this is a natural way in which fans in the all. The teams can expand that connectedness. Because most of this is about connection being art of something that you really adore something that you spent a lifetime as in sports Wanting to be included in this gets you there in a different way than if you were in the arena and to have some feeling of ownership of that are at fascinating correct and sat have a feeling of ownership of whether it be the art piece the moment music and and also you the a lot of the artists are making sure that in bedded in their contract is get back to the community. Alright donna rebel fascinating subject. Thank you so much for your insights about them. Welcome anytime happy. Happy to be here all right and up next our spotlight politics team dives into the details of the covid stimulus plan but first a look at the weather National news with the stimulus passing in. Congress and merrick garland confirmed as attorney. General with bipartisan. Support we'll also shine are spotlight on some city state and other political news. As well and joining us tonight. Our amana vicky and heather sharon. Let's start with that. One point nine trillion dollar code relief package that passed the house. Today here is what senate majority leader chuck schumer and minority leader mitch. Mcconnell had to say help is on the way you'll receive fourteen hundred dollar checks by the end of march help is on the way. Vaccines will be available far more quickly. This is a classic example of big government democratic overreach in the name of covid relief. All right heather surround break down. What does this stimulus package going to mean for illinois ins. Well most people will see a fourteen hundred dollars stimulus check and if you are unemployed and getting unemployment insurance that will be extended through labor day with an extra three hundred dollars there's a host of other provisions. There's money for states and cities as well as school districts as well as money for testing and vaccine and it will also take a real staff average using child poverty. It expands the child tax credit and it also expands aid for in terms of food to combat hunger. It's got it's a real smorgasbord of progressive attempts to get the economy going as we see this back seen rollout take action than yesterday on the show. We had congressman. Danny davis from chicago calling it mono- from heaven so amanda is this going to be for illinois's and chicago's dire budget situations. You know. I think it is going to cause in some ways. It is going to alleviate headaches for mayor lightfoot and for governor jay pritzker certainly they would be having to make a whole lot of tougher decisions. Were it not for this federal money. It gives them breathing room and at the same time. It gives them a headache already. My inbox has for example. A in email from the chicago teachers union ever at the back of mayor. Lightfoot saying we want money to be directed in this and there is going to be whenever you get sort of the the big huge gift like this. You're going to have politicians looking to spend it on what their priorities are. Of course those priorities are not always in alignment so I it is Like i said both once a gift but also a brand new headache. And we even see the mayor tamp down expectations about this one point eight billion or so windfall heather. Let's also talk about. Merrick garland niles. No lincoln would native niles would high school niles west but there we gotta get those northwest suburbs straight He was confirmed by by seventy two thirty vote today after many delays. Are you surprised. That was bipartisan. Like this no. It was always clear. That merrick garland was somebody who was highly respected even by members of the republican party Of course there were some republicans who said they couldn't vote for him. They thought that he would be too partisan attorney. General which many democrats said was quite rich coming. After attorney general bill barr under president. Trump. who of course made no bones about his job being there to protect the president but is redemption of sorts for garland who of course was nominated by former president barack obama to the united states supreme court and didn't even get a hearing in the united states. Senate thanks to the senate. Then senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell today voted to confirm him as attorney general so it all comes full circle and of course a different ballgame there right and mean one is a lifetime appointment to the state's highest court to the states to the nation's high court and you also had this really into when he was obama's nominee to the supreme court republicans seeing a chance running with it taking a bet that paid off in terms of their getting instead this seat on the court whereas here this is a president so if they weren't going to back garland who go get behind for position like this. It's it's just different and heather tomorrow. We expect to hear from president biden. In fact we will have his primetime address at seven o'clock on chicago tonight. What do you expect to hear from them. Well we're going to hear him talk about being really a years. Since the corona virus pandemic changed over lives. It is the anniversary of the day that we all learned that. Tom hanks to tested positive for covid nineteen as well as the end of nba play. Where of course. The game was stopped in the middle of it by a positive test and that life for me and for many americans. That was the day. When i realized that it was really going to be you a significant disruption and. I think we're going to hear him. Talk about the more than five hundred thousand americans who died he's going to pay tribute to their memory but he's also going to try to look ahead. I expect he will say something along the lines of we're not through this tunnel yet but there is light at the end of the tunnel and i expect he will encourage people to get vaccinated win. It's their chance to and he will claim credit for speeding. The rollout of those vaccines and he will no doubt. Celebrate the package of the one point nine billion dollar relief package just details and one of the places to get vaccinated the united center. Amanda you were out there on day. One of vaccination last night even the last couple of hours. The city is adjusted who is eligible to sign up for appointments there to try and improve some of these equity numbers. Tell us about the changes announcing we'll w- they had indicated. Actually yesterday that they were going to really focus on these five zip codes as we reported what. We didn't really know how this was going to work that. We knew that there was going to be a focus on the part of the city. And the state to really target the vaccinations and it seems as if they're going to be using what is basically a coupon code that you're going to have to answer enter in if you are somebody who resides in one of these areas and then you'll need to prove that and if not euro get your appointment cancelled and this comes as doctor already has said. Don't lie here on things like your address and your age because this is going to be your your permanent vaccination records so if as we are already seeing it is something that you might need to use to travel if you are looking to get out of the country for example at some point when that is safe to do so you're gonna need that to match up to your personal data. So that is there. But paris they believe. Also the tribune has indicated that there are some additional problems with that. Rollout for example. We did get guarantees. Just yesterday that when folks were. They're getting that first vaccine. That's when they would make an appointment for that second dose of the pfizer vaccine and instead the trip reporting that that already isn't happening in some people don't even have cell phone numbers or email addresses so it's going to be even more difficult. It's the onus will be on the first does vaccinated to reach out to the city way through that barrier of getting through to a phone line to make their second. Make sure to get that. Second dose of heather. Basically the city is responding to the figures that were showing that something like sixty percent of the folk signing up at some point. We're not from the city of chicago. So they're they're trying to reorient it that that the majority will be from chicago and especially from the communities hardest hit and then communities hardest hit in suburban cook county and then a little bit outside of cook county as well. Do you believe that that this will start to get those equity numbers in the right direction. Well it's hard to say. Because when they opened appointments for the united center at eight thirty thursday morning it was open to all illinois residents. And i'm surprised that they were surprised that that meant that sixty percent of people who signed up work from chicago and that the vast majority were white or asian. Because we've seen time and again as the vaccines have rolled out that. That's who has access to internet to the internet and can wait and keep clicking to make those appointments. I think it really has to do with this. Being designed not appropriately to achieve those equity goals by opening it up to everybody on thursday and then sort of trying to pull it back and say we're going to target it a little bit more that has led to a lot of frustration. A lot of hurt feelings especially for people in chicago and cook county. Who were hoping to get appointments. Because the united center is the only place if you have an underlying health condition to get vaccinated right now because the city and the In cook county haven't moved to that next phase so it's very frustrating and it seems like as amanda reported. There's not a whole lot. There's still a lot of questions remaining on how it's going to ultimately work or some questions have been resolved now in terms of what baseball is going to look like in the spring and summer Take a look at what the mayor had to announce on that front union. Let's play boss ocado all right. Amanda i know that you're going to be gearing up to try and get tickets at socks park heather over at wrigley field. Only about eight thousand or so fans and each stadium to start off with manda. How is this going to work. I think going to be empty. Relatively twenty percent capacity. These are huge stadiums. That said i do imagine that it is going to be this kind of slow tread back to reality Back to our normal lives. And hey it's the american pastime. Right this is the start of it. We did here governor. Jay pritzker was asked. Because we're we're sort of in this lol this phase four with no deadline for when we will move to the state phrases phase five which it'd be life close to really normal without this fifty percent capacity at restaurants in such in the governor indicated that he is at least considering open to some of these changes because you really is under a whole lot of pressure to lift some of those restrictions and by the way not just from republicans including democrats like state senator center. If i can hold saying hey wait a second. The seats losing conventions we need to have a concrete plan and some more metrics. We had the metrics for closing down. Now we need metrics for opening back up. And i think there's a report out there right. Now that says that conventions could possibly return mccormick place including the auto show which has sort of been on hold for a while normally takes place in the february. Heather what do you think about other events like the air and water show lollapalooza taste of chicago. I think can happen well. It's not clear yet because when the city approved it's twenty twenty one budget. They didn't appropriate any money for those festivals. The taste of chicago in the water show alone cost the city about nine million dollars so if those events are to take place. The mayor has to eighty. Decide that it's safe enough to allow people to gather and be. She's gotta find that money to make those events happen and it might seem like somers a long way away but it's really not because these events take of course planning and logistics. Especially if you're going to you know make sure there are Toilets and the handwashing stations and all the other things that need to be in place to prevent coded from spreading so. It's not clear yet. Although we did hear the mayor say she was optimistic that this summer would look more like twenty nineteen twenty twenty so if the and water show does happen. I think the three of us will probably be tandem skydiving to kick off the event. This year. I'm see if the mayor's office listen to all right we're gonna have to leave it there. Thank you is thank you all so much. And we'll have coverage president biden's address on our program tomorrow night chicago public schoolteacher took an early retirement to pursue his dream to continue in the long line of mexican who excel at printmaking from depicting calaveras the skulls seen and the day of the dead celebration to pursuing themes of social justice. Rene our sale is the heir apparent to an enduring tradition arts producer. Mark vitality recently shared a portrait of the chicagoan who has recommitted himself to his art and culture. Here's another look. When we visited his studio in pre pandemic days. He was working alone but this artist has a talent for collaboration in air ceo. I'm a pre maker. I have elaborate Blaze which is called ceo breasts where i publish Proteins with artists from not only across the united states but from different parts of the world. There's somebody for costa rica. puerto rico canada In spain and france there's several southern artists that are leaving the united states. That have collaborated some venezuelan. Argentinian peruvian from lino cuts and silkscreen to wood engravings and etchings print makers need a wide range of skill sets. We first learned about. Chicago's arceo ceo. Press when the bridgeport. Art center hosted an exhibit of work by rene arceo and the artists he works with that show was called. The border crossed us. Our ceo grew up in a small town near guadalajara. He told us the story of his own border crossing nineteen seventy-nine win as a nineteen year old. He left mexico and came to the us. His family hired a coyote to guide him his brother and a cousin. I remember going through the from the corner. There was a quota the took a group of is In the middle of the night he was probably around three o'clock in the morning we crossed the border. We saw some of the helicopters flying over head and down to heal. We saw several groups that were being caught We just stay there until For a few hours. I don't remember how long until there were no more helicopters flying around and then our group leader took us and we were walking. I don't know for how long until sunrise practically and then after that that afternoon they Buddha the trunk of a car. A big car. I think there were five or six of us in. They took us out best us through a checkpoint and then From there we went to the outskirts of Los angeles i feel lucky and also have been able to make something of myself While coming to the states are seo came to chicago married and became a us citizen. He studied at the school of the art institute and worked at. What later became the national museum of mexican art and he taught at chicago elementary school. For twenty years through the beginning of the pandemic we did do Virtual teaching for a few months. Actually he was allowed more difficult. Because most of the kids are were not getting connected a lot of them didn't have because we're talking about. Hobart did he have devices. Have access to the internet So it was very difficult for years. He had been planning to retire to focus on his art. His work is part of the heritage of mexican print. Making that started with the artist. Jose guadalupe posada in the late eighteen hundreds including works that feature calaveras and also the use of the skeletons. There are doing a lot of different things. Not in the bloody spooky away like halloween but they are doing regular activities as if they were alive because to us it is an extension of life and it is what remains of these body. Once we once we die. Our sales artistic is very much alive while his early works were more political. His latest artwork concentrates on people one is a tribute to the first responders to covid nineteen and includes a bat taking flight. I've been able to to get my artwork at the same time. I continue to produce everything Very happy that i'm able to to do that. So essentially just getting ready to until the pandemic a i can Do more dispersing on my work through exhibitions and collaborations with With artists as well for chicago tonight. This is mark fatality. Rene sale recently set up an fc shop to sell his original works which go for between twenty five and three hundred dollars. You can find out more and see more of his work on our website and that is our show for this wednesday night. Please join us tomorrow. Night live at seven. President biden gives his first primetime address to mark one year. Since the shutdown began and a new exhibit in elmhurst uses images of dr king to push forward the conversation unfair housing. Now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm parachutes thank you. So much for watching. Stay healthy and safe and good night clues. Captioning is made possible by robert a clifford and clifford law offices of chicago personal injury and wrongful death for that is proud of its partners named illinois meeting warriors by the law bulletin publishing company of chicago.

chicago illinois president biden jay pritzker congress quinn myers springfield Macy amanda finicky Senator jason berkman Senator ron villa senator christina cis senator donald dewitt university of illinois capitol Staff Illinois
Chicago Tonight: Latino Voices, Feb. 13, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

26:49 min | 4 months ago

Chicago Tonight: Latino Voices, Feb. 13, 2021 - Full Show

"Chicago tonight latino. Voices is made possible in part by. Cibc good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. Latino voices i'm brandis. Friedman filling in for balta this evening. Thank you for sharing part of your weekend with us on the show tonight. Recent data indicates latino and black populations are getting vaccinated at half the rate of white populations. Dr julia morita gives us a shot in the arm. On vaccine equity a visit to the small business incubator mercado they'll pueblo and humboldt park where culture and commerce go hand in hand a throwback to a two thousand two story on an afro latino music and dance style with an irresistible beat indiana. We remember that in mexico. The traditional way of having chocolate is having drinks and arts correspondent angel. Edo heads to pilsen to learn how to make mexican drinking chocolate from scratch in tonight's Latino first off tonight the covid nineteen has slowly but steadily improved as vaccinations make their way into the arms of healthcare workers and older adults across the state and country but data has indicated a troubling trend the communities most at risk of covid nineteen infection or not the communities that are receiving vaccines earlier. This month our next guest published an op ed and usa today urging an equity approach to vaccine distribution and. She joins us now. Dr julie morita executive vice president of the robert wood johnson foundation and a member of the biden. Administration's covid nineteen taskforce. She also served as commissioner of the chicago department of public health. Dr maria welcome back and thank you for joining us for him. Brandis nicest so we've seen in chicago. How the communities with the highest rate of vaccination the communities with the highest rates of infection which are namely black and latino communities with limited supply a vaccine still. How are you proposing that state and local governments address that problem in the short term brandis. We've seen with the covid that while. All communities in the united states has been affected by ovid. Certain communities have been hit harder seniors that lack latino native americans are much higher risk for hospitalization for death. And what we're proposing is that it's really important to focus. In the vaccination efforts to make sure that black latino and native americans actually have access to the vaccinated carry vaccinated cra korea's while we don't want for this disproportionate impact on the south platte early independent to see that continue on because people aren't getting vaccinated. How does that look in the implementation. Dr maria right now. We know that states and governments are taking. Cdc's guidance and starting with healthcare workers people who are over the age of sixty five but to to add the equity lens that it sounds like you're speaking of how does that. How do you implement that. So prioritization of who gets. The vaccine is just part of the equation in order to make sure that vaccines are administered equitable manner. It's really important that certain steps are taking. You make sure that everyone has access to the vaccines. i myself. Who struggled to get my parents appointments. Because they're eighty six and ninety one years of age. And i have high speed internet access at home in multiple devices that i can use but there are plenty of houses within the city in the nation that don't have access to high speed internet. The haitian there's telephone system schedule appointments appointments having community workers go into the communities section. Help people register make appointments making sure that the clinics are actually located in places and they're also accessible public transportation and open after hours on weekends. You'll be know that not. Everyone can take off time somewhere to get a vaccine. We also do not. Everybody has a car so part of it is higher education of who end up next. The other part of it is making sure that the mexicans are inquiry accessible and easily accessible to some blame vaccine skepticism or hesitancy among black and latino americans for fewer uptake in those communities. What are your thoughts on that theory. I think there's a lot more. Demand for nother is questioning or hesitancy about the vaccine. People are questioning wanted to have more information about the vaccines because we have to brand new vaccines that have never been used before. And so people want to wait and see in learned so there is a little bit of that but there's also some deeper issues in terms of people not trusting vaccines in general are not trust in government and those kinds of issues actually do need to be addressed but i think in addition to making sure the vaccine is accessible easily because there are barriers there for sure we also need to be addressing. The questions and concerns people have about the safety or efficacy nexans. And that's not easy work so it has to happen simultaneously or making the vaccine accessible and also the community concern and there's also obviously the concern about having enough vaccine hiller here in illinois illinois governor jay pritzker recently announced that people with co morbidity are now eligible to receive the vaccine as well. Here's some of what he said we here in illinois are making plans and looking ahead to the expansion of phase one b eligibility to people of all ages who have co morbidity and underlying conditions as defined by the cdc as well as those with disabilities my administration will be working with all the local public health departments to fit these higher risk individuals into their community vaccination plans in the coming weeks. Dr marina how can states manage what it is that you're talking about of course getting vaccines to people with co morbidity underserved communities when the vaccine supply is still so limited so these are challenging times. Because that's and supplies is limited. And i think it's critical that we got the vaccine out as quickly as possible. I think it is possible to do this work quickly and efficiently but also there have to be the support in place that actually help people think jet registered with vaccines particularly those people who have been hit hardest. There are definitely programs that are in place both of illinois in chicago and other states were actually help burgers are going out into the community to help people register vaccines. They don't have high speed internet access to get the vaccines into community health. Centers borough qualified health centers in armistice located in are harder communities that people actually have access to the vaccine so again prioritization is part of the solution but we also need to make sure the next easily accessible and it takes extra work actual effort. Fortunately there's more resources that are flowing both to states and local health departments so they can ramp up skill everything gentler vaccine kluber as possible we also seem to have sort of a patchwork of policies and approaches to this across the country. How does that Affect getting the vaccine out as quickly as you say as needed. So i think in most of the public health responses that was part of the chicago department of public health large national efforts were best when they were coordinated at the federal state and local levels. We know that state and local governments are really playing critical roles but it also requires federal oversight to provide that kind of coordination to make sure that the states and moguls of need more vaccine. Get the vaccine. Those who are who need help and other ways technical assistance or manpower that they get those resources while so it's this federal state and local coordination. That's really essential. But i'm seeing play out with. The current administration is that there is more of that coordination. that's happening. Federal government is stepping in to provide a digital resources to pharmacies. They're also providing additional services to community health centers so this coordination is starting to happen. And i think we'll see improved distribution of vaccine as a result in dr. Maria got about thirty seconds left. But what do you say to the idea that it shouldn't matter who is getting the vaccine. So long as people are getting the vaccine. Doesn't that mean more. People are getting vaccinated and starting to lower our rates. I don't think it's an either or we can definitely administer vaccines quickly do it. Equitably and now that resources are flowing from the federal government it can actually happen quickly as well as equitably. That's what's really important. Dr julia morita. Thank you for joining us. It was good to see you again. All the best picture back with more chicago tonight. Latino voices right after this. Television is brighter and more lifelike than ever today. So it's easy to forget that those screens used to be tiny grey grainy and an absolute marvel of technology for their time a little known chicago. One of puerto rican heritage was a pioneer in that early technology. Here's some of his story. Ooh a new business incubator. Launching humboldt park is focused on developing neighborhoods economy while retaining. Its puerto rican culture chicago tonight. Producer quinn myers joins us now with more on the makoto del pueblo quinn. That's right brandon. So chicago's puerto rican community has long been centered in humboldt park but in recent years as high rents and luxury developments have encroached on the neighborhood's borders fears of gentrification and displacement have grown and in some cases become reality so now as a new public market in the community opens. They are hoping to help change. That is taken in here. Squashed for the last few years. Luis colosio has been handcrafting. He burrito presses these wooden contraptions designed to flatten plantations for he burritos a puerto rican sandwich invented here in chicago. Nobody really had something to make a wish. We all had to go out or they break a bunch of plates. China may go but you blocks or something. Eventually my wife asked me to make maker something koya. So is now one of more than a dozen small businesses operating out of a new space called mercado del pueblo on peseos equa- or division street in humble park. The initiative is being organized by the puerto rican cultural center or prc seat which is providing free rent to vendors and artists to operate and try to develop their business this project it's market but at the same time and incubator so now the business that are part of the of this project have the opportunity to grow at some point that they can open future a storefront for example as the businesses grow. They'll also become eligible for advice and guidance from the prc and their partners. If we feel they're committed to license their business then we invite him to be part of the incubator. That's when we were more one on one and to give them advice in in terms of how to develop their their business and how to grow it had to register. It says he hopes to eventually have his own space in the neighborhood to sell his burrito makers as well as the coloring books and posters he also designs mcconnell offered a unique situation to small businesses. And i thought i could leverage that and learn more as the startup. There's a lot of things that Small pop-ups don't know which i did it and they've given me an avenue to to see other things that i was missing. One of the meccas goals is to eventually help. Businesses move into storefronts here on division street as a way of promoting economic development while stalling. Gentrification mercado del pueblo is the brainchild of pr director. Jose lopez long a fixture in humble park during the covert. We saw many of our businesses particularly informal. Suffer a great deal. They were not able to get any support from the federal government and with that we need to be able to take them step by step so they could become formal businesses. Andy mercado has a special section settling puerto rican products. That can be difficult to find in chicago. But the space is also open to non puerto ricans including business owners from black and latino communities. One is cedric salone who sells homemade body lotions and through his company. Butters are ex. Salone says he sees the marcado as a way to diversify his clientele. I have a huge online presence. But i have a small like in-person storefront type presence. So this puts me in a neighborhood. That's very different And also i get a lot of traffic and introduce my product to different areas in groups that come through kinda naturally pr or say businesses like yasa's and salons and the others. They're supporting our a way to keep dollars in the community instead of having them spent elsewhere for us. This medical pueblo speaks to us. Officials community is to us about identity but it also speaks about economic development in this age of covert and the america. Del pueblo is open. Friday afternoons and on saturdays and sundays at the corner of division rockwell in humboldt park they're enforcing social distancing guidelines and of course requiring face masks center and quinn. The mikado is in part about preserving informal businesses in humble park. Why did they say that. So important right. So as we just heard jose lopez the head of the pr. Puerto rican cultural center say informal businesses people on clothing arts the he burrito press guy. They've had a hard time during covert. I mean everyone has but these businesses aren't aren't eligible for any kind of government aid like more established businesses the mercado is a chance to sustain them and also give them some advice on how to grow. And this is just the latest of many projects in humboldt park designed to safeguard that neighborhoods culture right so humble park. East park is surrounded by higher. Rent districts like logan square wicker park which have experienced pretty rapid. Gentrification in the past decade or so humble park has not been immune but groups like the and others have really worked hard to keep on division street and the surrounding neighborhoods retain to retain that puerto rican culture and america was kind of just the latest example. Okay quinn myers have cd. Thanks for joining. Thanks brandis the puerto rican bomba is the island's first native created in the sugar plantations by enslaved africans and blended with elements of the indigenous culture in this throwback from a two thousand two art beat episode members of chicago cultural organization african rebate. Show us how to get on. With bomba dr west on division street and you'll feel a deep sense of puerto rican pride throughout chicago's humbled park community step inside cafe by tayo bano and let the percussion sounds of bomba group africa. Rebbe take you on a historical tour to this caribbean island. Music dance and songs that evolving. The sugar cane plantation time slavery. It is a music that is born out of pain or folk music that is born. I don't blame for entertainment. It is music that is born out of pain freedom. How long have you been teaching. We've done this for almost four years. Just the community teaching what we get us. Lot of young young young kids and grade school children just recently. We've begun to come out to the adult crowd alive. The first timers it it like. I said it takes thirty seconds to grab onto the choreography because it's a planned and mapped out dance. But once you get into it you put your own flavor into it you kind of move your shoulders and you put a little sas into how you move your skirt or your arms of your man. This one's fun generally. It's just you know you come up with the basic stuff with your arms your elbows pointing out and then you would salute the drummer by taking off your hat and he would acknowledge you and that's when you're dancing again that's when you start when you start with bomba drum rhythms people are free to learn the choreography or freestyle. Do their own thing. Even tito got his feet moving out on the floor. I that's how i started. I became a drama by necessity. Seeing a little bit composer also a little bit of historian. You need to learn how to do everything. That's what culture works in africa in. The business of creating coach works as valentine's day. Bridges for many of us are fancy turns to thoughts of chocolate. The bitter sweet treats history can be traced all the way back to the ancient mayans olmecs of southern mexico. Where the couch is native in. Tonight's several latino. We've visited chocolate or rea- offering chocolate bars in traditionally made mexican drinking chocolate made with cacao beans direct from mexico arts correspondent angel. Edo takes us to sleep. Walk in pilsen to learn more about an idea that was ten years in the making today. We're making a little bit of the process of making chocolate and sleep off working with mexican accounts. Welcome to sleepwalk chocolate and cafe the latest entity by chicago coffee company. Dark matter brew really. Good coffee and really good chocolate have a lot of overlapping flavors That you can really pick out from From cocoa beans to copy. And i'm like it's seven other locations. This one is in partnership with glory fight chocolate city which is originally based in mexico. It i started with them inviting us to mexico and going over there to be able to travel see the producers understand the processing understand the chocolate production and we were so blown away by what they've been able to accomplish there that we were inspired to really bring a lot of these ideas here to chicago home to chicago. Co founders of monica and daniel have been in chicago during the pandemic training sleepwalk employees on how to transform the cow. We roasted cacao beans and then we had to get the skin off the beat of the counter. This is going to be really helpful whenever we grind the count and that traditional stone meals that we also brought from mexico this stone. Males are a big Traditional meals that what they're going to do is that they are going to friction. The stones are going to be friction in one. Another to get the takao grinded. We're going to get a piece really really quick pace because cal has a big amount of takao butter so once we have to cow paste ready. We're going to add sugar and grind it again. Using our melander to create refine chocolate. The cows produced by monica jimenez margarito mendoza to farmers based in tabasco mexico. It's because the cow is growing amongst different fruits flowers and trees sleepwalking. Offer seven different chocolate flavors after we grind and refine our chocolate. We're going to temperate by temporary indica cal an evening the temperature we're going to get it crystallized properly so we get this shiny and beautiful chocolate virus that they're are super crunchy when you taste them so this is how we then mold the chocolate bars and then we pack them so we can have this amazing i collection the same procedure is used to turn cow paste into tablets that they mix with natural vanilla to create what's known as mexican drinking chocolate. That's right the only ingredients are cow and vanilla zero additives. They taught me a little bit of the process. We are going to have only what weather. Yeah it's like a twelve. Also to put them on on yuka out. I'm going to disclaimer. As i don't like chocolate on white patch. Wow ooh that is strong. Yes wow that's so rich and potent and flavor for both dark matter and laurie faa this collaboration amongst the artists. The community and mexico is imperative. Know all too clearly by the field including it's a great way to reconnect with our cultural roots and creating relationships here for chicago tonight. I'm angel edo and if you're interested in trying your own cup of mexican drinking chocolate you can visit sleepwalk. Chicago's local chocolate area in pilsen on blue island avenue and we have more information about their community partnerships with local bakeries and artists on our website. And that's our show for this saturday night. Join me tomorrow night for chicago. Tonight black voices. We'll have details on a new online archive. Documenting years of police torture one survivor shares. His story with us and a museum honoring the father of modern blues muddy waters. It's headed north kenwood. At his former home we go behind the scenes now for all of us here at chicago tonight. Latino voices i'm brandis friedman. Thanks for sharing part of your weekend with us. Stay safe and healthy and have a good night closed. Caption he's made possible by robert a clifford and clifford law offices are chicago personal injury and wrongful death. That's proud to serve its community through pro bono legal services.

chicago humboldt park Dr maria chicago department of public h Dr julia morita brandis illinois Dr julie morita quinn myers jay pritzker Dr marina mexico federal government Brandis Cibc makoto del pueblo quinn robert wood johnson foundation Luis colosio koya ovid
November 25, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:49 min | 7 months ago

November 25, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm peres shots. Spreads friedman has the night off on the show. Tonight we're responsible for each other's well being a man of indicate reports live from rogers park on. Chicago's northside as part of our in your neighborhood series. It's better to have a zoom thanksgiving then in icu. Christmas with holiday travel numbers reaching into the tens of millions. We check in with. Chicago's top doc. On how to safely celebrate this thanksgiving. This was a really difficult hard budget. Chicago's budget passes by a record-breaking thin margin of yes votes what went down behind the scenes. How chicago area businesses or preparing for the winter months and what they hope to see on the horizon the role of advocacy journalism in telling the stories of marginalized communities and revisiting a show of paintings by the french impressionist clause monet and the chicago garden inspired in paris. As you mentioned rogers park tonight as part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series will be speaking with leaders from local food pantries. Who are working to feed their neighbors. This thanksgiving also local business owners who are struggling to stay afloat during the pandemic but for now back to you. Thanks amanda and i tonight some of today's top stories mayor lori. Lightfoot says she's quote extremely concerned. That thanksgiving could become a corona virus superspreader event lightfoot is again calling on chicagoans to avoid travel in large family gatherings over the holiday and stress that the city is on track to lose an additional one thousand chicago into the virus by the start of the new year. The mayor did have some good news to share regarding the availability of a vaccine. We are expecting to have the first supply. A covid nineteen vaccine. Before the end. Of this year percy dc and federal guidance only a limited segment of the population will receive the vaccine. I this include our frontline. High risk healthcare workers and first responders. Those people who are treating covid patients themselves then that will be followed by especially high risk individuals lightfoot says vaccines are not to be expected widely available for the general population until mid to late. Twenty twenty one and we'll talk with chicago public health. Commissioner dr allison arwady a bit later in the program. Meanwhile state health officials report more than eleven thousand new cases and an additional one. Hundred fifty five have died. The total number of covid nineteen cases. Confirmed in the state is now over. Six hundred eighty-five thousand while eleven thousand eight hundred and thirty two illinois wins have lost their lives to the virus. The statewide test positivity rate currently stands at twelve point two percent and the unemployment rate is up as well and available. Jobs are down over the past year in all fourteen metropolitan areas of illinois. That's according to data released today by the us bureau of labor statistics and the illinois department of employment security. The number of non-farm jobs decreased in all fourteen illinois metropolitan areas the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in illinois. Was six point five percent in october. Three points higher than october. Twenty nineteen soccer fans in chicago and around the world are mourning. The death of legend diego maradona who captained argentina to world club. Glory in one thousand nine hundred six. Madonna died today at the age of sixty from cardiac arrest. The argentine football association confirmed that news. Tweeting that it expresses its deepest sorrow for the death of our legend diego armando mardona. And you'll always be in. Our hearts. Martorana had surgery for a blood clot on the brain was regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the game and was revered across the sporting world. Argentina's president alberto fernandez has announced three days of national mourning. Their holiday lights are starting to go up in rogers park. Chicago's northernmost neighborhood. The neighborhood hugs the coast of lake michigan and spreads out to a college campus businesses and large historic homes. And it's where our amanda finicky and producer quinn myers. Spent this rainy day for this week's edition of chicago tonight. In your neighborhood out amanda. Who's near the red line. Stop at morris avenue in one of rodgers. Parks commercial corridors. Amanda paris rogers park is a neighborhood where seniors live in assisted building in assisted living buildings or crush sheridan road from college students who attend loyal the neighborhood have about a quarter of the residents are black. A quarter hispanic or latino. there's also a large orthodox jewish population tuesday codes. Make up rogers park and together. They've seen about five thousand confirmed covid nineteen cases that's relatively high compared to case counts in edgewater on the neighborhood's southern end in evanston to the north but it is far lower than the ten thousand cove in nineteen cases that so far had been reported in the six. Oh six to nine zip code on the southwest side that includes west lawn and marquette park. The pandemic has heightened food insecurity throughout chicago including in rogers park every wednesday. The howard area community center gives away food to those who need it. Employees say they used to distribute food to a couple hundred families a month now that his doubled they also deliver food to homebound seniors. Food pantry. supervisor savina mamani started volunteering their twenty three years ago the community center has been a fixture in rogers park for more than fifty years to building. It used to be a church with services for immigrants is the most i think okay diverse community and saw does why is changing every everytime is changing we. Sometimes we have more latinos come in now. We have more people from the middle east from from from asia now the association does so much more and it has kept up with all of it throughout covid dental clinics. Esl classes citizenship workshops resume and other assistance for those seeking jobs hiv prevention and support for those who are domestically abused. Unfortunately demand for those services in particular has also heightened during the pandemic. they are leaving the building with the hope can hope and we are here with this time of panic. We have we are here. We are open. We are through classes through just a distribution food. We are open and we are here for them. We will have more from another local food provider leader in the program. But meanwhile the rogers park business alliance says it is doing whatever it can to help. Businesses making them aware of webinars of new city and state covid nineteen rules in for grants specifically now. Everyone needs money. And so we've been following all the grants that are available And making sure that we reach out to if it's industry specific to that industry so they know what's available to them and encouraging them and and helping with the applications if if we get to that. We saw some of that. Collaboration on display when we went to third coast comex along sheridan road. Owner terry gant has encouraged customers to wear masks with assign reminding them. Spiderman has been wearing a mask since he was in high school. now wednesdays are a big day for comics fans in comic shops nationwide. It's when new releases are dropped. Our business owners that are not competitive collaborative. They help each other. They want to work together. We have restaurants over in jarvis square and restaurants over here on glenwood that worked together to do events and crawls and and that kind of stuff And we're still doing in our theaters. Would you know would do things with the restaurants and stuff and actually there. That obviously was not gone to. I've jumped the gun a bit. We do so. Let's go now in here. From terry ga- that comic book owner who i talked about collaborative we have. It's not raining sidewalk side of the says. Hey you've been training for this entire locked right. Come get these books you know. It's like i'm a small shop. I can be agile. you're a human being. you can adjust right. So why don't we just bring your bill just joining together. And they'll get you the book that you need. You'll be happy so getting back to that. Even so against as they do to cove well as due to a lack of loyola students on campus. His business has seen eight major. Drop in foot traffic. Despite that he so he has gone back in fact actually to the model of how his business started. And that's million orders as you kinda into and i should anything you but we even have. What really been working is my chef's choice. Which is you. Give me a budget and tell me kind of that. You tend to like from the shelves. Kind of what i think you would like based on your taste and we just sent it to you anywhere and so he said rather than trying to draw businesses to his shop actually even four black friday or is the city of chicago is encouraging shoppers. This year to shop black as in black owned businesses can't says for shopper. Safety as well as for his own he hopes that more comic fans will shop remotely and now here is where the spirit of collaboration kicks in when i called to see whether he'd be willing to talk with us for an interview he suggested that we also speak with the shopowner just across the hall. Sarah lukens who owns shy town. Magpie lucan suspects. Her store may be the smallest shop in chicago. It's one hundred square feet only but it has stopped with posters ornaments candles other tickets and treasures all either maiden or celebrating rogers park the city of chicago. She's also missing loyola students. Who would typically be coming in for a ten dollar chicago print that they could hang in their apartment or their dorm wall now. She's looking for her neighbors to step in and step up really gonna have to step up now and really think micro local if you want your streets scene in your neighborhood to stay the way you have enjoyed it. Being and the reason you've bought real estate may be in your neighborhood. You're going to have to support the small businesses because it's really the flavor of your community. That is something to keep in. Mind as you begin to shop for this holiday season we will be back soon with cook. County commissioner larry suffered in. He's represented the area for nearly twenty years. But for now paris back to you thanks. Amanda city officials pleased for folks. To stay home for thanksgiving seemed to be falling on deaf. Ears as triple a. estimates. Some fifty million americans will still be traveling this week. The city announced last week that it'll be opening a permanent testing facility at midway airport and fourteen million dollars in federal grant funds will be going to community health centers. This comes as demand for testing has grown exponentially in recent weeks. Will the city and testing facilities be prepared if another surge of cases comes after the holiday and joining us once again. Is dr allison arwady. Commissioner of the chicago department of public health. Dr already good to see you. Thanks for being here. Well let's hear what your boss mayor lightfoot had to say about thanksgiving celebrations and plans and travel a little earlier today. I'm urging you not to engage in your normal thanksgiving plans to keep it limited to your immediate household while we have seen encouraging signs in our covid nineteen positivity rate levels are still in the double digits and dangerously high and we are still on track unfortunately tragically for an additional one thousand deaths by the new year just in chicago alone that throw. What's your reaction to the number of people travelling in the lines. We see at o'hare display despite pleas to stay home. Stay socially distant. Yes i mean. I can control what i can control and what i really have asked. Is that you know folks here in chicago. Avoid travel and if they haven't already laughter to really not ring folks into their household. I think unfortunately we still are seeing a lot of people are not to in covid as seriously as they need to given how. It's surging across the us. Where adding more than a million cases a week you're across the country So i'm worried that we definitely could see a another increase in cases after thanksgiving just like they saw in canada after canadian thanksgiving. Are there any models that show you. What exactly those numbers would be. We've seen the positivity rate. Come down just a little bit. What could the caseload. In the positivity rate be in worst case scenario right so as you know we have seen just the beginnings of some curb flattening. Worry is more that we could get right back onto that trajectory that we've been on and that would really be tragic because that has the potential to fill. Our hospitals leaves even more deaths. What is a safe way to celebrate. Thanksgiving if you're with your household or with a few people right. So we very much encouraged people for thanksgiving but just right now under are stay at home advisory to not have people into your household who don't already live there If there are people who are going to be gathering please remember that a negative test does not mean someone might not have covid task can be negative for a number of days even while someone can infectious so if there is going to be gathering do the mass gang paying. But it's not too late to change your plans and if you can not have people over right now we recommended we estimate as many one in seventeen chicagoans. Right now has active kobe. Right as going on. I want to show a two maps. Here of testing. I of positivity rates on the left there. That's what you're seeing. So the positivity rates are really high on the southwest side the darker blue and then the right map that's the test rates and so the test rates are lower where those light blue and grey areas are so duck you. How'd you get more testing accessibility to areas like the south west side. That are seeing these high positivity rates. Yeah absolutely this is exactly what the chicago department of public health has been working on We know there are lots of different entities. The do testing across chicago. Academic hospitals clinical settings private practices. Cdph has worked to push testing every single week to where it is most needed. Those areas applied positively where seeing cases. And so we've been standing out some permanent sites as well as mobile sites in those areas but we represent a relatively small fraction. The good news is here in chicago. We've more than doubled the number of tasks that are being done every day just since the beginning of october. So that's been important and we're seeing that continue to grow because we're supporting a lot of the partners even as we're putting additional funding into testing at the city level and part of that includes a new testing site at midway. How how much capacity will that have. Yes so. I want to emphasize its at midway. But it's in a hurricane. Let it midway because it is not not really travelers. It is aimed at people who live in that six six to nine zip code which is where we seen a lot of certain cases so similar to our other static locations that will have the ability to bring through many hundreds of potentially as many as a thousand per day And we're working to sort of you know. Continue to build that capacity and it's good because already on our first day opening. We saw no more than six hundred fifty people tested even on that very first day. We're asking people who have other options to get tested through their healthcare provider on our website. You can find information about how to get testing at home mail to you with no cost upfront through your insurance but for people who may not have a health provider may not have insurance. That's really where we're particularly focused with our city testing sites and we put them in as it codes where they're most needed and we most want to push testing. That's interesting basic. Call your medical provider and they can mail you a testing kit for free. Yeah if you go to chicago. Dot gov slash corona virus on the testing website. You'll see there. That increasingly there are companies One for example lab core that you click and if you fill out a form if you've got symptoms we've gotta known exposure. They will mail directly to your house without you needing to talk to your doctor tasks and then you can mail it back directly from your house so for people who have insurance or even if they're not insured if they provide information the company will bill the federal government and. It's another important way to get test into people's homes with low barriers And i recommend people have big not look the best to really take advantage of it. It's newer that these fda that these tests at home are fda approved and we'd love people to also take advantage of those. It helps again. Keep some of our cities sites for people who may have fewer options so so lots of different options presented here to get testing. Still you hear a lot of folks saying we're having a hard time finding a test where we go to some of these cities sites and the lines are so long. What's your advice to them right so again. My advice is your first call. You've got a doctor is to your office. If you go to our website there are about a hundred and twenty five places that are offering cogan testing in chicago. Many of those are open to the public. Particularly of people are insured. There's a lot more options. They're also thinking about getting the testing at home. And we've been growing capacity particularly in our federally qualified health centers which are open to everybody regardless of insurance regardless of immigration status on a sliding scale. It goes all the way down to zero. We've pushed additional tests that we've gotten from the federal government into some of those high yield settings. They're doing a lot of throughput so we're looking to partners. We've really appreciated the way hospitals and clinical partners have been stepping up. The state is offering some additional testing this weekend. Lots of approaches here to continue to grow testing when we have this much kobe going on. I know that there's more likely to potentially have some lines. But i'm encouraging people to do sign up ahead of time as they're able to Four testing appointments because that cuts down on the lines at the time. All right dr. Allison arwady as i understand. You're going to be enjoying a zoom giving with some takeout. We wish happy thanksgiving and thanks for being here. Happy thanksgiving have a safe one year. Two and now we check back in with amanda vicky. Who's live in rogers park as part of our chicago tonight. In your neighborhood series. Amanda yes. I'm joined by cook county. Commissioner larry suffered and he's represented rogers park and surrounding areas since two thousand and two and you're just saying actually the when you first began this work. You have an office. Just down the road morris avenue. Things looked a little different than tell us about. Rogers park that character and how it's changed. Rogers park is of the seventy eight communities in chicago is the one. That's number one on the list And it has always been a diverse place. I went to college at loyola university. So i've been involved in rogers park since high school coming up here and doing things. The diversity continues to change a lot of rental units which means that every year. There's a different group of people who come in and live here when the students are here at loyola we have another mix and So it's it's one of the communities that has the resources of the lake one of the best beaches and lakefront that part of chicago and it has wonderful schools and it has people who are involved in care about each other. I know you talked to some of the folks today who've been involved in helping make sure we feed people in people here everywhere of course dealing with a corona viruses. What can you tell us about the state of cook county health. The the hospitals there are they what how close to they are. How close are they. To reaching capacity and of course the strain on the health system who's well financially already struggling pre pandemic. Yesterday we pass the country budget and so we passed the budget for the hospital system and our our budget for the third year in a row had no tax increases and we were able to stabilize our healthcare system. Tonight there are about seventy patients with covid over. Its strode your hospital. We still have capacity. We are working very hard to make sure our staffs are safe that our patients are safe. We've had a little bit of an uptick at the jail which is also under our hospitals consider control and treatment but we're working on that I think at this point where we were stable. And i'm optimistic that we'll be able to deal with this next surge you of course the budget that passed unanimously. Leave which is also a rarity but from what i have gathered. It really is sort of relying on dipping into some reserves in. Its next year. That cook county's budget. You might not be able to say the same thing about no tax or fee increases. So what do you plan to do this year when to go forward looking at all times the revenue losses are really going to take a hit for the county so we we plan by increasing our reserves over the last five years. We also made additional payments on our pension. So that we have the best funded pensions in the in the immediate area. With those things going we were able to do planning and strategize where we are. Now we've maximized are used to the federal dollars We made some changes. Our budget resolution. Yesterday that will allow was to have more flexibility if the biden administration gets his heroes act dollars or other things and a lot of governments hitting on that. I'm afraid that we will have cleveland at their. Thank you so very much to commissioner. Larry suffered in and peres back to you all right. Be careful out there. A man and up next break down the newly approved pandemic budget for the city of chicago. So stick around. Get past the idea of turn into a political topic and really gets a soldier knock community. That's something i could get behind. Maybe we can use it as a calling card to unite the mayor. Lightfoot twelve point eight billion dollar budget passed city council. It didn't come without some opposition. Here's what the mayor had to say after alderman voted twenty nine to twenty one in favor of the plan. This was a really difficult hard budget. It's stretched all of us in lots of different ways. What i appreciate Is the number of a city council members who were willing to listen Who came to the table in good faith and deputy news reporter heather. Sharon joins us now to take us behind the scenes at virtual city hall. Heather very challenging budget remind us the finer points. What's in here well. It had to close a one point. Two billion dollar budget deficit and it does that with a combination of tax hikes and debt refinancing so The owner of a home worth two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. We'll see about fifty six dollars more. In their tax bill in you'll also pay more at the pump. The city's gas tax is going to go up from three cents to eight cents. So that's probably about thirty six cents per gallon so we'll definitely start to hit chicagoans in the pocket bug as the city starts to recover from the covid nineteen pandemic even though the pandemic continues to rage and hurt chicago businesses and its resident as twenty nine and twenty one very slim margin per compared to what we're used to with budgets. The outcome ever in doubt. Was there any last minute wrangling. There was a lot of last minute wrangling. So originally the budget proposal included three hundred and sixty layoffs however. The mayor dropped that plan. Instead the city will borrow fifteen million dollars to make up the difference also. The mayor added ten million dollars for violence prevention funds and agreed to test a mental health pilot program that will send non law enforcement officers to some calls for help. A separate. a pilot program will test sending a combination of yours mental health professionals so the mayor had to do some wheeling and dealing and even then the tax levy only passed with twenty eight yes votes and she needed twenty six and in chicago history. There's never been a closer budget. The no we're used to running up the score. Although as she said over and over all i need is twenty six. She got that plus two and plus three with the budget. All right heather. Thank you so much. Thank stairs and you can read others full story on our website where you'll find more details on the budget and how it impacts you. That's all at w. w. dot com slash news and still to come on chicago tonight. How one food pantry is still serving. Rogers park nine months into the pandemic. What distinguishes the work of advocacy journalists from bias journalism or misinformation exploring monet and his connection to chicago at the art institute and the garfield park conservatory. But i some more of today's top stories. Governor jay pritzker asked the us federal reserve to lend the state money to help mitigate the effects of the covid nineteen pandemic on the state's finances in a virtual news conference this afternoon. Pritzker said while the general assembly had authorized him to borrow up to five billion dollars. He believed it would be irresponsible to borrow that much. As a state would struggle to repay all that he said today that it was the deadline. Today to tell the fed how much illinois wanted to borrow so in light of this pandemic effects on our state's fiscal condition and my insistence that we look beyond this year to our states longer term fiscal condition. Today we have notified the federal reserve. Our intention are only two billion dollars less than half of the five billion dollars that's been offered to us by the federal government. Pritzker says the pandemic has cost the state more than five billion dollars in tax revenue. So far on this. Eva thanksgiving a treasure trove of documents have been released related to the investigation into house speaker. Michael madigan connection with comment the documents show requests from madigan associates for favors and jobs from senior comet officials. This includes e mails between. Michael mclean atop madigan ally and former comment employees fidel marquez. An promissory the utilities former ceo. In one of the many many emails referencing quote. Madigan letter mclean rights marquez ceasing. Promontory quote we offered our friend. Six summer jobs is submitted for attached as a request for a person to work in our legal department. This year. he'll not learn very much and he will not be able to contribute much if anything but that is still the ask. Another email references comet consulting work for cook county recorder of ed mooney and an additional email appears to show mcleans seeking favors on behalf of house. Republican leader. Jim durkin last week. Mclean promissory and two. Others were indicted on charges of conspiring to make illegal payments to win. The support of madigan. Madigan has denied any wrongdoing residents. Haven't yet moved into vista tower. But it's getting a new name. Chicago's third tallest. Skyscraper will now be called. The saint regis chicago after the project. Developer signed a deal with saint regis hotels and resorts part of the mo- marriott. International hotel group. They'll manage one hundred ninety one room hotel on the bottom twelve fours that genie gang designed building since the pandemic it. We've been talking with people from across the chicago area's business community about how they've been coping with corona for some the summer months offered a bit of a reprieve. Others still have not yet been able to reopen so we wanted to check back in with some of the people. We spoke with earlier this year especially since loan funds are drying up and the cold. Winter months are beginning and joining us. Our joe shanahan owner of metro smart bar and tavern and one of the founders of the chicago independent venue league nabil mugabe general manager of the kipton gray hotel downtown and director of midwest operations for the hotel brand and spring capers. Stylus owner of springs place salon in the south loop. Welcome all of you back to chicago tonight. All right nabil. I'll start with you when we spoke to last summer you were saying that. Occupancy was about fifteen to twenty percent of your normal summer whereas occupancy right now compared to where it normally is. Unfortunately i have to say it's actually getting worse now. We're going into the winter months and in chicago. That's never a good thing because typically business will slow down but additionally feel like we're in that second wave now we're really things have slowed down. There's no more leisure travel really travel. And as we know conventions and sporting events everything else has been cancelled or shut down. So we're We're about five percents right now between five and ten percent which is about an eighty percent decline from year-over-year. So it's a it's a really rough spot that we're in right so very hard to drum up business joe. Shanahan talked to you. A bunch rough spot. That metro is ben. And because you've been close since march you cannot reopen until there's a vaccine and everything. Reopens how are you and your sister. Independent venues faring. Right now well. We are faced five businesses. So what that means is we will not be reopened until bler is to stay and sit closures You know with over a hundred people furloughed for metro. In the greatest staff i've ever worked with From small venues like the hideout all the way up to metro as five businesses. Leave and not to be abandoned by the federal government. Won't we'll talk a little bit about some of that relief you hope to get the spring when we spoke with you in. May you're doing. Some virtual training sessions was. There is some pent-up demand. When you were able to go back into business. I when i came back. I was working six days twelve hour days. It was alive. I'm worship diva's A couple of stylus help had health concerns so they couldn't And it will just scared and did their own thing so we went down. We were at six seven stylists So you've lost them. They're scared to come back. Are you worried about staying open right now. Even at twenty five percent capacity and staying distant from your customers. No we had to do. Because you know we do volume business so we had to scale back and do one client at spaced out so We had to make choice. You know it was like hell over contact it the way we do our service without touching someone so we had to be taught right a lot of cautious a lot of caution. You have to take their deal with a vaccine. Hopefully coming does that signal light at the end of the tunnel. People proactively made bookings for the future assuming things get back to normal in the spring or summer. Yeah that's a great question and we have seen more confidence in people trying to book around late spring early summer and into the second half of next year so for us. That's sort of the light that we see is you know would say june onwards especially with conventions group business Business travelers and of course in the summer. We're very very anxious to have all of our leisure travelers back. When we can have concerts and outdoor sporting events and festivals. Back on the counter. And joe i know you wanna have concerts back on the calendar. Hopefully by summer you in these other venues you mentioned hideout you form the chicago independent venue league to try and get relief. Have you had any success. At the city state federal level in getting stimulus money or any other kind relief. Well the dialogue is present kind of shout out to congressman quigley congresswoman Senator duckworth You know Our my alderman. Tom tunney we are in dialogue. They understood star unsustainable predicament and that is really the real bare facts and things that we are the first to close in the last two And so what we're trying to do is really create like as much inertia and energy behind the venues themselves. Were if you don't take it. Maybe it's time. I a t shirt or a poster. It really would help each individual member of civil as well as metro and joe. How how long can these venues. You're venue and other venues sustain this before we see some start to go to business. I wish i had a crystal ball to tell you that. I don't i think that each and every menu it's is difference it's all predicament but You know relationships with With your banking with your insurance and with the just muted itself Really helps What honestly it's It's unsustainable but begin. We do we do have things booked for spring and summer and fall similar to what the hotel outside is saying. Is that it does. It does look that once. We will look at vaccine. There will be movement to people coming back to participate in these activities. I'm sure a lot of folks missed live music. I certainly miss a live musica spring. You say has scaled back your business. Do you hope for more relief from the federal government is good because we have survived keith. e e every comes in has to have other mass. We have to wear masks. We have to wear goggles. So we have to a part issues like that is the ongoing costs that we never had so idea or the ppp and then are qualified for the big for the business interruption and so dana main cutting back how many clients i can do and buying p. p. e. in keeping on is challenging is challenging be foregone profits but we won't pay particular ourselves so you're you know province right now but you're getting by today nabil. What about employees. i mean obviously. You can't bring all the employees you want to work. If you're only doing five percent capacity could you lose them permanently to other industries yeah. We've certainly seen that as as a fallout from. What's going on. There was a time when we wanted to bring a few employees back and they've even talked to a whole bunch of employees who have already gone onto a different industry. They just become scared of coming back to the hospitality industry and because it just doesn't have a sustainable future at this time. So that is something. That i'm worried about as we rebuild our business. We're going to have to open up to you new managers new trainees and And seriously we feel like we're just reopening the hotel from scratch and that's gonna take a lot of time training hell training money and that's also like everyone else not something that we have in abundance right now. All right we're gonna we're going to have to leave it. There are thanks to joe. Shanahan nobile mobile add in spring capers. All the best to you all and happy thanksgiving and now we check back with amanda finicky. Who's live in rogers park on the north side. Part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series amanda perez earlier. Today we stopped by a jaw harvest. That is a food pantry in community organization. That has been feeding people here in rogers park for many years. A one woman today who outside standing in line waiting for food said she was so thankful didn't know where else she would get a thanksgiving meal. We spoke with the organization's executive director maryland. Pagan banks and i started by asking her about the origins of adjust harvest. We started off to make sure that people who needed food had access to food right but we think about breaking bread. It's also meaning you gather you welcome people table. You're willing to sit with them and eat with them. And when you break bread with people you deepen relationships you see people and a whole new way and we're very committed to create a space. That's not just about food but a space where people can deepen relationships connect to each other and begin to understand that. We're you know we're sort of responsible for each other's well being how do you do that. In a pandemic where we are encouraged to not physically be together to not break bread dip particularly on a thanksgiving holiday. Well as you can see from this space here we used to do a sit down restaurant style meal people come in. We bring the food to the table. Serve them asking what they wanted to drink. And we had to shift things because the pandemic and since march with use this as a hub for groceries and deliveries and that kind of thing. And we're doing to go and while we can't gather folks in here. We had the same spirit of hospitality. They get a full meal. Nutritious meal we didn't skimp. We were very intentional by not doing a bag lunch because we know sometimes this only happening gonna get and so we did that. And then of course with our partners we were able to provide. Let me see how make sure. I got the right number. Three hundred forty three households with turkeys and all the fixings for tomorrow's dinner so nothing cranberry warned brad. Yes yes and then of course. We'll serve a thanksgiving meal here as well and it's not just food that you are giving away you have also helped to distribute other necessities. Yes we've done at least three or four mass giveaways given out thousands of mask already. We give out masks every day. We have ready at the front especially. We noticed that someone's baskets dirty are missing. And we make sure that they get to mass with some instructions that how to take up improperly. We do Scarves and hats just did that. Partnership with one of our congregations that them you know. They've crafty angels. They call themselves and so we give their their brand new far patrons. We've also done hygiene kits. We're doing twenty trees. We're doing diapers and again. We're not going to be everything everybody always needs. But you know when we get donations we get a call and we have with somebody needs. We make sure we can get it to them. What's next on the horizon. You're going into the holiday season. Where after thanksgiving of course hannukah christmas. This time of greater desires greater need cold weather. You know chata really have conversations with our elected officials here to figure out. What can we do. And how can we prepare ourselves right because again covet. We can't let anybody come in but at the same time we know many of our neighbors. She's not out there now because of the weather but typically one of our patrons she sets up she lays out there waits for lunch eats and then leaves and you know choosing have anywhere to go and so we try to be just as hospitable as we can't outside as long as everybody's safe we're not pushing people away. We're not telling them to go stand someplace else but we are asking ourselves. What can we do. We're we're both going to provide a space the bathroom or whatever and make sure people are safe so hurt. It's not an easy fix and so we we don't know yet. We might have to figure out a structure to put outside so the people can be protected from the elements but not come in. We're having those conversations now and that's going to mean money. We'll talk to somebody about scaffolding in the cost of that right and so we have to be creative and we're know we can get it done as we as we did with the dining room and with our partners support we feel. We feel confident that we're gonna be able to do something. But i heart are breaking wondering about those folks. We have nowhere to go dealing with elements such as these rain beginning to fall again here in rogers park again that was maryland. Begun banks with a just hoping for donations to come ahead of giving thursday and paris. I will toss it back to you and to our viewers evening with a message from the theater. That's just within my eyesight. It's the main theater here on morris avenue sign because the theater of course is closed says be healthy be safe. Be kind back to you. You as well amanda and happy thanksgiving and now we go to. Www news director and host of chicago tonight latino voices hugo balta with how advocacy journalists report on the ground from conversation that aired last weekend now in a year filled with twists and turns from covid nineteen to the racial reckoning following. The death of george floyd and election twenty twenty news outlets are more important than ever and helping the public understand what is often chaos sometimes. Those news sources are criticized for leaning left or right viewed as ideological propaganda machines. So what distinguishes the work of advocacy journalists reporting that begins with non-objective viewpoints from bias journalism and misinformation joining us now with more or less status reporter for injustice watch justin raila civic reporting resident at city bureau and jackie's editor in chief of south side. Weekly let's get right to it. Jackie how would you describe advocacy journalism. Some critics us advocacy journalism in fake news. Interchangeably what's the difference advocacy. Journalism is just another word for journalism at south side. Weekly for example. We've gotten rid of the notion of objectivity which we understand as it being primarily white male and western perspective which there's nothing wrong with that point of view but it's not a point of view that we plays on a pedestal or that we model ourselves after We are focused on the south side of chicago. Which is up of black and brown residents immigrants and other working class folks and so we keep our readership minds when we are writing these stories. We're not keeping shareholders or sponsors or other interested in mind so advocacy. Journalism should really just be journalism. Let's keep with that theme of point of view godless you describe justice watch reporting as having fun foundational understanding that some groups of people are systemically exploited. Where does the understanding come from. And how does it serve your reporting. Yeah i think it comes from facts you know. I think it's silly to pretend that the world that the world we live in the country we live in equally good to all people. I think it is the fact that like people imigrants working class. People women clear folk are all subjected to different inequities systemic oppression and to pretend otherwise is a silly inaccurate inaccurate and so i think us coming from that perspective knowing that this is true that these things are true informs a reporting informs what we should want cover and how we wanted to cover it and what voice is what we want to include in those stories yes very foundational forums sign. Jackie mentioned earlier. She doesn't believe enough titi. Justin should a journalist. They've lived experience and personal identity and formed their reporting. Yeah i think. I think all of our lived experiences in our entities. Inform our porting. If we want to admit to that. I think just thinking about source selection whose voices are resenting however describing communities what meant what in what ways are read arguing about communities other than really is impacted by by We are in in our experiences. I think like jackie was saying on there. Is this idea that like a journalist. Is this empty vessel. That is unbiased. And that's just observing the world reporting truth. Naturally a lot of the things a lot of our perceptions of the world are or socially constructed rate in thinking. Oh my god losing my up. But yeah i think definitely like on our whether we want to admit it or not are by disease. Birth where people have opinions in they. They impact the type of stories that we wanted to help. But i don't necessarily think that that means that we don't tell stories that are fair that we don't tell stories that are accurate in that. We don't tell us absolutely all the stories that we do need to be based on facts. Of course now jackie. Let's talk delivered more about advocacy journalism. Tell us about how you train journalists to to practice advocacy journalism. Well for starters. We don't take Police statements at face value Or really any information. That is coming from a figure of authority. We make sure that we always have the community perspective and the input of disenfranchised communities that make up part of our readership So at south san weekly even though we do offer paid opportunities for the most part where volunteer newsroom which means that we have an open door policy where anybody who wants to pursue. A story can come to us And and write that story with editorial support and any type of support. They need to get their story out there. And that's because we value we value the point of view and the lived experiences of everyone in our beat which is the south side right and and those lived experiences matter. I mean one thing is to write about on issue but to write about it and live through that issue and think is extra powerful. And so i wanted to jump in there. One of the things that have been very important during the election. Have been border guides. We hear certainly at wcw news producer guy to help again. The public have a better understanding of both not just a national racist with the local racist godless injustice watch judicial voting guide has a point of view about what should keep a judge from retaining their position. What are the principles behind. That guy was that god was developed. Yeah i will say you know. Our guide was nonpartisan means. We weren't telling folks who vote for him would vote against but we did decide to highlight certain aspects of judges their Their careers That were over. Pretension and some of the controversies that have arisen from their careers and we also made a point of highlighting which judges prosecutors in the past which judges or public defenders on in which is practiced private law and for how long I think our interest was mostly to give the electric all information that we could so that people can make an informed decision as they possibly could great. And i want to get this one last question into to justin. Can you give some examples of advocacy journalism bringing about positive change in communities i think injustice watches judges guide isn't perfect example of that of autumn of people being informed when they were getting the ballet and deciding of a judge should should be related or not. I'm can't think of the specific judge. Recently broke were. A judge was voted out of their seat. But i'm i think it is a perfect example of of giving the electorate what what they need in and informing them in a way that helps them navigate their lived experience in the world around them. Justin jackie carlos. Thank you so much for your time and for your insights back with more chicago tonight. Right after this Or two days into the new decade and two days into recreational marijuana being legal in illinois all our residents will be subject to a stay at home order that the pandemic familiar with in america. The best is yet to today's vote is counted. This is far from over. It's going to take years to really understand twenty twenty. Chicago's home more claude monet paintings than any city other than paris. That's because the works of the famous. French impressionist made a strong impression on local collectors. Here beginning in the eighteen eighties paintings from the art institute collection and from private collections. Have come together in a show called monet and chicago and all the art institute is currently closed arts producer mark. Vitale recently visited to see the show. Here's another look at that story Stepping into the world of claude monet you see the play of light in his famous series of stacks of wheat landscapes and gardens. The paintings he made in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were radically different and very modern. They appeal to the well-heeled citizens of a young city that saw itself as modern money never came to chicago his everywhere museum and i think even chicago associates itself with the french impressionist and we wanted to celebrate that because we take it for granted that we have thirty three monet's in our collection chicago land collectors very generous. We have works from private collections. So those are extremely exciting when you put them in dialogue with paintings that we've known about since the eighteen ninety s scores of monet's were collected by the palmer and ryerson families and eighteen. Eighty eight review in the chicago. Tribune asked why go to paris since paris has come to chicago. When you're looking at amona you're thinking of an artist. Who doesn't use the intermediary of drawing to get to where he's going. The that was one of the innovations of the impressionist that they didn't spend the time of making careful. Drawings at than they would enlarge into tableau painting. Everything looks like it was done in one. Go and we know that he was all about observation that he painted on planner outdoors. But after we've looked at them with infrared with x rays with all of these wonderful scientific tools that we have at our fingertips. Now we're finding out that. Oh my gosh. This was an artist who struggled. This was an artist to change his mind. This was an artist who came back in the studio. And that's where the magic happened. The first impression becomes something quite different monet famously. Spent years painting his gardens at jeeva rene near paris. This exhibit has a companion show in garden at garfield park conservatory. Where horticultural team found inspiration in the french painter. I took elements from his paintings. The colors textures specific flowers that we're in his paintings and in this garden he loved his So we had to include those and you always let them sprawl out into the pathways Just to break up the lines a little bit some things. I found in his paintings. Some things i found that were in his garden such as tonia here. Which is Mexican sunflower dali's. He loved his values. So i had include dyas. The monet's garden at the conservatory is all outdoors and will last until the weather changes indoors at the art institute. The show which had been scheduled to open in may had to adapt to the new reality. We really had to re conceive how it was going to be experienced. We have a certain way of doing things. i like. benches have benches. I like very dramatic lighting in dark rooms. And of course you don't want that you don't want people bumping into together and they added extra space between paintings to encourage social distance. I think that people who know our collection are going to be astounded and see the collection in a much different light and also for chicago and this is the exhibition about their city and about their museum for chicago tonight. This is mark. Vitale saw the exhibit and i was founded. It's great and the show at the garfield park conservatory has since closed. The exhibition at the art institute is called bodet in chicago while the museum is currently closed. The if it was originally scheduled to run through the eighteenth you can see more of those beautiful paintings on our website and that is our show for this wednesday night. Please join us tomorrow. Night live at seven just half of. Us adults say they would get covid nineteen vaccine. So what's the cause of the trust. And how can trust be rebuilt anna growing movement to flip black friday two black shop friday and now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm peres shuts. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe. Happy thanksgiving good night closed. Captioning is made possible by robert clifford and clifford law offices representing dozens of families. In the crash of a boeing. Seven thirty-seven max eight jet. Mr clifford has been named lead counsel and litigation in federal court in chicago.

chicago rogers park chicago department of public h illinois five billion dollars Chicago amanda finicky cook county lightfoot federal government mayor lori dr allison us bureau of labor statistics illinois department of employm argentine football association diego armando mardona Martorana alberto fernandez quinn myers Amanda paris rogers park
December 7, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:46 min | 7 months ago

December 7, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm brandon friedman and parachutes just down the hall reticent. I will be hosting from separate studios for the near future in an effort to socially distanced during this current kovic surge on the show tonight secretary white will keep a close eye on how things are going with the pandemic. If you're driving on an expired license that may not be expired after all the bottom line is that. We can't allow iran to get nuclear weapons. Centurions rise with iran after the assassination of nuclear scientist look president-elect. Biden's woman foreign policy priorities. I heard no mention on of any pardons on any conversations. I've had in the white house. President trump is reportedly looking at pardoning family members and political allies. How the president can and cannot use his pardon power. Those one thousand one hundred twenty three were in the intensive care unit. Icu beds are at seventy nine percent capacity or occupancy statewide as the corona virus surges. We talk with to healthcare workers on the frontlines. The weather gets cold. And you're indoors in this a lot of community spread since in person. Gatherings of the holidays can exacerbate this faith. Groups are moving the celebration online and the chicago auto show that was scheduled for february. Has been postponed when it's rescheduled. For plus other business news from cranes are vacancy. Rate is is around forty percent on the south. Chicago neighborhood is doing six months. After many stores were damaged during civil unrest this summer highest ninety nine over three hundred shooting from my wheelchair where my mouth in the inspiring story of the bet payton who's overcome disability to win gold medals in archery but first some of today's top stories lakeview alderman. Tom tiny is taking some heat for allowing diners to eat inside his and slather restaurant. Defying the governor's thirty eight day old ban on indoor dining the forty fourth ward alderman. Who also leaves the city council's powerful. Zoning committee admits that he allowed a very limited number of regular diners to eat inside. The restaurant on a sporadic basis wild distancing and wearing masks. He says it was an error in judgment and it will not happen again. The city's department of business affairs and consumer protection says its investigation into chinese. Alleged violation will will be handled in the same manner as the thousands of others. it's investigated during the pandemic. You can read more about those investigations on our website and illinois. The finals confirm nearly eighty seven hundred new cases of corona virus. Today plus ninety debts. There have been a total of more than seven hundred ninety six thousand cases and thirteen thousand three hundred forty three deaths. The state test positivity rate is eleven point nine percent. The chicago teachers union is again seeking an injunction to get chicago public schools to the bargaining table specifically on the issue of safety in schools. The district has set january eleventh as the target date to return preschool and some special education students to in person instruction but in documents the union filed with the illinois educational labor relations board. The union calls that in arbitrary date set unilaterally by the district. See to argues. The district hasn't shown a plan that includes steps for covid nineteen screening testing and tracing ventilation upgrades in school buildings thus endangering teachers who'd be required to return the labor board is expected to review the request next week and a chicago. Baseball legend has died in just three seasons with the team. Dick allen helped rejuvenate event troubled white sox franchise and brought national attention to the south side. The freewheeling allen won the american league mvp award in nineteen seventy two and get a look at this here. He is hitting a home run and nine hundred sixty seven. All star game. Allen told the tribune that his three years in chicago was the best time of his fifteen year career in two thousand fourteen. He missed making the hall of fame by one vote but may still get in one day. Alan will soon be the subject of a new documentary by mike. Tolan who recently produced the acclaimed. Espn documentary series about michael jordan and the bulls. Two gallon died today at his home. In pennsylvania he was seventy eight illinois. Driver's license facilities have been closed since mid-november and they'll remain that way through the beginning of the new year. Amanda finicky joins us now to help. Explain what this means if you need your license renewed or have other concerns about how to keep things up to date and on track. During the pandemic amanda. Yes for drivers license. Disabilities in illinois will remain closed through january force. At least i'm not saying that they will necessarily be closed for any longer but all of this depends on covid case numbers that might make folks uneasy if their driver's license or state. Id has or is about to expire but secretaryastate spokesman henry helped says not tori everyone with a driver's license or an id card that on. Its face currently looks expire or will be expiring soon actually has an expiration date moved up until june. I twenty twenty one. Still if you want to get things taking care of you don't have to wait for dmv's to open necessarily you can do all lot online like get a new license plate sticker renew. Your license state encourages it. We encourage people to take advantage of that and do their business with our office from the comfort of their own home. And i might also add that if you do radio online you won't have to come stand in a line at when they reopen but not. Everyone can go to the lab to renew their driver's license. There are some exemptions. you've got suspended license. of course he won't be able to. If you're someone who has not had a photo in eight years you're required to come in to get a new photo. That's basically a fraud is she. We wanna have fairly recent photos of individuals but if if all you really need is to take the vision screening the majority those individuals will be allowed to renew their driver's license online. So you know what category you fall to help says. The secretary of state's team is going to make it so that you'll be able to type in your driver's license number into a form on the state cyber drive website and it will tell you your options but that form is not ready yet so in the meanwhile this month tribes whose licenses expired really starting at the beginning of the pandemic in february through january of twenty twenty one will be receiving letters from the secretary of state's office in the mail. And if you can renew your driver's license online it's going to tell you how you'll get a pin them now if you're not one of those people well again. Dmv's do open back up in january but there are some exceptions views that are open now for certain populations just certain facilities have and will remain open to service those who need commercial driver's licenses. So basically those in the trucking industry and then others are opening tomorrow for first time drivers who have never had and who need a license also. There are seven drive through facilities throughout illinois in three of these are in chicago and these are open for only people to renew their driver's license plate stickers. So if you're someone who doesn't wanna go online purchase your license plate sticker. You could go to those facilities. Go through the drive thru. You don't have to leave your vehicle and our employees conservancy through the drive through window which brings up an important reminder. Your driver's license may be good through summer but you stood could still get fined for driving around with out in up to date state license plate sticker illinois. Did offer basically amnesty on that but that program ended november. I in that is something that really most anybody can renew again but you have to. Have i cleared your emissions test. If you are due for one now a plate sticker will ring you at least one hundred fifty one dollars the fee for that rose by one hundred dollars in two thousand twenty two paid for major infrastructure upgrades throughout the state. Now that license plate sticker. That is different than the city sticker. That chicago requires drivers to have on their front window. The city also did because of coburg drivers break on that earlier in the pandemic but that waiver is now over so city clerk offices. They are open. You can also renew your city sticker on line by the way he also do have to pay parking in the city just like usual covid or not. Now hopes as the secretary of state's office has alerted both all state and federal law enforcement about this driver's license extension. So no matter where you're at in the united states. Those expired licenses should still be considered valid friend. Just after you. Amanda good to know thank you and now to paris and a look at what foreign policy may be like under the biden administration. Paris brennan america is back. That was president. Elect joe biden's proclamation to the rest of the world. When talking about what to expect from his foreign policy it follows four years of a more isolationist approach to foreign policy that ruffled the feathers of traditional allies and appeared to embrace authoritarian leaders but the issues biden faces are vast starting with climate change china russia and iran. Here's what biden had to say on friday. I want to reestablish close close close alliance relationships. We had both in in europe and in the pacific. Europe now has basically stiff arm in the united states based on the president's embrace of autocrats and stick poking his finger in there is joining us now to talk about what they expect from biden and trump's foreign policy legacy are john near shaima professor of political science at the university of chicago and a specialist in foreign policy and alberto cole professor of law and us foreign relations at depaul university cole is also a former principal. Deputy attorney secretary of defense gentlemen. Welcome both of you back to chicago. Tonight john mir shammar you hear biden talking about reengaging with european countries and Rejoining trans alliances or at least strengthening ties to transatlantic. What do you expect. That will look like. I think there's no question that one of the real problems with president trump's foreign policy was that he was unilateral not an isolation the unilateralist who treated america's allies with contempt and this included our allies in europe. And i think more importantly because of the importance of containing china he treated east asian allies with contempt as well and this made it very hard for american diplomacy to work around the world. And i think if nothing else biden will go to great ways to rectify that problem and that will be all good for the united states. Better call ken. that problem be rectified. Or will other western nations or some of the east asian nations that this is a temporary respite and donald trump in that unilateralist policy might come back and for years. Well first of all. I have to disagree with hasn't colleague. Shiner said i fully agree with him. That trump was a unilateralist on in europe. And that he treated our allies. There was 'em but he certainly strengthened our acidic ties considerably Not just by the end of pacific command but by strengthening ties with india on creating a more robust specific alliance that includes not just korea and japan with will. He got along very well or also australia. Taiwan india so Now again the issue going forward is trump should have worked with our european allies in our policy towards china. Okay and i would expect Joe biden do that as well. I think that our allies are very realistic. I i think they understand that. America is deeply deeply engaged in asia. America has to care about asia and that also with regards to europe our european allies that who expect to be back but i think they also got the message that they have to start contributing more to their defense which is a point that not just from me but bob gates. Mr obama secretary of defense made many many times to the european. So let's take a look at some of the picks on the foreign policy team here. Anthony blinken at state department linda. Thomas greenfield is un ambassador. Jake sullivan is national security adviser. What did those names tell you about. The biden approach. I think basically this is the third obama administration. What what's happening year is that president elect biden is bringing all his old advisors From the obama days into his administration and they will run american foreign policy. And you want to remember that. When they ran american foreign policy between two thousand eight and two thousand sixteen they basically failed the reason that donald trump is now on the white house is that he ran against the both both the democratic and republican foreign policy establishments and he said that they failed and the american people by and large agreed with donald trump and elected him. So we have to hope that. These policymakers who are coming in with the president as well as the president himself have learned from their past mistakes. We have to hope they have a steep learning curve. And they'll do much better this time than they did last. Let's talk about specific challenges. A better call you alluded to this china. How have biden administration approach china. So that is one thing. Donald trump did well which is he broke. Prevailing consensus up to that time on china. We lost our bed on china. We made this giant bed. All the way from the time. Richard nixon and henry kissinger that if we open our markets to china that china will gradually become a democracy on would become a team player at china clearly is not china's an adversary and is a competitor and a very very different level. So i think that joe biden hopefully understands that and i agree with john that we have to worry about some of the people that he's bringing in because they had a very conventional mindset about china. The question is do they realize that we have to be tough on china again. I hope that will be toughened. China with the europeans because together with your put a lot of economic pressuring china and more importantly working with our allies can also strategic pressure on china check china's activities particularly the key issue that keeps a lot of was awake at night is will china take a risk. I'm try to invade taiwan by source. If they did that united states decision-makers in a very tall spot jamir shaima area of the world. You know very well. The middle east trump pulling out of the iran nuclear deal. Now you've got the killing supposedly the top scientists in iran How does that complicate. Biden's approach to iran complicates the situation normally. And i believe this is the first major problem on the foreign policy front that he will face when he takes office. The fact is the iranians have said. That biden doesn't get back into the nuclear deal. The so-called jcp away within a month of taking office that the iranians will throw out the inspectors and they will go back to enriching uranium up to a twenty percent level and they will significantly increase the amount of uranium. They enrich So if biden doesn't get back into the deal. There's dan going to be a huge crisis. And there's going to be great pressure on president and from the israelis and from the israel lobby in the united states to attack iran's nuclear facilities. All this raises the question. Will he be able to get back into the j. Cpo will trump be able to get back. I mean we'll buy be able to get back into the nuclear deal. And i don't think he'll be able to do it because of problems here in the united states and problems in iran and i think therefore we're likely to face a crisis in the near future with tremendous pressure brought to bear on by to attack iran. All right we have to leave it there. My thanks to john mir shimmer and alberto call. Thank you so much and up next how doctors and nurses are bracing for an uptick in covid cases so stick around chicago. Tonight is made possible in part by the city club of chicago. Smart people may disagree about what makes a great city but part of what makes chicago. Great is that we don't have to agree to one a city like ours. A lot of issues come up. The city club of chicago is a place to debate those issues and hear from the men and women who shape the policies lead the industries and tell the stories that defy our city for the free and open exchange of ideas. The city club chicago fatigue constant death and fears of bringing the corona virus home nine months into the pandemic many healthcare workers. Say they're reaching a breaking point and though multiple vaccines may be on the way some doctors and nurses are bracing for what health officials say could be one of the most difficult winters in american public health history. Joining us to talk about what it's like working on the front lines of the virus. Are dr vishnu chandi chairman of the chicago. Medical societies cova nineteen task force. He's an infectious disease specialist working in several chicago area hospitals and paul peter member of the illinois nurses association's board of directors. He's also a nurse in health. Emergency department thanks to you. Both for joining us dr trendy. Let's start with you please. How would you compare working in this pandemic especially during this recent surge to any other time in your career or any other epidemic. Been around for a while now. Uh so the first pandemic was the hiv pandemic so a lot of young people come in it was a it was rolling out over years. This has been constant since march And in our own group which were a large group over one hundred doctors This time people are just tired Were on almost seven days a week for a lot of us weekend after weekend. And there's no saturday there's no sunday even after you finish work Like i'm coming over here today. After work i still have to go home at chart And if you look at the rest of our colleagues critical care colleagues. The er colleagues It's been the same for them. There's been no break from this and the current surges long winter december january february march. And there's no end in sight for us so it's been hard for all of us in the physician world paul. Peter described the concern. That nurses have about going to work exposing themselves to possibly catching the corona virus and then taking it home to your own families. Of course you know that's something. At the forefront of reminds catching cororavirus and bringing home to her home to our loved ones is a very real risk You know at my hospital. We've had people bring corona virus home and infect their loved ones and they died so we've had very real losses You know at at our hospital and at other nursing stamps around the city. And it's it's troubling to an addition you're saying to obviously losing patience you're experiencing losing colleagues. Yes you know at my hospital. We did have to nurses who lost their lives due to covid nineteen earlier in the pandemic And even now we still have a an opera purses who are Becoming infected being placed in quarantine. And you're finding that's happening in every hospital. Throughout the city dr trendy. What kind of impact does all of this have on the social. Excuse me the mental and physical health physicians who are working such long hours but also experiencing what kind of trauma. So there's a there's a physical wear down of day to day stuff. There is the mental breakdown of just seeing patients. Pass away without family members. There's no grieving process. You go you go to the next patient afterwards. And then there's there's there's a social thing we're not able to mix with people Because of the pandemic and then you're seeing it no department after department from the emergency room on You go to the critical care side where you see our critical care colleagues working equally hard and everyone's worn out at the end of the day. You all look at each other and then you go start doing this all over the next day and the patients keep coming in and you're not able to really spend time talking and doing the usual stuff that you do with your patience and your family and the family's doing zoom calls over that over the phone. It's been very hard. It's been very hard in the nurses. See them breaking down. Occasionally you see physicians this weekend. One of my doctor's got sick with cova and you're talking to her today and she's there with her husband. She's worried about that. So there's a lot of lot of issues that that are hard to deal with Because you've got sick patients in the hospital. Paul peter what goes through your mind knowing what you know and based on your experience what goes through your mind then when you see people out and about not following public health guidance you know it honestly feels like You know people wanna call us. That were just tell us. We're heroes and that we're doing all this very important work but then you know. They don't provide us with the dignity of preventing us from to having to do that work. If we don't need to so it feels like a stamp in the back to be honest to say one thing and then do another You know. I really want the public to understand that there are we. You have a limited number of doctors and nurses and tax to provide the care that is required to get people through this pandemic and if you burn us out. There's no one left. Dr john day we've got about twenty seconds left. How difficult is this winter season going to be for your profession is going to be very hard Because we're running out of people there. Is you know you can have more hospital beds. We simply don't have enough doctors nurses respiratory therapists on the way up in the hospital staff if it continues this way so it's gonna be a long three months And you know. We hope people wear their masks and we hope people socially distance and wash their hands and do the stuff okay. We're out of time my. Thanks to dr vishnu. Chandi an paul peter. Best of luck to you both thinks working to this month. Wcw news is checking in with neighborhoods across chicago that experienced civil unrest and often ensuing property damage in the wake of mass protests. And rioting over the summer. I up the south chicago neighborhood on the city's south east side. Which we. I visited in early. June as businesses and residents were coming together and to clean up and rebuild chicago. Tonight's quinn myers. Stop by to see how the community is doing now. Six months later commercial avenue in south chicago has long been the area's main business core since the days when tens of thousands of steelworkers lived in the surrounding neighborhoods but in recent years strip has struggled to fill vacant storefronts a trend. That was seriously exacerbated. By civil unrest and ensuing property damage in late may and early june. We had sixteen retail businesses that were essentially broken into and really mass looting for the most part These businesses suffered massive inventory loss. But there was also extensive damage so it wasn't simply that things were being stolen that includes mission cannabis dispensary which has been operating in south chicago since twenty seventeen. Almost all of the store's inventory was wiped out after closing for two months. Mission reopens in late july after more than one hundred thousand dollars in repairs and increased security measures. All of this is out of pocket. You know we went with and filed a claim with our insurance company However you know these are small insurance. Companies that that ensure cannabis companies. and so. the max didn't even cover the door. So most today employees say business has mostly stabilized masked customers are steadily streaming into by medical and recreational weed. It's companies like mission that public officials in south chicago are eager to see more of retailers. That can be anchors for the entire commercial district retails important because there's a lot of people that we don't have a mall. I mean we have on one hundred eighteenth street. We have a tj maxx up there but a lot of people you know they can't take the bus or it's too far or you know we have a big senior population in chicago. That banks on that corridor to be there shopping. Area and officials say they're optimistic. Investment is coming mayor lori. Lightfoot invest southwest initiative prioritizes south chicago as one of its ten target markets. The real effort has been to identify and use monies that became available to help those businesses get reestablished there was some city funds state funds various foundations that provided monies but for some businesses on commercial avenue. The damage was just too heavy. Fill shoe store and nearby cities sports have closed permanently. The looting and the follow-up problems related to covid have really caused a very big setback. Our vacancy rate is is around forty percent now. So it's it's jumped up by about seventy percent. One retailer that has reopened is hair world. A beauty supply store whose owner richard. Ken has been business in south chicago. Since the nineteen eighty s. Kim says he lost almost five hundred thousand dollars in merchandise and damages this summer in six months later. He's still angry at inaction. From the city we call the city including a nine hundred eleven. Then they say like oh. I'm sorry we have a number two for you all the nine hundred game. I'm sorry we can't. We have nothing to nothing for you. We pay the property tax. We pay the sales tax. We pay the corporation tax income test. All my taxable savant. I lost almost let go with the dies and the searchers damaging over like five hundred thousand dollars. They made my whole my last thirty airport. It's gone within a couple of hours over the past few months. Kim considered closing his store for good amidst the added pressures of operating during the pandemic but like the dispensary and the majority of the other businesses on commercial avenue. He's not ready to give up quite yet. This is the only thing i know. I put all my whole younger life and the commercial revenue as a beauty supply owner. This is the only thing. I know. I cannot go nowhere for chicago tonight. I'm quinn myers and next in our series will visit inglewood also on the south side. We'll check in with businesses as well as neighborhood organizers working to transform one intersection into a sustainable community run development and resource center still to come on chicago tonight world business chicago. Ceo andrea op is stepping down. Where she's off to next and other business news from cranes president trump could pardon family members and close allies on his way out of office and the fall out that might create gathering for the winter. Holidays isn't possible for many people. So faith groups are bringing their services to the small screen's and i'm so inspirational they say to other people. Thank you up. And they try and the inspiring story of champion archer bet peyton and how she never gave up despite health obstacles but i some more of today's top stories illinois. Health officials confirmed nearly eighty seven hundred new cases of the coronavirus today. Plus ninety deaths. There have been a total of more than seven hundred and nine six thousand cases and thirteen thousand three hundred and forty-three deaths chicago. Neighbors are being encouraged to organize and find ways to promote recycle healing for the next two months through a campaign from the mayor's office called together. We heal from now through the end of january. Mayor lightfoot office of equity in racial justice is encouraging residents to organize a virtual healing event with their social networks and share experiences through an online form that creates an interactive healing map. Here's a look at a campaign video watched today. We need a shared commitment to racial healing and transformation. We need to engage true. Telling we need to repair harm. We need to restore our wholeness and we need every chicago to be part of this work and now to paris and some of today's top business headlines thanks grandest. Chicago auto show is on hold but for how long developers pitch to mega residential towers for downtown despite a slow economy and world business. Chicago's president and ceo is stepping down. Here go behind the headlines. Crain's chicago business editor. Ann dwyer and great to see you So the first story here we have on the daca chicago auto show something. Everyone starts to look forward to this time of year. Postponed for february twenty twenty one win might come back hoping to push it into spring peres but even that seems like an aggressive timetable to be honest so much depends on the roll out of vaccines for one thing. And also just how comfortable capable might be gathering In such a gigantic event like the honor show. And yes you know. This has been a build for years as the biggest auto show in the nation it typically brought in about a million people over a ten day period in the pre covid era. So i think a lot really depends on people's comfort level Another factor that the organizers are having to way is trying to find a date that won't bump into other auto shows. There's one in new york. There's another one in la and toronto in detroit. So it's going to be a challenge to find the right time. So much lost revenue million people. There and certainly doesn't seem like people are gonna be comfortable congregating like that by the spring all right next story despite the slowdown here in real estate developers are pitching to mega residential towers. One south loop one in the near west side. What do we know about these projects. They're big for one thing and it's really a significant bats that investors still see value downtown and are betting that there's going to be a rebound post pandemic The south loop one that you mentioned. Paris is of being pitched along south wabash avenue between congress and than harrison. Our guest ida b wells. Drive now that one calls for a twenty three story tower with a more than three hundred hotel rooms since a lot And two hundred sixty apartments or so As well as a separate thirty six story tower with another five hundred plus apartments there Now meanwhile over in the west looe In ohio based developer is pitching a forty seven story tower With up to will opt to four hundred. Thirteen apartments And that's going to be a step. It goes through on washington boulevard along the kennedy expressway. Wow developers making a better. It really quickly last story here. Familiar name andrea stop stepping down from world business chicago. What's next for her. She's heading over to cleveland avenue. That's a venture capital fund that's operated by former mcdonald's. Ceo don thomson a longtime name here in chicago through that fun. He has become a really significant food. Industry investor in fact he has of major state and beyond meet the plant based meat alternative company. he's also been really active in philanthropy and in fostering minority and women owned businesses. And that's going to be a particular focus for andy's up when she lands at cleveland avenue as managing partner. All right and wire thank you so much always multiple reports say. The president is considering a flurry of pardons upon leaving office including a possible self. Pardon but does the constitution explicitly. Give him that power. And cana- president issue pardons for crimes that have at least publicly been charged yet recently. Pro-trump tv host. Sean hannity made the case for a self pardon. Though the white house press secretary downplayed that idea. My question is why wouldn't he just pardon himself in his family on the way out the door because i think he would be right to do so because these people are nuts. I've heard no mention of any pardons on any conversations. I've had in the white house other than the pardon of lieutenant. General michael flynn and joining us now. Our z's huck franken bernice j greenberg professor of law at the university of chicago and michael allen associate professor at northwestern university's department of history. Welcome both of you. I disease hook. What explicit pardon power does the constitution. Give the president to the president of power to pardon federal but not state crimes. The framers didn't think about the question of south auden's and so nothing in the text speaks to it one way or the other right. So that doesn't seem to be precedent for that right now and micheal and there's a lot of rumors swirling that the president might pardon likes of rudy giuliani. His family members. himself are there precedents for the president issuing so many pardons potentially two people close to his campaign or even in his family certainly precedent for issuing pardons to close associates members an administration but not to family members Unique features of the trump administration is the number of a direct relatives of president trump. Who serve in his administration and issuing pardons to senior staff while not unprecedented Is is rare than issuing them to one's own family member is unprecedented in in My view But the to overlap considerably in this administration. That's always these huck. You're saying that framers never really intended for this question to arise cana president pardom themselves. How do you think south pardon would be interpreted by the courts. I think it's exceedingly likely that a south baden would be rejected as unconstitutional other. Parts of the constitution Acts of self dealing acts of bribery and require that the fact that the president take cat that the little bait faithfully execute it is impossible. Read those other obligations fateful execution as consistent with the idea of self op so certainly if there is a self pardon it will be challenged in court would seem Michael allen what did the issuing a blanket part in For crimes that we really don't know the specifics of i mean. Does it have to be a specific crime. That you're pardoning someone for well in terms of what is allowed or disallowed. I would be z's one of the things i would say however is that It's rare to have The issuance of pardons in advance of crimes is not unprecedented. I mean the issuing of a pardon for richard nixon for the watergate events surrounding watergate. I should say You know included the issuing of the pardon before he had been officially prosecuted that being said there have been legal proceedings. You know that involved other watergate defendants and this included a lot of Unindicted co-conspirator Allegations a clearly involved mr nixon. Those were in the public sphere. So the idea of that. There was a kind of preemptive. Pardon in advance of prosecution in the nixon case is a precedent of but it's a wholly unprecedented. The have the idea that you had issue apart in advance of even a specificity specified crime or any kind of Legal or Congressional investigations into such side crimes. And so this is entering into new territory certainly. I think it's pretty clear that the president cannot pardon someone for crimes that that person has yet to commit a z's hook what about that question though of blanket pardons for instance with giuliani or members of trump's family. Will he have to say That that they are pardoned for x y and z. Or can they just say any crimes. I would build on the example. That michael of presidents boards often of president nixon as michael said that that pardon extended to at great related offenses but also apply to any and all actions that nixon may taken during his time as president so the ford pardon of nixon is an example of a blanket. Pardon was importantly said it is not possible for the president to say issue is south padre on december the fifteenth and then taken action. That's criminal in reliance on that pop in on december the twentieth yukon. Pop yourself for actions that have taken place. Even if you can pop a others full prosecutions or indictments that if yet to come down so long as perhaps our investigations ongoing or something like that michael allen this notion i mean you heard trump surrogates saying he should pardon himself and his family because folks will quote unquote witch-hunt although if a president does take this kind of action doesn't give the perception of some kind of guilt of the public. Well i think that's traditionally been the the understanding that there is an acceptance of gil with the acceptance of the pardon but again this is in part because typically historically pardons have been issued a during or after legal proceedings on legal findings of guilt This notion of issuing a preemptive pardon of course it begs the question what is the what is the pardon four and then how do you accept guilt for a crime. That has not yet been committed or at least has not been substantiated. So there there is this you know sort of open question. I suppose not only whether or not Trump will issue apart to himself or his family. But then what is that. Pardon for and what does it mean to accept harden in advance of any kind of legal proceeding or legal finding of guilt. All right. we're gonna have to follow this over the next few weeks and my thanks to z's hook and michael allen thank you so much thank you thank you now brandis. We go back to you. Thank you still ahead. How faith leaders are pivoting their services online this holiday season amid a surge in cova cases but first we want to invite you to become a part of the new wtt w fund independent the fund for independent news is a bold initiative to ensure the news coverage that you rely on is funded and secure this year has been like none other and throughout it all we have remained solid lead focused on our mission to bring you straightforward fact based information on the issues that impact your life today when you call seven seven three five eight eight eleven eleven or go to wtt w dot com your contribution will be matched dollar for dollar now more than ever trusted. Local news is vital to our chicago community with your contribution to the wti w fund for independent news. 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W today call seven seven three five eight eleven eleven or go to. www dot com. Thank you and we're back with a look. At how different faith groups are readjusting their services for the holidays as we see a rise in cova cases but first a look at the weather we can get past the idea of tournaments into a political topic. It really gets a soldier in our community. That's something i could get behind. Maybe we can use it as a calling card to unite. Hanukkah and christmas are held on some of the shortest therefore darkest days of the year however they offer light through igniting a minora or advent candles and now due to the pandemic the glow of a computer screen typically. These holidays are celebrated in groups of family and friends but with kobe cases on the rise faith groups in particular have had to push their celebrations. Virtually johnny us to talk about their congregations. Celebrations are rachel weiss senior. Rabbi at the jewish reconstructionist congregation in evanston and shawn bowman a pastor with friendship presbyterian church. Thanks to you both for joining us. Rachel let's start with you please. You know we had you on in april on the first night of passover back in this spring seven months later. What's changed for your congregation now in many ways Not a whole lot. We have gotten more used to being virtual more nimble much more creative. We made it through our holiday season when to gathering thousands thousand people together and instead we had hundreds of zoom screens and we discovered that it has been unjustice meaningful to do this. Virtually and so we're holding together really well and we're excited for ponca defeat like you've probably learned things from passover some practices that you could implement this time around that you maybe didn't know about or that you learned from then absolutely i mean they sure didn't teach stuff in rabbinical school right how to be a stage manager or opposed were manage zoom. But we're learning about how to use this technology. We've had a lot of bar and bought an breeds services in which we've been able to do really creative things with our liturgy with reportings with ways that we can zoom in on taurus role and ways that we can bring us secret experienced. Somebody's home so it's very empowering for so many of our members and it's gotten a lot more people involved who have real tangible skills that can help shawn bowman your church. You already operating with sort of a hybrid model since he don't have a physical church building. How is christmas going to be celebrated differently this year. Yeah we're going to do a couple of different things this year both on zoom online The first is On christmas eve we're gonna gather each in our own households and bring different characters from the cast of the christmas story and do an online table reading of a christmas pageant. called Do not be afraid of illustrated ministries and our goal is that feel very accessible and that people can come and go and kids dress to. Sheep can run through living rooms and that we take that very Casual and intimate. That's offered with this online tool and bring you the story to life in a way that is Centers us on some delight enjoy in the midst of what has been a really hard and challenging. Season enriched ritual wise. How about hanukkah. How's it being celebrated differently for your congregation. Haka is inherently an at home holiday and so one of the things that will do is. We're calling it every night lights. And so every night at seven pm people log onto zoom and a different family from our congregation will lead the congregation in candle lighting. And it's actually something that's really beautiful because it many years we'd have a lot of people who would home alone mighty. They're minora by themselves and this way they get to do it in community so we have a lot of ways to bring people together and to spread a little bit more light over lots of screens and lots of ways will be frying lucky as we normally get about. Fifteen people are guy kitchen this time. We'll be in fifty different kitchens trying to keep our laptops away from the oil but definitely sharing and doing a lot of laughing together. Probably a good idea earlier today. Infectious disease expert. Dr anthony fauci. Cheese spoke about the risk of gathering for the holidays. Here's what he said when the weather gets cold and you're indoors and there's a lot of community spread it just compounds itself one after the other and the situation is that as we enter now from the thanksgiving holiday season into the christmas holiday season. It's going to be challenging sean. Bowen what do you say to people who are debating whether or not to stay virtual virtual from holidays so important and Our tradition To point to the tax that say we are called to care for the most vulnerable to be aware of those. Who are you know those great at the greatest risk and really to think about. How do we create spaces. That are safe For those who are most vulnerable so that we don't end up leaving those folks out at the edges but actually censoring them in our decision making so as we think about whether to gather To not think about like well. How high could the risk phoebe and we still do it but actually to say like how do we center these folks whose lives are really at stake and how do we help. Contribute to public health and ways. That still We we believe in our traditions that god is on the move and not contained in one place or building and so how do we invite people into that expansive understanding of what it means to be the church not to not to be closed because our buildings are inaccessible. Now both hanukkah and christmas they invite a lot of light win observed as we mentioned through the leading of the minora or advent candles. Just hanging christmas lights Which is helpful at a time of the year when it gets really dark. The days are short. Sean back to you in about twenty seconds. What do you think is the significance of this especially during a pandemic. I think we always hold light and dark together. Right and neither inherently good or bad. But we really can't experience the fullness of one without the other and so in this time in particular where Oftentimes it is darker earlier in the day and we do have this sense of of the creeping of shadows that we light lights. is a reminder that we're not alone That god is with us and that we have one. Another is rabbi weiss mentioned earlier. Okay rubber i. Rachel weiss. In reverend john booming. Thank you both for joining us. Happy holidays thank you about four months ago chicago. Tonight's evan garcia visited an urban garden on the south side. Where young people were organizing. Open mics on his way there. He met rebecca payton a local athlete with an inspiring story for our latest chicago portrait. We profile archer abed payton today. Thank you. I want to tell you that i love. I'll tell you thinking of you every minute every hour every second day a few times a week sixty eight year old but bet payton feeds the turkeys and rooster at a community garden in the south side neighborhood of auburn gresham august. I gotta look at the miles. Wang got in the nearby arrived. The bet lives nearby in a low income apartment building for veterans. Usually i see a little cat. Jump into canada even going to the garden while in the military but bet sustained an injury that eventually resulted in paralysis. The guide me pain causes me to off. Okay and then this progress to a stroke actually. I ended up in the wheelchair since two thousand nine at that time the. Us army veteran thought her life was over. I was told i was the next off for me was a hospice. So that time. I was able to write. I wrote my bitch and when the military came and said they wanted to take me to a military paralympic sports cap and wrote newport rhode island. I thought well this is my last move. I as well go in archery. Coach taught her how to shoot using her teeth after her. First two arrows missed the target. She fired four more without noticing where they landed my and help other form. I said i'll six nine finished right. Look this way. Ms pain and that looked at where people jumping up all. What's their problem. You've got to me gone crazy since then bet who only ten years ago experienced homelessness has traveled the world to compete. But i got a hundred and fifty six zero five highest scores to ninety nine over three hundred shooting from my wheelchair with my mouth. The bets unable to shoot because her bow broke in two thousand nineteen during a competition in ohio so we visited the kroc center where the chicago archery club is giving lessons. She asked me. How do i like my air knocking. The arrows is actually putting it into the bow. Before you shoot it. The that hopes to raise enough money to buy a compound. Bow chicago archery club. President klay thompson says the to southside ranges. they normally use are not wheelchair accessible but he hopes to change that for the outdoor range in washington park. We have been promised at a outdoor rain a ramp that would make it accessible for her to be able to get in and use the facilities and hopefully we will get that in place in the early part of the spring and we're looking forward to coming out in practice practice if she's not on an international tournament tour through gospel radio and tv appearances as well as church and community speaking engagements but bedspreads. Her message don't doubt yourself here. I'll use the mouth here. What are shooting. think about that. At first yes. Because i'm like i can't do this. Everybody's using two hands for now that i can. I ran out of time. No but you know. I went so much and i'm so inspirational. Say to other people take it up and they try and i quiet. Don't worry about what you're air with his shoot at it for chicago tonight. I'm evan garcia in the. Us army payton served overseas as a trauma. Specialist stabilizing and rehabilitating wounded soldiers on their way. Home visit our website for more on her story and information on how to help her get new archery equipment. And that's our show for this monday night don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube bamboo website. Wtt w dot com slash news can also the show via podcast and the pbs video app. And please join us tomorrow. Night live at seven now for all of us here at chicago tonight. Brandis friedman. i'm peres shuts. Thank you so much for watching a healthy and safe good night Closed captioning is made. Possible in part by robin inkling and clifford law offices wishing all a happy and healthy holiday season.

chicago china biden iran united states illinois forty percent trump joe biden Donald trump quinn myers brandon friedman five hundred thousand dollars seventy nine percent thirty eight day Zoning committee department of business affairs chicago teachers union europe illinois educational labor rel
December 1, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

27:01 min | 7 months ago

December 1, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm brandon friedman. Parachutes is on assignment on on the show this evening. They've told this tale that it was really good for consumers. The public interest research group says it was a tall tale and state laws are costing consumers. The latest comments scandal only saw the nine states. One on one with the author of a new book about president elect joe biden and the challenges. That await him that markings only tim. Buildings city council committee votes down the controversial hilson landmark district proposal. What's next poulsen residents avenues and a new online exhibit launching today showcases. The stories of women living with hiv in chicago and across the country. But first some of today's top stories all but three states now fall. Under chicago's emergency travel order requiring travelers from those states to quarantine for two weeks upon arriving in chicago. The only three states with fewer than fifteen daily cases per one hundred thousand people are maine vermont and hawaii shown here in the lighter yellow additionally chicago public health commissioner. Dr allison arwady outlined. The city's plans to distribute the covid nineteen vaccine. If one should arrive in chicago in the last two weeks of the month. We have plans. That will start with with all thirty. Seven hospitals receiving vaccine for healthcare workers. Not yet for patients and we have plans for all one hundred twenty eight a long term care facilities in chicago that would include both skilled nursing facilities and assisted living facilities. Meanwhile state health officials report another twelve thousand cases of corona virus in illinois and an additional one hundred twenty five the state total number of cases since the beginning of the pandemic is now more than seven hundred. Thirty eight thousand and the total number of deaths is twelve thousand. Four hundred. Three the test positivity rate sits at twelve point two percent with a month to go before the year's end chicago police say they've already recovered more than ten thousand illegal guns as shootings and homicides in the city are up more than fifty percent for the first eleven months of twenty twenty. Compared to twenty nineteen cd says november's fifty eight homicides mark the highest total for that month since twenty seventeen and be third highest total since two thousand still. The department says overall crime is down seven percent so far this year driven mostly by a reduction in burglaries and thefts utility giant commonwealth. Edison has been in the news since july. When prosecutors made the stunning announcement that the company headed admitted to a long running bribery scheme. A new report takes detailed. Look at the law at the center of the scandal. Amanda finicky joins us now with more. Amanda friend is that bribery scheme intended to gain the goodwill of my house speaker michael madigan who by the way denies any involvement or wrongdoing began in twenty eleven. That is also the that the general assembly approved the energy infrastructure modernisation grin muscle. And also you can just think of it as the smart grid. Law comment said that the electric grid up but that it wanted. I guarantee you would get money back for spending all the cash to do that. Since comment has a virtual monopoly the state regulates what it can charge customers. So come ed worked out a deal with the legislature. It would invest in the grid. Make it smart. In in return. Illinois with significant regulatory oversight the new report out from the illinois public interest research group says for comment. It was a prophet machine. What was sold as this kind of need for a very specific set of investments has led to these incredible profits to me really stood out and One calculation we did is we looked at if they continue to have this automatic rate making authority and they make the investments that exelon is telling its investors. It plans to make a twenty twenty. Three comment will make just under a billion dollars in profits each year. That's all coming out of our bills. And that's pretty incredible perks. Abe scar who co-authored the report says the grid need modernizing but he says come. It is obligated to provide a reliable service. It shouldn't need a windfall to do is comment is required under law to provide reliable service. And so it's kind of weird that they would need some sort of fantastic windfall to do it as basic fundamental obligation of their existence. And if we look at they have improved reliability. That's a good thing but that's not the only question we should be asking the question. We should be asking did what we pay for. That improvement make sense. Did we get an actual value out of that. Sorta answer he says no we overpaid and has our report shows a lot of the potential benefits that comet promised and that we think could come to fruition through smarter technology have in fact not come to fruition and we think changes need to be made so that customers do get more value from the smart meters that they've been paying for mostly since two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen in a statement and comment. Spokesperson says the smirk rebuild resulted in substantial benefits to customers including record reliability. She also points out that. In several years come at request. Regulators decrease the rates at charges the deferred prosecution agreement does not contain any allegations that consumers were harmed by legislation passed in illinois. The comments statement says every year regulators must review and must approve every dollar of investment by conrad to make sure it is prudent and in customers interest but per which was among those that tried to prevent the smart read law from passing in. The first place is now advocating for a series of changes among them overturning margaret law. That changed how comments rates are regulated. It comes as clean. Energy advocates are also pressing for a massive energy package to prop up renewable energy the only environmental council jennifer willing says. Discussions are ongoing. We have had leadership from governor pritzker who has stated publicly. He wants to achieve one hundred percent clean. Energy by twenty fifty has agreed with our goals. But all of the Spikes and information that we've learned about comrade and the corruption scandal have sent these energy negotiations back and. We hope that we don't just help that. We know that there has to be an energy package in twenty twenty one but it's unclear how often the general assembly will meet in twenty twenty one due to the coronavirus. It's also unclear. Who will be at the helm of the illinois house speaker. Madigan is striving for another term in that powerful post today a nineteen house democrat announced. She will oppose him meaning. He does not have the votes. We need to put the distraction that has been created by representative madigan behind us and move forward and mending the state of illinois. representative kathleen willis of. Addison wrote in a letter now again. Madigan has not been charged in. He denies any wrongdoing. Back to you amanda. Thank you in fifty days. President elect joe biden is set to become president biden but he still faces an ongoing assault on transition norms from president donald trump. It's going to be a very hard thing to concede because we know there was massive fraud so as to whether or not i can get this apparatus moving this quickly because time is on our side. Everything else is on us. I wanna say this was a massive fraud. So how might biden view the obstacles. President trump is attempting to create. Our next guest has written a new book on biden released just before the election called. Joe biden the life. The run and what matters now and author. Evan osnos joins us now. he's also a staff writer at the new yorker and a former writer at the chicago tribune where he won a pulitzer prize for investigative reporting. Welcome back to chicago tonight. Evan thanks for having to be with you of course. So what is your reaction. Then to president trump not conceding and continuing to fight the election results. Well look i think you have to call it what it is. Which is patently false biz point. This has become a kind of public relations campaign. I think it has as much to do with trying to lay the foundations for the that. Donald trump wants to have after leaving the presidency. But it's worth just reminding ourselves that the facts are clear. The law is clear. Vote council beyond your point and he is maintaining a speech in. I have to say is part of my time. Talking to foreign diplomats are barriers to some degree and they are looking upon this with some baffled. I mean they are just not used to say. The united states going group process which outgoing president is not seeking to facilitate the process of transition. That is fact. Impeding it so it taking a lot of getting used to. Yeah so joe biden. He's been in washington for a very long time when he first ran for senate just before turning thirty he used his then opponents age against him at the time accusing quote to the old guard of bungling things but now he's going to be the oldest president to office. They say a little bit of irony there. There is an irony forty eight years ago. This fall that joe biden first one is raised for the senate and he was so young at the time that he was actually too young. Take his seat into wait. A few months to get old enough to be sworn in and at the time he million regarded itself as the vanguard of this rising generation in the ads that he ran in the newspaper. Said joe biden understands. What's happening now. He was one of the people who's talking about environmentalist. I find it though. There isn't a sense a- logic to because if you talk to him these days one of the things that he will say as instead me is that he understands that there are a lot of americans. Millions of young mertz millennials. Now make up the largest generation in america larger than own silent or the boomers that he recognizes that they don't look at them and see a person necessarily understands their and their experience and he's trying in some way beginning with his appointments and and through his message say i get it. He calls himself but transition president. And that's partly because he wants them he'll like he's not here to try to bottle up what they want. But in fact to try to be abridged was he like in his early career and even now it seems like he's always and even then was striving for the center. He was spite noticeable. If you go back and you look how you voted in that how we talked about politics. There is this rule line that runs through his career. I mean people. Sometimes lets say he's not an ideological person i would say he has. An ideology and that ideology is centrist in effect. Somebody who worked with him in the white house work with president. Obama said to me that has a nearly perfect weather vane for where the center of the of the democrat party and that meant that when he was coming up that early stage he represented a district in delleri representative state. That was in many ways both of the south of the north. And you saw him the all remember This came up in the debates that he became one of the defenders or sorry i should say component of court ordered busing and us doing that at the time partly because he was getting a lot of pressure from suburban white parents were opposed to the busing group and then changed his view over time and began to see at many different place that he has tried to sense where the party is moving and try to be there when it happens not to get left behind by history but then also not to get out in frontal. So he's worked his entire life to become president. This last time that he ran third. Time was a charm How do you think a biden administration will be different from an obama administration. Well he talks a lot about how he recognizes that the country has changed in. The world has changed. I mean it's interesting. I go back now and remember one of my first interviews with him in two thousand fourteen when he was still in the vice presidency and he said something to me that. In retrospect i was not smart enough to recognize. He was on to something he said. Look i think the democratic party. My party is not doing enough to recognize the concerns of working people across the country. We were just leaving them behind. They're getting crushed as he put it by inequality and that was before the rise of bernie sanders it was before certainly the rise of donald trump as a political phenomenon. He sensed something was happening. And now you fast forward six years and you are beginning to see in some of his appointments to the cabinet. But he's pointing people who are talking about inequality heather for instance somebody who. He has name as an important economic advisory somebody who talks a lot about trying to deal with inequality more so than democrats would have even a few years ago on the foreign policy front. I think they also recognize that the world is not the same as it was. When president obama left office in two thousand seventeen particularly the rise of china at a more confrontational relationship with the united states poses challenges that biden administration is going to have to deal with and you just mentioned it. President-elect joe biden today introduced his economic team. Here's a little bit of what he said. Eleven years ago president obama i entered office during the great recession and implemented that recovery act saved us from a great depression. I didn't see the map of america at the time. Nor did he in terms of blue states and red states. We only saw the united states. America we work with everyone forever and evan. What do you expect from biden in the next four years. Can he bring the country back together. It is an awesome challenge. I mean frankly. It's a challenge. No incoming president would seek to have that. He's facing a country as polarized as it is today historic levels of division and what we know or what his instincts telling his instincts. Tell him that. It's possible and president. Obama shared something in common. They have a lot of things that were that made them different stylistically in terms of age generation. But they both share this idea that it was possible to unify the country. In the beginning of the obama administration he was tasked with finding votes to help. Pass the stimulus bill. Joe biden called six members of congress and he got three yes votes and the bill passed by three votes. He believes that it is possible to find common ground even on issues. That are really device. Id but this will depend as much on mitch. Mcconnell i think as it does on joe biden okay again. The book is called. Joe biden the life the run and what matters now. You can read an excerpt on our website and now our thanks to evan osnos much well the polls closed four weeks ago. The impact of the election is still unfolding. Wtt w news director and chicago tonight. Latino voices host google balta moderated a virtual community conversation last night about the election and its impact on the latino community. Here's a short clip. About what the panelists will be looking for from. President elect joe biden and other newly elected officials. The pandemic was a number one issue especially for orders. Who went provided. I think we definitely wanna see the results of that over. Nineteen assistance will cash assistance housing assistance assistance to those community awards organizations who are doing the tough work I know right now. Dc is is is deadlock but seeing some action there. We need to reimagine all elements of our society in systems. Because what kobe has presented to us is that the the way we operated before is no longer tenable in therefore we need to be ingenious in how we respond and have that long and short term game in mind as we're moving ahead and you can watch the full conversation on our youtube channel it. Wtt w dot com slash news slash. Voices excuse me and be sure to tune into chicago tonight. Latino voices when we return saturday december twelve at six pm and mark your calendars for our next community. Conversation on december. Twenty eighth which i will be hosting. Nfl ponce with a look into a community. Vote a committee. Vote over a landmark district in pilsen phil brandis plan to turn hundred buildings in pilsen. Chicago's largest landmark district reached a landmark rejection today. A city council committee unanimously voted. The plan down this after one of its biggest critic said his constituents asked for an alternative proposal longtime residents new residents is more businesses. Everybody has said no to mark but yes to a different route. If this is indeed a new era then we ought to be listened to our testimonies people who came and said we need a different plan. Wcw news reporter heather. Sharon joins us now with more heather. First of all remind us with the plan included and why it was turned down of the plan would have put a landmark designation on about nine hundred buildings on eighteenth street blue island avenue that would have prevented their owners from making changes to be outside. Now these were buildings built near the turn of the century in a baroque style. That are very ornate and beloved by people who live in pilsen but to fear was. Is that these buildings would be impossible to maintain especially by sort of low income middle income chicagoans. Just struggling to get by. That won't happen after today's vote. So what is the next step nava. This proposal has been turned down. Well we heard from ultraman byron seek show lopez who asked his colleagues today to approve a six month demolition ban as he tried to work out that sort of long term plan that was also rejected by the committee so everything is in a little bit of flexing. I guess you'll have to stay tuned to chicago tonight and keep reading. Wtt w news find out. What's next thanks. Thanks bill and you can read. Heather is full story on our web site. That's w. w. dot com slash news. Now brandis we go back to you. Phil thank you today. December first is world aids day for more than thirty years. It sought to raise awareness of a global pandemic one that's been largely out of the headlines. In twenty twenty today is also the launch date of a new online exhibition showcasing. The stories of women living with hiv in chicago and across the country chicago. Tonight's quinn myers spoke with some of the participants and organizers there was a commercial that came on and it said if you had unprotected sex if you've injected drugs if you from those things there and it was like a finger was pointing right at me from the team i said yep yep i just kept saying up to everything they were saying. When first learned of my diagnosed with the whole package day came with it It of course. I thought i was able to drink it away. Draw it away in. That would been happened. And i don. I wanted to be suicide or commit suicide but out. Whisky it too. So bad been happing. Marta santiago and cordelia. Who asked us not to use her. Last name are lifelong chicagoans having grown up on the west and south sides respectively. They've also both lived with hiv for decades. Now they're stories of diagnosis. Treatment and community are part of an online exhibition put together by the history moves project based at the university of illinois at chicago. It's called. I'm still surviving a living women's history of hiv aids. The project really allows us to speak with women and have them tell their stories and in combining their stories together chart every of hiv in the united states and to release center the experiences of women and women's history the exhibition has gone digital because of covid and it features recordings and testimonials from almost forty women living with hiv in chicago new york and north carolina. I think it's really important lesson for us to bring today that we have to understand how women how the female body lives through illness. Survives with illness dies from illness. And we can't just think that studying The universal subject of madison give us the answer. The project also includes photos showing the role that cities and institutions played in these women's stories and in the larger history of hiv aids. One of those institutions is cook county hospital where many women in chicago received medical care and found a wide range of support groups and s. What kinda getting me back to august. You would say not thinking so negative knock digging. This was to kill me and relax. And did i can survive this today. Cordelia and marta are both doing well and are eager to share living with hiv. Both changed their lives and doesn't totally define who they are kind of an honor To be part of this and it was like okay. You know we could show world out there in those who are still afraid with the impact of hiv living with it Life goes on this amazing to know that is women all over the world. They just like meat in. You would never know you know because they're still living their life to the fullest. They're still looking healthy. They're still being healthy and they're still surviving for chicago tonight. I'm quinn myers. I'm still surviving launches online today in conjunction with world aids day you can learn much more on our website up next previewing a behind the scenes. Look at how. Wtt w news covered tumultuous year but first a check of the weather a global pandemic a nationwide racial reckoning a contentious presidential election a new. Wtt documentary premiering tonight explores how unusual twenty twenty has been making sense of twenty twenty follows the wtt w news staff as our team adapted to report these stories including how community members reacted to racial tensions flaring up in some neighborhoods after protests the summer some of which turned destructive. There's a clip. We are standing on the corner on eighteenth street and this woman comes up and gives me a dollar bill which i thought was really strange and she walked away and then about half an hour later. This kid comes up and says call the number on the dollar bill. My mom wants to talk to you. But she's afraid of being seen talking to the media. We talked about how she was so disappointed in some of the behavior she was seeing in her community namely prejudice against african americans for that was invaluable to our reporting just capturing the tone of the situation. I don't think you earn trust in five minutes. I don't think you earn it in in five monsour partner trust is just being there being present not necessarily coming in with agenda. And that's our show for this tuesday night abbreviated to bring you as we just mentioned the premiere of making sense of twenty twenty. You can join the conversation on twitter using the hashtag making sense. Wtt w and don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website. Wtt w dot com slash news. You can also get the show via podcast and the ps video app and please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven. President-elect joe biden introduces his economic team with former fed chair. Janet yellen tapped to be the first woman to ever lead the treasury department. Plus i want some chicago. Residents are experiencing major delays with mail delivery for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm friedman thank you for watching. Stay healthy and safe and have a good night Closed captioning is made possible in part by robert clifford and clifford law offices wishing a happy and healthy holiday season.

chicago joe biden biden illinois evan osnos brandon friedman Buildings city council committ Dr allison arwady Donald trump obama administration Amanda finicky united states Abe scar Madigan representative madigan general assembly representative kathleen willis two weeks hiv michael madigan
April 8, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:46 min | 2 months ago

April 8, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm brandis friedman and i'm peres shots on the show tonight just happy to be back watching baseball and haven't had sell cy pride so go suck on the south side. We're live from bridgeport with the return of white sox fans to guaranteed rate field plus how neighborhood businesses are surviving the pandemic the us considers boycotting the twenty twenty two winter olympics in beijing drawing a strong warning from china's government scientists just outside chicago at fermilab say they may have made a discovery that would offend all of the known laws of physics program to vaccinate home bound chicagoans launches and critic officials need to speed it up just by creating it ourselves. Where already been liberated because again. That's what is all about. We introduced you to chicago. Nonprofit committed to diversity in video. Jeffrey bear serves up some fast food. History with the side of super signs and ask geoffrey. It was absolutely insane and we check in with local bike shops and cycling groups on. What's ahead this season after record. Twenty twenty and renison harris. As you mentioned. I'll be reporting live tonight from bridgeport for latest chicago tonight in your neighborhood series for the first time since twenty nine teen white sox fans are back at guaranteed rate field to watch their team play in person. We'll have the latest on the return game still going on in fact we also checked in with community anchors. We'll hear about how they've been fearing a year into the pandemic but first back to you. Thank you manda. And now to some of today's top stories. A sell side resident is free on bond tonight after being charged in connection with the shooting of a twenty one month old after an apparent road rage on lakeshore. Drive tuesday forty three year. Old jew sean. Brown is charged with a felony count of unlawful use of a weapon according to a cpa news release. Police say brown was riding in the car with the twenty one month old. Who is his grandson and he fired at the suv that was involved in the altercation. Police say they're still searching for the person in the suv. That fired the bullet that hit the child. Health officials at lurie children's hospital. Say the twenty one month. Old is still in critical condition but showing some signs of brain activity and remains in an induced coma. All suburban cook county residents over the age of sixteen are eligible for the covid vaccine. Starting monday governor. Jay pritzker made the announcement today. As state health officials get ready for all illinois to be eligible on that date earlier this week chicago mayor lori lightfoot announced that all chicagoans are eligible starting april nineteenth but pritzker says chicagoans over sixteen can sign up for any state run mass vaccination site starting monday as well so there'll just be a week there between april twelfth and april nineteenth but but if people choose to come to our mass vaccination sites of they're absolutely welcome and state public health officials report more than thirty seven hundred new covid cases in the last twenty four hours with thirty four additional deaths that makes a statewide case total of more than one point. Two six nine million and a death toll of twenty one thousand. Four hundred and fifty. Seven the test. Positivity rate is four point eight percent and six point seven million illinois have received at least one dose of the vaccine so far loyola university chicago professor takes the stand in the murder trial of former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin loyal pulmonologist and critical care specialist. Dr martin tobin testified. Showbiz need to george floyd's neck was the cause of floyd's not being able to breathe which then led to his death. Tobin refuted questioning from. Show wtn's defense attorneys. That insinuated floyd could have died from drugs in his system. Mr floyd died from a low level of oxygen and this caused damage to his brain that we see and it also caused a pa arrhythmia that caused his heart stop. The white sox are underway in their home opener against the royals after a lengthy rain delay and so far it's been worth the wait for the eight thousand plus in attendance. Here's you on moncada hitting a two run bomb and the bottom of the first followed by you guessed it the all world twenty eight year old rookie year mercedes who punishes this ball. Four hundred and eighty five feet for a follow up. Solo shot giving the socks at three to nothing lead right out of the gate right now. The socks are up four to nothing in the six. meanwhile the cubs beat the pirates. Four to two in pittsburgh earlier today and now to brandis for a look behind that white sox home opener brandis. That's right paris. We just heard from amanda the white sox of course play at guaranteed rate field which is technically in the armor square neighborhood but most chicagoans would claim it as bridgeport which is in fact just across the street. That's her amanda. Finicky and producer. Quinn myers spent their day to day as part of our chicago. Tonight in your neighborhood series not the best weather for baseball. Amanda but our things otherwise brandis a week ago. It was freezing for the cubs hormonal on the north side. Getting your the minute here. Plus the socks stuck with rain. All day for the south siders home opener know both teams limited in the number of fans allowed in their ballparks and here at guaranteed rate fields or perhaps you still consider it comiskey as i do. Everything is cashless. No purser bags allowed masks on the other hand required before the game we end up a bunch of other sox fans kept dry for a bit action nick's pub serving beers in bridgeport for some eighty three years. Okay the bar. It started with my grandparents back in one thousand nine thirty eight george and mary and then in one thousand nine sixty five. My mom and dad took over and then by nineteen eighty eight. After we lost my mom my dad passed the bar around the nine children. So right now nine of us own it. I have five brothers and three sisters. Yeah it's amazing isn't it. You gotta give it to salim there. She was busy and booking it behind the bar. She says that her record for steps well tending bar. Seventeen thousand sets still. She says today couldn't be and wasn't anywhere near as busy as it usually would be for sox home opening day crowded inside and out before the game and then after the game. It's it's a huge crowd after the ball game. It's it's changed. We won't see that this year. What i'm glad we're open now. It really is a family affair at the pub. One of the cynic grandchildren had a pregame prime seat at the bar. And it is awesome to have baseball back. Now it's it's not even just the ballgame. It's the atmosphere. It's the family the fans. It's our regulars you know everything all come together being here again and we're still in this pandemic a little bit but we're on the way out and you can feel bad around. Evergreen park resident. Jimmy brosnahan says last year was brutal. It was the first year that he bought season tickets. Thankfully he says they transferred over so instead he has tickets for all of this starting with today and it means that as long as cud forbid there aren't any additional kovic shutdowns. He is going to be back often at chamonix this spring and summer. I always like my ritual. I come here before games. I walked to the park. I get a dog at thirty fifth street dogs on to the game and we go to turtles after the game. This kind of are kind of a ritual. So i love that. Allah few blocks away. We found more diehard sox fans owners of the stockyard coffeehouse. Sisters myra guadalupe carranza opened the cafe. Just two years ago but it has quickly become a neighborhood staple the sisters who both live nearby coffeehouse and moved to bridgeport about a dozen years ago love coffee. They wonder coffee shop that they could walk to. They also love their neighborhood. Like the easy commute and being tucked between chinatown canary. Ville becoming a lot more diverse. Now we have a lot of you. Young families moving in and we also have we still have. It was like traditionally like irish italian neighborhood too so we still had him lease but overall everybody's copes net like everybody family hard-working. I think the neighborhood. The neighborhood is growing and changing. And there's a lot of new development A lot of you know. We're hoping that a lot. More businesses come into the neighborhood. Stock hard stu- stockyard coffeehouse specialties. Are served up from time to time to players. Who the say do come by. And those specialties include a mexican milka we also have our chocolates. And that's a whole made sweetener that we make and we make it the traditional way. So it's very you know. It goes back to our roots. We come from a big mexican family for having the hatay having. I'm having a cafe which is very popular You know we had a drink this summer. specialty drink called cuomo. Referencing felina in the show. Now for another taste of the changing bridgeport. We stopped at bridgeport bakery two point. Oh now bridgeport bakery had been a local staple especially known for its polish funky for nearly fifty years until it closed in late. Twenty nineteen some months later in january. Twenty twenty yes just before the pandemic that bakery reopened with new owner. Ken lau the committee. Did join me into continuing the business. Because i mean i'm bridgeport and monaco. People were so sad. You know when this close you know. And then i wasn't expect that much. I support from the customer. Oh my god you and they keep giving suggestion. And that's when mentioned about a manual not the manual suggests from the whole customer. Hey can you make you make that. And i tried to get defend. Why the you know like culture offerings now range from italian cannoli to polish collapse also mexican kontscha in now chinese shumate dumplings flavors and desserts as varied as bridgeport residents the last community data snapshot of bridgeport showed the asian population to be nearly forty percent. That is a jump of fifty percent in about twenty years time. Not love himself immigrated from china in two thousand one meanwhile about thirty three percents of bridgeport residents are white twenty three percent hispanic latino alas the census bureau. The last i checked does not survey residents to see whether are fans or the cubs or the socks guessing more socks in this territory now. The stockyard coffeehouse and bridgeport bakery two point. Oh have something else in common because they were so new. When the corona virus hit they had a difficult time getting coverted relief. Money being a new business. That's just getting started during pandemic not easy but both say they are making it all right and we do have to give an extra shoutout to lao. He is not only business owner and a baker. he's also a pharmacist so when he is not at the bakery. He's busy giving people jabs in the arm of the coronavirus vaccine or helping people to get an appointment to get one for themselves so we'll leave it at that but we're going to be back soon with a community activist tossing it back to you guys in the studio. Amanda sounds great. The both of those places the coffee house and a bakery. Next time we see you. Maybe they'll be snacks. Thank you and data phil ponce and a look at sports intersecting with politics phil bradenton less than a year. The twenty twenty two winter olympics will take place in beijing china however discussion of a possible. Us led boycott of the olympic games was sparked by comments made earlier this week by us. Department of state spokesman ned price. The department of state as part of our thinking on the beijing olympics easing gauging with partners with allies to coordinate coordinate closely on decisions and approaches to the government in beijing there have been calls for boycott at the beijing games due to china's ongoing human rights violations and even though the state department and the white house have since walked back. Prices comments controversy surrounding the games is ongoing joining us as dolly young a political science professor at the university of chicago and specialist on. Us china professor young. Thank you so much for joining us and i. Let's establish exactly. Why are some of china's critics calling for a boycott or this is clearly not new Be recalled two thousand eighteen. There were Actually costs for boy at time as well relationship to cook sample developments in too bad now of course the list of things that were complaining about is actually quite long from change to hong kong to taiwa into other issues of human rights. And of course there's cove it as well as there are a lot of people who are looking at this high profile events then trying to put their agenda onto the olympics. What was your reaction when you heard of what the state department spokesman price said earlier this week. How did you take that well. I wasn't surprised that there was consideration of us participation. Exactly how the us will participate. But i wouldn't be surprised. There is a fall Volley call because any boycott of that nature would really our ask these who for many of them. Actually they are looking for this event and course for many of them. This is the only chance to shine. be very important to think carefully so i wasn't surprised also that there was the walk back because of hearings in nineteen eighty nine hundred. Eighty four particula well after the state department spokesman made that statement china issued a swift warning in reaction promising a quote robust chinese response. What form that response take well. Clearly china has been very positive responses to wear issues talking tough trying to establish establish credibility of threat and of course china has been imposing sanctions host of countries for no way to australia. You're reason the us and south korea as well so you that sense and especially given the us china cheap wall where there has been a tad. China can adopt a variety of measures the sanctions and other things as well. But i think what the chinese spokesman is trying to stop. It is to say we strongly opposed to it will cost to doing so is trying to forestall a united front against the olympics. Say there were to be a boycott. What impact would that have on china. Well i think the chance of a full boycott a very unlikely. In fact i think the easiest way is to say well the. Us does not want to be diplomatic. Rian literally heavily involved presdent with traveling. There secretary of state would not be traveling up and of course In contrast two thousand eight why president bush did go there so in that sense. Actually there's a big difference already but at the same time that could be different levels of displeasure being expressed so We're not really looking at uh for boycott as we mentioned and as you alluded both the white house and the state department of since walked back those comments on. Why do you think they're sort of coming back from that edge. Clearly there is a very strong push back from the supposed community and also. Let's also keep your mind. That many of those athletes have been working at charlie. Hard over the last couple years the happening Going through this pandemic like the rest of us and you want to shutdown that doll for them to participate in the olympics. Just doesn't seems to make sense to me if you advising. Us government officials regarding how they should approach the olympics or how they should pressure china to improve on. Its human rights records. Say well clearly. This on there is a united a very strong sentiments bipartisan. In fact you. In congress and also the secretary branch released regard to china and lot of our displeasure has been communicated china and china. Guest the idea so there can be a as the us. Secretary of state. For example just had a meeting alaska. Is the chinese conduct balls. So there will be continuing dialogue. About how the improve the situation and i think china is making some effort in xinjiang and elsewhere trying to the edges but is clearly at this point and not being seen as enough from the perspective of washington but clearly over the next few months. For example the two sides could engage for the dialogue and to tamp down the rhetoric and perhaps make it easier for our ask the participate and of course the ira the as the pandemic making also easier for both sides. The president is in the best of circumstances. The damage is not likely to participate. Anyway and beijing usually expanded by saying that there is this pandemic and be restrictions on people travelling to beijing so as a result it would be limited event anyway so Both sides can say that real that the athletes compete on the less professor yang. Thank you so much for your insights. We very much appreciate it. Thank you you almost want them. And now we go back to you all right. Thanks phil and now we check back in with amanda vicky who spent the day in bridgeport as part of our in your neighborhood series. Amanda what he got. I'm joined now by initiative rescue. She is with the bridge alliance. It is a community organization. That is based off here in french for we are a year into condemning. Tell me what is it. Fun like on the ground here. Oh we've seen that. There's a big lack of social services in the city and especially in the neighborhood. What do you mean by that. Typically do you think would still help or could have helped this past year that you have been residents have been sir we've seen other neighborhoods had mass testing and mass vaccination sites now and we haven't had that despite having a huge stadium where that could be that could take place. Have you been asking where right there. There's a stadium right here. And i know we have asked in conversations after all ready said get. You know you could see that. Clearly there is one right next to greatly in their gallagher. Way you've been asking for one year and was the response that we haven't been asking the alderman for it but the neighborhood groups We have helped in our own ways. We set up a greater bridgeport mutual aid which has been helping people since april of last year. And doing what the greater bridgeport. Mutual aid Fundraise forty thousand dollars that we have redistributed to the community in the last year in the form of two hundred dollar grants and fifty dollars of free groceries that are Volunteer shop for sanitized and delivered to people's porches. Is that still going on or we are coming to. What a lot of people think everyone hoping the end of this So we've transitioned to more of a neighbor to neighbor direct giving project because we found that what people truly needed was cash to pay their bills so we're not doing grocery delivery anymore But we're encouraging neighbors to give to one another From the neighbors. I've talked to the pandemic is not over People over twelve thousand dollars background because they haven't been working since last march so i think we're going to be dealing with the fallout for quite a while. What are you doing to prepare for that. And it's a question that i've asked some of our elected officials. There's a moratorium right now on addictions but that is going to come do. Yeah in december greater bridgeport aid partnered with bridgeport alliance. Cbc ac and several legal aid organizations to do a housing rights training So people would know their rights around a victorian and the moratoriums And we'll probably hold another one of those When we hear that the moratorium is coming to an end and just get back to Why do you believe that there hasn't been gave his testing or vaccinations site here I think that our local elected officials in the ward alderman. Patrick daley thompson commissioner. John daly don't have the political will and are not connected enough with the people in the ward to understand what is needed and then also you did speak previously with chicago. Tonight's nick lumber about distributions center that is supposed to be planned for. You're not happy about it It is going ahead. We've fought it every chance we got But it's passed all of the city zoning stops and it's going ahead we're going to have actually to Amazon facilities in the ward. Lots of changes here. Thank you so very much once again to initiate rescue with for an alliance for joining us. That's you guys in the studio. We'll see you soon with more on the bridgeport near time museum with the chicago. Maritime museum mattis is amanda. it's kind of startling to hear public officials with the last name. Not having the muscle to bring a testing site over to bridgeport but Thank you very much. We'll see you in just a bit here. paris absolutely not up next how. A local nonprofit is creating space for artists of color in television production. So please stay with us. It really is about unity where we all come together. Chicago needs to make space for everyone. Chicago nonprofit geared toward promoting more diversity in television is gearing up for its annual artists showcase in partnership with the museum of contemporary art arts correspondent angel edo shares. How the group. Otd works to not only create more inclusive space is but hold existing institutions like the accountable we think about the ways in which intersectional identities have been cast out of fell and television. And seeing as. We're in this really really unique position to amplify artists and celebrate the unique gifts that intersection identities bring to the world. What's really really beautiful. Is that now. We have the foundation. It's the foundation about five years in the making open. Tv or otd is a platform for multi hyphenated artists encompassing different identities within race gender and class annual showcase. Oh tv tonight explores how. They're artists are rooted at the intersection of art and television for all of artists. Come to us with so many different types of backgrounds and we are providing platform for those artists to tell those particular stories again uninhibitedly. It's very transactional in hollywood. You pitch an idea that's like cool we love your idea and even if it's the most fragile piece of art those things are not really considered what's considered as is it going to sell. Is it going to profit. So tv's mission is always making sure that the artists and their vision is first and foremost and also working with artists through the entire creation whatever level or stage. They're at to its completion. Ot artists shervan. In victoria agree the showcase will have a sneak peek of the second season of their series low strung which explores the antics of two black queer chicagoans. Tv all the time you see the spectrum the more content that comes out from black creators more will start to see every part of that spectrum. And i think that's a really powerful thing. Yeah showcasing the diversity. Really like black as black people. We are diversity but there's diversity within that there's other subsets of people. Lau pats loose squared language bootlegs babble mouth saucy and slick quick card crack and grammar for chicago's first poet laureate and ot artists iman laurent. It's vital their work be inclusive for everyone not just for black and brown ears. I love television. i love acting. I love singing. I live for theater saying but there's tropes that That white hollywood likes. We don't care because we know are we know are are black is bountiful and our bounty is beautiful to the point of artemis hours. I'm saying like everybody's voice mind body is dares for their own and not for as a representative for all black people. it is about language. That's that's what it really is for me like. I like to make language accessible for all my language accessible for all the accessibility. Oh tv works to provide through critical development. Resources is not just for its artist but for existing institutions. Like the mca as well. That's where its annual. Showcase will be livestreamed from next weekend said of removing ourselves or you know immediately jumping to a reaction. We want to take the long dream right the long road ahead. Which is you know. Rooted in liberation and equity. It is one of the blueprints of what it looks like to hold a seat in community at and also holds a seat within these really nuance troubled historically problematic institutions and again bridge a gap for deeper understanding for chicago tonight. I'm angel edo. Tv tonight airs next saturday at eight pm at the museum of contemporary art. Visit our website for more information on how to view the program. Go back to you. Thanks for a lot of creative work coming out of tv. We'll have to watch for that and they're livestream at the mca and still to come on chicago tonight. City officials launched a new program to vaccinate homebound folks against covid nineteen. We have the details on how it works. Scientists at formula just outside chicago say they may have made a discovery that would fundamentally transform our understanding of basic physics or my understanding of physics. At all. jeffrey bayer takes a bite out of some spectacular edge and fast food history in tonight's ask geoffrey and we check in with a local bike shop and cycling group about how they're faring after last year's boom and biking and what's ahead this season but i some more of today's top stories president joe biden announces executive action on guns today the actions range from tightening regulations on homemade guns ghost guns to more federal resources for gun violence prevention but biden urged congress to take further steps like enacting a new federal ban on assault weapons. There's no reason someone needs a weapon of war with one hundred rounds one hundred bullets. That can be fired from that weapon. Nobody needs and the announcement comes in the wake of mass shootings in atlanta georgia in boulder colorado and as a city. Chicago sees homicide skyrocket. This year after a deadly twenty twenty and the university of chicago is reporting an outbreak of covid on the south side. Hyde park campus university officials announced that all classes will go remote an all. Campus residents must begin mandatory. Week long. stay at home. They say they've detected cases many of them tied to parties held by off campus fraternities in the last week. And now brandis we go back to you with details into a code vaccine program for homebound folks paris. Thank you in early march. Chicago officials announced a covid nineteen vaccine program for homebound neighbors but now more than a month later critics say the program is off to a very slow start. Wtt w news reporter heather. Sharon joins us now. With more and heather what is the process for homebound chicagoans to get vaccinated for covid nineteen. Well they can sign up with the city and they will get put on a weightless that has nearly four thousand chicagoans who are waiting for a team of paramedics and volunteers to come to their house to vaccinate them as well as their caregivers but there have been some complaints about the program folks saying well. People who signed up on the very first day of the program has yet to get scheduled and they're frustrated. Because these are the people who are most medically vulnerable so of course. They're not going to go to the grocery store and catch coed but their caregiver might and if they get coded they are far more likely to get severely ill or even die so they want to be vaccinated as soon as possible and what the city has found. Is that when they're trying to work through that backlog about the people who they're calling to finally schedule have already found a different way to get a vaccine perhaps putting themselves at greater risk of catching covid or another illness so that is frustrating. City officials say they are expanding the number of teams that are doing this work which is really labor intensive. Because you have to drive there and you know is relatively quick but it is still something that you can't do a hundreds of a day so to speak. Yeah like a big undertaking to be able to spread out across the city like that. How does your own thank you so much for joining us. Things brandis and you can read the full story on our web site. That's w. w. dot com slash news up next new findings from fermilab that could upend the known laws of physics stick around coverage of science and technology on chicago. Tonight is made possible in part by joel. M friedman president of the alvin h-bomb family fund. It's the chicago area discovery. That could shake the universe or at least our understanding of it and it's based upon the study of tiny subatomic particles called nuance that are behaving in ways. That appear to be at odds with the so called standard model of physics. So how could this experiment at fermilab in batavia upend what we think we know about just about everything joining us his chris polly experimental physicists. At fermilab and one of the lead. Researchers on this project chris polly. Thank you so much for being here all right so this work is making headlines around the world right now first of all. We alluded to the standard model of physics for the layperson. What is that you can think of the standard model of physics sort of the universe. Broken down on its most fundamental scale. You know as particle physicists. While we're really interested in are the basic ingredients of the universe at the very smallest scales water. The particles that are involved water the fundamental forces that govern. How articles interact. You know we're basically wants to bound from the Table of elements. You learned about At another step a little more fundamental but the amazing thing knowing even the things about these smaller scales that information will help us understand the largest scales all the way up to supernova explosions and how the universe of all of that's why we like to do why is are these experiments causing so much interest and delight among scientists around the world. Oh it's because the moon is an extremely interesting article We've known about it for some time. It's it's not the fact that it exists. That is fundamentally interesting. It's that we use it to probe other basic laws of physics fermilab and so the thing that's interesting about these milan's we make very intense source of them at our our exceleron fermilab which was department of energy laboratory right outside of the chicago area. We make them in a particle accelerator. Because you can sorta think ms electrons. They're very similar of have the same charge. They have the same spin properties But they're also different in some fundamental ways two hundred times more massive and they're unstable they only live for about two millions of the second so we make intense bunches of the is the premier labid celebrator complex by accelerating protons of the very high energy smashing in eventually reflect nuance that come from that process. I'm so that's why we use them you on the thing. We're particularly interested in Is called the magnetic moment of the milan because they're look kind of like little spinning tops than they have charged yuan's Like their cousins electrons. You can think of. Having their own little journal magnetic field they generate their own magnetic field just like a bar magnet as our goal of our experiment is to measure the strength of that art magnet to very high precision. So why do we do that. The reason we're interested in is not so much because of the beyond itself. It's because of this very strange fact that in the universe it turns out. Articles are never really alone. They're constantly surrounded by an entourage of other articles that blink into existence and disappear. They you know they appear for just an instant. I'm this is happening all the time. So these articles that in the field with me on actually changed the strength of that magnetic field ever so slightly you can think of. The internal magnet is being screened by all these other particles that a beer. I'm so the reason that's interesting is because we know from the unimodal laws of physics. All the particles rediscovered. So far the universe can fluctuate in and out and change this internal magnetic magnetic strength of these milan's so by going out in measuring a very very precisely we can then calculate with similar position. What we expect based on all the articles in the universe. And what you find what you what you find. An experiment differs from that calculation. Then you have to wonder. Are there other articles. Are there other forces that are appearing that we add directly spelled so the nuance. The behavior is is different than what you expected to be given the standard laws of physics what are the ramifications then for understanding of the universe. In general the this experiment is actually follow experiment to one that was done about twenty years at brookhaven national laboratory and in that experiment. They did something very similar. They stored nuance look. How strong their magnetic field that they generate is. I'm they found that. It differed from the expectation from the standard model prediction. By a number. We called you know by an amount of three sigma of three standard deviations. What that means. Is that if you went out. Random experiment thousand times. Only expect to find something to strange that something is different about three in every one thousand experiments and so that difference has intrigued article businesses for about twenty years. Because we've been wondering. Was that a end. That there is You know some sort of new cast of characters entering in the entourage. Some new basic ingredients in the recipe of the universe and so formula. What we've done now is. We've repeated that experiment with higher statistics. Which meant much more modern detector technologies much more powerful cuter stimulations at what we found. Is that result from twenty years from brookhaven. We find a result that is in very good agreement with that and so that what that means is that the significance of this discrepancy has grown from what it was when it was roughly three sigma in the brookhaven era. What we would now call four point. Two sigma Standard deviation deviation. This doesn't mean that there was a mistake. In the study this signifies that that there's something undiscovered here. Yes so the headline news here. Is that this experiment has confirmed as brookhaven experiment. And now the probability of that difference between the standard model prediction the theoretical prediction and experiment would only be expected to be by chance about one in forty thousand times. So now we know there really has to be something driving this distant difference between the theoretical prediction in the experiment on. So there's sort of only three options there either. The experiment can be wrong. Which we don't think is likely now that we've done a whole follow up experiment You know a new experiment framingham. That's infirm the old one. That could be that the standard model prediction. There's something we don't understand about the normal articles and so that's a very active area of research with With the decisions in the field they continue to evaluate that their expert excited to look at all their adulation again with result in hand. Of course the interesting possibilities that that difference that one in forty thousand probability. I'm is really describe israeli because there's something new in the something we haven't yet discovered and we have some pretty good reasons to believe that there are other things in the universe. for instance we look at and we can sort of way the mass of the universe around us and we find that there's roughly four or five times more mass in the universe than we can explain with all the visible matter. The stars the planets the bible. And so we don't know what that matter is what it might be. I could get to the discussion of of dark matter and dark energy which has as i know physicist. Scientists still haven't really unlocked the mystery of that and unfortunately we can't do it on this show because that's all the time we have a but chris polly thank you so much for joining us of banks and now brandon. We go back to you paris. thank you now. we check back in with amanda finicky. Who's joining us. Live from bridgeport tonight. As part of our in your neighborhood series amanda earlier today we stopped by the chicago. Maritime museum yes. Chicago does have a maritime museum. It is actually located in the basement of the bridgeport arts center. At thirty fifth street and that infamous bubbly creek i sent some time with carrier dylan hoffman and began asking him about the museum's mission. We're about to celebrate our five year anniversary here. In bridgeport we tell the story you have. How chicago was founded by the waterways. It's basically the connection between the watersheds of the great lakes and the mississippi river. And so what if people were to come here. What did they learn about. They start with that history and forward no they basically learn how chicago transformed from a muddy marsh into a metropolis that it is today so a lot of challenges over the years and lot of excitement as well innovations in engineering to keep sustainable area for a large population. So what are some of the artifacts that people would be able to see in real life. That are special. We have a great collection of artifacts in particular. We're really excited to share our new mural with visitors this year as we work to reopen in november the ubs art collection donated a twenty foot long wpa mural titled the history of ships there was attributed to gustov dalstrom and it details shipbuilding from tall masted sailing. Ships to side ped- paddle boats to large passenger boats as well and the artifact itself is has its own history the mural because it was a commission in the loss in school for the wpa but then it was displayed in the rookery building. Downtown reopening. Why were you closed. Covert or also a little bit of irony here a little bit of both. Actually in march of last year we closed due to the pandemic and then in may we sustain the flood that had some structural damage to the building. We've been working to recover ever since had some. Drywall reinstalled they're actually painting the other side of the museum as well. Finishing up those final touches it's given us an opportunity though to redesign some of our exhibits and look forward to new things when you look to this museum that covers. Much of chicago's maritime past. What is chicago's maritime future. Well it's exciting. We're working with friends of the chicago river to help clean up bubbly creek and also. There are a lot of future plans as far as sustaining. A population of this is and sustainable waterways. The tar project with the mccook revival coming live in twenty twenty nine to be able to handle more stormwater impacts like that so a lot of a future generations can be inspired by the history of the chicago waterways and maritime history and what about the future of the maritime museum. You said you're celebrating five years here in bridgeport. The museums been around longer than that. What does the future look like. As hopefully the surgeon cases goes back down folks get vaccinated and people are once again really able to come here and enjoy things. Were very excited to bring people back to the museum. We have a third friday event. We've been keeping in touch with our community. it's a virtual event. Every third friday. We have our rotating speakers talk about different engaging exciting aspects of maritime history this month actually on april sixteenth. We have daniel gifford author of the last voyage of the whale bark wailing bark progress. He's going to be speaking with chicago. Historian ted care manzke so you can get on our website and check that out and hopefully soon. We'll be returning to live a third friday events here at the museum and no relics are artifacts were damaged in the flooding. Really just some drywall again. The bridgeport the chicago maritime museum set to open. They hope this summer we talked about all of that. With dylan hoffman. So thanks to him and back to you guys in the studio. Amanda thank you up next some local fast food history and an encore edition of ask. Geoffrey ask geoffrey is brought to you in part by be mo harris bank while you ready. let me just. I've seen this before while it way. Too big skinny jeans skinny. I'll just scary. Break something you should know. You don't actually need a while. It would be more hairs. You can just take cash out with your phone or if you need to pay him with zell that works just doug. Aren't you smile those jeans a way to tucked that feeling again. No wallet is no big deal. That's the beam fact. It may not be so glamorous anymore but there was a time when people clamored to enjoy the novelty of eating fast food from the comfort of their cars. Think about that the next time you find old fries under your seat. Jeffrey bear is here to revisit. The happy days of chicago's drive in restaurants in tonight's ask geoffrey. Hello again jeffrey brandis. So this question comes from harry. Sheridan and western springs as a teenager in the sixties. I remember eating at really cool drive in hangouts like beefy. Nineteen that one had a big wooden rubenesque waitress on a revolving pedestal wondering if the sign is in a museum son somewhere oh brandis got to see it to believe it. The sign it's a real show stopper. Let's take a look nineteen hamburger drive in on the north side in the bowmanville neighborhood that served quote hefty food at skinny prices. The nineteen in the name refers to the price of their hamburgers. One thousand nine cents. Unfortunately all we were able to find was this one photo and we were not able to track down. Whatever happened to the girl during the can cannon sign of but four nine thousand nine closed in the early nineteen eighties. Like virtually all driving. It was really popular. Hang out for teenagers in their cars and hot rods of most of them are gone. Now that is the teenagers. The hot rods in The drive ins of but there are still a couple spots out there that hung onto that. Hang out by nineteen cent hamburger. Okay so we're talking about drive ins and not drive throughs right so we should make a distinction between drive ins. Those are where you ward from your car and a server would bring the meal out to your car or eat it onsite in your car. That's versus the more mundane drive-thrus where orders is handed to you from a window. And then you drive away across across the country drive ins in particular often head quirky architecture and outrageous outsized sign edge. The drew people especially teenagers like moths to a flame. Most famous of course today in chicago is cute. couple maury and fluorine. Hot dogging it at top these super dog drive in on milwaukee avenue a devan on the northwest side east media mascots were named for the couple founded the iconic restaurant in nineteen forty eight maury in florida berman. And you can still pull up into a spot. In order from their carside speakers are hop will. Bring the order out to your car now in days. Like this jeffrey. It seems like a good option for dining out right now. Maybe we'll ever resurgence of santa. Both maurienne flurry of have passed away. Up at the berman family still runs the business. Super dog is last sausage. Standing in fact of drive ins with in chicago city limits. Those some survive in the suburbs where to drive ins originate. Oh okay so. The first drive in restaurant had the appetizing name of the pig stand in dallas. It opened in nineteen twenty one. Just as the american automobile industry was getting revved up. The owner jesse g kirby said the idea was quite simple in his words people with cars so lazy. Just don't want to get out of them while driving weren't invented here but chicago must have had plenty of our own drive ins back in the day. Oh yeah we had some great ones in the south side beverly neighborhood. Janssen's drive in began slinging burgers. Hot dogs and milkshakes from their groovy mid century building in the nineteen sixties. Janssen's ended the car hop service years ago but their manager manager actually told us they will still bring orders out to cars for some longtime patrons who missed the old days now. The sky high drive in restaurant in the austin neighborhood didn't really need outrageous. Sign to attract attention since a salvage dc six airliner sitting on a chicago street corner was enough to turn heads of the owners. Use the plane's cabin as ten table dining room and that was perched over a luncheon that that served driving customers at ground level. Wow so did that concept or not really a it closed in just after two years in nineteen sixty five so even though most drive ins are a thing of the past some takeout joints still. Keep up this tradition of of super sized edge. We thought we'd show you a few of our favorites This one is from limbs barbecue. I in south side chatham neighborhood they'd been offering famous chicago original rib tips from under this glitzy sign since nineteen sixty eight in north west belmont creggan central euros leans into its greek heritage with a hellenic fund and a giant cone of euro. Meet at huston. California wolf fees has been working over chicago hotdogs to west rogers park customers since nineteen sixty seven. We'll see is not too far from the station. Appear all right jeffrey. Very good to see you. Thanks so much my pleasure and visit our website for more chicago style. History with all the trimmings. And while you're there. Don't forget to submit your own question to jeffrey bear and there's more chicago tonight just ahead but first a look at the weather chicago. Tonight is made possible in part to the generous support of the julius frankel foundation bicycle sales skyrocketed in twenty twenty as the pandemic forced more people to exercise and commute outdoors but the surge in demand plus supply chain issues led the lingering shortages still being felt in chicago cycling community chicago. Tonight's quinn myers checked in with local bike shops in cycling groups last month about the tumultuous past year and what to expect this season. Here's another look bike shops across chicago. Say they've never experienced anything like twenty twenty. It was absolutely insane. I've been in this business for twenty five years. I've been a bike retailer. That long and i have never seen anything like it. Justina frank is the co owner of cosmic bikes in jefferson park which sells and fixes a wide range of styles. At first frank says last year bike. Boom was really great until they ran out of stuff to sell from her. We were still chugging along. And then i don't remember exactly when but at some point there was nothing more we could get. There was a point in the summer where we couldn't get basic inner tube sizes some really basic components to do repairs on people's existing bikes bike. Sales jumped sixty five percent in twenty twenty over the previous year. According to data from market research firm and pd group that came on top of a host of pandemic related supply chain issues for bike manufacturers in chicago that translated into long waits for maintenance last summer and an almost total scarcity of new bucks last year. People were like. Oh yeah this must be really great for you. Well yeah the demand is great but the demand has to be coupled with dependable. Supply have demand and there's no supply and you're spending a lot of time explaining to people why you don't have what you don't have bike shop owners in chicago. Say they've been able to at least partially restock and catch their breath. After last year's by boom but because of uncertainty in the markets there may be another shortage this year. We can't order anymore vice for twenty twenty one Whatever we're getting in Now is what we're getting And they've all they've actually started looking at twenty twenty two. Julian forsyth owns and operates the f. bikes on damon avenue in buck town which sells bikes and cycling apparel geared toward women foresight says in the past. When they didn't have a part she would just order it man. They would come these days she says. Bff is trying to stock up in case there won't be anything left few months. Bring your bike in. And you know you're crossing your fingers hoping that you know we can get their part for you if you if you need. While the past year has put a significant strain on local bike shops. it's also been a boon to area cycling groups in south suburban all sip. We caught up with chicago. Chapter of black girls do bike. A cycling club organized by and for women of color although all women are welcome. The group's leaders last adams says they've seen a huge surge of interest. Since the pandemic began. People were really getting into cycling and they were trying to reach out to various cycling groups. You know hey. Can i join join. We had well over one hundred people join our club in twenty twenty black girls. Do bike paused group rides for safety reasons in twenty twenty but are expecting to have a full calendar this season just this week about fifteen women showed up for an afternoon ride along the cal sag channel. Even though he'd been writing individually you know we have missed truly messed writing with our clubs with our group in our groups with our with the komo the camaraderie of group so we are really looking forward to doing that. People say i have to lose weight. I gotta get a new bike a half to you know you have a lot of reasons and ride with whatever you have come on out right now and take advantage of this for chicago. Tonight's i'm quinn myers local shop. Say if you're trying to buy a new bike this year do it sooner rather than later and expect to pay more and you can also learn more about black girls do bike on our website and that is our show for this thursday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube banner website w. w. dot com slash news. You can also get the show via podcast and the pbs video app and please join us tomorrow night. At seven four the week in review. Now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm parachutes and brandis friedman. Thanks for watching to healthy and safe and have a good night Closed captioning made possible by robert clifford at clifford law. His chicago personal injury. Wrongful death for that is proud of its partners named illinois meeting lawyers by the law bulletin publishing company of chicago.

bridgeport chicago china brandis olympics beijing us Jeffrey bear chris polly cubs amanda Department of state Amanda brandis friedman renison harris lurie children's hospital baseball Jay pritzker lori lightfoot
January 26, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:48 min | 5 months ago

January 26, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm brandon friedman. Parachutes has the evening off on the show tonight. There were anywhere from four to seven inches of accumulation. It's the first major snowfall of the season. How the kobe pandemic makes it harder for. The city's most vulnerable residents lee. Not merely by the example of our power but by the power of our example looking at president biden's foreign policy approach as china's leader warns protectionist trade policies could lead to a new cold war. Indoor dining is open in chicago. We hear how some in the service industry he'll about that move we and other cities around the world and found out the pandemic has played havoc with our ecosystem. How businesses are hanging on in the chicago. Loop after this. Summer's civil unrest and ten months. Cove shutdowns. I will not be the last raking barriers. The significance of vice president kamala harris holding the second highest office in the nation. And what challenges me lie ahead and the chicago tribune's former architecture restaurant and music critics talk about their storied careers and the future of journalism. But first some of today's top stories chicago public schools tells parents to keep their children home tomorrow as talks with the teachers union over in person learning. Reach an impasse. Preschool and special needs. Students were given the option to return earlier this month with k. Through eight set to return next week today. The union told all of its members to work remotely. Starting tomorrow even those who had already been working in schools these last few weeks and told them to prepare for a possible strike on thursday in a statement. See to president. Jesse sharkey says quote. We are willing to keep teaching but cps has said they will lock us out. We need a mediator to intervene and put our attempts to bargain a truly safe path reopening back on track and late this afternoon mayor lori lightfoot and school ceo. Janice jackson touted the district's safety efforts instead. They've been working with the union for months. Cbs has to demonstrated its good faith by since june meeting with the leadership over sixty times and in the last two weeks. Virtually every day including weekends meeting or exceeding the cdc and chicago department of public health guidelines. I am deeply disappointed that after all this time. All these sessions all other work to make sure that our cps schools and buildings are safe. No agreement has yet been reached and snowfall is finally letting up in parts of the chicago area. Farther from the lake as of this afternoon snowfall as high as seven inches was recorded in some suburbs. Lake effect snow is expected to continue this evening. And into tomorrow and we'll have more on the impact of the year's first major snowstorm in just a few minutes illinois. Regulators reject a bid by the owners of mercy hospital to open an agent center on the south side last month. Regulators shot down a plan by the owner of the brownsville hospital. To close mercy. Critics argued. It's one of the south side's busiest emergency departments and largely treats already underserved populations in a three two vote today. The state board that oversees health care projects also turned down a request to open an outpatient center two miles from the current hospital site which was intended as a replacement the proposal to shut down the hospital. We'll be up for consideration again. In march and illinois health officials reported another thirty six hundred cases of corona virus and eighty seven deaths deaths. Since yesterday the state's total number of cases stands at more than one point one million with eighteen thousand eight hundred and eighty three lives lost. Some three hundred vehicles have been plowing and salting chicago roads making the main arteries at least drivable despite the snow. That's blanketed northern illinois. Amanda finicky joins us now to explain some of the science behind this storm and why it's presenting a challenge for some of the city's most vulnerable residents. Amanda grand is illinois's official climatologist. It is trent. ford's job to follow storms like this one and then to study. How weather patterns matchup with years past. He also by the way teaches classes on climate science. And he says what we saw over the past twenty four hours or so was a literal textbook example of the range of precipitation types that can come from large winter weather systems depending on where you are where the low pressure center is the system would have passes through and and where the warm air coming up versus a cold air coming down meet together. So while there's a cargo area got four to seven inches and smell whereas when you go down further south towards here in champagne we got a little bit of snow. A little bit of rain in a decent amount of ice which forms from freezing rain of liquid precipitation hits the surface in freezes immediately as well as a little bit of sleep. We go further down south of springfield and seventy we. was mostly precipitation. Mostly rainfall go. Further says the net. And you have last night's tornado in alabama. Now what is not textbook. It's swan pretty late about two to four weeks behind four northern illinois to see its first major snowfall that really sticks. He says most of the state also went into this storm behind for overall levels of snowfall for the season even with what is on the ground now chicago. He says we'll still be behind for a typical year. Actually he says granted there was that polar vortex but we have strung together. A few relatively mild winters says climate change means that temperatures are rising. they're increasing at the largest rate in the winter versus seasons. Says that means it will be less likely to have prolonged stretches of super cold weather we can still get those cold air outbreaks. Those are definitely possible as we saw in january twenty nineteen. But it's less likely that will have an entire month of well below average temperatures because of that background warming now as for still fall. He says that's really variable. Total snowfall for a season can be dominated by just a couple of large snowfalls storms. Like we're getting now. Milder winters and rising winter temps by the way does not mean that. Chicago's winters are getting balmy. Doesn't mean it's not cold. It's still winter. We still have an energy deficit in temperatures are still going to be cold. It's just that they're they're they're warming and i'll also say that projections. We looked at projections of future changes. those snowstorms yield of snow from snowstorms are rejected decrease as we continue to warm into the future so snowstorms cold weather is a cause for concern for individuals experiencing homelessness. Usually when it's freezing cold or you have a whole lot of snow journey nichols would we would go and search around the neighborhood for those who are particularly vulnerable and like under the viaducts And offer them a place to stay cafeteria using the cafeteria at a warming center. Nickel says has saved some digits over the years people who were at the point. They couldn't field our hands or feet had a place to go notice. I said that is what he usually does. We've had to make a lot of drastic changes this year inviting people into the shelter. Where many of the programs residents are older and immune compromise was not possible because of the coronavirus. If we bring in a lot of people that we've done in the past that do have covered then dame where put we could possibly put everybody else at risk from participants to style. And then we couldn't staff what we're doing as well and so. It's a fine balance that we really do need to really take into consideration. He says it is an eternal battle. He says it is hard knowing that there are people out side at risk of hypothermia and frostbite director of the chicago coalition for the homeless doug. Shackle burg says actually the city has done a decent job throughout the pandemic of addressing individuals. Shelter needs so much concerned about whether or not shelters sufficient beds. It's the factor of folks who are unsheltered. Oftentimes don't want to go into a shelter system not because they don't need housing but because they don't feel safe in the shelter system and as particularly heightened in the age of cohen. Now next week those who live and who work at homeless shelters will begin to have access to the covid. Vaccine because they are congregate settings but shackled says that it is going to be important for those who are homeless and who are not insult to be able to get access to the covid vaccine soon after many also have compromised systems. Brenda spectacle. amanda. Thank you say to look at president. Biden's foreign policy plans phil brenda biden. Administration faces a host of foreign policy challenges only yesterday in a virtual address the world economic forum. China's president warned of a new cold war countries keep protectionist trade policies in what was seen as a thinly veiled attack the us biden also has to contend with the impact to four years of an america first approach that has strained old alliances. He addressed those challenges in his inauguration speech last week. Here's my message to those beyond our borders. America has been tested. And we've come out stronger for it. We'll repair our alliances and engaged with the rural once again not to me. Yesterday's challenges but today's and tomorrow's challenges joining us now on their expectations for the new administration's foreign policy our cecile a non resident senior fellow on security and diplomacy at the chicago council on global affairs. John mir shurmur professor of political science at the university of chicago and foreign policy specialists and alberto call professor of law and us foreign relations at depaul university. Thank you for joining us. Cecile shalem me. Begin with you please. President biden had his first call with president putin today and he was said to have discussed a range of topics including arms control reports of russian bodies on us troops in afghanistan and russia's interference in the two thousand twenty election briefly will your expectations of how biden relationship with trump will with putin that is will differ from trump's relationship with putin. I think that the relationship itself will be very different for whatever reason. President trump seemed really eager to buddy up to putin and really eager to deny Some of the really harmful behavior that russia was engaged in the us the fact that President biden has appointed bill burns the former. Us ambassador to moscow to head. The cia shows a side of this relationship. Most americans don't see are still not going to see but clearly President bindings going to take very seriously which is looking into exactly how much russian interference there is in our culture in our society and our political system and finding ways to tamp that down been really really problematic for the last five or six years. Now we seem from the indictments against some russians. Just how involved. They are in every sector of our society trying the terrorists apart and a certain amount of what we witnessed in the last six weeks with our country just being rent asunder can be blamed really on moscow. So i think you're gonna see biden taking a much tougher line behind the scenes with intelligence but also forcefully in public. John muir shurmur. What are the things that president biden said to have raised with president. Putin is the arrest of alexi no vanni and the mass protests that a set smart strategic for the president biden to do. I think it's actually foolish for two reasons one is i think i disagree with sale. Here i think the united states has a vested interest in improving its relations with the russians and putting an end to this wild and crazy russell go via In the united states we need the russians albums contain china. And in this regard i think president trump's instincts were correct. We should improve relations and we should stay out of domestic. Politics of countries. Like russia This whole question of whether or not the valley was poisoned. Then exactly what role played in that. All episode is one that we can assess in any meaningful way from this distance. And we just keep our nose out of their business in the same way that we like them to keep their those people like cecile complaint back fact that the russians interfere in domestic american politics. Fine but why should we then go around. Interfering in the domestic politics rushing so insane by a large painting meditation. Alberto call better for the us to have a friendlier relationship with the russians. As opposed to one. That borders on the confrontational definitely. I mean we do need to engage. Russia they exist. They're a great power. Continue to be. Let's think about the russia relationship in terms of three chessboards sill. Okay one. Chessboard is the chest of arms control. We need to be negotiating with the russians on arms control agreements. We need to renew some of the agreements that the trump administration allowed to lapse like the open skies treaty to rejoin that. We we need to renew. Start the second. Chessboard has to do with russia's behavior on Places like ukraine some of their more aggressive behavior towards our baltic allies and eastern europe. That we have two very clear to russia as we were during the cold war that we have certain red lines and there were prepared to deter them. The third chessboard is out of human rights. And i think there. We need kind of a mix of what cecile on. John pointed out on the one hand. We are our leverage on russia's really limited with regards to human rights and it hasn't been that way twelve the history of us relations with russia going back to the earliest times of the soviet union. It's okay to let them know that we are concerned about things like the poisoning of navan but on the other hand that knots and in the way of negotiations on dialogue on really strategic issues. so she'll shea. Antony blinken was confirmed today as secretary of state aside from what does this say about how the us Expects to engage with the world at large ant- anti lincoln Was was a rather low key in his previous state department assignments and he is very well. Liked certainly is extremely competent. He is not terribly flashy but he also understands the institution of the state department. And i think that one thing. The president biden understands is that the trump administration did enormous damage to a lot of the institutions that are responsible for maintaining and strengthening our democracy. Whether you're talking the statement the department of justice all sorts of other parts of the us government and so one of lincoln's jobs. And i think that this is signalled by his by his appointment is to rebuild the state department And naked able to meet the challenges that we're facing around the world right now so i think you're going to see a somewhat low key but highly competent secretary of state who is also going to be focused on rebuilding the infrastructure in state department john muir sharper damaging to the united states' international. Standing was the insurrection at the capitol on january six. How much did that hurt this country. Don't think it hurt very much than it was certainly wasn't helpful. The fact is that president trump did a great deal to damage our relations with most countries around the world President trump was a unilateralist are excellence. And he tended to view our allies much the way as he viewed her adversaries. He thought that they were all trying to take advantage of us. He thought our allies will free riders. They wanted us to pay all the costs. Do all the heavy lifting. They sat on the sidelines and enjoyed the benefits. And there was actually some element of truth. Who would president trump was sane but the end result is he slapped allies around and slapped our adversaries around look at his policies toward china for example and the end result is that are standing in the world is not very good and i do think one of the great advantages of the biden administration will day that they will do a better job than president trump and his administration did working with our homes. And i think that's especially when it comes to dealing with china red and also dealing with the whole question of iran which is another huge issue sitting on the table alberta call. Let's start talk about china for a second. you mentioned. The chinese president warned about a possible new cold war thinly veiled reference to the united states of these protectionist policies continued. What can the what's the best case scenario for the united states and china. I think the best case scenario fill is a managed rivalry carefully managed rivalries. We cannot go back in our relations with china to what they might have been ten fifteen twenty years ago the reality is. China has become a major geopolitical at the series. And we need even though we don't like to use that term. We need a policy of containing and deterring only the united states has the military forces on the capabilities to actually deter china. China has to believe for example that invading taiwan would not be worth it because it would be so costly toward that it would be a tremendously difficult thing for them to do and that requires a rethinking of us military strategy. It literally requires what michelle flournoy said means that we would have the capabilities to sink every single chinese acid in the pacific ocean in the first seventy two hours of any chinese attempt to invade taiwan so that requires capabilities out of time when president biden is going to be facing pressures from some elements of the democratic party to reduce the defense budget. So yes we have to work with our allies in the pacific but we are also going to have to strengthen. Our military posture in the pacific and president biden is going to have to be able to look at china and the eye of the chinese president. The i say look we want to work with you. We don't want a hot war but there are certain things that we will not allow an invading. Taiwan is one of them. I asked you about the best case scenario. That certainly doesn't sound like a good area. But i know what you're i take your point. Thank you all very much. We appreciate your insights cecile shea. Jr on mir armor and albert bertel call and affects. Indoor dining is back on the menu but not everyone's on board we hear from a server who doesn't think it's a good idea so please stay with us. What can you tell us about how chicago small businesses are doing. These are more than just shopping centers for the community gathering places. They maintain their culture. Even without a pandemic january and february are notoriously slow months for the service industry however as of last saturday indoor dining and drinking in chicago and suburban cook county are back open at a limited capacity. Some say it could bring more cash during these cold months but others in the industry fear. The health risks outweighed the possibility of more income. Joining us to talk more about indoor dining reopening our rafael royale or royalists use me co owner bianca's burgers in the revival food hall cynthia miranda who works front of house at flow in nobel square and nine occuren- at fireside restaurant and lounge in edgewater at. Thank you all for joining us. So cynthia let's start with you. Please you actually contracted cova over the summer. How do you feel about safety with regard to indoor dining honors many mixed emotions. I want our industry to come up and get back to normalcy by code israel and it hit me hard and financially. It hit hard and everyone is hurting out. I'm sure how would you say guests are about following the guidelines when you see them come to the restaurant many people that are very respectful the guidelines and listen to the roles under some people that are just very anxious to come in and wednesday under the door. Everything goes right out of rolls around are they tend to forget and just kind of get comfortable and settle into the comfort. They're used to at a restaurant. Okay so to move into tier one restrictions. Any region needs to record three consecutive days of tests. Positively below eight percent. They need to see you know. Increase in covid nineteen hospitalizations for seven out of ten days and more than twenty percent of its intensive care unit in hospital. Beds must be available nine. Do you think restaurants were rushed into reopening for indoor dining. I mean. I personally do believe that we had a little bit of a rush. You know dipped right below the number that we were supposed to but we by a very small percentage I i also understand the one. E need to reopen the restaurants that at the same time I do think it was definitely rushed. Was it surprising when you received the news that restaurants would in fact be reopening I was a little bit surprised. Help quickly from when we heard. Hey were dining might be opening up again to it actually opening up and the time that we were given the okay to win. We are expected to have the dining rooms in indoor dining open. It was really really quick. Turn around but luckily the restaurant that i work at mutate hoping russia's extremely seriously the end we really great staffs we were able to get it off on its feet but it's art for restaurants to do that turnaround raphael. You and your sister. You all actually opened your restaurant in august so during the pandemic. what's that been like. It's been it's been really interesting. Want people know it was a tough time. Open a restaurant but because the restaurant mommy operate. We're always worry about sanitation and raleigh's No-one stick rollers picture that the food is fame and the environment so the hardest part wasn't adjusting to new cobra guidelines Fantasizing it was more jumping to the gap. That was the hardest part about it. Everyone either doesn't really think it is. And i've known several people in this industry gotten sick than if you stab your passed away So they made it very harvard. Same time people that really do take it seriously. I love them for it. And if it weren't for them. I probably would have made it. Most business has been takeout so musically unity wearing them. No house using take. Everything has kind of godson with and we're sorry to hear The loss that you experienced obviously rafael revival is a little bit different. But do you see. Indoor dining as being good for business is a little different on indoor dining. We'd the the friday when it started back up. We saw a huge people. Just want to be out whether it's all a restaurant. I think kobe teague israel. They didn't call myself. Wishing are but then thinking about it. But i wanna be out. But i don't want to be out this out so badly that i got the virus not worth the risk for you. nine restaurant has a patio open as well And for restaurants that have the option for outdoor how viable is that during the chicago winter. So we always had an enclosed patio space. So what we've done is open about. All one of the walls in the patio and then we stuck a bunch of heaters out there and they do an okay job. It's still definitely cold out there. I'm not gonna lie to you. What is it like having to serve in in those cold temperatures. It's i will be. Honest is less than ideal. But i would rather be safe and i know that i can give a guest safe service and be a little bit uncomfortable. Cynthia flow does not have a patio fitted for the winter. Before this. it's been relying on carry out. How do you think that's working out and is continued. Carry out sustainable. We are fortunate in chicago avenue for over twenty years. Have a great regulars that come in a great neighborhood that does support their small business. So it's we've been study again. We've been solving. What very study. And we're thankful for everyone. S cunanan out from us rafael. How long do you think indoor dining will stay open because it seems like when cases go up restaurants get closed as open until spring but realistically just because of the way that you handle the closure i don't think of and very long because there's so many different guidelines lake. I live in the city of chicago. My sister my business loop making the hill and we different guideline so in the city in an our restaurant can be as safe as possible but until we have the same guidelines statewide nationwide. It really doesn't mean much because one person might be. They've person in the world on the next person following there there's a whole guideline isn't and they're just moving. The virus around the state and around the city and none of our restaurants are on an island. Unfortunately raphael royal cynthia miranda nine thanks to you all for joining us and best of luck to you need to you and still tecom on chicago tonight. How the loop is doing ten months into the pandemic and after this. Summer's civil unrest a woman of many firsts the significance of vice president khama harris holding the second highest in the nation and three veteran journalists. Leave the chicago tribune. They join us to talk about their careers the future of journalism and what comes next but first some more of today's top stories chicago public schools tells parents to keep students home tomorrow. As the teacher's union tells members to prepare for possible strike the union and the district have been in marathon negotiations over ending in person learning options to k through eight students. Pre-k and special needs students have the option to go back earlier this month. The union told all members though to work remotely starting tomorrow in prepare for picket lines on thursday. Cps locks them out the district says it's offered additional safety measures including priority access to vaccinations for staff working in hard hit neighborhoods more testing and expanded remote work accommodations but the union says safety measures still. Don't go far enough and has called for mediation also today. Cps announces a new program to quote reimagine school safety widespread. Racial justice protests last year included a call for cps to remove chicago police officers from schools. The district instead gave local school councils control and okayed a plan to rethink safety programs today. Cps announced five community organizations set to help create trauma informed school safety plans beginning with a series of ten community engagement meetings next month. We've got details about that initiative on our website. More chicago area counties. Get the go ahead for. Indoor dining improved corona virus metrics mean in restaurants and bars that serve food and regions. Eight and nine are now allowed to have patrons inside either twenty five people or five percent capacity whichever is smaller. Those regions include to page kane lake and mchenry counties and as we mentioned earlier lusa restrictions on indoor dining in chicago. Went into effect. This past saturday city officials said today only one business was cited for violating the rules with too many customers and there's more about that online at w. w. dot com slash news. The streets of chicago's loop had been eerily quiet over the past year. Covert nineteen has forced thousands of downtown office workers to stay home while performing arts venues have retreated into hibernation in major events have been indefinitely postponed but the loops. Small businesses and cultural institutions are still kicking chicago. Tonight's quinn myers spoke with some of them about how they're staying. Afloat terry t. has worked on jewelers row in downtown chicago for the past twelve years selling and manufacturing wedding bands and engagement rings located in the chicago landmark diamond center at wabash madison. T store was one of dozens in the loop. That was broken. Into during civil unrest last may chaos. The window was broken all around the building and then two months later in mid august t was hit again in order to more just decided come down here with another of the building managers and just try to get people out. Looters out yes. Yeah oh yeah definitely. We prevented a lot of damage that time. For the second time today the store and most of its competitors are back open with business stable but still pretty slow because of the pandemic slow enough to where t- has considered moving elsewhere if rely on our regular customers or our wholesale business than we can very easily do this in another location which much which would be much less than the rent. It's a decision. Businesses across the loop are facing even as people slowly returned downtown at the bottom of the pandemic when it first started we had pedestrian counts of twenty percent year on year. And now they're around thirty five to forty percents At around the holiday they got up to about fifty percent so people are finding their way back But it's been tough. Most of the stores on state street remain open and museums are expected to follow suit in the coming weeks but the loop ecosystem where one industry success or failure feeds right into another is still struggling. Nobody thinks the loop can fail right. It's so big. It's filled with big corporations with lots of people. Lots of money for what really makes downtown. Go in many ways is the storefront economy and so the store standing behind you you know is suffering because there's not a lot of people down here so our job is to bring more people down like pretty much. Everyone during the pandemic businesses in the loop have had to reimagine how they operate especially as foot traffic once the main selling points of being downtown has slowed to a crawl that includes the goodman theatre which has pivoted to virtual offerings during the pandemic like a recent production of the christmas carol but those activities are divorced from the downtown economy. The goodman is or was a part of we produce christmas carol online. I mentioned how successful that was. That doesn't generate any revenue for petterino's next door. You know when we come back. That's the type of collaborative approach. I think we're gonna have to find if we're going to be able to come back. Successfully managing director john collins is also the chair of the league of chicago theaters and says while it's too soon to put a hard date on reopening he's optimistic. The city will work with venues to figure out a safe way to make it happen as we start to bring back audiences into into art theatres. We can start to fill the restaurants around us. We can start to fill the hotels around us and get back to playing our part back. On wabash locally owned bakery bliss has also had to totally rethink their business model during the pandemic of our businesses corporate and since they were working from home They just weren't you know catering for business meetings and stuff like that. After the initial shutdown owner teresa gang began offering different online packages and started shipping her goods nationwide so far. It's working did better. This past december than in december twenty nineteen and like terry t. on jewelers row gang has stayed open as a foothold for the loop during the multiple upheavals of twenty twenty. You know we have a lot of residential buildings in the lube area. So i think they were grateful that they still had some other options to kind of get out of the house. Come and get a cupcake. I'm glad that we have a lot of customers. That support us. And i really appreciate all the all the help from our customers and the community and trying to keep us going and i think if that continues then everybody will be okay for chicago tonight. I'm quinn myers and the chicago loop alliance as they'd like to see continued. Government aid for businesses and loop is specially shuttered restaurants and theaters. You can learn more on our website. vice president. kamla harris has spent her career breaking barriers. Last wednesday was no different as she made. History taking the oath for the nation's second highest office. She's the first woman vice president and the first african american and person of south asian descent to hold the position. Here's the then vice president-elect vic her victory speech in november on this -nificant of her new role. While i may be the first woman in this office. I will not be the last because every little girl watching tonight sees that this is a country of possibilities and joining us to discuss the significance of her role in the challenges that lie ahead are rebecca signed a political strategist and former university of chicago lecturer where she founded the university of chicago harris school of public policy women's public leadership initiative she's also authored several books related to women running for office. Natasha sharma associate professor of african american studies and asian american studies at northwestern university and felicia davis president and ceo of chicago foundation for women. Thanks to you all for joining us. Glad you're here So rebecca side. Let's start with you please. What is harris's seat. In the nation's second highest office mean for women in politics especially considering that that sector is dominated by men well in the first place she holds the second most important executive office in the country and is one of the most important people in the world. Now we've never had that opportunity before to see a woman in that role and very women's unfortunately all executive office the primary route women spin through legislative positions. And so i think that's the second thing is she gets then to carry portfolio policy and legislative mag that we've never seen a woman and i have before in political leadership. So that's terrifically important the administration grapples so many prices of moment. How significant is that the fact that you know. Here's his both shoes by racial in that she is black in south asian. Is it that it is her who breaks this barrier really significant and you know speaking to the previous question. I think it's interesting to think about her politics on the one hand in her identities on the other hand and they don't always align ways that we might expect so i think it's incredibly significant that a woman who has gotten to this position of power is not a white woman in this country. And so i think that signifies really important messages as she said in the clip on the other hand you know while representation matters. I think we learned from obama. That just because a person is black or indian doesn't necessarily mean that those only constituencies that she's going to speak to and so. I think it'll be really interesting to see how her politics excite or disappoint people and also how they do and how they don't align with her biracial identity now in november van vice. President-elect harris gave victory speech thanking the women who came before her. Let's listen women who fought and sacrificed so much for equality and liberty and justice for all including the black women who are often too often overlooked but so often prove they are the backbone of our democracy now even after the nineteen th amendment. Black women were still left. Disenfranchised in states where there were policies limiting who could vote and that happened for decades. Today though black women are one of the most powerful voting blocs in the country. Felicia davis what does harris's position tell us about how far we've come but we still have to go into question it's You know it's really interesting. Two hundred years ago. I'm some women received the right to vote. Victory absent him in that were black women And women of color left behind and so to have this moment almost come full circle where i think a lot of black women myself included. I believe that this is you know the what they have been for. All of their data haitians and organizing in reaching communities holy and lifting community up together. Now what happens next is extremely important. Just wow it's about the policies vice president harris on supports and advocates or rebekah. Luton's earlier we are in ain't treacherous time right now. We do pandemic going on right. Now is black racism to be clear as long as the covid nineteen Hinder meghan so. It's really important that equity standpoint that we her Black women and women of color and our recovery and the policies around recovery Breach nation that they had been hearing. You know there's pandemic quite under banks. And rebecca what challenges will harris face That are unique to women in politics. And in this case a woman of color in politics i would i. I guess to the challenges that of structural discrimination which of course deletion just alluded to is specifically against african americans. Second lasers gender discrimination that women in leadership continue to face. So he's going to have to confront those two axes people. Lear believe them. Women should hold a kind of holding much less than even unless your position. So that sort of problem number one number two is the fact that it's unclear. What the division of labor will be between her and president and while she will be in the room with him and has clearly shown a partnership with him. Today we don't know yet what her portfolio will be and specifically whether is nine hold it will. It will include a special attention to the issues that women and girls can find. Thursday try to achieve healthy and successful lives. I guess the last thing i would say about the challenges is that know. What kind of message is she going to consistently present about fool. She is and what she is. And what this means for women writ large around the world and we don't know yet what that will be whether chill beside to make those statements and we've talked about this. Before but she is the daughter of both jamaican and indian immigrants. How is she changing. The way we think and talk about race particularly multi-culturalism in this country. That's a great question. Osh is also going to have to deal with right the expectation that indian americans. Now i'm that. Asian americans have represent on their behalf and shit a lot of people who are identifying with her. I think what she's also doing In her role on stages of vice president of the united states is really shaping up the as the normal ways that we think about race we often might see her as a black woman and she talks about her indian family mother relatives in india. And so she's really changing the way that we think about Races people only having one racial identity and so. I think what's going to happen. Is it's going to raise on the other hand. Asian americans racial visibility And it's also going to have really interesting conversations between asian-americans and the americans of black and asian communities within the united states and It's not align on immigration laws and things like that and other times we'll do align with regard to gender discrimination and desires or for equities so overall. I wouldn't say that she's really going to change our conversation about race with regard to the assumption that people only have one race and also the conversation about multiracial mixed race identity. Which is the fastest growing population with the presumption that most mixed race people have a white parent here. We have come. I apologize for jumping in. We're we've got so much to talk about in the time. Flies right by was hoping to get. Felicia davison wilmer time But we'd that means we'll have to have you back rebecca cy. Natasha sharma and felicia davis. Thanks for joining us up. Next former longtime tribune journalists reflect on their careers and the future of the news business. Don't go away Three of the chicago tribune's most veteran and respected writers have taken voluntary buyouts leaving after decades covering their respective beats here to talk about their careers. The future of journalism. And what comes. Next are blair canaan a pulitzer prize winning architecture critic who was at the chicago tribune for thirty three years. Twenty eight of those on the architecture beat howard reich arts and culture for the trib since nineteen eighty-three and fill vitelle. Who worked at the tribune for more than forty one years and was restaurant critic for three decades and before we begin chicago no longer has a fulltime architecture or restaurant critic. There's only one remaining fulltime music critic. And i should also state that all of them have taken voluntary buyouts they have not been ousted and they're also bound by nondisclosure agreements that we won't be getting any juice on the trip this evening phil welcome congrats on this new chapter Let's start with you please. What was your most memorable experience reporting on your beat. And i'm sure it's like picking sheild a lot like that. I was very happy to be around for the birth of restaurants such as true in evanston and and for to watch the ascent really of chicago dining And becoming a national force. It's all it's. I don't think i could pick one particular moment but it's been i've had really good front row seat for a long time chicago. Dining blair came in. What would you say was the biggest story you covered on your beat. Oh like phil. that's that's the. What is your favorite child question. But millennium park's opening certainly also Covering the opening of the world. False building dubai. The burst khalif foul. They're just many others. Unlike fill. It was a pleasure to witness the rise of stars like genie gang over the last twenty years Again having a front row seat to great architectural city like chicago with this is truly a privilege and a responsibility. Howard you know your work led to interviewing elliot's l. which led to a book. What would you say was your biggest thrill in your time. I guess there were two one is getting to meet him. Know him work with him. During the last four years of his life on our book with that we wrote the art of inventing hope and the tribune also made it possible for me to go to eastern europe and uncovered my mother's secret childhood holocaust experience and jazz. It was proving jelly roll morton and fully two generations of black composers were swindled out of millions of dollars by the white music industry. Wow fill the towel you said you did not take the buy out two years ago but why now. It was a good time for me. Ha i'm a grandpa now. I wasn't two years ago. There are more things to do at home. And i just turned sixty six. And i wasn't going to do this forever. The wooden seven started actually aligned. But this as good a time as any congrats grandpa a player. Same question to you Why now. I took it now because this was a good time i mean. I decided a year ago that i was going probably going to leave and i wanted to get to the end of the current post great recession building boom to cover the completion of buildings like the new bank of america tower. The tallest office building in chicago in thirty years. also the saint regis chicago tower The third tallest building in city also by jeannie gang. So those were kind of milepost. And if i was going to leave i wanted to kind of finish the race By covering major stories. And so it was the right time howard reich. Why was this the right time for you. Ll actually my wife. And i have been talking about this for some years but three years ago. The tribune asked me. If i also like to take on the classical music and i just could not resist that so done that for a few years. Now i've been writing for the tribune since nineteen seventy eight but the thing is since march there have been no concerts and there may not be conscious for most or perhaps all this year maybe into next year. So it's like being a war correspondent without the war. I don't have music to cover and music as the center of what i do and so. That's why i thought this would be perfect moment to redirect my energies on continuing working on books and films. And hopefully there's time we can come back to your film in a bit Blair the last line in your column your farewell farewell column. Was this quote. Imagine chicago without a fulltime skyline watchdog. Schlock developers and hacker architects welcomed. The lack of scrutiny. The last word on the importance of architectural criticism. Yeah well i mean. That's one of the things that architecture critics to the the most important perhaps as to educate the public just open their eyes to get them to look at buildings and to raise their expectations for the art that shapes how we live really more than any other art but certainly That function watch dogging key developments is is critical part of the beat when donald trump first veil has chicago skyscraper. In two thousand one. It was a real dog and even though city hall people were waxing enthusiastic about it. It was important that someone say sucks. Excuse my french In order to get the design improved and over time. That's what happened That's just a really important part of what we do. you know. Criticism is about judgment. The greek word critic coast instilled in judgment and somebody has to be able to say to the powers that be whether they're in architecture food or culture that you know this is a real story and that's a that's an important function whether whatever your beat is whether it's food should i spend money on a restaurant. Should i spend money to go to a classical music concert. That's what i think. One of the reasons that critics are valued. And were there. Like phil or howard. They open your eyes to worlds. You just don't understand. That's why i enjoyed reading my colleagues so much because i know they opened the door for me to new worlds quote. Fill as well your farewell column quote. The work is never done. There's always another restaurant to cover another trend to spot another new. Who's about to make the world stand up and take notice you know. As howard mentioned the lack of concerts. The restaurant industry has certainly been upended during this pandemic as well phil what is in the future for restaurants hopefully survival. It's incredibly tough time for them. The chicago restaurants should just now been able to open again indoors but only at twenty five percent which nobody pretends is a viable of for survival and It's going to be really really tough. We're going to see a lot of really really good restaurants go away and and maybe that in the long term will create opportunities for someone else but it's not going to be a happy time and it's It's it makes me sad and howard. There is a car. Tempur films documentary. coming out based on a series. He wrote what. Can you tell us about that so glad. This is my next act. After the tribune the film is called for the left hand. This amazing chicago man. Who when he was ten years. Old tragedy was tech. I his father left. Paralysed on his right side but he was determined to still be a pianist and he spent decades as a successful high school. Choral teacher and never told anyone why he was paralyzed on his right side and also never told anyone he was still practicing the piano. I heard about this guy. I wrote a three part series on about him and suddenly age seventy eight. He gets invitations to play concerts across the country and now norm alone at age. Eighty three is a contra. Janice in this film will tell his tail. What a story. We look forward to seeing what each of you has up your collective sleeves next time. We see you in the meantime best of luck. And our thanks to fill vitelle blair came and howard reich you throughout the pandemic the corona virus has disproportionately affected chicago's latino community. Wtt w news director in chicago tonight. Latino voices host ugo balta moderated community conversation last night about covert nineteen impact and available vaccines during the conversation. Miguel blend cartel. Junior of esperanza health centers talked about the importance migrant workers in illinois getting the vaccine. Here's a short clip. We need to ensure that they get vaccinated as well because farm workers in rural illinois are the essential workers of chicago of our cities right. And it's extremely important. We see the disparities. How kogo impacting essential workers in the city of chicago. how. Kobe has been impacting Not only type. Positivity rates but morbidity rates as well of latinos who are the essential who are define themselves as essential workers and so for farmworkers. We need to make sure similarly that they get back in that they have access to the vaccine as well because they're part of the infrastructure of the state and again that was from last night's virtual community conversation about covid nineteen impact on chicago's latino community. You can watch the full conversation on our youtube channel at wtt. W shot and be sure to tune into chicago tonight. Latino voices saturday evenings at six and mark your calendars for our next community. Conversation on monday. February twenty-second which i will be hosting and that's our show for this tuesday night. Please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm brandis friedman. Thanks for watching and have a good night closed. Captioning is made possible by robert aches and clifford law offices chicago personal injury and wrongful death. That's proud to serve its community through pro bono legal services.

chicago taiwan united states president biden russia president trump biden illinois President biden President trump putin trump brandon friedman Jesse sharkey lori lightfoot Janice jackson chicago department of public h brownsville hospital chicago tribune
July 2, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:48 min | 1 year ago

July 2, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to Chicago tonight. I'm Peres shuts here in our North West side studio. And I'm Brandis Friedman, reporting live from Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood on the show tonight. A judge rules on the governor's corona virus. Actions local movie theaters reopened the movement toward canceling. ACT'S IN SAT's revival of classic Chicago Beer and a conflict between nineteenth century. Social reformers in tonight's ask Jeffrey. And Paris as I mentioned I. Am live tonight and Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood on the city's south. We're all be co anchoring pairs. You came to this neighborhood in April earlier on in the pandemic, but we wanted to return for a couple of reasons one to see how this covert hotspot has been managing in pandemic, but also to see how activists are working to increase the peace in advance of what is typically a violent weekend in the city of Chicago, so we'll have more on both of those stories in just a bit of course, but for now we'll send it back to you for. For more today's developments, thanks, it looks like a lot of activists are mobilizing behind. We look forward to your reports and breaking news this evening Mayor Lory lightfoot is issuing an emergency travel order for anyone traveling to Chicago from states experiencing a surge in cove nineteen cases, the mayor made the announcement in a series of tweets, asking travelers from those states to quarantine at home for a period of fourteen days. The states on the list right now are Alabama. Arkansas Arizona California Florida Georgia. Idaho Louisiana. Mississippi North Carolina Nevada South Carolina Tennessee Texas and Utah. It's unclear how this order would be enforced. Also from the mayor today stern warning to bars and restaurants that don't abide by social distancing an indoor capacity rules for the fourth of July weekend. We're going to be out and we're going to be active and we're going to be looking, and if we see businesses that are flouting the rules that are putting your profit over a public health and safety of your workers. Of members of the public. We're not gonNA. Hesitate to shut you down and if you are shut down, you're not coming back. Warning comes after reports that trendy areas like Wrigley Ville. had bars filled to capacity with patrons, not engaging in social distancing. It looks like they are doing at this restaurant, Chicago. Illinois have been phased for covert recovery for one week with restaurants allowed to operate at twenty five percent capacity. And Illinois health officials report more than eight hundred new known COVID, nineteen cases today for a total of nearly one, hundred, forty, five, thousand and an additional thirty six deaths reported today for a statewide total of just under seven thousand seven day testing positivity rate is two point six percent. When and if baseball comes back later this month, some cubs fans will be able to enjoy the action in person. From the rooftops that is the city reached a deal with the rooftops to operate at twenty five percent capacity during games. No word yet on whether fans will be allowed inside baseball stadiums. Major League Baseball has announced a short and sixty games season to start either July twenty, third or twenty fourth. As promised our neighborhood reporting goes on now weekly every Thursday night and tonight, Brad Friedman is reporting from Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood. A majority black, working class community that at the beginning of the pandemic was considered a covid nineteen hotspot as of late though it has also become a hot spot for some of the city's increasing violence Brandis us now from near a pillar of that community Saints Church so Brandon. What's going on there? So. It's actually been a flurry of activity outside Saint Sabina. All this afternoon and I'm going to come back to that in just a little bit, but what's happening behind me right now is demand justice rally. It's happening on the steps of Saint. Sabina obviously organized by the Church and members of the community here and they're sending a big message Paris, and I mean that literally very big message on the side street. Right next to me on seventy eighth place next to saint by now a member of the church community has painted a mural on the street, and it reads demand justice in massive letters, church pastor Father Michael Pfleger explains what they mean by that. We Want Justice Investment and opportunity. we want investment of resources of jobs and economic development and good schools access to healthcare access to food. we want a help at housing, and so we want justice for that from the economic level and the investment level. Now this community area it also reflects the increasing shootings and murders that the city has been experiencing in recent weeks. Numbers from the Chicago Police Department show that there were ten murders in the six police district where Auburn Gresham sits from the beginning of June through the twenty eight, five of them were from June twenty second through the twenty eight now those are significant increases over the year twenty, one, thousand, nine, that same time period when murders for those first twenty eight days of June up one hundred and fifty percent compared to the same period last year shootings up fifty nine percent now the fourth of Of July sadly is notoriously very violent weekend in Chicago in numbers already showed that it's on the rise across the city as we reported just yesterday, on its way to matching twenty sixteen historic Hyde at the city experienced the mayor and the police department. Say that they are preparing what they're calling an all hands on deck approach. This weekend already deployed an additional twelve hundred police officers today through the weekend. They say particularly neighborhood hotspots that have experienced high levels of summer violence lightfoot says for all the focus on public safety the next few days. The real work doesn't end this weekend or anytime soon. If we are truly to reverse the epidemic of gun violence and make every neighborhood safe and secure. We need to continue working to reverse a circumstances that underpin. The circumstances that lead people to feel like their only option is the streets and gangs and drugs. That means reversing the generations of inequity, a poverty lack of hope and despair. Now, the mayor's office says the all hands on deck. Approach means not just police, but also partnering with Community Organizations that mediate conflict and interrupt violence on the streets. Now we spoke with one organization. It's called the target Area Development Corporation. They work here in Auburn Gresham. They say they've got their own strategy for how to disrupt violence this weekend. Public San focused on the house box and stuff. Try and. Jerry yes, and be visible at all times pick. Thing is to try and distract them from the norm with they normally do. So we, we will be barbecuing. Whatever we can do to take command set off what they normally do. Where they end up in trouble buys end up. have. Now back here at Saint by I mentioned. It's been a busy day. That's because here in the parking lot. Community organizations partnered with Molina healthcare to give away food to about five hundred families, additionally core or community organized relief effort. That's the one founded by actor. Sean Penn provided a mobile testing site for Covid nineteen with Dr up testing. So. Again Internet. Going to work. The pandemic started saying. He i. Is wanted on tests. AC-. I have run short. You know my frigerator is like really empty. So as it's only me say I've been unemployed since March so. unemployment is screwing around with yourself like I. Say every thing, help everything I, appreciate a really appreciate it. Now Paris when you were here back in April, one of the concerns that you heard from elected officials at the time was that there was not enough testing in this community that was considered to be a covid nineteen hotspot. For! The Corona virus that there wasn't enough of that being done. Clearly, there's more testing being done in this community now. We're going to have a little bit more on that coming up later on in the broadcast. All Right? Thanks brass always great to see how that community comes together. Let's hope for a peaceful weekend and we'll see you in just a bit. Only governor Jay pritzker takes a win and a loss in court as separate judges make opposite rulings on his executive actions during the coronavirus pandemic Amanda finicky joins us now with the latest Amanda. What the latest on this! Well, Paris will the bad news for Pritzker first and that is that a judge in downstate Lake County afternoon ruled that the governor exceeded his authority by issuing consecutive executive orders in response to Covid nineteen republican state representative. Darren Bailey who brought the lawsuit against the governor called it a victory for Illinois. It feels awesome because this is freedom. Freedom. I don't get. He explains it so perfectly well that we don't allow one person governor Jay Pritzker. That has never in his life been here. It's disastrous, so that alone suggest to me that somebody does not know what they are doing, and that they desire totalitarian rule. That's honestly that's what we are experiencing, and it's time to say no more. Just what the impact of this cases depends on who you talk to, the judges ruled that any covid nineteen related executive order issued after April is buoyed is if it never existed? The court declares defendant had no Illinois Constitutional Authority as Governor to restrict citizens, movement or activities, and or forcibly close business premises. The court order reads here's Bailey's attorney. So as we stand here today, any executive order the out there one of them that comes to mind with me as one of the most recent that limits, the occupancy of the people can have their businesses. That's gone as we stand here right now. They don't have as of right now. Is We stand here? But the attorney general isn't giving an interpretation in a statement. The office said only we are reviewing the decision and evaluating our options. The governor's office does have an opinion. No, and that is that his executive orders still stand there. Say is what God Illinois to the point where it's doing better than other states in the Midwest, in terms of having a lower covid, nineteen positivity rate, but we the. The PRESCRIP- ministration sees it nothing in the Clay County judge's order. Trump's the various other court decisions related to how the governor has used his authority during the pandemic, including the other case that came down today and this one pritzker one. It was in federal court. The Illinois Republican Party had sued arguing that as a political party. It should be able to meet without limitation similar to the rules that. That govern were a religious gatherings, but in her order US District Judge Sarah. Ellis wrote that granting the GOP. The relief that it's seeking would pose serious. Health rests the current state of our nation demands that we sacrifice the benefits of person interactions for the greater good enjoying your would risk infections amongst members of the Illinois Republican Party and its regional affiliates as well as their families, friends, neighbors and and Co, Workers Palace wrote now briefly want to add that regardless of this court back and forth. Local governments do have the ability to continue to impose their own restrictions, so all Chicago is doing that still stands now as these court back and forth. That's not the only battle that governor Pritzker has on his hand. If you dare to stray from channel eleven, you may see this ad on TV. pritzker ripped out his toilets dodge paying property taxes. Investigators called it a scheme to defraud taxpayers. Now pritzker is scheming again I. HE raised taxes on gas cars an online shopping. Then he had his for by a dark money. Super Pac called Illinois rising action. We do know that it is run by folks with the Felicien two GOP. Good Star, a billionaire who has plenty of his own money to hit back with his own ads. Well, you did just that. Caesar, said it's great for the same Republican Group Raju you Donald Trump, but why are they attacking governor Pritzker because he's calling out the president's failed leadership. Don't believe their lies. Spot goes on to praise the PRITZKER. Leadership particularly sends covid nineteen arrived. The governor's senior Political Adviser told me that these Illinois rising ads were a blatant hit in. You weren't going to let those lies. Go unanswered. Mind you while there is an election in November prisoner himself is not on the ballot, but one of his signature initiatives is. This is one that would change the State Constitution Moving Illinois to a graduated income tax structure now due to the corona virus, November's election is going to be different, no matter what expect a huge. Huge effort to get voters to cast their ballots by mail. There may also be more third party or independent candidates on the ballot, and here's why Illinois makes it really hard for candidates to run, unless they're doing it under the mantle of the Republican or the Democratic Party's, but the Libertarian and green parties head filed a lawsuit in court saying that during the coronavirus. It's hard to get signatures. He can't very well go door to door and talk to people, so they one meaning. It's easier for them to get on the ballot. Rosalie the democracy world. Very bad it was. One of the candidates aiming to get on that November village, well-heeled sounds familiar Willie Wilson today officially declared that he is running for the US Senate. He'll be running as the leader of a new party that he has done the Willie Wilson Party. Now. I'm anti US Senate. I use my element. So Gary No conflicts that people. I don't know what what the US senator make. Whatever paycheck that is, I'll give it away to the community. Wilson says he does believe reparations, but he is not necessarily all four. What the black lives matter movement is asking nonetheless, he says he believes incumbent US Senator Dick Durbin and other Democrats have taken black and Brown communities in voters for granted also in that race. Republican Mark Kerlin Harris back to you all right, thank you so much and up next. How our movie theater's reopening during phase four. We hear from some industry leaders about what precautions they're taking. CHICAGO. Tonight is made possible in part by allstate. ALLSTATE is investing in Chicago's youth. We believe good starts young. That's why we're helping our youth. Develop the skills. They need to achieve success in life. allstate is proud to empower the next generation of leaders. For many, it seems like the last few months have been like living in a bad movie, but now some local movie theaters are welcoming fans back in the buy some popcorn, and to watch an actual filled on the big screen. More are scheduled to open this weekend and large chains are saying they'll be ready for audiences later this month, but is it safe and we'll audiences come out to sit in the dark with strangers as the pandemic moves forward joining us with more are Chris Johnson owner CEO of classic cinemas, a local theater chain and Ryan Oh strike general manager of the music box theatre an independent movie House on Chicago's Northside Gentlemen. Thank you so much for here. Chris Johnson, I wanNA start with you. classic cinemas been open for about a week. Is it safe to go to the movies? Absolutely And I think that once you go in, I think the proof is in the pudding. You'll see all the precautions and everything that we've done and. I think you'll feel very safe. Ryan Oh strike. What are some of the precautions taken at the music box? Plenty of precautions mass, Sir absolutely required Our staff will have them as well including gloves everything will be wiped down with frequency. The movie theaters will be The showtimes will be staggered so basically we can air out the house lately between shows and Queen down all the US seats We're just taking a lot of precautions in terms of anything that could be cleaned or could be done by the CDC, the State of Illinois or the city of Chicago guidelines. You're absolutely taking them. Just our staff and customers go safety movie theater. In Chris Johnson. You operate a local chain. There's eleven theaters as I understand. Two of them Tivoli and the Oak Park Lake. Theater are not open. Have you seen patrons coming back in numbers that you want to see? They have been coming back actually last Friday. We had kind of doozy gas to open, but In all candor, not in the numbers that you know that that give me excited and so yeah, it's a it's. It's hard to sort of way the expense of operating with. Implementing all the increase protocols at the same time with a reduced box office which. is in part because of the. Lack of. Product and a little bit on the capacity side as well and Ryan Oh strike. What are the innovative ways? The music box has been able to stay afloat over the last three months during this shutdown. You're joining us right now from your outdoor garden theater. Yes so we We try to just about just about everything. We have done concessions to go orders. We did a music box garage sale. Where ninety-year-old venue so or could imagine all of the old things we could find that he would love to own including some of these reels old thirty-five in sixteen millimeter reels. We've done a lot of virtual cinema, which basically is US getting new movies where our customers can stay at home and stay safe there we in that since the shutdown and then we opened up the. The garden big, which is an outdoor space kind of a secret space? We don't want it to be a secret. More people should know about it because we have a lounge are and we'd been showing movies in the garden. People love it. They can be outdo- outdoors on a lovely June or July evening and watch a movie last weekend. It was a purple rain this weekend. It's going to be a nineties or movie called. I know what you did last summer I do remember that one and I assume you're not selling that classic pump organ. Although I'm sure you could get a lot of for that Chris. Johnson you alluded to this earlier I've been so lost in the news I have no idea what's going on in the movie industry. What are the movies that are out right now? Well there there are no new movies out right now. So the you know. All the all the movies were playing our throwback. Or movies that were in theater prior to the shutdown. So you know there's. For instance, I should have this all I. Think I think this week. Deadpool is one of the big movies we did. Play trolls, which you know for families, though family families that it was supposed to be released in April you pick that up and. You know we'll be playing empire strikes back next week, and we're just doing just a host of of sort of different demographics and John Russia's, but most of the films are. Movies that you've absolutely heard of before, probably a little different than. Actually at the music box. I mean they have a little bit more ECLECTIC. Palette so You know trying to hit both sides of at least. Yeah what about that, Ryan? You've always had an ECLECTIC schedule at the music box with some indie new films and some classic old films. Is that what you're doing now? It's that's exactly what we're know. Exactly what reopening with we actually surveyed our customers. Ask them you know when you're ready to come back. What sort of things would you like to see? Also you know. What what what would you be excited about? Seventy millimeter is always something high on the list of folks we. We were Pop. We were suspended reclosed in our seventy. Or reopening with seventy millimeter with two thousand, one, a space odyssey, and then we'll be going to to go next week. Suppose these will get week long runs, and then we'll have some new indie films in our smaller theatre. We're going to have a good trouble. The John Lewis Documentary of Lang for a couple of weeks, and then we have a new independently named for movie coming up after that, so yeah, it'll be the mix of what you know from the music. Music box by start big, bright, seventy millimeter, big temporary screen in the big house. You'll only be one of fifty, but you'll probably be socially distanced twenty five feet away from any other the else, because it's such a large auditorium, but it will be a great experience. Come out absolutely. That is a giant auditorium in the big movie theater chain around the country. They say they plan to reopen by July thirtieth, so here's what cinemark CEO Mark Zadie had to say about that. cinemark were thrilled to once again. Welcome you to a shared immersive experience as we begin the phased reopening of our theaters. There's nothing quite as powerful as cinematic storytelling on the big screen. And we wanted to ensure the time was right before we reopened our doors. Chris Johnson so you see the big chains. They're gonNA come back, but as you look at Covadonga, exploding especially across. South and South Western states. Is there worry that this reopenings to be temporary? Absolutely. You know. The one thing the virus. Really doesn't care about what we're looking to do. And you know the other part that also herds is that even though Illinois looks like to you know to be in pretty good shape if you're la aren't in the picture that the new releases. Could be bombed again and so that's that's our. That's our big concern. Absolutely rhino striking. You know the music box small independent theatre. How long can it go with reduced capacity? How long can it be financially solvent? I think right now. We're just trying to break even with the idea that at some point will. Be Able to have more than fifty people in our main eater. or find other revenue streams to keep us going five I don't have a I. Don't have a magic. All the look into Intel you at what point? It just becomes too much for us. I know right now or Rather than ICE. It's not it's a grim picture for us, but we're going to try to make this work and we're gonNA. Try to be a good steward for our industry in for the movie theater business in general and we'll help. It's a happy ending I want thank you both Chris Johnson and Ryan Strike for joining us. We check back in with Brandis. WHO's live in Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood, but first a look at the weather. Still to come on Chicago tonight. Some colleges are doing away with the act and sat year others good. There are lots of things that should be lost to history, but this beer is not one of them. A landmark Chicago. Beer is back in production. And a story of a clash between women's suffrage is an anti lynching. Activists in ask Jeffrey. But first we check back in with Brandon Friedman who's co anchoring in Chicago's Auburn Gresham Neighborhood Brandis. Paris, so we're joined now by Todd. Bellcore with social change, one of the organizations that helped organize the food giveaway that we saw here at Saint. Sabina this afternoon. tied thanks for joining us I tell us about social change. What is your mission? SOCIAL CHANGES COMMITTED TO LIBERATION DO Policy Action Direct Action like you saw today we're meeting the needs community members, but providing food, but also going out and telling stories through film and other mechanisms, more people understand the struggles of peoples worldwide. You, you also saw you. Guys had enough food today to give away to five hundred families. There was the pop up testing site or Or the mobile testing site next stories well What does the turn turn out that you saw today? Tell you about the need in the community. The turnout was both hardening heartbreaking, hardening that we had opportunity to plan an event where organizations business leaders able to come together and provide food to meet the need, but also heartbreaking that it's clear that the the needs tremendous because we had a three hour event in half the time, five hundred families with the school was distributed and we had to tell people came as early as fifteen and an event is supposed to go to four. We're out and we're sorry to hear. The relay that, but that's the fact that there's so much need. We can't necessarily always meet it as Kobe and other issues in the city. What are you hearing about? You know Gresham and the need here. What? What folks? Unemployment record highs I mean people are absolutely living in fear, not just of the police, but also fear of leaving their doorstep, and how to keep food on the table and fear roof over their heads, and there's so many different needs air competing, but the very least we can respond by putting together something to make sure people had food D- And something for the holiday weekend. Keep them over the grill and bring people together, but the date is much more. Systemic problems were also working at the attack. Let's social change by changing policy and beyond. The, mayor and her police superintendent. They're deploying twelve hundred cops over the course of the weekend but at the same time you know, she acknowledges that the violence that we experience the result of systemic racism, poverty and inequity. How would you rate her response to I mean to a lot. That's going on right now. To this moment I think to have twelve hundred police officers Khan is a continuation Chicago's tradition of investing incarceration versus liberation, and what I mean by that there's too many people are communities. Who Truly on free right now. Now if you're if you're worried about your public safety, if you're worried about food, whereabout shelter, that's that's not freedom, so I think the one hundred thirty million. We invest in in overtime for police very even two and a half million over this weekend. To make sure there's more police on the streets that was all radically invested in liberating, our community, providing quality education access to true opportunity second chances business investment then we wouldn't have to worry about the same response violence that we do in the south and West sides right now at. Violence Prevention Strategy in Chicago and South West side mirrored that of lake, forest, or really villager Lincoln Parking. We wouldn't have the same problems when I mean by that is. There is no violence prevention strategies there because there's a super saturation of opportunity everywhere you go is opportunity to better yourself to get a job to be in a position to do something for yourself and your family given that violence outlier there versus an expectation as it is here, and that's should work to cultivate by investing and having that reality on the south and West Sides Chicago. Tell me a little bit about what social change does to that end right the legislation that you all work on that's right, so we work on removing the barriers there usually impacting people's ability to own a bit businesses put themselves in a position to further education working at a piece of legislation that passed recently to ensure people had more access to grants within the context of getting secondary education, working on a successfully passing legislation to ensure more people who have criminal histories were able to get occupational licenses, so they could start business the physician take care of themselves and their families, but also trying to modify criminal justice. At the end of the day I mean the people being over police. They're not having an opportunity to really had the margin for error. That's necessary just a function and you understand that we're not meaningful, second and second chances for people. We need to make sure that their first blush along. forcement is one that's positive in instill stress versus field, and right now that's happened either advocating for the reinvestment of the money. That's being put into things like. Into actually building significant community bridges between communities and the police. So there is a trust and mechanisms to commute is going to have more say over how they're being police interacting with the police and we've got about twenty seconds left. Tell me a little bit about how the work that you do with lobbying and legislation how that works in tandem with the work that we saw here tonight with marches and rallies like this one absolutely marches rallies critical for making sure the public is aware of what's going on and make sure people understand the pain. The heartbreak and point is prayerfully. Conscious of people who are otherwise I'm paying attention are engaged and get them more engaged, so they can use their influence their time and their opportunities fracture to make sure there's more opportunities to change legislation systems responsible for grading these injustices that we experience and I'm sure we'll be seeing the folks. We just saw marching to the neighborhood I. Todd Bellcore Social Change. Thank you so much for joining us up to. You NPR's. We're GONNA. Send you back to you. All Right Branson we'll check back in with you in just a bit and up next some universities are deciding to forego act and sat scores due to the pandemic, but some advocates WANNA. Make that a permanent decision or on that right after this. Chicago tonight is made possible in part through the generous support of Julius Frankel Foundation. Standardized College entrance tests like the Act and sat may soon be a thing of the past more than half of all us. Colleges and universities have dropped the requirement for act and sat scores due to the pandemic, and while some are doing it just for this upcoming academic year there's a growing trend of opting out of the requirement altogether and joining us with more are Veronica. How add the deputy director of admissions at the University of Chicago and Kevin Brown the vice provost for academic and enrollment services at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Welcome both of you to Chicago tonight. I Kevin Your School is one of the schools canceling the test because of the pandemic. What brought you to that decision? We actually to save for twenty one giving. The exams. We're going to wave the requirements for all of twenty one. We're GONNA take this year and look at the results of that is still requirement for missions going forward or making a test optional. There are some students who can use it to better, their academic records, and for those students who can't get the exam. We don't want to hold them. To a standard, they can't meet at this point. White massive numbers of exams have been canceled, and we just want to get that level of confusion, their table at this point and Veronica the U. OF C. has not been requiring these exams since two thousand eighteen. So, what is the argument against using these exams? Cracked, we went out on. Eighteen is part of our empower initiative? I think colleges especially admissions offices we regularly. Assess access right access to higher access to this process, and for many different types of students, even in a normal year access to testing in the ability for on testing is a barrier. So why not remove? Barriers for students if they really perceived if it's a barrier to them as iron to college. A change the student body at all or the kind of students that year admitting. We have seen in the last two years, a more diverse applicant pool in every way more students of color in the pool, more first generation students whose parents don't have college degrees. More veterans, more students role areas. You name it. We've seen more diverse applicants wall, and when you have Gordon first half of your emissions on all, you're asking me more diverse, so we see in the same in our student body. More diverse class comes in two tests optional. And Kevin you said the. Will still use the test in coming years? What is the argument? For keeping the tests. So, there are some students who do well in exams. I was not one of them I. Would never give me into the University of Chicago. My grade point average might so we use the exam to allow students to demonstrate their excellence and their preparedness for universities to their advantage in the next year, students can still cement exams results if they're available to bolster their case. Where the only industrialized nation in the world without a national secondary school leaving exam and to some extent. Is Way equalizing out grades from across the country across forty nine different other systems, other than on I and nearly million high schools, so we want to be able to have it as a tool. We've had programs for the last five years. Where you're in the top four percent of an Illinois, high school we met you test score blind, because we know you demonstrated the work in your school in were much more concerned about what you've done over four years and y you name Don over two or three hours Veronica. Typically, how much weight has been given to these tests related to GPA or extracurricular activity or an essay? Dependent type of institution for us like you, Chicago. Ruin the college admissions process be read applications holistically at means. That testing is just one art a several. Incident that can tell you even just on the academic student prepared. For Rigor eligible writing thinking. There are schools were feature more prominently if they have a different formula for citing gets an doesn't but for any school like you. Chicago ballistic admissions means at all. It's one of several times and Kevin. You know, you mentioned. The test is kind of an equaliser, although there are whole industries of test, prep, classes and books. You know if you don't have the resources to engage in that kind of prep. Does it limit? Students that could be could good candidates for you, you I see. Exactly, right so the intent is to use it to the students advantaged, but again giving much much more weight in our holistic review to the grades, and the SAT act, allowing students shines from those exams to do so, and for those eight can't or don't. We can look at letters. Recommendation extracurricular activities leadership opportunities their role in a home how they've been able to demonstrate success in context with their school, so has always been a small part of it, but has been a factor, and for the next year won't even play a factor unless they chose to bring to us. Veronica d'you, think more colleges and higher education institutions should do away with act and sat or is this just something specific to you? I U of see you think it's good for them and other colleges should make their own decision. Think every college has to make its own decision. Very different places I. do think something to descended for learning to tests when you have those resources in time. In their whole professionals built off of testing at every. Test. Are there ways in which many schools can improve their admissions process do broadly by other things that also show baroness, yes? But every college will have to make that decision. Glad we were able to make that decision, but it's coming to that point. Where now everyone is being forced. Make that decision on mobile. We see of data and results for the next two three years. Now tell colleges a lot about how? I'm sure that'll be analyzed all right. We're out of time. I want to thank Veronica how it and Kevin Brown. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you. When it comes to mid West Beer. Brewing Chicago tends to get overshadowed by neighbors like Saint Louis and the walkie, but the production, and of course consumption of beer has always been a vital part of the city's economic and social life, and now the revival of popular Chicago beer aims to prove that Chicago tonight producer Quinn Myers has more on the old and now new Conrad Sipe Brewing Company. For more than a decade, the former Michael Reese Hospital site and nearby truck lot have sat in limbo, waiting for possible revival as a mixed use, development, or maybe the future Chicago Casino, but before all of that the Brownsville plot was home to the Conrad's Sipe Brewing Company at one time, the largest brewer in the United States in the eighteen seventies believe it was the end of the eighteen seventies. He was the number one beer producer in America. And I think the numbers have been shown to be upwards of two hundred and fifty thousand barrels of beer. Per Year by the end of the nineteenth century, which for anyone who Bruce Beer? That's a lot of beer. Lauren Mack is the great great great. That's three grades. Granddaughter of Conrad Sipe Himself a German immigrant who came to Chicago in the eighteen fifties over the next few decades he would turn out German style beers for thirsty chicagoans and people across the country growing his business exponentially. Max says safe success. In the late nineteenth century came from a combination of hard work, ingenuity, and some good luck sipe was one of the few breweries that did not burn down. During the great fire of eighteen seventy one, it was outside of the fire line so certainly not good luck for the city that the so much of the city burned, but from the point of view of ruin capacity. He was able to keep brewing during a time when the city really needed beer to feed its workers and to keep the city. Quenched as they rebuilt, the brewery would eventually close in the early nineteen thirties, but a few years ago, Max started toying with an idea. What if she brought back? The Conrad Site Brewing Company? She had heard so much about it growing up, but had never been able to taste her family's beer. Through a connection at the Chicago bruisers. Mac linked up metropolitan brewing a northside craft brewery together. They've spent the past year. Reviving sites extra Pale pills ner one of the brand's top sellers now almost eight century since the brewery closed, chicagoans once again be able to SIP SIPE Speier. Metropolitan Owners Tracy and Doug hearst safer them working on these sites project made perfect sense for one thing they specialize in making German style lagers, and they were also attracted to local history. What I thought was really exciting about the project is Conrad sites descendant female descendant. Lauren Mack was heading up the project. Craft beer like a lot of industries in our culture. Doesn't really feature enough women so the fact that she was up. This project made it really exciting for me. There wasn't an exact recipe for the extra pale available, so they relied on hints from old notes and records bullied by Doug's extensive knowledge of broiling German lagers. There was not a lot of information about the recipes and so forth. So then I had to go back and look at pre pro so-called pre prohibition lager pills, nurse and we think about Miller and Budweiser today the beer that they making in many other breweries like them before prohibition was a little bit different, it was stronger. In flavor it had more hops in it but it's still used a corn or rice like they use today and eighty seven years after the original sites was shuttered, and after hearing about the beer for her whole life Mac finally was able to try to be able to taste something that he would have tasted to be able to bring back something from history that he created. It was just a very poignant moment for me. I feel very lucky that that I get to hold that memory and I always will. FOUR CHICAGO TONIGHT! I'm Quinn Myers. You can drink sites extra pale pills near right now. At Metropolitan Brewing's taproom could also be available next week and select Chicago stores and bars, and now we go back with a check back in with Brandon Friedman in Chicago's Auburn Gresham Neighborhood Brandis. Parents this time we've got Carlos Nelson. He's with the Greater Auburn. Gresham Community Development Corporation Carlos. Thank you again for joining US problem for having of course so back in April. When Paris was here, you a number of elected officials from this community. You all were very angry about how covert nineteen was being managed here at the time. How's IT being? Being held handled now managed now, absolutely backed in our community was being ravaged by covert nineteen. We had no testing sites where little a attention to or access health and wellness, and since then the mayor's Office of Racial Equity and rapid response team that she put together has really helped us to a tip to overwhelmed the virus, and so we've been. Improving substantially here in Auburn, Gresham community now today we saw there was a a mobile testing site right here in this parking lot across the street about a block over there is another testing site that was close today. How has How has the the pandemic kind of exposed the health disparities? That already existed. Oh, absolutely well. That's what was so painful. You know about this this pandemic, and how it affected our community. We've known all along that This community has been health and wellness desert. The fact that we were all screaming for a testing site in this community where the very first death in the state of Illinois occurred just two, and a half blocks from where we're standing was was really a travesty and so We now have friend health. Health supported by University of Chicago. Providing free testing. We've had more than a thousand tests perform at that testing site that we've stood up and now we've implemented mobile testing to address the large numbers of residents in congregants centers, so things are on the on the uptick. How would you say that health disparities though have been exposed people in lower income communities, people of Color Yeah absolutely well, so we've not had access to access to health care in this community the nearest little miles miles away Few clinics in the community and You know it was just time to address these health disparities, which is why? Our. Organization led by community have been fighting to get a full service. Health Center built here in Auburn Gresham. you also received four million dollars in funding this week from the city's Invest Southwest Program. How's that going to be used less exciting news and because we fought to get a full service health center, the Mayor's Office recognized that the cares act. Funding was there to support covid nineteen. Our health center was part of our recovery effort, so that money will be. Be Used to build out at full service health center to build out the Auburn Gresham healthy lifestyle hub at eight thirty nine West. Seventy Ninth Street just steps away from Sunday night in Halston kind of services, can community expect to receive their? It's gotta be really exciting. We're expecting groundbreaking sometime within the next few months, but you'll be able to get access. Access to not not only general healthcare services mental health services oral health services. We also have a sit down restaurant that has an offering four vegan vegetarian and those that enjoy seafood as well. It's Mickey's Retro Grill and African American owned restaurant. It's also a digital community center community center within that building that building once fully completed. We'll have up to one hundred. Hundred, two hundred and fifty living wage jobs in that building right near seventy nights in Halston before I. Let you go, you know. I saw a walgreens on the corner over here still boarded up though it is open How would you say businesses have been recovering these last few weeks? Oh, it's been a very slow recovery The Wa- group watching the Walgreens. you know almost burned down CVs. Pharmacy closed up to save. A lot closed up. Many other businesses as were were destroyed. It's been a very slow recovery and it's and we. We pinot penalized ourselves now. We have literally no access to pharmacies or groceries. Thank God. Walgreens has stood up this mobile testing site or so. Mobile, pharmacy, absolutely okay Carlos Nelson. Thank you again for joining us best of luck to you. Thank you. NPR's will be wrap it up with you in just a little bit for now I'm GonNa. Send it back to you in the studio brass. Please tell Carlos I say it's great to see him and I know he's been fighting for that health center for a long time. All right and we're back with some history behind fighting for women's rights to vote in an all new. Ask Jeffrey right after this. Ask Jeffrey is made possible in part by be Mo Harris Bank. While you ready. Let me. Just grab my Wad. I've seen this before. Wallet Way too big skinny jeans skinny just. That the break somethingyoushouldknow you don't actually need. A wallet would be Harris. Can just take cash out with your phone or if you need to, you can pay them with Zell that works. Stuck, aren't you smile? Those genes are way too tight that feeling when no wallet is no big deal. That's the beam fact. Twenty, twenty one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, which secured women's right to vote a major two part PBS documentary called. The vote chronicles the long fight for women's suffrage. You can catch it next week on WTT. W on Monday and Tuesday and here's a clip. The textbooks when I went to school, said women were given the boat. GIVEN ANYTHING! We took it. You had five thousand women marching down Pennsylvania Avenue and surrounding. Were hundred thousand men many of them. Assaulted the marchers and seven hundred of them to the hospital. Alice Paul is an absolute force of nature she's impatient and confrontational. People felt the WHO's going to import militant tactics. Black women have a stake in this question. They see it as part of a larger struggle for racial justice. So those very frightened, the senator from Mississippi said there'll be the voice of you. Get the vote. But there's an untold part of this suffrage story, and it centers on Chicago Jeffrey Bayer is here to tell us about it. In this edition of ask Geoffrey Geoffrey great to see you again. See Uber's okay. So what is this untold story? Well it's a dramatic and frankly sad by between tooth, famous champions of social justice. Chicago's is wells and Evanston Frances Willard. At its center of attention of between suffrage crusaders on the one side. And, those fighting for black citizenship and voting rights, civil war on the other side of each group felt that it's caused should take precedence because fighting for both causes was just too much radical change for the country to accept all right, so you have these two causes how to either be wells and Francis Willard play into this. Well Frances. Willard Women's suffrage burst. She was the former dean of women at northwestern, university, and in Eighteen, seventy nine, she became president of the women's Christian temperance. Union which was a worldwide organization dedicated outlying alcoholic beverages. Under Willard's leadership at W sue grew into the largest organization of women in the nineteen central. Now Willard felt that women got the vote. They would be seen to passing a constitutional amendment prohibiting alcohol. Of course I to be wells, is the famous journalists civil rights leader and founding member of the W the N., double ACP, yes, and in fact this past day on, she was posthumously awarded of surprise or her word. Famous Leagues Exposing the horrors of Lynching in south right, and it seems like these two women might have a lot in common. So, what was dispute right? So the unfortunately the conflict between will or wells erupted in one, thousand, nine, hundred two after. Willard made racist statements in an interview with the New York newspaper while touring south of in that article, she implied that black men were a threat to white women. That was the very sentiment that Lynch's used to justify the murders. Willard was quoted as saying the colored race multiplies like locusts of Egypt, the same the of women of childhood. Home is menaced. Localities at this moment, something I didn't know about her. So what? What did Willard have to gain by making such racist statements? Well I to be well Saudis Oracle statements by Francis Willard as a cynical effort to win over southern whites because. She said that Willard had quote unhesitatingly slandered the entire Negro. In order to gain favor with those who are hanging shooting and burning Negroes alive Willard react to defensively. It's called Wells' characterization of Berms absurd and untrue, and she even suggested that wells would lose support for her. 'cause resolve wells in back saying. Mr Willard is no better or no worse than the great all complete American Negro question they are all afraid to speak out. And this war of words continued in the press months. Ultimately, the pressure was really on Willard to take a public stand against lynching. In the wake of this dispute, the WCTC, you indeed did put forward multiple anti lynching positions, and even a resolution that was finally passed at a convention in two nine five, but by that point Willie was already in poor health. She died in eighteen, Ninety, eight, hundred, fifty eight years old, and her legacy really was clouded by this clash. Wells of course, continue to fight racism and injustice for another more than thirty years still long after Francis Willard's death. Wells continued to be ill-treated by the suffrage movement. There's one incident in particular. That's covered in this pdf documentary. That was shown next week. Hauge photo of this took place in nineteen thirteen and women's march in Washington. DC organized by suffrage leader named Alice Paul who invited them all women's March, but take a look at what happened. Eager to mobilize African American women. Wells recently had founded the suffrage club the first black suffrage organization in Chicago. And she intended to represent it in Allah's Paul's Parade. Alice Paul had every expectation that African American women would March African American women had marched in the New York parade. And she had already reached out to African Americans encouraging them to think about marching. She was quickly disillusioned. That was a good idea when some of the Washington. Women came to her and said that that simply was not acceptable. So Jeffrey, I have to know how the story ends. Well the marches organizers caved in to demands, did segregate the march, but I e wells. She was undeterred halfway through the march. She emerged Yada crowder drunk in male spectators and triumphantly replace at the Front of the Illinois delegation, and so we'll we see this story of the dispute between Francis Willard and either be wells in this upcoming PBS documentary. No actually it's not in there and infect. Willard isn't even mentioned at all, but the story of their conflict is documented in an excellent online exhibit from the Frances Willard. House Museum and Archives in Evanston. They worked in collaboration scholars Western University and Loyola University. Chicago and we've put a link to that into other resources on our website all right. It's a fascinating history Jeffrey. Thank you so much. And again you can catch the PBS documentary vote. This Monday and Tuesday at nine pm on WTT W and don't forget that you can visit our website for more details and find previous questions answered by Jeffrey Bayer and even some at your own. That's at www dot com slash news. And we're joined again by Brandis Friedman. Who spent the day reporting in Auburn? Gresham on the city's south side British spoke to some business owners today. What's the economic recovery looking like over there? We'll embarrass I spoke to a few community members more than that. You know I. Heard from Father Pfleger as well as the outreach workers that I spoke with a lot of them. Say you know the businesses are very slow to come back, not just the ones that are locally owned because even when you drive through the neighborhood, you can see that so many of them are still boarded up many of them with signs painted outside that say that their businesses black owned hoping to deter any of those who might want to inflict some property damage, and you just heard from Carlos. Nelson. WHO said it as well businesses or slow to come back even? Father Pfleger tells me that The Bank of America is is still closed down. So I think there's. A lack of access to certain services that a lot of residents here experiencing embarrass you know we're into our fourth week sees me one week of phase four. What are you going to be looking out for? Like you are the businesses you know. There have been reports of packed bars and restaurants going well beyond the capacity that they're supposed to, and you've seen you know states like New Jersey all of a sudden go back on the whole indoor dining. Things so is Chicago. Illinois going to do that? I will know more about that next week. No indication yet, but you know things seem to be going in a certain direction. Anyway. Brennan's thank you so much and a note before we go a long time member. Chicago tonight team is calling it a career and a great career at that Tom, Seagal has been an outstanding cameraman and I don't even recognize you there and Tom Wow. You Look Great. At www for thirty six years in addition to Chicago tonight. He's worked on award. Winning programs documentaries too numerous to mention here, Tom? Thank you for all the great work and enjoy. Your well deserved retirement. We're sure GONNA. Miss you here. And that is our show for this Thursday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing, and you can get Chicago tonight streamed on facebook Youtube and our website. WWW DOT com slash news. You can also get the show via podcast and the PBS VIDEO APP and please join us tomorrow night at seven four the weekend review. And now for all of us here, Chicago tonight I'm parachutes. And I'm Brandon Friedman much for watching. Stay safe and healthy and have a good night. Closed captioning is made possible by Robert. Clifford and Clifford law offices, a Chicago personal injury and wrongful death, for that is proud of its partners named Illinois leading lawyers by the Law Bulletin Publishing Company of Chicago.

Chicago Illinois Paris Jeffrey Bayer University of Chicago US Chris Johnson Auburn Gresham neighborhood governor Pritzker Ryan Strike Brandis Friedman Illinois Republican Party Veronica Chicago Police Department Auburn Gresham Kevin Brown baseball Auburn Gresham Frances Willard Auburn Gresham Neighborhood Br
February 2, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:47 min | 5 months ago

February 2, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. Brandis friedman parachutes will join us later in the program on the show tonight leader schumer and speaker pelosi both said they would also like it to be bipartisan. President joe biden looks for. Gop support on his stimulus. Plan here from local congressman on relief aid and more. We made it works. We're gonna make it work strikes still possible for chicago public school teachers. But how are other area districts handling Nineteen a check in on their return to school. Plans a look at how nursing homes are faring with covid nineteen vaccine distribution no break from winter. This groundhog day weeks. Blame the weather system. That's expected to bring highs in the single digits this coming weekend dream of just brawl will be deferred no longer. The biden administration releases is racial equity agenda. The leaders of both chicago and national urban league way in everything here almost speaks to some element of puerto rican culture are of latino culture and a business incubator in humboldt park is working to preserve the neighborhoods puerto rican culture but first some of today's top stories chicagoans frustrated with trying to schedule covid nineteen vaccine appointments might be glad the city is partnering with online scheduling platform. Zach dock in an effort to make it easier one of the biggest concerns that we've heard from people is i m having to do a lot of work to find vaccine appointments but where we do have publicly available appointments. We wanted to create it technology based partnership that would it easier chicago. Health officials say the free resources for eligible people who can't get the vaccine through a doctor pharmacy or employer. It'll allow them to access. Vaccination sites operated by the city and through healthcare providers like erie. Family health or rush. Commissioner dr allison arwady warns though the city supplied the vaccine is still limited for more on how to access the zacks dot website. You can visit our website. Meanwhile the state reports more than twenty three hundred new cases of the coronavirus today and forty-seven deaths the state's total case count since the start of the pandemic more than one million one hundred thirty thousand and nineteen thousand. Three hundred and six people have died. This comes as suburban cook county or region. Ten in the states reopening plan moves into phase four lifting some restrictions but cook county health department says it will follow the lead set by chicago officials last week by maintaining the current limit on indoor drinking and dining at a max of twenty five people or twenty five percent capacity a changing of the guard at city council. Thirty six all jamin gilbert. Vegas is resigning his position. As mayor lori lightfoot floor leader a position he's held since may twenty nineteen via says. The work has pulled him away from his duties as chair of the economic capital and technology development committee where he feels his time is more valuable. Meanwhile the mayor has appointed eighth ward alderman michelle harris as her new floor leader and created the position of deputy floor leader for twelve ward alderman jorge cardenas and it's official chicago's own candace. Parker is leaving the la sparks to join the chicago sky. When you realize how special is little orange bowl and how many journeys and events and memories in relationships that you've established because of it. I really feel they'll special. I left naperville eighteen years old. And now i'm returning at thirty five. I'll be thirty five. When i return and the lessons i've learned being gone have brought me back home the two-time wnba mvp. Who grew up in. Naperville says she wouldn't have left the sparks for any other team but the sky. You can see her here in the two thousand seventeen. Wnba finals parker was defensive player of the year last season. Plus she's a five time all star and the sparks all time leader in scoring blocks and rebounds worker ads. She plans to be an active voice in the community helping address racial inequities and encouraging girls to play sports and not a pair of shuts and details about the president's stimulus proposal with local members of congress. Paris brad is the next round of stimulus. Negotiations are well under way as congress braces for the second impeachment of former president. Donald trump yesterday president joe biden held an oval office meeting with ten republican senators who have proposed a dramatically scaled down stimulus. Effort is compromise. Possible here to talk about that and much more are congresswoman robin kelly a democrat from madison freshman congresswoman. Maria newman democrat from chicago. Southwest side congressman. Bobby rush a democrat from chicago. South side and congressman raja krishnamoorthi a democrat from schaumburg and we should note that we invited every member of the republican illinois congressional delegation. None accepted our invitation tonight. But we do thank you all for joining us and before we start. Let's outline what's in this one point. Nine trillion dollar biden stimulus proposal includes fourteen hundred and fourteen hundred dollar individual checks. Four hundred dollar enhanced unemployment payments money for vaccine distribution and money for state and local governments congressman marine. Newman you saw republicans. Propose about six hundred billion. Dramatically scaled down from the biden proposal. Is there a number less than one. Point nine trillion dollars that would retain democrats support. You know. I think that it would take a lot because most of The democrats thinks that one point nine trillion isn't quite enough so i think that it would be some unusual negotiations. Here's what i think. Is that when you come back and in negotiation and you're coming in less than a third of what was offered to you on a. It's disrespectful offer. Be either not serious at all and see. They don't allow for any money to cities towns and states and counties and therefore they don't care about vaccine distribution. They don't care about mental health services Health care disturbances. Provided at the state local or county level so it was a person in that state and local government. Aid is very important to all of you. A congresswoman kelly outlined specifically. What would be coming to the city of chicago and the state of illinois and their cash-strapped well state would receive not just the state of illinois but they will receive money around vaccines money around transportation and then there's money of course for a vaccine and the city gets their own and it's separate from emma with the state of illinois sees or. Were hoping like what happened last year. Every state city small town large town. They were all supposed to get money last year. And then the spring of this year which of course we got through the house but could not get through the senate so we want to make sure that we're sending money to the states and the municipalities because they've lost so much money because of covert did not getting the the tax money and the revenue that they're used to getting so it's extremely important that we get money to them and get money to them for a transportation needs and republican ship has been against that money for state and local governments. Let's hear a little bit more about that. Meeting the oval office yesterday. Here's what white house press. Secretary jen sacchi had to say about it leader schumer and speaker pelosi of both said they would also like it to be bipartisan. We'll see what comes out of this meeting today. And if there are good ideas to put forward we'll put forward them. There's still time to do exactly that. And even if through the parliamentary process that the congress will decide it moves toward reconciliation. Republicans can still vote for that. And there's certainly precedent of that in the past congressman rush. This reconciliation process has already begun. That's where the senate would need only a simple majority of fifty one votes to pass this instead of a filibuster proof majority of sixty votes so they wouldn't need republicans for this. Is this the right path to go down. Or would it start the biden era off to a hyper partisan start. Think then actions on the house of representatives in a particular. As a result of the january six demarco arrested in ending capital and Was the republican majority of voting of two nine nine to President trump is pretty clear than we have divided government in washington. And frankly i would say that. Reconciliation is the only way we can go lou. I'm in their loneliness to seeing Republicans supposedly negotiating good faith and and then they will get income of is a hell of hells meal. Oh moment hair and in an intimate name moaning against it. So i don't trust the republicans. I think that we have to do what we have to do to the number. Two american people so lessening results of the reconciliation or a way of. I think we need a number us. Congressman chris. What about that. Would you prefer that there be republican votes on this bill or as congressman rush said. Do you prefer that it just gets done A and it's big enough to accomplish what you want it to both. I'd love to have republican votes on this bill. I think we all like it to be bipartisan. But at the end of the day the pandemic is to Serious the healthcare crisis is too grave and our economy is slowing now again and my constituents are demanding that washington step up to the plate and help save the small businesses that are about to close. Still fifty percent of restaurants in illinois are about to close their doors without any more relief Unemployment benefits are about to expire on march fourteenth. Just weeks away and state and local governments. are crying out for aid. I just received a letter from the village of schaumburg saying that year-over-year they've lost A large portion of their sales tax revenues because of the pandemic and. If we don't assist them they are going to lay people off the very people that we need to help with the response to kovin We already had one. Million people laid off across the country in state local government so We need to get results right now. However it's done so clearly to all four that municipal government aid is very important. I want to shift gears for a second talk about safety. On capitol hill after the january. Six insurrection your speaker. Pelosi say quote. The enemy is within there are still a presence of national guard troops in washington including mill annoy congresswoman newman. How safe do you feel in a. Luckily we have this amazing course of national guard. It's men that are watching over us. And i feel safe in terms of them being there i will agree with speaker pelosi that there are some folks that i don't feel safe around and i'll be very clear because Were asking her to either resign. Be taken off the Educational labor committee and actually her office. mark retailer green so many talking about sheep readily from her said. Some incredibly incredibly a hateful things. She's acted as a white supremacist. She follows cunanan. she has downstream. Said that she's not stable on so her offices directly across from she intimidated corey bush. I just wanna finish the spot She intimidated cord. Bush and i saw the tail end of that corey was right to take her staff and keep them safe. I admire that. I'm not going to move even know. She makes me nervous and i fear for my staff safety. That said It the the leadership is doing everything they can to keep us safe and keep guns off the floor. But i do want to be clear that i agree with that With speaker pelosi that there are folks that should be investigated and if found guilty. They should be expelled night. You you mentioned corey bush a congresswoman from saint louis congresswoman marjorie taylor green from georgia. We're going to get more into her. And what should be done about her in our second seven. We're going to leave it there for now. We'll be joined again. By congress members later in the program to discuss among other things biden's immigration plan and reminder we invited every republican member of the illinois delegation but none accepted our invitation. We do thank representatives. Kelly newman rush and krizner. More the for joining us. Thank you so much everybody and now brandis. We go back to you paris. thank you chicago. Public schools had planned to reopen kindergarten through. Eighth grade classrooms to students. This past monday instead. There is no definitive answer as to win chicago. Public schools will reopen teachers and cps leaders have at least one more day of talks but other schools in the area did reopen some just yesterday. Amanda finicky surveyed several to see how it's going and she joins us now. Amanda brandis anthony. Less evita teaches world history to freshman at morton east. They're currently studying the middle ages difficult topic the black death because it's so close to some of these kids but there's some very very good Comparisons comparisons and contrasts about the way people behave towards it in the way we're behaving towards the today he and other teachers have been her back in their buildings since mid january but mostly without students. We also have office hours where Students were able to come Up to our classrooms. If need be students could also come to the cafeteria to use wi fi but today was the first day that students who wanted could return to their classrooms though this despite misgivings by teachers the district reopening without an agreement prompting the union to file an unfair labor. Practice some ventilation issues that we we are concerns about and still have concerns about and a metric. We want to discuss what what a metric would look like that. Would that would cause the The district return to remote so they're When we did speak earlier today less evita said that he had only three students show up for one period and then one student show up for another period. He said he had the windows open in a fan going. He says that there is nothing that a teacher wants more than to have students in the classroom but he says it has to be safe. Elementary school teachers in cicero had already filed an unfair labor practice and there was a hearing on it today. Union leader. Rachel zito says the district bargained in bad faith. She says cosette has made a big impact in the community. Cicero is a predominantly latino. Lat next Community low income They don't have necessarily the same access to health care as other communities do And cicero has been really hit. Hard by the cova pandemic In the fall we were Twenty five percent positivity rates All across the city among the unions request a metric so that if communities spread of covid nineteen is high. There won't be in person school also bringing in a professional to do a hazard analysis on the ventilation systems. The vaccine may be a game changer. So that's a factor too busy though says now despite that the district did go on with reopening but not all teachers went to school. I am one of the individuals that said now so been teaching from home from the safety of my home Since the beginning of the school year esposito is a junior high language arts teacher and she says that the district has issued warnings to her and two other teachers who have refused to physically return. She is hopeful for a ruling in the union favor that she says she wants hopes will lead to mediation to immutable memo of understanding with the district. Now meanwhile schools in algonquin carpenters. Ville dundee hampshire. That's district three hundred. They've been back since january eleventh now for high school students. It's a hybrid model with some days in school and other days online. We've got some kids that are there on. You know monday and wednesday and others. That are there on tuesday and thursday and then on our elementaries We kept our in person classes size at twenty. But they're back it possible. They're back fulltime of the class. Can't be made smaller than twenty than they might be on a hybrid model to where kids are there some days a week and and synchronous on other days a week and we are doing live in synchronous at the same time which is Hats off to teachers who pull this off because it is. It's like being in two classrooms at the same time. Union leader anteater. Michael williams says the district had to make a lot of other changes to we've had a redo cafeterias with with plastic dividers between where each of the kids set and then depending on the population that comes in you sit them several seats apart from each other is again. it's a very different environment As far as schools go. you know. There's naturally anything you can do to help having a lot of people in a hallway but if you can direct people so they're all going in the same direction and everybody's wearing the masks that they need to wear and they have to be quiet. No chatting talking as much meaning that hallways are not the iraqis places that they were pre pandemic oak park social worker and district ninety seven union co president. Hannah boudreau also says always quiet. They're following rules staying socially distance even gentle reminders when they started to cluster Each other excited to see you this morning. I had to tell a couple girls. Six feet Outsides standard dots. You know nearly all uncertain like they're just great. You know so. Super compliant super cooperative. She says students had been wearing their masks. Following those rules. Since oak park elementary students return to school yesterday elementary is five days a week due to the middle schools being rather large and having a dense population oak park. Each grade level at the middle school has doesn't needed week. Sold first week back was sixth grade this week. Now science teacher larry commodity does teach sixth grade but he could not be there. He has to stay home in quarantine due to close contact with somebody who's tested positive for covid nineteen but he says that that was part of the agreement that the union had worked out with the district's teachers in positions like him would be able to continue to work remotely if they were able with a substitute teacher. Actually in the classroom to monitor the students who are physically there with the person. I'm still with them and i'm still reading the instruction he says it's been exciting for him and for the students as well. Now in old parks case gremaldi says administrators wet and out of their way to work with the union to reach an agreement ensure he says there have been a couple of kings but they are working through it also. He says what helped. Local donors fundraise thousand to by teachers in staff. K n ninety five masks earned expect to you. Amanda thank you and now phil ponce for check. In on vaccine distribution in nursing homes spill brando's first round of covid nineteen vaccinations to annoy nursing homes classified as skilled is now complete and assisted. Living sites are set to finish the first round by february fifteenth. This comes just over a month into the states. Corona virus vaccine distribution too long term care facilities. Which has been criticized for a slow rollout joining us to discuss the state of the pandemic in nursing homes. Are dr rajiv. Kumar the medical director to suburban suburban facilities burgess quarry healthcare and rehab center in westmont and plymouth place in lagrange and tomorrow coach. She's a professor at the university of chicago who studies long term care. Thank you both for joining us professor connecticut. There's been criticism that residents long term care facilities are not getting the vaccines fast enough more than one hundred sixty. Three thousand does had been administered in illinois of the four hundred ninety six thousand allocated. Where do these numbers tell you. I say we can't underestimate. What a dramatically. Good thing it. Is that these vaccines are available is going to really change. What's happening in In long term care nursing homes in particular and insert the horrors of the last year. The rollout whoever has been going slower than expected. I think part of this is the way it was organized. the federal government contracting with two large companies walgreens and cvs to handle the distribution across the country. And that's not a crazy idea. It's good to have some economies of scale and have the same company doing this over and over and that should produce some efficiencies but i think they've probably reached some capacity constraints And so it's just hard to Have enough personnel to get through all the long term care facilities in this country. Dr kumar how. Would you describe the rate of vaccinations in your facilities could have been better I agree with the professor. The challenges saw these vaccines have to be transported and stored at certain temperatures is difficult to do for most operators. That's why the biggest two pharmacy chains. They're chosen but it dead. Impact the rollout for show. Dr kumar. Let me stay with you for a second data from the cdc suggests that Released yesterday show that while. Seventy eight percent of residents offered the vaccine have gotten it about thirty seven point. Thirty seven point. Five percent of staff members offered the vaccine have Dr kumar those rates More or less what. You're seeing in your facilities a little bit higher but you're right about ninety percent for my residents are getting acceded but forty to fifty percent of the staff. It goes back to you know the the decomposition of our staff the front line staff are made up of ethnic minorities and in our country. We've had a long history a iniquitous health and social There was also a history of governmental distrust so all of this combined together with the prevailing miss information that is going around in the community not just in the healthcare And what i missed but generally in the community. A lot of people are questioning these vaccines. So that has flickered down to our healthcare staff as well professor connecticut. This is something you study. How do you convince people who are suspicious of for historical reasons and otherwise of Government vaccines are government sponsored vaccination programs. What do you say. I think it's important to note that The sort of hesitant about getting the vaccine among nursing home staff at least anecdotally because we don't have a lot of data on that's the hesitant is not that they're strongly against vaccines or that they're anti vaccine is in some sense It's just that it's new authorized for emergency use and they're worried about side effects. They're worried About you know having to miss work feel sick getting vaccine and so. I think partly time will solve this. They'll see that other people get the vaccine and that people haven't gotten ill and that it really does help to prevent getting covid which they should be much more worried about. Dr kumar. One of your facilities has completed both of the stages vaccination another one is completed one. Are you seeing any positive results at this point in terms of lower rates and so forth yes hope is revealing. our residents are overjoyed. They know that there's light at the end of the tunnel. They finally get the freedom to go and mingle with their family of course socially distance and asked in practicing would hygiene. But you it is. It is a really good thing that's happening in our communities professor connecticut. Do you see these positive trends. Which despite the slow roll lot. Evidently is is in place Do you see that as a trend that you expect to see continue. We certainly expect dramatic decreases in cases and deaths in nursing homes As the vaccine gets rolled out. I think it's actually. It's still too soon to see that I think it's not too soon for hope but it's too soon to see it in the data Because you know even the nursing home residents have gotten vaccinated often. Haven't gotten their second dose yet and obviously there are still other long term care facilities that need to get vaccinated. But hopefully we'll see a dramatic decline in the numbers. And dr kumar last question for you and that is What do you make of the variants. And how do you expect to handle these variance to the current covid. Nineteen as we know it. It's the nature of the beast. I mean this virus is no to mutate so we have to be prepared for it so far all the data show that the existing maxine do work on most of these mutant strains even if they don't at some point The disease will still be less ruined. If you'll be max it'd so we recommend that everybody get vaccinated as soon as possible. As soon as it's available to bet baby can check this disease. Dr kumar professor can thank you both for joining us. We appreciate it and up next a story of a market business incubator in humbled park. So please stay with us. What can you tell us about how chicago small businesses are doing. These are more than just shopping centers for the community gathering places where they maintain their culture. And there's much more ahead on the program including local members of congress on former president donald trump's impeachment but first chicago's humboldt. Park neighborhood has been the epicenter of the city's puerto rican community for decades but in recent years as high rents and luxury developments have encroached on the neighborhood's borders fears of gentrification and displacement to have grown and in some cases become reality as chicago. Tonight's quinn myers reports a new initiative focused on developing small businesses in the community hopes to help change. That whole plan. Team is taken in here squashed for the last few years. Luis colosio has been handcrafting. He burrito presses these wooden contraptions designed to flatten plantations for he burritos a puerto rican sandwich invented here in chicago. Nobody really had something to make a wish. We all had to go out or are they break a bunch of plates. China may go but you blocks or something. Eventually my wife asked me to make her maker something. Colosio is now one of more than a dozen small businesses operating out of a new space called mercado del pueblo on peseos equa- or division street in humble park. The initiative is being organized by puerto rican cultural center or rc seat which is providing free rent to vendors and artists to operate and try to develop their business this project. It's market but at the same time. He's an incubator so right now. The business that are part of the abuse project have the opportunity to grow at some point that they can open fisher a storefront for example as businesses grow. They'll also become eligible for advice and guidance from the prc and their partners. If we feel that they're committed to my life business then we invite him to be part of the incubator. So that's when we were more one on one and to give them advice in in terms of poudel develop their their business and how to grow it how to register also says he hopes to eventually have his own space in the neighborhood to sell his he burrito makers as well as the coloring books and posters he also designs mcconnell offered a unique situation to small businesses and i thought i could leverage that and learn more as the startup. There's a lot of things that Small pop-ups don't know which i did it and they've given me an avenue to to see other things that i was missing one of the america. Those goals is to eventually help. Businesses move into storefronts here on division street as a way of promoting economic development while stalling. Gentrification mercado del pueblo is the brainchild of pr director. Jose lopez long a fixture in humble park during the covert. We saw many of our businesses particularly informal. Suffer a great deal. They were not able to get any support from the federal government and we talk. We need to be able to take them step by step so they could become formal businesses. Andy mercado has a special section selling puerto rican products. That can be difficult to find in chicago. But the space is also open to non puerto ricans including business owners from black and latino communities. One is cedric. Salone who sells homemade body lotions and oil through his company. Butters are ex salone says. He sees the mercado as a way to diversify his clientele. I have a huge online presence. But i have a small like in-person storefront type presence. So this puts me in a neighborhood. That's very different And also i get a lot of traffic and introduce smart product to different areas in groups that come through kinda naturally. Pr organizers say businesses like toyotas and salons and the others. They're supporting our a way to keep dollars in the community instead of having them spent elsewhere for us. This medical pueblo speaks to us. Officials community is to us about identity but it also speaks about economic development in this age of covert four chicago. Tonight i'm quinn myers and the mercado. Pueblo is open. Friday afternoons and on saturdays and sundays at the corner of division rockwell. In humboldt park they are enforcing social distancing guidelines and requiring face masks to enter and you can learn more on our website still to come on chicago tonight local congressman on. How safe they feel around controversial congresswoman congresswoman marjorie taylor green on capitol hill dangerously. Cold weather is forecast to hit the chicago area. We'll explain what to expect. And what's driving. The arctic chill and president biden releases his racial equity agenda the leaders of both national and chicago. Urban league share their thoughts. But i some more of today's top stories. The chicago teachers union and chicago. Public schools are negotiating this evening to hammer out a deal to reopen schools. A statement from both mayor lori lightfoot and school. Ceo janice jackson says the two sides conferred on a small number of remaining issues today and expect to continue into the evening. The two sides have been able to avert a strike so far on how to safely reopen schools for kindergarten through eighth grade students. Yesterday they both agreed to negotiate for two more days allowing remote learning to go on in the interim tomorrow evening marks the end of their agreed upon forty-eight hour cooling off period the pandemic has also claimed. Chicago's famed saint patrick's day parades. For the second year in a row typically held in mid march both the downtown and south side parades have been cancelled. Officials confirmed today that they are not issuing permits for parades or large gatherings due to the pandemic but says the city is working with organizers and communities to find ways to celebrate within public health guidance. the chicago's saint patrick's day parade says this year. The parade will be held virtually on march thirteen and now to paris with more from some local members of congress paris thanks brandis and earlier in the program. We discussed the covid stimulus proposal and joining us once again our members of the illinois congressional delegation robin kelly marine newman bobby rush and raja krishnamoorthi and has reminder. We invited every republican member of the delegation but none accepted our invitation. Let's talk about impeachment of first congresswoman kelly. A president trump's lawyers say. His speech was protected by the first amendment at that rally before the riot happened. A congressional a democrat in impeachment. Managers say he is responsible for what happened. You see that that there aren't many republicans senators Board for this. Where do you think the trial's gonna go with the senate. I think we absolutely must have the trial. I there needs to be consequences. Whether he's he's convicted or not. I think we have to bring him to trial. And i believe he did incite a what happened. I don't think he was alone and inciting what happened. And it wasn't just that day it. It's been the buildup and more build up. More built up that culminated in that day. Five people that day. And then i believe more to suicide. So they're they're allowed negative things that happened that day beside the members of caught in their offices crouched behind steps and things like that so no matter what happens. I do think that we should go through with the impeachment. Trial covers men rush. We alluded to this in the first segment of the congressman from georgia. Marjorie taylor green. Who is a spouse some bizarre kuan theories talks of jewish space laser. And you'll just completely off the reservation things. Do you think there would be votes in the congress to expel her as as democrats have called for a vote to her. But you know. I have a different vantage point. You know. i'm going to have twenty twenty. Two june greening could be very valuable. Personality and image for democrats Tony to moderate marin. Joe's green is the republican chairman. And i think democrats on his head tros in this past republican very Smart and kenny. Amount holiday. Hungry saints chris based on them and a members of the house. Generally you know loss sees based on we see on never carrying nancy pelosi. S sourcing this one marjorie. Jones green is a fascist element and i'll society and republican party is lame more and more and more as witness Roller by january near leaning more and more and more choice session. I don't think that we need to rescue new refunds slum among jones winning tat her to them and china them to her and we need to put her withholding merman female as is who you want to read net you in washington news in new comments on to that to that effect congressman rush even senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell has called her quote a cancer on the party and on. The country congressman. Chris should she lose at the very least at that spot that she has On on on one of the congressional committees yes. I think that she should be treated at least the same way. That steve king of iowa was treated Last term where he was stripped of his committee assignments now that it will be up to the voters of her district whether they actually want somebody who's powerless to do their business in congress and they can decide that the next election but i think that she's done enough to merit at least that type of sanction or penalty congressman newman. Let's pivot back to a policy. Issue a president biden is announced more executive orders on immigration including a wholesale review of the family separation policy at the border. Is there enough here that you believe that these families can be brought back together and some of these children that have lost. Their parents can can find them again. We'll here's the tragedy of this. There are hundreds of families are still torn apart. I think this task force is not only necessary. It's imperative if we can get one child reunited. It is absolutely worth it but we have to get these families back together with the trump administration did these families is beyond horrifying and we. It is our job as always democrats And correct The immorality of what's come before them so we will correct this. And i think this is a good first step and i encourage it congresswoman kelly. A what immigration legislation Might we see from congress given hyper polarized nature of this issue and of the country in general. While we've been talking about this a long time. And i know president biden wants to see. What can we work on to provide a pathway to citizenship for. I believe it's eleven million able plus. What can we do around dhaka around in all of the young people that were born when they were very young. I expect to see certainly legislation around that Turn turn going back from what Trump did but also i expect to see some legislation around The eleven million people that want to be citizens of the united states many are working many are contributing and we need to see what we can do to make them at us citizens and harassed and jumping for a second. Yeah go ahead congressman. Just very quickly. Yes as an immigrant. I think that the entire immigration system. It has to work for america but that also means A pathway for eleven million undocumented as well as the dreamers as well as high-skilled immigrants these are the people that come here and enrich our technology space as well as our economy and create jobs for all americans and those issues have gotten some bipartisan support. Over the years. We're going to have to leave it there. And his reminder. We invited every republican member of the delegation tonight but none accepted our request. We do thank representatives. Kelly newman rush and krishnamoorthi for joining us. Thank you all again. Everybody thank you and now we go back to brandis for look at the science behind. This weekend's forecast hint. It's going to be a bit chilly out there. Brandis that's right paris. After getting walloped by two big snowstorms the chicago area is now bracing for bitter cold. That's expected to settle in later this week after possible. Rain snow mix on thursday. Temperatures are forecast to drop dramatically with highs in the single digits. Possible this weekend joining us to explain what we should expect. And what's driving. This weather is scott. Call us atmospheric scientist at national laboratories scott. Welcome back so. We have a couple of animations showing the brutal cold air. that's in gray and green coming down from the north explained to us what we're seeing please so that is a lick of. That's a lick of cold air. That's coming down area from the very deep north up in the arctic here the grays and the greens is bride at that. Holiest represents overnight lows in the In the negative teams over the chicago area. Okay and so. How does sort of what does that mean. Obviously how does the weather that we already have on the ground. Lots of snow. How does that influence. What's coming our way. So there are a couple of ingredients to this one. Iran talks about the poll of ortega. Ovo tech's is always there. But this time of hollywood exes kind of walked and it's sending a ton winds up way up in the atmosphere other the iran that is guiding all these storms down the chicago and the story hoped about is going to bring snow rain mixture dragon holding down with it but this summit snug between us and canada and alaska that of moves down from the north pole isn't going to warm at all. Okay so it's got lots to go on So super cold highs in like what the single digits what are. What are we expecting this record breaking. I'm guessing that's a really good question. So the coldest air is sitting out around that sunday. Monday tuesday time for letters right. The limits of predictability of the weather simulations when used to make our forecast so every tommy ronald computer simulation get slightly different aunts. At the moment. We're seeing numbers that could be low. A high temperatures below zero and lows getting into the very very negative pains which ends up near record breaking temperatures. The coldest low temperature for monday. The eight is minus seventeen fahrenheit net. Sit in eighteen ninety nine. There is a good chance we will break records this coming new week. Regardless of what actually happens they will be bitter cold too dangerous call in now focused and what are the dangers of this kind of extreme cold. So they're of dangerous and exacerbated by the covid nineteen pandemic because folks remote more isolated. A lot had to check in on us. We see them such. You got the obvious things the bitter cold damage to extremities hypothermia and then you put the this things. The silent killers like when it gets really cold. People were having albums eating their houses out. Alternative sources may not be used inside the become carbon monoxide heaven. So as a so as well as changing the drafts and things like that in the run-up to abbas call where the people really checking the battery and the carbon monoxide detectors to make sure that they protect you from the silent killer. Lots to be on the lookout for both inside and outside just climate change. Make this kind of extreme cold more likely. Another good question. I'm so from an observation. Point of view very difficult to show the role. Climate change has been called exchange because we get some fairly rarely however there have been a number of studies done. Shows that the polar vortex and the wobbling of the polar vortex is highly related to the cia extent around the arctic. Lessee is the more wobbly. The polar vortex is the higher. The likely hood is of these call and warm extremes depending on what part of the polar vortex you have a view windows directing warm weather up towards you or coke with the down toward you. Yeah and scott. You said You know you're kind of at the limits of your predictability for this particular system but any idea. What do we know about when this kind of cold might break. So the been cyclist. Typically last between three to four days Depending on how extreme that dip in the polar vortex is so can waken like peer just the horizon and we can use a ho a statistical set of model round cisco set of simulations who have a good guess of this near folks like is gone and the poverty. You're trying to improve predictability now skill of doing that but we really expect last year three to four days bud that call areas in layers emplacements snowpack is in place while we may recover. We're still going to remain quite cold for quite some time but hey it's february in chicago we've had a pretty good run so fingers crossed that it doesn't last too long. Scott thank you so much for joining us. Scott my pleasure. Thank you brands and up. Next a conversation about president. Biden's racial equity agenda that first aired on sundays shock tonight black voices but first details of the five day forecast november's election black voters were instrumental in putting joe biden into the oval office in his victory. Speech biden told those voters quote. You've always had my back. And i'll have yours now in the early weeks of his presidency. We're beginning to see how president biden intends to make good on that promise with the undoing of some of the trump administration's policies as well as the release of his racial justice and equity agenda joining us to talk about civil rights during the biden presidency. Are karen freeman wilson president of the chicago urban league and more al president of the national urban league. Thank you for joining us so early. So biden was the first president to ever address white supremacy in his inaugural address years. A little bit of what he had to say cry for racial justice some four hundred years in the making moves us the dream of justice for all will be deferred no longer and now arise of political extremism white supremacy domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat and marc morial. Let's start with you please. Do you think the biden administration will be able to combat this the threat of right wing conspiracy and violence that we're seeing across the country. It's going to take everything they have. First of all thank you. For having me to defeat the tide of white supremacy and violent extremism the defeat of donald trump and all that represented is political. Philosophy is approach to governing is hatred and racism was a step by the american people to say to the new president. We embrace a different approach. We want to go a different direction. Now joe biden has been in office now nine days. I believe nine days. I believe i think the first steps he's taken have been remarkable in that. No prior president that accurate number act has acted so decisively down several markers when it comes to issues racial justice let's qualify by saying we're nine days in and the all the beginning and much more needs to be done so you feel like he's sending a very clear signal then. Karen freeman wilson. We saw demonstration by white supremacists in front of city hall here last week. How do you feel like biden's presidency will affect issues like policing here in chicago. Let me add my things and also Support what mark just said There is a clear message being sent that we want to engage differently. That white supremacy is not welcome in dc or any aspect of the federal government. And not only. Is it not welcome. But that president biden will use his administration's resources to get at the root of white supremacy and to uncover that that in in the military in places where he has federal jurisdiction. Which i think is extremely important. Marc morial you and the national urban league. You'll wrote a letter to president biden upon his inauguration him and just this week the last few days roll out his racial equity agenda. How does his agenda lineup for what you called for in your letter. First steps were important in that what he did was he signed an executive order that sent all the agencies of government all of the departments of government. You have two hundred days to assess and evaluate whether they're disparities racial animus racial disparities in your programs and policies and to report back. I think what is happening is the framework is being put down For significant action on issues related to if you will racial justice so i embrace the early steps but i'm not spiking the ball or popping a bottle of champagne because these are just initial steps. That demonstrate that. I'm not putting racial justice on the back burner and i'll get to it late. I'm not ignoring it. After i said in my acceptance speech and in my inaugural address racial justice is going to be a central principle to everything we do as an administration. It's no was just going to add. Sorry so it sounds like you know lots of work to do going forward because as you said. It's only been nine days. Karen freeman wilson to that end. What can groups like the urban league due to address the inequities of the pandemic on the local level. Well you know. I think it's important that we focus on the local level on the needs of people right now. It's to ensure that blacks get the vaccine. We know that there is some skepticism. And so we are working with the state with the city and the county to ensure that people understand that one of the best ways to fight back against covid In addition to testing and washing your hands and all of the things that we've been doing mask for a long time is to now get the vaccine and that's something that the chicago urban lee has placed front and center in addition to that. It's the need for relief to those who have seen so many challenges as a result of this pandemic particularly black businesses and that is why we promoted black shop friday on black friday last year. Yeah that's right. I remember that memorial. You were at the inauguration. What did that mean to you. To see the vice. President's worn in it was cold but to see combat harrison. Amanda goldman powerful sisters too powerful black women. A talented black village has brought a great deal of pride to me as it i believe does for all. Americans it. It's a little bit of great accomplishment comma harris And i think she is just well positioned great vice president and i think oh beyond outstanding. My thanks to mark morale in karen freeman wilson for joining us. All the best thank you. We're back to wrap up right after this and that's our show for this tuesday night. Please join us tomorrow. night live at seven illinois senior. us senator dick durbin on capitol safety. Trump's second impeachment and kobe relief. Plus how a new music program is preparing students for career at the collegiate level. Now for shots and all of us here at chicago tonight. Brandis friedman thanks for watching. Stay healthy and safe and have a good night closed. Captioning is made possible by robert he clifford and clifford law offices chicago personal injury and wrongful death firm sponsoring a free continuing legal education program for over a decade for lawyers across the state.

chicago Dr kumar illinois biden congress pelosi corey bush lori lightfoot robin kelly raja krishnamoorthi marjorie taylor biden administration Brandis friedman Wnba President joe biden Kelly newman schumer Zach dock Commissioner dr allison national urban league
December 9, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:46 min | 6 months ago

December 9, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm parachutes and i'm brandon friedman on the show tonight we expect to receive twenty three thousand doses other vaccine starting next week. The city's public health. Commissioner joins us with what to expect from. Chicago's rollout of covid nineteen vaccine. The airline industry has been devastated by the pandemic losing flyers and billions of dollars. We'll vaccine be enough to revive it. All of us will remember who was protecting us which business owners and businesses are spotlight. Politics team on the governor's reaction to violations to the states. Covid nineteen restrictions change positive change. We have to do things differently. The role of women in the legislature with springfield on the brink of a big cultural shift. When people say oh my god you guys are trying to do so much is because inglewood needs so much business. Owners and community organizers in englewood. Talk about what's next six months after widespread civil unrest in the neighborhood concert at lyric opera of chicago. Unlike anything you've ever heard the first some of today's top stories pfizer's covid vaccine could be in the possession of all thirty four city hospitals by next week. Chicago is set to receive twenty three thousand doses of the pfizer vaccine in. Its initial shipment. It could come soon after and if fda approval happens tomorrow lightfoot says the cdc will determine who gets the first batches she says the city will eventually set up public mass vaccination sites but chicago public health director. Dr allison arwady says that cooperation from community and health organizations will be key to the city's distribution plan. We will be working as soon as we are able to pushback. Seen two partners are full. Goal is to push this vaccine to as many vaccinating partners as we can so our goal will be that people will actually be able to get their vaccine through their provider. And we'll be asking them to prioritize outreach to their patients who are over sixty-five who have these underlying conditions both mayor lightfoot and dr are would he cautioned that widespread distribution of the vaccine is still months away and dr are would he will join us on the program in just a few moments. Meanwhile illinois health officials are reporting more than eighty two hundred new cova cases and one hundred seventy nine additional deaths in the last twenty four hours that makes for a total of eight hundred twelve thousand cases and thirteen thousand six hundred. Sixty six deaths. The test positive across the state right now is eleven point four percent and life would says she's spoken with forty fourth ward alderman. Tom tunney and says she's quote deeply disappointed. The alderman acknowledged he allowed indoor dining. At and sather's the restaurant he always. I'm belmont and lakeview city. Officials are investigating and could issue sunny. A ten thousand dollar fine for violating city kovin protocols lightfoot says she expects there will be consequences the minoza he did wrong. He will absolutely be held accountable zero exceptions for that But i understand the anger and the frustration because this has been such an incredibly hard year more on this story with our spotlight politics team just a bit later in the program. Some buzz around chicago native mellody the business executive and philanthropist. We'll become chair of the board of starbucks. Non executive chair hobson has been on the board for fifteen years. There and co-ceo chicago-based ariel investments. She's also mary to star wars creator. George lucas and now back to brandis. And chicago's top. Dr brandis paris. Thank you and as you just reported. Officials are detailing their covid vaccine. Rollout planned today. An initial shipment of twenty three thousand doses is expected in chicago as soon as next week with healthcare workers receiving vaccine. I joining us with more. About chicago's covid vaccine plan. Is dr allison arwady commissioner of the chicago department of public health. Dr arnn thanks for fitting us in again. So i please remind us what are the recommendations on who should receive this vaccine. I or so we have to follow the cdc recommendations which put in the first priority healthcare workers and long term facility both workers and residents. And so that's what the whole first part of phases healthcare workers were starting with hospitals. But then we'll be expanding out from there and that's all kinds of healthcare workers. We're talking home health. Aides were talking dentist. It's a wide range. That will be talking but it starts Probably as soon as next week potentially with our hospitals. And we'll this first shipment be enough for all of the healthcare workers in chicago. Who need it not at all so we estimate we have about four hundred thousand healthcare workers in the city of chicago using that broad definition so twenty. Three thousand will be the first week and then we'll be getting more week after week after week and pushing it to help their workers to launch him care facilities and then following up and it's going to take a while for sure to get through that group but we're really excited to get started assuming the fda gives the emergency use authorization and the cdc recommends actually starting destination and then who's next after healthcare workers. So we will be waiting to hear the formal guidance of from the advisory committee on immunization practices through the cdc. They've signaled likely next. Group will include essential workers as well as people over sixty five and people with underlying conditions. That obviously is a lot of chicago. And so even as we're waiting to hear some more details about potential sub prioritisation within that. We're already planning thinking about for people who are over. Sixty-five with underlying conditions will be working closely with for example many many many Doctors offices and outpatient practices across chicago will be asking them to be reaching out to their partners. Sorry to their patients so that people who are older with conditions will especially be able to get it through their doctors offices and then we'll be working on the essential workers side with employers will be doing outreach. In communities of where the virus has hit hardest to ensure that as essential workers lived in those neighborhoods for example they know how to get vaccinated. And then we'll be having some mass vaccination sites they'll be by appointment initially and we'll start with healthcare workers. But we're doing planning in all of these streams we can handle all of the vaccine that is given to us by the federal government. And we've got plans that flex very large or very small depending on what that supply chain looks like now. During this afternoon's press conference we also heard from dr helene gayle. The chicago community. Trust us speaking specifically about equity. Tell us how equity for communities of color factor into your vaccination plan so we have thought about equity and actually put it at the center of every phase of his vaccination plan. You've heard us talk a lot about equity already on the case side on testing side and we're being more serious about it on the vaccine side because this is how we're eventually gonna get past covid i and so for example where even from the beginning where we're thinking about healthcare workers This is not just doctors and the nurses this is also thinking about people who are nurses aides people who are working sometimes in some of the more support roles which may be lower paid and which we know in chicago. A lot of black chicagoans lat next chicagoans fill those roles will be specifically doing outreach And working to make sure that they know they can get vaccinated and that once pulled especially moving into some outpatient provider side will be thinking about some of the lower paid healthcare workers and trying to prioritize them for appointments for vaccine in our mass vaccination sites. And it'll go on from there We have to follow the federal guidance. But we implement that and so we'll be pushing to make sure than some of our neighborhoods and particularly in black chicago where we've seen more deaths still than in any other group. We wanna make sure that there's good messaging about the safety of the vaccine advocacy of the vaccine. We're doing everything we can to remove barriers so that people are excited about getting. This seems to protect their communities. It also will be a free of charge to chicagoans no today in the uk public health officials. There are warning people who have a history of allergic reactions to medicine To skip the vaccine because of the case of a couple of people who received they're having those reactions of how do you how do you rectify that here. How do you deal with that here. Yes so actually for all vaccines We always have a plan for what's called. Nfl axis this allergic reaction. Even if i'm giving a single dose of a vaccine i have in my in my container The medicine use in case. Somebody has a allergic reaction so it is something we planned for. I think in this case with a new vaccine certainly what. The recommendation in the uk was. Was that anyone who has history of serious allergic reactions enough where they need to carry an abbey pen. For example it asks them to delay vaccination while they explore this And this is exactly what will happen as as we roll out a new vaccine we will be looking Really understanding harder things we need to be prepared for and if we need to change some of the guidance around who will be getting vaccine right at the beginning. Were ready to do that. Point five percent of the people in the visor. Trial had some kind of allergic reaction. It was actually very similar to the group that got the placebo. Not the real vaccine but again as the vaccine is available in the real world we also have a lot more opportunity to collect information about side effects or any concerns other robust plans for doing that. at the city level at the state level and at the federal level. We want to be transparent. Make sure people have the information they need to secure in their decision to hopefully become vaccinated when a vaccine is available for them and dr already. They're still a lot of people who are still resistant to getting this vaccine. Once it becomes available to them perhaps even some health care workers but for some folks. It's a matter of mistrust in the medical community. What do you say to that. Yeah so. I'd say there is a long history here that we want to acknowledge. I think particularly. We're talking with black chicagoans really acknowledging the racist history that is absolutely part of the medical system in the public health system. This vaccine and our recommendations around it are absolutely based insci- the fact that this visor vaccine in particular which were now able to share data about ninety five percent protective that is an amazingly effective vaccine and the advocacy was the same across different race. Ethnicity groups ages genders people with underlying conditions We wanna make sure that there has been good representation of both black and latinx acts americans in these trials and here in chicago. We've seen that by and large and we'll be wanting to share that data in details that people really can feel secure that this vaccine has had the appropriate testing That the trials have not skipped stops which they have not that we are watching close. Leave for side effects. We were able to share today. Some of the data around side effects. Things like store harms on things like people feeling fatigued and having headaches the came out of those trials we will be making more that data available on the website and really sharing That as we are on the one hand talking about how effective this vaccine is were thrilled that there were not any serious safety concerns identified. What we want to understand that there will probably be some of these lower level side effects to be inspected all right. Dr allison arwady. We look forward to having you back again in the future as this continues to roll out. Thanks again for joining us. Thank you and now back to paris for a look at whether the availability of vaccines will be enough to revive the airline industry. Paris brennan's the airline industry has been devastated by the pandemic major. Us carriers are losing millions of dollars each day and the losses could total one hundred eighteen billion dollars by the end of this year and has big ramifications for chicago. Airlines are hopeful for a twenty twenty one recovery as the nation begins the vaccination process and joining us to share their assessment of the outlook for the industry are tracy rosinsky chicago-based aviation correspondent four thompson reuters and joe sweeter men professor in the school for public service department of public policy and a sustainable urban development program at depaul university and a specialist on transportation policy. Welcome back both of you To chicago tonight. I joe are the mayor yesterday announced plans for covid nineteen testing for employees and travelers at chicago airports. How's that going to work breakthroughs this week and testing guy chicago. Rollout this plan. They're going to be a terminal to have ticketing. If you're ticketed. Pasture employer eligible uses service. And the be both rapid testing and today testing. Start sheep maybe one hundred fifty dollars a bit more but it's going to pass just some confidence that they know where to go to get tested thinking bribed here are the early and mid way is going to be close Closer to the parking garage. Cpa station it's a pretty big news story this week and there's also going to be that city testing site near the garage. Midway tracy sqi let health experts were worried about a busy travel. Week during thanksgiving. And whether there'd be breakouts tied to folks in airports and on airplanes is there any data suggest to suggest any of that materialized well and just to clarify that there really have not been any any outbreaks tied to air travel at all An terms of i mean to say is on airplanes or at but it's a little too soon to tell whether that thanksgiving travel in and of itself led to a spike in cases. Are joe swetering. We mentioned the the terrible financial for the industry does twenty twenty one. Look like a rebound here on a roller coaster. A pair of september. The airlines are optimistic. The added lots of schedules That didn't pan out. They scale back. Thanksgiving was so so Head bashed delta just announced that he's seeing flat lining for quite a while. I think though just the last day or two all felt a little bit of excitement First of all A southwest their bond rating got improve We're seeing the vaccine. Excitement spread everywhere. So i think finally. We're seeing some confidence in the public. That we're getting the vaccine and testing system down enough. So people contacting back to the skies tracy rozanski. What are the financials look like for the big players in this industry american united delta south west. Could we see a major carrier. Go out of business. I don't think we'll see a major here. You're going to business They are each burning between twelve million and thirty million dollars every single day of cash. So it's a large sum of money but they have also raised a lot of capital and they all say that that should get them through at least twenty twenty one What happens after that really depends on strength of the recovery next year and it also may depend on what further assistance they get from the government government joe sweeter men should airlines and the industry anticipate anything out of this latest stimulus bill. That is being negotiated they do. The news is spreading fast. And we're getting close to a deal. I said that before airlines did well in that first round you call with the payroll protection that kept employs on board. That allowed them to keep a lot of flights in the area. Even though the economics sport were good that ended in october. So now we're waiting for round two of this and The sense that airlines are going to do quite as well as they did. The first time but all transportation's position really well and we now know of course that the big four probably okay to skirt bankruptcy but some of these smaller airlines legion frontier sun country. They're really in a tough spot. And if something does give congress who knows what's going to happen to their ability to fly and some of those airlines have had trouble for years tracy brzezinski what about vaccine distribution. You have carriers like american saying they. They wanna distribute the vaccine. How would that work logistically. How does that play into airlines recovery. Well all there is enough vaccine distribution business to go around for all of the major carriers and this is going to not only be a big part of their cargo business a as soon as these vaccines are approved but going into next year as well and they're hoping that that that axing distribution can also help them open up some of the passenger routes that have been closed as well as the that bridge to place in which people can start traveling rural. You're done and just weird and let's let's bring this back local you know o.'hare midway thousands of jobs. The city relies on the tax revenue. That comes through their the tourism. that comes through their. how has this impacted. chicago's airports. And and what does the future look. Like for o'hare redevelopment as we do no one one is going to be down. Other some sense that things could start to Approach normalcy next summer or perhaps eighty percent of pre pandemic volumes But we know the winner and springer probably going to be pretty rough but that means fewer personal facility charges less parking revenue all those things which has got to be tough for the city. And they're gonna situation. They gotta decide how quickly to proceed with. The you know the massive o'hare twenty one plan the new terminals terminal to rebel the satellite terminals and The bond ratings are got nervous about all airports right now. So i think the good news is. We're still only in the design. Planning stage of that were not Least the terminal to project had a little time but it's going to be some tough decisions whether does whether to slow things down presents ski. Are there deals out there for passengers and will there be going forward in two thousand twenty one just given the state of the industry i yes. There are deals. If if you book ahead of time i think the closer you get your travel dave the higher the fares are because the fact is there just aren't a lot of flights out there right now. Airlines have reduced their capacity by about fifty percents. So it it. It's a tough call. They are offering low fares to entice people to get on board to start flying again but the says until people really feel comfortable traveling. They don't expect Those those troubles to to return to what they were before the pandemic all right. We're gonna have to it. There are lots to talk about. Our thanks to tracy resents ski and joseph peterman for the first time in decades. There's no clear answer to the question who will be the next speaker of the illinois house longtime speaker. Michael madigan still wants that job. But at least nineteen of his fellow. Democrats say they won't support him for another term. Amanda finicky spoke with some of the first legislators to take that position and she joins us now. Amanda would you find out. House speaker is a powerful job. And really it's been crafted into one largely by madigan. Who's held the post for all but a blips since the early eighties but it is is not the only reason why madigan is frequently referred to as one of if not the most powerful politician in illinois us also chair of the democratic party of illinois and democrats ruled the roost in this state which is why freshman state representative tara. Kosta howard running for a second term. This november says she had a lot of soul-searching to do this summer after madigan was identified in federal court papers in which comment admitted to a long running scheme to bribe him. She said she'd already been frustrated. That madigan hadn't been doing enough as illinois was fighting pandemic. I am an attorney. I am a former public defender. So you are innocent until proven guilty and for me. This wasn't about whether you know he's guilty of a crime or not. This says this doesn't feel right. This is wrong. Casa howard in july became the first democrat to essentially abandoned madigan announcing that. If she were re elected she would not support him for another term as speaker. Let me tell you. The impact was much greater than than people realize particularly because this occurred in the middle of my campaign as speaker and democratic party chairman. It doesn't matter who raises bid bucks and then uses it to send money as well as support staff polling in campaign brochures to democrats to help them get elected but kosta howard told me in an interview that she was essentially punished for her stance. It has huge ramifications for me. When i decided that i needed to say and to speak out that i would not support him. Ramifications like what while the largest ramification was fundraising. I mean i was essentially While i was basically cut off from from the typical large donors she says some changes were subtle for example. The party did send a worker to help her with the race. But this worker was inexperienced and she says not a good fit. Unlike the season campaign worker who the democratic party had sent to help her in eighteen and the party did offer to help with polling but kosta howard says that came too late in the process and also she says the party refused to let her ask on that poll. A question about madigan. It's a very fine line right because nothing you don't want any want anything to look retaliatory return. Excuse me so. I think that there was a fine line. That was walked. Kosta howard said. She didn't end up doing her own poll and she did ask about madigan again. It showed the speaker less popular with voters in her district. Them president donald trump. So all her decisions may have been controversial in political circles. That stance on madigan may have helped with voters. Well howard says she didn't accept money for madigan she did however receive and take money from campaign committees that he controls according to the democratic party of illinois money totalling about a half million dollars a dpi spokesperson says kosta. Howard faced no repercussions rather. She says it was pulling that showed. It was clear that kosta howard's race against former republican representative. Peter brin wasn't all that tight cost howard was pulling away so money was shifted to raises. That were tighter. This spokesperson saying that. Supporting strong female candidates remains a dpi priority. But retribution can come in other forms. It is a big deal. And i don't think people really understand outside of those of us who are living at every day really understand what it's like to come out and say i will not be supporting him. As a legislator we have a responsibility to pass legislation that that hopefully benefits are districts and your legislation could be held up and it could be something that you've worked on and it's important. It could mean what committee assignments it could mean on projects that come out to your district. While custom howard was the first to have previously backed madigan. Men defected democratic representative installed. A murray of naperville refused to vote for madigan as speaker two years ago. She says she did get legislation passed. Despite that i mean. I think it's a couple of things number one. I don't think this should be discounted in the metoo move. Man is his chief of staff. Tim makes was taken out of our. And from what i understand. He would have been the ringleader in quote unquote making my life. A living how she also says she may not have been punished given the reason that she opposed him as expand opposition to sexual harassment incidents in springfield. I don't think the other women and the caucus would have looked very fondly upon him very openly having retribution against someone who was who was standing up against that still summary says the for two years. She requested meetings with madigan and he never responded. Now come the twenty twenty one legislature women. Democrats will number mill democrats in the house and stop. Maria says that that's something that should be considered as democrats in the caucus battle out. Who will be the next house speaker. A seven murray says she does expect more democrats to join in the nineteen who have already said that. They will not support for another role as speaker even if they're not going to come out and say so in public. She says she doesn't necessarily feel vindicated. She says she feels grateful. We have to point out madigan nonsmoking publicly since the comrade deferred prosecution agreement was announced but he has issued statements continually denying any role in the com add scandal and denying wrongdoing. He has presented himself as democrats best choice as illinois faces. Some big budget woes. Paris lot of shaking out that needs to happen between now and late january. All right amanda. We'll see later in the program for spotlight politics. But i a unique virtual concert from lyric opera of chicago. And that's right. After this latinos who make up one third of the population continue to power. The city that works. These are the people that are working three jobs knowing that covert is out there and the people that need the help we should help them and we still have much more ahead on the show including of public official caught breaking the state's covert restrictions and other stories in this week's spotlight politics but i this sunday lyric opera of chicago is having a virtual concert. Unlike anything they've ever had before arts correspondent angel edo takes us to lyric opera which opened its doors for the first time since june. Two film. this virtual concert today. I had the joy of recording a duet. Mckee us with david petillo. And he's a beautiful tenor and We've never sung together so to have that. Experience was was really beautiful hosted by puerto rican soprano anna maria martinez with musical accompaniment. By craig terry for the first time ever. Lyric opera of chicago is hosting a concert. Entirely sung in spanish in pacione. Listen featuring students from the ryan opera center. Each singer tried to choose songs that were best reflective of their talents. Those news again for third year. Baritone ricardo rivera. It was about singing songs that reflected his upbringing in puerto rico. This songs that were danced to almost every night in certain places and there are recognized immediately by people off maybe one or two generation per two hours immediately and it's almost like a sense of going back home originally from oaxaca mexico first-year soprano. Denise villas has been a practicing singer for the past eleven years old. Georgina eighty postpartum me. As i am missy way afford to nara a the work untidiness buying your e most threatened he. Kinda is presentiment that stuck on while its virtual i for lyric and more ways than one. The artists say they're grateful to bring the community together during this time. What their love for the language did madina latin passion. And i think that there's a lot of joy and strengthen in passion some will be familiar. Some will be new discoveries. And i think the language will be the common thread and i've i've always thought that person's favourite word or the one that will open their heart the most is their own name and i think after that it's their mother tongue so i am very hopeful that everyone will rejoice who speaks spanish in this presentation but also those that don't speak it. They'll they'll see the beauty and here the beauty in it for chicago tonight. I'm angel edo on latina premieres this sunday evening at six on the lyric opera of chicago facebook and youtube channels with closed captions available in both english and spanish. Visit our website for more information and their parents who go back to you. Thanks brandis and still to come on chicago tonight. How black owned businesses and chicago's would community are managing six months. After civil unrest in the area. Recall we'll bring the state some accountability plus their spotlight. Politics team looks at the push to pass a recall measure in the state which could affect speaker madigan. But i some more of today's top stories. The fbi chicago offices asking for tips leading to the arrest of a man seen firing a rifle at a metro station. The suspect seen here in this video from the f. b. i. allegedly fired around from collapsible rifle at the mccormick place. Metra stop on december first. The fbi says the suspect is believed to be five foot eight and of medium or slender billed. The public is urged to call the chicago. Fbi office or go to website with tips and state public health officials report more than eighty two hundred new cases of covid nineteen in the last twenty four hours with one hundred seventy nine additional deaths that makes a total of more than eight hundred and twelve thousand cases and thirteen thousand six hundred sixty six deaths. The test positivity rate is eleven point four percent the cubs could be getting a tax break from the city due to covid nineteen a city council committee voted unanimously to wave two hundred fifty thousand dollar annual bill. The team is normally required to pay each year for the renovations on wrigley field. The cubs argued that they deserve the break because they were not allowed to have fans or hold concerts depriving them of major sources of their revenue. The team is expected to resume paying those yearly fees. Starting in two thousand twenty one this month. Btw news checking in on neighborhoods across chicago where civil unrest occurred this summer including instances of looting and property damage. Our next stop is englewood on the south side where businesses experienced extensive damage along commercial quarters like sixty third street and ashland avenue six months later chicago. Tonight's quinn myers. Checks in with community organizers and business owners to see how they're holding on. And what's next. I got ill to my stomach. Husband was felt ill to stomach of just the whole situation. Hacia butler is the executive director of the resident association of greater englewood or rage a group dedicated to community engagement in the south side neighborhood. This summer butler watched as businesses near her home were broken into and looted just one portion of widespread damage in the neighborhood. That's long struggled with disinvestment. Our community has been looted for the last forty fifty years. When you just turn around in front of an abandoned school you look across the street. It's abandoned homes and talking about years of segregation years of Targeting black folks out of their homes contract by making it difficult for african americans to get loans to open businesses after the civil unrest butler says people reached out to her eager to support black owned businesses and englewood but didn't have a centralized way to find them so her organization began putting together a directory. One business on the list is would hardware on sixty third street. Owner jared hicks worked here in high school and came back to buy the place a couple years ago. Got limited black ministers. They used to have here. You know years ago. When i was coming up it was. You know all down through here. Hopefully they'll those are all businesses sixty third and fifth. I mean this everywhere. You went with printshop. Somebody was always one stockton down. Sixty third street near ashland is another black owned business included in the directory clothing and apparel store. Englewood branded owner corey luckett says most of the surrounding businesses were damaged during the summer civil unrest but his store was left untouched. In fact people were coming by asking. He always everything. Okay good i have people willing to stand outside the store to protect it. I just felt that was great. Let me know that did something right. Look it says his englewood. T shirts and hoodies are about taking pride in the positive aspects of his community. Ones that don't get much attention on the six o'clock news. You can be your own business your own boss you can grow. You can help the community. You can do this all at the same time. Without having any negative surroundings or backlash with its that attitude butler and a host of other community groups like the inner city muslim action network or iman have applied to ambitious project called. Go green on racine. The initiative hopes to revitalize the entire intersection at sixty third street and racine avenue including a fresh produce market the business incubator and a resource center for people. Returning from incarceration work iman has already been doing in the community for years. Essential piece of the project is the closed green line station here at sixty third in racine which organizers say they're advocating to get reopened so for us just like having a vacant school is unacceptable having a vacant green line stop that just rolls past residents is unacceptable at the future fresh market on sixty third street. We met jake hat. Who's working on the team renovating the space. This is like a starting point for the community. We're trying to better this community Making more comfortable making more lovable hatton. Who grew up on the west side says he sees the project as a model to take to other neighborhoods across chicago. I don't want this to stop. I wanna continue on this road. And i want others to join us and become a part of this family that like i say i'm from the west side of chicago so i'm out here but i plan to bring back out and give others opportunities just like i get for chicago tonight. I'm quinn myers. And w w news is continuing our series through the month of december checking it on different communities months after civil unrest next up in this series. We'll be live tomorrow. From chicago's pilsen neighborhood has part of our chicago tonight. In your neighborhood series still to come are spotlight. Politics team looks at repercussions for alderman. Tom tunney who serve customers indoors at his and slather restaurant but first we're in chicago. Tonight's december pledge right now and we have a matching grant that will make your contribution. Go farther when you call tonight. You're matching gift will be supporting the w. t. w. fund for independent news. This new initiative will provide ongoing financial support for the quality journalism. 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Tonight you can make a matching contribution by calling seven seven three five eight eight eleven eleven or go online at. Www dot com and next our spotlight politics team tackles the latest battle against speaker. Mike madigan but first we take a look at the weather illinois house speaker. Michael madigan floats an income tax hike. Meanwhile alderman. Tom tunney rolled for serving diners indoors at his restaurant. Here with all that and much. More are are spotlight. Politics team of amanda finicky heather sharon and parachutes so embattled speaker michael madigan. He's floating this tax increases of course after governor pritzker so called fair tax amendment. The graduated income tax amendment failed at the ballot box manda so of the wealthier paying more. Does this mean we all pay more. Oh that was always going to be one of the possibilities especially with the failure of the graduated income tax illinois needs to do something particularly if governor jb pritzker is going to fulfill his promise to get illinois back on the past to having balanced budgets. There's going to be some sort of a solution cuts tax increase. They've kind of done a whole lot of the easy stuff. What madigan told this was reporting from the chicago sun times with madigan told a private meeting that was then leaked of the black caucus as he sought their support for another term speaker was been he would help to get that done. Should the governor asked for it. We really don't have a whole lot of details yet. But yeah it's it's a possibility. How much does he want to get. This done manda. I'm not sure that there is any politician who wants to vote for a tax increase. Then again madigan certainly has plenty else going on to worry about. His district has sought to even with the veil of corruption. And he said he'd done nothing wrong. But regardless his district has sought to send him back to springfield repeatedly so presumably not a big issue for him but again. The the really aren't a whole lot of choices here. If you need revenue a flat tax and increase along those lines is surely one of the key ways to do it. Heather is their support for a tax hike in the general assembly. We don't really know because we don't really know what the federal government is going to come forward with is as part of relief package. If there's no relief package it's going. The tax hike is going to be on on unavoidable. Just because simply the whole is too big to fill otherwise if the package includes aid to states which means illinois will benefit. It's possible that cuts and sort of more sort of borrowing could fill the gap but that's a completely unknown at this point however You know this is crunch time really for the state's budget There is no more low hanging fruit to pick off. These are all going to be really tough. Decisions and governor pritzker has said that he will not allow those cuts to fall hardest on the poorest illinois ins which means that all of us will probably have to pay a little bit more somewhere along the line. Heather should lawmakers then consider putting this tax hike off until they do know what they're getting from washington. Yes i think that we will know by the end of the year. So by december thirty first weather a relief package path. The gop controlled senate. So that will mean that they will have a little bit more information when they convene in january and then they'll be able to say well. How long can we wait for an additional package. After president-elect biden takes office and perhaps even has control of the senate if pending the outcome of the georgia senate runoff. So a lot is sort of really up in the air. And i think that state lawmakers will be sort of hoping in crossing their fingers that they won't have to take a vote to hike taxes but it may be inevitable. Paris republican house leader. Jim durkin wants spending cuts. Could that mean more layoffs. It could mean more layoffs brands. But it's important to remember that it's hard to find big wholesale cuts in the state budget because the state is statutorily obligated to make certain payments like the pension payments. It's it has to fund education at a certain level has to fund social services at a certain level and it seems like there's this game of chicken being played right now governor. Pritzker says okay. Well why don't you show us. What cuts you're talking about and Reportedly minority leader durkan hasn't really unveiled. What exactly he wanna cut. So you know i. It is politically popular to say. We don't want tax hikes. We want cuts. But then it becomes less politically popular when you go out and say exactly what you wanna cut and what kind of layoffs that might mean so this weekend amanda just mentioned mike madigan told the black caucus that they should support him for house speaker in spite of his waning support and house. We know that nineteen representatives have said they will not support his bid for speaker He talked about you. Know his strong leadership and about his ability to steer through a possible tax increase And guiding the remapping process amanda. What does his support. Look like in the blackhawks. It's hard to gauge that. We didn't get any comment or endorsement. To after that weekend meeting again privately held. Why didn't we get any sort of announcement from the black caucus dorsey. What had been expected to be mad again. Well it may be again because some of that audio got leaked and time to tax increase. Not particularly a popular thing again. As we've been talking about that could be part of it. I do think. Redistricting is key for example in speaking with both of representatives that were featured in the story that i did earlier. Custom howard instead of murray. They're both from the suburbs. Madigan is a big deal. There brewers don't like him. It is certainly very different in many districts. Particularly those in chicago those represented by members of the black caucus. Who don't really give that big a hoot about who is leading the illinois house. They just want other measures passed things that the black caucus promoting do have to add. There has been at least one member of the black caucus. That's marines west out of the rockford area. Who has said he does not support madigan. but he's a bit of an outlier in terms of just his district and many of his possessions. In light of the state's history of corruption to republicans have proposed a recall measure senator adjacent berkman of bloomington and representative mark baton. Nick of plainfield wanna make it easier to recall more elected officials take a look people illinois have been shut out too long. They are done with corruption. They are done with machine politics and they're done with speaker. Madigan recall will bring the state some accountability when the majority party seems to have little now paris after rod blagojevich's indictment recall measure passed. But that was just for governor. Is this proposed bill targeted at madigan. It certainly seems that way and right now you know piling on the madigan train is politically. It pays dividends for republicans you saw how it impacted the election tying speaker madigan to justice kilbride and to the graduated income tax amendments so any little opening they see to sort of tie democrats as speaker meeting and keep madigan in the news. They will All caution and say that with state representatives. It's a little bit different than the governor. They serve two year terms so there are constantly primaries and they're constantly challenges talking about running maybe makes a little more sense for a recall for a four year term But when there's a two year term it's like amanda said speaker madigan adage all the time. There are term limits already. They're called elections. I want to get to kobe. But does this have legs. Could it pass. I don't think that it is going to get to that point. It's sponsored by republicans. They're not in control in. In addition to some of the poems at paris noted constitutional questions. I don't think we're going to get to this point anytime young so not one. But two lawmakers were caught violating the states copa nineteen restrictions. Let's start with the democrat. One of the mayor's key leaders forty fourth ward alderman. Tom tunney also owns the end. Say the restaurant in lakeview. There's been dispute over how that's actually pronounced. We'll get back to that But heather what happened at his restaurant. And what's the city doing in the way of fines. Well he was allowing longtime he diners at his late. You read a restaurant. pulling in sather's i'm not gonna argue with brandis you to sign enrolls cycle which he was letting them in to dine thirty eight days into this ban imposed by governor pritzker and he was essentially caught out and there were complaints made to the cities. He's now facing two citations. Which if it's held responsible for could mean that he needs to pay ten thousand five hundred dollars to the city and it was a real embarrassment for the mayor and she said today she was quote deeply disappointed in alderman tiny and she said that she he would be held responsible and not made an exception. This is ben a clash between mayor. Lightfoot governor pritzker since almost the beginning of the pandemic mayor lightfoot wants restaurants to be able to reopen. The governor has said this is where coded is spreading. This just couldn't have been sort of a more hot button. Issue to snare one of the mayor's closest allies now governor pritzker spoke out against alderman. Tom tiny about his restaurant violations but also against republican holiday party with dozens of unmasked people. A look at what he had to say to the host state representative brad. Halbrook shame on him. Shame on him for having people in a room packed together not wearing a mask. He knows better. He should know better. If he doesn't maybe shouldn't be in the general assembly. Amanda could representative helper punishment to. I don't know how what that punishment would be. More likely the venue that hosted this event in arthur illinois is sort of a bit different given that helper is a tough thing when you have politicians not practicing what they preach when it comes to the corona virus representative. Halbrook is not one of those who've been preaching about it. He has openly said that he disagrees with the actions. That pritzker has taken. Use it as an overreach is allied with representative darren bailey. Who's been behind all of these lawsuits so this is really in keeping with hell brooks beliefs. Though it may not be safe for you'll annoyance particularly those who attended this bash now pairs. You broke the story yesterday that eleanor lawmakers want billions back from private health. Insurers tell us more about that well a brandis. These are two lawmakers one in the house. One of the senate democrats and and basically they're saying in the medicaid system in illinois. It's run as a managed care system so basically the state pays a sum billions of dollars every year. Half of that by the way is reimbursed in federal taxes to these private organizations that manage medicaid for two plus million low income residents in illinois. And what they're saying is most of these companies are big healthcare companies that are making huge profits in covid companies like meridian companies. Like blue cross blue shield. Also they say that because of ovid utilization rates are down so fewer people are going to the doctor for big elective surgeries meaning. They're using fewer insurance claims so the lawmakers are saying. Well what are you doing with that pile of money. We think you're sitting on a pile of money and frankly we think you should give that back to the state to redirect to critical care hospitals like mercy hospital. The thing is to keep that federal matching a dollar those dollars that come in from the federal government for medicaid. They have to keep this in the healthcare system so they said we don't want this when he going overwhelmingly to these big healthcare companies. Let's let's send them to hospitals now. Amanda i'm sure the hospitals are going to lobby the general assembly about this. No doubt what's going to happen lawsuits in the future. A yes for sure. If anything like this were to pass which don't necessarily expect particularly at this degree think would raise about three billion dollars. That's the equivalent of what the graduated income tax constitutional amendment would have done so makes it sound quite easy to basically plug the budget hole. But i don't think it is going to be that there certainly is going to be a lot of negotiating around healthcare and there are issues around these mc organizations period when those contracts are up but given both federal and state law. I don't think that this is something that will readily fly. Heather raw manual continues to make his case for biden's transportation secretary you've written extensively about this Now the former mayor's facing a good bit of pushback from liberals who oppose his nomination or potential nomination over the way he handled the liquid mcdonald case. Tell us about your story. well i just. I wanted to look back at his eight years in office to really figure out if the case that he's making for himself that his legacy in chicago as a transportation focused mayor didn't what did that. Tell us about what he would do at in abidjan cabinet and really he focused primarily on two areas o'hare and the cpa and nobody can deny that he really sort of positioned o'hare once the pandemic is over to be expanded by nearly forty percent more flights and sort of securing. Its place like a mobile hub in the united states also he. He directed nearly eight billion dollars. This eta rebuilding all sorts of train lines. But the question is i think is worse those decisions made equitably and i think if you talk to people on the south side so they'll say they're still waiting for the red line extension to one hundred thirty th street and that bus ridership really drop during his tenure and buses are what you know. Poor chicagoans rely on. So it's he definitely had an ambitious agenda but in some ways. It was clouded with some of those equity issues. That were talking so much about in the wake of george floyd staff in police custody and after as part of the black lives matter movement and had her husband's name also been floated for us. Trade representative yes and we found out today that he will not be getting that job so it seems like transportation secretary or bust and we will be waiting to hear if he is named to. Joe biden's cabinet along with illinois senator. Tammy duckworth who is believed to be a leading contender to lead the veterans affairs department. So we're all on pins and needles or at least i am vacancy. See for governor pritzker two point in the senate if that happens a man we've got about twenty seconds left five politicians talking about running for secretary of state. who are they. Is it early. Who i don't know if i'm going to get them all in the clerk. Karen yarbrough city clerk in valencia former state treasurer alexi genucel. Elliot's of ultimate. Run out of getting somebody. That won't be the like thing. Everybody wants this job jesse white. His said before that he was going to retire. Never actually done it. He says he actually means it. It is going to be a hot contest. Should be fun to watch for those of us. Who enjoy watching it. My thanks our spotlight. Politics team periods shuts heather serono and amanda energy. And you can visit our website for more on the stories discussed tonight with our spotlight politics team. And while you're there make sure to check on our died for things to know about the state's plan for a covid nineteen vaccine that's all it. Wtt w dot com slash news. And that's our show for this wednesday night don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website. Wtt w dot com slash news can also give the show via podcast and the pbs video. App please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven. We visit pilsen and its businesses and community leaders for next in your neighborhood and an update on the long awaited final stretch of the lakefront trail which the city hopes to complete by year's end. And we leave you tonight with some more of the lyric opera's pass the own latina performance now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm brandon friedman and i'm parachutes. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe and good night closed. Captioning is made possible in part by robert a clifford and clifford law offices wishing a happy and healthy holiday season.

chicago madigan kosta howard illinois Tom tunney cdc eleven point four percent Kosta howard lightfoot mike madigan englewood ward alderman brandon friedman Dr allison arwady mayor lightfoot lakeview city ten thousand dollar ariel investments Dr brandis brandis
January 14, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:45 min | 5 months ago

January 14, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm peres shots here. On our north west side studio. And i'm brandon friedman reporting live from chicago's north lauderdale neighborhood on the show tonight. No one is above the law. Not even the president of the united states a second impeachment trial awaits president trump as he belatedly condemned the deadly violence at the capital. This is unacceptable occurrence happened in springfield besides selection of a new illinois house speaker. We've got the legislative scorecard. Everything that was happening before was just amplified by the pandemic prentice. Friedman is live in north london for the latest. Stop in our in your neighborhood. Series providing critical care to some of the most vulnerable covid patients to respiratory therapists on their work during the pandemic angel. Edo and tonight. I'll have more on. How a chicago teen is incorporating art in stem to continue. Dr king's message of unity and jeffrey has the scoop on some chicago. Ice cream history in ask geoffrey but first harris as we mentioned. I'm in north lonsdale. Where i'll be co anchoring. Tonight from chicago's north longdale community as i said as part of our chicago night in your neighborhood series and we're going to check in with a number of community groups here who have had to come together to help provide food and services to the community members here still struggling amid this pandemic will have that more paris all brennan's thank you and now at some of today's top stories. President elect joe biden addressed the nation within the past hour. He announced a nearly two trillion dollar covid stimulus proposal that includes fourteen hundred dollar direct checks to individuals and families four hundred billion dollars in pandemic relief funds and three hundred fifty billion dollars for state and local governments like illinois in chicago to stem some of the resultant budget shortfalls now. The address comes as the labor department reports more than one million new unemployment claims last week. And that's up twenty five percent from the week. Before biden says the plan is necessary to combat this raging pandemic and cratering economy that has exacerbated economic inequality. there were in the middle of the once in several generations economic crisis with the once in several generations. Public health crisis crisis of deep human suffering is in plain sight. There's no time to waste. We have to act. We have to act now in. Chicago's getting more mass covid. Nineteen vaccinations sites for healthcare workers to new sites. Open today at city colleges of chicago locations with three more coming online early next week. The city says it is still in phase one of the vaccination meeting up to four hundred thousand chicago. Healthcare workers are eligible but mayor lori lightfoot again called on the federal government to speed up the vaccine distribution. She says the amount of vaccines delivered have been going in the wrong direction. Two weeks ago the number fell to thirty eight thousand first doses last week. The number drop to thirty two thousand first doses. That is clearly. They of where we need to be going at the rate we've been on chicago won't be fully vaccinated for another year and a half and that is completely and totally unacceptable. And lightfoot says she wants the authority to be able to reopen chicago bars and restaurants lightfoot today again called on governor jay pritzker to allow the relaxing of some cove in nineteen restrictions as quickly as possible as a spiked. That materialized in late october of last year appears to have leveled off a bit. Pritzker is office says that neither chicago or cook county of reach the metric level for a partial reopen and illinois public health officials report. Sixty six hundred new covid nineteen cases today and eighty eight additional deaths. The statewide case total is now more than one million. Fifty two thousand cases along with seventeen thousand nine hundred and twenty eight deaths. The seven day test positivity rate right now is a flat eight percent all eyes are on the senate after the house votes for a second time to impeach president donald trump for his role inciting the violent insurrection that took place at the capitol on january six after a week of soft condemnation and silence. The president put out a video statement. Last night i wanna be very clear. I unequivocally condemn the violence that we saw last week. Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country and no place in our movement mob. Violence goes against everything. I believe in and everything are movement stands for and joining us to talk about the impending impeachment. Trial are william professor in american politics at the university of chicago harris school of public policy as well as the political science department. He's also the director of the center for effective government and heidi trouser sir a visiting professor of constitutional law at northwestern university law school. Welcome both of you back to chicago tonight. So we'll how. What is the point of carrying out an impeachment trial in the senate if it's going to happen under a biden administration. Well there's two things that we can look to. The first is that it. Should they succeed in convicting in the senate and that's probably unlikely but should they manage to do so the then we'll be afforded an opportunity to cast a vote on a majoritarian basis about whether to ban him ban trump from holding office evermore. So that's significant particularly when you think about a president who has done to subtly hinted at his interest in running in two thousand twenty four. The bigger reason though has to do with managing the public's expectations about what constitutes proper presidential conduct. And there's just a ton of work to be done on that front. There's a real reason why we need to see real repudiation from congress and it goes beyond the select willingness of individual members of congress to show up on sunday morning talk shows and say that they wish hadn't happened to do something official and indeed only ten republican members of the house voted for the impeachment. Heineken trouser. there's some question today as to whether a post-presidency impeachment trial is even constitutional. What's your read on that. So there is a debate about that In fact there was very good article today in the new york times by one law. Professor steve vladeck making the case is there was an article in the washington. Post the other day by former judge louis. Making the argument that it's not constitutional. I think you'd better origin is that it is indeed constitutional first of all Very fact that the constitutes creates the auction of disqualification for future office as an option after conviction suggests that it just won't be logical not to make each been an option even after one term ended. Otherwise it would be all too easy right for someone simply to avoid being disqualified by resigning before they could be impeached. Second of all there is some historical storm evidence indicating that indeed. The congress were well aware of the possibility of sluiced term impeachment And historically in the us there have been some impeachments of lower level officers after they had left office. I think that's better argue. So there is precedent there in terms of lower level officers of. We'll how majority leader mitch. Mcconnell is not going to call the senate back as we mentioned until the new term starts january nineteenth. No activity would happen on this until biden. Sworn in what we know about mitch. Mcconnell is he loves being in the majority. he's a very political animal but from reporting apparently he also wants to purge trump from the party. So what's the political calculation mcconnell's making here. Well i think just pointed to it which is on the one hand. He doesn't like trump he sees the rise of populism within his party as being potentially destructive but he also is in one to shake this tree. He's been in power for the last four years and has done precious little to take on this president serious-minded way he won't be the majority leader going forward. It's going to be chuck schumer. Who's gonna decide the terms of the senate trial that we're going to observe and if what happened in the house is any kind of provides any insight into the senate only ten only ten republicans out of the more than two hundred. There saw fit to vote for impeachment. They're going to need in the in the senate to get to go seventeen fifty if they're going to actually convict and that seems pretty unlikely mcconnell's kind of hesitation or is it the little dance. He's performing right now. Notwithstanding and control sir is there could a senate impeachment trial upenn. The early biden agenda when he wants to get off to a fast start on cova did on economic relief on confirmation of his cabinet appointments. Yeah well that is a concern. And it's a concern that that biden has has certainly indicated You know is one that he wants to put a who relief and somebody other challenges facing the country front and center That said there is the possibility of sort of double tracking. Also that the senate for part of the day could handle the confirmation. I could handle the impeachment trial And for part of the day could consider legislation cbs's cohen. Except so i think the balance can be struck but it is what trippy and we'll how. How do you see the broader shakeout happening in the republican party as you mentioned mcconnell and certain other press more establishment figures want trump gone from their party. They see it as a cancer to their party. But trump still is the most popular figure in the party and the more grassroots folks. Still stand behind him going to play out. Well we're going to see. I mean i think that trump is leaving office does not mean that populism is just going to dissipate from our midst that he he got forty seven forty seven seventy four. My dyslexia seventy four million votes. In the general election he one hundred and thirty nine. Republicans sofit at of the even in the aftermath. The immediate aftermath of the last week's insurrection to propagate his lies about the election had been stolen their own whole lineup of folks who had loved to pick up the mantle of populism and carry it forward so sure trump as an individual may be taping taking a step back but he remains incredibly popular in populism as decidedly. Take hold of this party. And that's there are a few signs that's gonna that's gonna change in the immediate future and it's such a different washington. Dc now folks talking about all the national guard troops. It looks like a fortified zone in a war torn country heidi control sir in the aftermath of january six What what about the united states. Strength around the world As as a as the export of democracy because of its example dot com. How does this what happened. Complicate biden's agenda both at home and abroad. Well i think that this does a add to biden's agenda on the need to show that the united states continues to take seriously the notion of living under the rule of law freedom of the press peaceful transfer of power except for all so many norms and. Here's the values have been up in did in this administration And that is birth loud and clear around the world and so it's true that that is among the task that is really important for the administration to carry out and we'll you know we've always celebrated the peaceful transfer of power in the united states. I don't know that you can say this is a peaceful transfer of power. I think that that's already of left. The building is there any parallel to to this situation and any worries. You have about the inauguration. Next week for sure i mean. There are lots of concerns about violence of course but much of the damage. Frankly has already been done that both in terms the spread of miss information disenfranchised disinformation campaign from this president. The failure of this president to cooperate with the incoming administration to ensure not just a peaceful transfer of power. But that there's a seamless transfer power. That is that the work that's going on within bureaucracies in on the diplomacy fronts can continue without too much disruption. This is an incredibly lost opportunity. That we've we've observed over the last couple of months. Were still what we've seen is again. The kind of the final throes of a populist president is doing everything he can to leak damage and destruction as week. It's been really awful. And it certainly seems like at the very least beyond the inauguration it could lead to an insurrectionist movement that sticks around in the united states for a while right. We're going to have to leave it. There are thanks to william how and heidi controls thank you so much house speaker. Michael madigan is out. How speaker chris. Welsh is in. You know that much. So what else did illinois general assembly do these past few days while they were in session. Well it turns out a lot. Amanda finicky live at the capital with more. Amanda gives the rundown you know. Paris capital is once again relatively empty after a busy couple of days and actually up until then it had been two hundred thirty days since the illinois legislature had last convened. What would have normally busy. Several months was all cancelled because of covid nineteen and so a lot built up in that time including a major focus of this lame duck session. Net is a package put forth by the black caucus. In the wake of george floyd killing the illinois legislative black caucus agenda will ensure that we're addressing the pandemic's that exist in our society one assistant racism to violence and now covid nineteen so that black caucus agenda is one provision of it with limit to thirty six percent the interest that payday loan lenders can charge. How many of you want to get a credit card. Maybe for mazey's and marcus at eighty percent ninety nine percent this preying on certain communities. It's really targeting. It's a remake. Rebirth redlining housing covenants. And all the other ills have decimated my community and what we're trying to do is ensure that they have an opportunity to build economic stability now. That measure passed despite concerns that it will leave low income individuals without any access to capital. There are many citizens not just in illinois but all across the country who don't necessarily have the credit rating that would allow them to go to the top shelf lending institutions and borrow money but nevertheless have a cash need or a capital. Need maybe short term. It may have. It may be to put a put a new roof on the house or repair. A car republicans also raising concerns about another measure that restricts employers from making hiring decisions based on job applicants criminal history the laid out scenarios of employers being at risk of breaking the law when they say those employers are just trying to look out for their business. I feel like i have fallen into an episode of hypotheticals. Gone wild with all of these various nightmare scenarios looking for a way to make this bill the boogeyman again. We are at a critical point in our history. We have generations of errors and injustices to correct for another pillar of that black caucus agenda. In fact maybe the biggest one deals with policing in criminal justice and we are going to delve into that on. Wtt ws black voices on sunday at six pm now. In part because of covid nineteen illinois's budget is in a world of hurt and governor gb prescribe solution partially. Anyway is to bring some additional money into state coffers by eliminating tax break for certain businesses. This is a tax break that the federal government actually recently created in provided for for businesses. That were hurting losing money. Because of covid nineteen it is called decoupling and republicans. Were furious about it now. I understand that the governor doesn't have a lot of empathy and a lot of understanding for the struggles of small business owners. But this is unacceptable. I would like to know one reason. Why any business would want to come. L. annoy are staying illinois. We're treating our small businesses especially with this decoupling shamefully. They need our help. This is a one billion dollar tax increase. Everybody needs to wake up. This is a tax increase on small businesses but governor and other backers of this that they have to be some tough choices made right now in this point. Illuminate cannot afford to give additional tax breaks to business when we're talking about taxing businesses out of existence that's a bit of an overage h me and i'll take to the bill The bill this is a this is a deficit increase if we don't pass bets decisions in the hundred second general assembly are not going to be easy. This makes balancing the budget much more palatable circumstance for our constituents but it was not just republicans who were not on board. Democrats have more than enough members to be able to pass any bill without even legal. Gop vote and that decoupling plan. Well it did not have enough support to pass. It was among many measures. That didn't get their way to governor. Gb printers either for lack of support or for lack of time and now includes for example in elected school board for chicago public schools anything to do with essex and also something that would have allowed the general assembly to not have to go for such a long stretch without needing again. Did talk about it. Nobil on the way to governor. Gb predators desk that would allow legislators to meet remotely say over zoom so from springfield. Back to you perez. A man a lot on the agenda there. Thank you so much. And last summer we visited one of chicago's more historic neighborhoods but that same neighborhood. His face challenges of economic depression and unemployment violence. And of course the pandemic for this week. Stop in are in your neighborhood series. Brandis friedman and producer quinn myers traveled back to north lonsdale to find out how the community is faring. Eleven months into the pandemic andbranch join us from an area. That's gotten a lot of attention in the last year. Tell us about that. Yeah that's right paris. We wanted to go ahead and spotlight one of the successes of this community right away. We were standing in douglas park. Which until last year had been named for stephen douglas he wasn't illinois leads legislator but in illinois politician who was who profited off of the slave trade in the eighteen hundreds well a campaign from the community led by students at village leadership academy it led the city's park district to rename. This park for abolitionist frederick. Douglass the village leadership academy students afro futurist because right before the pandemic we went to hearing For them to talk about it and there was like no they they weren't receptive to it at all and they have been there a number of times but seeing everything that happened after the death of george floyd and the response in the cities all over the country and then to see the change it would like it was really emotional for me to to watch that last hearing now that last hearing referring tubes in july when the chicago park district board unanimously. Agreed to change. The park's name after that year's long effort led by students and the community power says because the signs reflecting the parks name-change were just replaced late last year. Community hasn't really had the opportunity to celebrate the way they would like to and that's especially because of the pandemic and of course the cold weather now. The corona virus has hit this community especially hard certainly not the worst but it does have a twelve point. One percent positivity rate now this zip code where we are six. Oh six to three. It also is shared with little village but their zip code south of here with the positivity rate gets higher all the way up to sixteen percent all of this. Compared to the city's positivity rate of nine point seven percent as of today now this community though it is historic it still has needs to sean pollard. Who you just heard from. She says that her organization. The northland community coordinating council was working on equality of life plan a year ago until the pandemic hit volunteers. Were working to address housing workforce development and since then had to shift focus everything that was happening before was was just amplified by the pandemic. So you know there were housing needs. There were food insecurity needs before the pandemic it was just amplified and we a lot of people losing their jobs. Not having money to pay their rent now. Some of the support that the council has been the community. It includes a food giveaways diaper drives donating masks and other p p p p so. This is a working class community with more than fifty percent of residents. Earning fifty thousand dollars or less. It is also predominantly black community with eighty eight percent of the residents being black one of those longtime residents and business owners. Many of us remember from our in your neighborhood. Stop here last summer. He's edwin mold. Row of del car pharmacy on sixteenth street. Which has been here since the sixties we wanted to check in with him again and he says he's definitely noticed residents are struggling and gone into what he calls survival mode but he does his best to lend support as well. I know what i've done as far as helping people you know with medication even at my mini mart next door if you need assists with groceries or he would just simple delivery because a lot of times you don't have the means to get out and go to pick up your medicine or pick up some milk or whatever now also here in. The northland community is sinai hospital. It's a safety net hospital in that means they're they treat patients regardless of their ability to pay one of the hospitals leaders of infectious. Diseases says the hospital has been hit. Hard by cova. They're noticing a lot of multi generational impacts on the patients. They're serving additionally she says about forty percent of the staff has been vaccinated for the corona virus and that that is on par with what other hospitals are doing as well as within the community. There are also healthcare workers who are hesitant about the vaccine even healthcare workers are human. And it's a new vaccine. So there's a lot of concerns about the novelty of the vaccine A lot of concerns about potential issues if somebody's pregnant particularly if it's an early pregnancy There have been questions from caregivers who have recently had cove. Ed and i should mention the doctor. Mohapatra says that the hospital is providing that one on one counseling to answer questions with healthcare workers if they are concerned about getting that covid nineteen vaccine and coming up later on. We're going to hear from the aldermen. Here michael scott's and as i mentioned this is a historic neighborhood. We're going to have a little bit more on that later on as well. We'll look forward to that. Brandis and up next ways to celebrate. Martin luther king junior day virtually so stick around. What can you tell us about. How chicago small businesses. These are more than just shopping centers for the community. They're gathering places where they maintain their culture and as much more ahead of the program including how respiratory therapists have been working through the pandemic. But first martin luther king day is coming. Monday artists throughout the city are finding creative. Ways to celebrate king's movement in virtual celebrations arts correspondent angel edo shares more. We wanted to showcase how martin luther king junior works in tandem with every single letter of steam like he is science technology engineering and math. He's not just like a leader. He's not just the civil rights leader like he has done everything under that umbrella that you could think of this martin luther king day fourteen year old. Dorothy jean tillman is using her passion for education to highlight dr king's impact in steam related fields in virtual celebration. It will be livestreamed from the harold washington cultural center from dance and musical numbers to excerpts from some of his most prominent speeches. A call upon you to take your money out of the banks downtown and put your money in tristate inc to science experiments. Tillman's mother says the afternoons assembly highlights the impact of art and science working together them in steam there a teen in it's all about unity and ultimately the ultimate goal is to make sure that young people know that this is something that can do. This is something that is a choice. And it's the. Dr king fought for them to have the right to be able to learn in excel in any field but unity isn't the only message of dr king that chicago artists will be celebrating. Over at the black ensemble theater. They'll be having their tent. Mlk day production in collaboration with the african american arts alliance founder and ceo of the theater. Jackie taylor says she hopes the annual showcase reinforces empathy and humanity. That's what dr king preach towards anything. It wasn't about cbs revenge. We either love and learn how to love and care for each other. And i mean that on a worldwide regard class. Actress says she hopes viewers are able to see how art has helped progress. Dr king's movement. The arts are of forced to evolve. And we always do. I think they were actually as artists in artist in all this creative people. I think we're on the verge of renaissance another genocides. And i'm just. I'm actually very excited. Because it's just forcing people to really get creative with their creativity. Art reflecting change was most recently seen this summer with a rise in public art. So much of what martin luther king junior was speaking to through his political lands was it idea. Claiming space of claiming self of pride will join a group of black mirrorless of all ages to discuss the impact of this mural movement and one of many mlk day celebrations at the hyde park art center. This period in protest is really just kind of it so much more conversation about what public space should be and mean and how we can engage it to create more camaraderie. This not enough just to have an individual opinion but how do we come together and find commonalities in terms of our direction for chicago. Tonight i'm angel. Edo the celebrate. Dr king's life and legacy virtually this monday. We've got the full details on our website and still to come on chicago. Tonight are in your neighborhood. Series takes us to north lonsdale where we check in with community leaders to hear how they've been impacted by covid nineteen. They're critical care of most vulnerable coronavirus patients we hear from to respiratory therapists on their work during the pandemic and or has the scoop on some chicago ice cream history in tonight's ask geoffrey but i some more of today's top stories. The chicago police department announces disciplinary action. Against officers who were caught on. Camera sleeping and lounging in the offices of congressman bobby rush during riots last summer a group of thirteen officers which included three supervisors were captured on video surveillance footage discovered by russia's staff and then turned over to the city a spokesperson for the chicago. Police department would confirm only that the investigation of the incident was complete but did not say how many officers were disciplined. And what exactly that discipline would be. Different accounts of how many covert cases have broken out in chicago public schools. Cps puts the official number at four total presumed positive cases among more than a thousand tests administered to students and staff. The statistics don't identify which schools have seen positive cases but the chicago teachers union puts the number at twenty schools with positive covid cases and today a group of teachers union. School nurses protested the return to in person. Learning today is not a game jake. He see the effects of this disease. People in the city. And now we check back in with brandis. Friedman whose co anchoring tonight in north lonsdale on the west side. It's part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series brandis. That's right here earlier. Today we spoke with twenty fourth ward alderman. Hot and i started by asking him about how this community is coping ten months into this covid. Nineteen pandemic in and around north mondale. There aren't many things to do when you know that's part of my job is trying to figure out how to bring more minutes to this community and and not having those amenities and not having the ability to do anything. Even in the summer was rough and now That everything's closed down in and around chicago. You can't go downtown Many of my community members are stuck in the house. And and wondering you know. Just win this. Kobe thing is going to be end when you're going to get the vaccine when they're gonna see some light at the end of the tunnel economically We were driving through earlier. And i noticed a business that we spoke to the summer. You know had its door closed today. And we haven't called them yet to find out why but how our businesses you know. What's the economics here again. bef- even before cove we having problems covert just exacerbated those problems exacerbated those issues and so what what will continue to do is eat a work on new businesses Black owned businesses. We actually have a fun that we've created here in the ward where we were raised about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Will we will give to a new community businesses hopefully in the summer to start startup and Get when they get when again. It's good when the weather's warm people can come out and frequent the business. How would you rate the vaccine. Roll out at this point and also what are you hearing from your community members with regard to vaccine hesitancy. So i would. I would give it a incomplete I think we're still trying to figure out just who win wherein how What i what. I will say though is members of my community members of my family members of the african american community in general. Have a mixed bag about The vaccine and how it should be rolled out if they should get it or not I was talking to an individual the other day who was telling me how They really want the vaccine and when things are available please let them know. And then i was having a conversation with a relative of mine who just didn't feel comfortable in couldn't understand the speed and the rollout of how we got the vaccine the way that it is and so. I think it's a mixed bag of sorts yesterday. We reported that there will be no citywide registry. Doctor already saying that most folks will get that vaccine through their doctor but a lot of those don't have a primary physician that they would go to. What do you think we need to be doing to make sure that win. The vaccine is available to more people that more people are able to get it. You know so one of the things that i've mentioned to the administration to dr. Our herself is meeting people where they are Like you said in the community. North mondale We don't have a lot of health centres. We don't have a lot of places where people go and have a primary care physician and so we have to go to the places where they will go. talking to A lawyer friend of mine the other day who works for community organization here in north mondale. Who does drug treatment facilities a drug treatment facility in and wants to see if they could get the vaccine because he knows a lot of people get their healthcare their their mental health their physical health Chat kind of like a catch all and so we have to figure out those places where people go so we can meet them where they are. You're also share of the city council. Education committee hosted a hearing on monday about reopening plan. Do you think it was the right time knowing what we know about cases to reopen schools. So you know there's never going to be the exact right time. What i do know is that there are a lot of children in communities. Like north mondale likely inglewood like Back of the yards. Well we have a lot of people of color. They just aren't getting the educational needs met by E-learning and so we have to think of another thing to do to make sure that our children are it not a lost generation. There've been some cova cases reported in several schools A lot of local school councils are concerned about reopening and they're very resistant to it. You know what do you say to those folks though especially in communities where the rates are higher and they just don't trusts epsn's plan. I think this is kind of all wrapped around like the the mistrust of government. We talked about the virus and people. Having mistrust people have mistrust in government as it is and so what what i would say to people. Is you have to do your research. You have to you have to feel comfortable yourself And that's why. Eps has the option of people going in not going and so if you feel like it is not the right time. And you're not comfortable They're still going to be learning. We're still going to make sure that that people educated the way that they can be whether it's at home whether it's in person and so You know never going to be the right time until kobe is is gone away but we gotta do the best for children that we can in paris in just a few minutes. We're actually going to hear from a local church in the community about how they've pivoted during this pandemic we'll see in a few minutes. Our branch will look forward to that and now fill say for a look at the work of respiratory therapists during this pandemic fill says Profession many people may not know much about and they're providing critical care during this pandemic respiratory therapists are the healthcare workers trained to use ventilators machine needed by some of the sickest cova patients. Even before the pandemic there was a shortage of respiratory therapists. A problem that's now become more apparent joining us out or talk about their work amid the pandemic are brady scott. He's a respiratory therapist at rush medical center. He's also an associate professor at rush university and director of clinical education for respiratory care and neither peres respiratory therapist at health. And thank you both for joining us on night. Appraises i mentioned a lotta people may not know exactly what a respiratory therapist does. How do you describe what you do. That's therapist in our role we treat and assess patients we Take care of patients with various lung disease and lung infections such as copd asthma lung cancer. And now code brady scott. How would you describe the role of respiratory therapists amidst this kovin pandemic. Well a lot of the individuals that were taking care of Because they're they're dealing with kovin are in pre severe restaurant failure so royal restroom. There are using devices to help them breathe easier to improve their oxygen levels. Sometimes we have to use devices the breath for them. If they're critically ill so the we restaurant there do this for a lot of folks but The kobe night that the covid nineteen population are really challenging during this time so use devices other than respirators themselves. There are other tools at your disposal. Is that what you're saying. So you know we. We make a lot of attempts to try to keep people off those mechanical ventilators in the first place so Something commonly Something that we use commonly it would be high flow nasal kanye oxygen therapy or non invasive ventilation which is which is similar to putting a patient on a the breathing machines with the indo trae throw to was actually with al too. So the patient doesn't have to be sedated heavily and paralyzing those things so it's a way to keep patient awake and prevent them from going on those machines in the first place neither pros. We understand that. A patient's condition can change very dramatically. Very quickly could you. Could you talk about that any experience. You've had slowly. Well i've seen due to the media. You know a lot of people. Try to simplify cove and say it's not real. It's not serious. And i think that has caused delay in a lot of our patients coming into the er and by the time they do come to the er They need to be on. Oxygen like Rated with saying an easel kanye la and depending on how low the oxygen levels are. We've seen it where we had to start them on high nasal kenya or by tapper c-pap with by cpac a regulator oxygenation very well by drawing their blood and checking oxygenation levels. But unfortunately there are times where it's just chew grave and we do have to intubate and brady scott. How about that. How quickly can a patient's condition change very quickly The if you're referring to cove nineteen in the individuals with covid nineteen to be frank. Some of those folks really deteriorate very quickly with us as as she just said you know some folks come to emergency room and they're very sick and they deteriorate very quickly and have to be placed on those mechanical ventilation in the emergency department even before they're admitted to the floor of the hospital or bad. So and then we're even seeing folks that are are that have been admitted. still deteriorate At the bedside and have to be intimated Which is that that means putting the reason to bed very quickly. so that's pretty common actually night pres- winter sand. As we mentioned that there's a shortage of respiratory therapists. And what can you tell us about burnout that some respiratory therapist might be experiencing for example. What kinds of ours are a lot of you working. We're working our normal shifts and covering extra ships you don't see them overstaff also test positive in the near gone for two weeks at a time. So we're picking up the slack from that or there's just so many patients on ventilators are point system that we work on the points are very high requiring extra respiratory therapists that we do not have so we have seek out agency therapists to come and help us on staff and you know. We're working twelve sixteen hour days sometimes five six times a week rather than our normal three to four shifts so week brady scott how. 'bout that how do you assess the shortage in your profession and what it means in this moment. Well you clearly. In the said in the beginning we shortage in the profession even before the covid nineteen pandemic. I think what this pandemic is just highlighted. That reality You know our restaurant service have been asked to work a lot of our shifts. They don't normally work during the surge Some restaurant therapist went from their like pulmonary function. Labs back to working at the bedside again Know a lot of people shifted around. So you know again. I think that that raising awareness of the restaurant therapy professions important And then you know a hold that after the pandemic than people towards our profession as a career opportunity to help people and and really filled up a lot of the jobs that are available nowadays right now in chicago about eighty percent of staffed. Icu beds are occupied. And about thirty. Two percent of ventilators are being used. That's according to state data on either with another more. Contagious strain. Just stayed away in both indiana and wisconsin. How concerned about you that this could change. Those numbers could go up. I do feel they will change especially hearing that it's more contagious and a lot of people are still not following simple rules. Such as wearing masks and a lot of people are scared to get the vaccine. I mean i've done the vaccine. So hopefully we can start developing a herd immunity and get out of this new strain. That's coming our way but you know we're fully staffed we got our ventilators and we're ready. We're ready to take on the fight night. Perot's brady scott. We hope that we wish you the best with that fight. And we all hope everybody's say that that fight soon diminishes somewhat many thanks to you. Both and i'll paris we go back to you. Thanks phil and now. We check back in with brandon friedman. Who's calling entering. Tonight's show in north one dell part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series brandis impairs earlier today. We stopped by the stone temple. Baptist church on douglas boulevard here in north dale and we spoke with pastor risona fitz patrick about the church's long history. But also how it's pivoted during the pandemic we've adapted by realizing that we have a responsibility to our community and is to do whatever we can to make sure that people understand what this pandemic is all about and what we need to do to rally together to show some sense of unity in how we're going to help one another out of this situation so we've rally we've partnered with authorizations in the community and even outside of the community to provide food to provide clothing to provide toiletries and p. p. e. and it's really been a wonderful experience so just now for example you know we saw food donation arrive and you've got some people helping to set up for it. Tell us going on there. So you know what that brings me so much joy because i'll get a call early in the morning. They'll say. Hey we got a shipment. Can you guys use anything and my answer is always yes because people can always use something especially in the midst of a pandemic so i got a call from you can which is an organization. That's right around the corner and I lined up people who are willing to help to who are willing to serve and they might guide goes to pick up the goodies brings back set up a table outside and one of the things i love to do is to make it as beautiful as possible. So we'll put a tablecloth on it because i want people to come have a sense of dignity like this is just not a food pantry. This is a place where you can come and get some really good food items. 'cause i'm excited about the sausages. That are there and the pasta. That is there so we come. We set up a new facebook post. And before you know it everything that we have been given from the community goes out to the community in debt brings me a sense of joy. Because i feel like we've done what we're supposed to do. We're supposed to be service. I am a proponent of of the scripture that says you know we our brother's keeper it's my responsibility to serve. And if i'm not serving i'm really not living. What would you say are some of the needs in the north longdale community especially during the pandemic so so one of the things out say Education about the pandemic empowering people on where to get help and There's been a lot of disenfranchisement in this community since the fifties so for a very very long time and so now i'm people being generous and generally come to north landale. Find a group of people that wants to be in power and to empower them with educational twos with Entrepreneurship to that. They can start their own businesses. Because right now that's what people are doing. Because his gotten so difficult to hold a regular nine to five because of the pandemic people are inside. So let's be creative while you insight. Let's do something. So we're working on trying to get a entrepreneur hub where we can get leaders and people in the community to come and to share skills into teach in train and develop so that people can can empower themselves in you know instead of having to come to the table that can bring something to the table. So that's exciting because it's happening toes a little bit about the history of your churches building. There are lot of former synagogues in the north on nil community so so stone temple was originally a jewish synagogue. In one thousand nine hundred six was as the romanian temple and one of the things. I like to tell people get excited when i'm asking. Is that when you come to stone. Simple you actually coming to a place where queen was and also the king. So the romanian coin came in nineteen twenty six. Go the place. So when you cross threshold you are in a place disc queenly and also kingly and i like to share their story because dr king spent a lotta time as stone simple also in his sixty so there's a lot of history at stone simple and we try to continue to tell the history For example this garden tell somebody history to the tablets. These tabs were inside of the church. This jewish tablets so we bought him out because we have a partnership with chicago. Sign up and they help actually keep this garden together. there are partisan we love them. They come here often with us. And we want to use this stage as a A way of telling narratives are jewish family and african american families abridged stolz histories together so that there is a spirit of unity here and you mentioned dr king having preached here. When he's been time. Here in the in the sixties tells about that saw and six as dr king was here making sure that this community was aware of what was happening what he was trying to do as it relates to civil rights and so he spent time having rallies here bringing people together talking about redline talking about how all the disenfranchisement was happening not just in the south but even in north and even still today it's still exists Systemic racism is very real and it continues to happen we have to stand up against it. People have biases that really know about so. Let's go inside of ourselves and see. What can we get rid of to bring us all together. And that is what's interesting because there's a latte going on now and everybody's talking and s what i love because everybody's talking but now is more than talk. Everybody can see everybody activated in the process of india systemic racism because it does exist. And of course that's pastor rashawn fitzpatrick of stone temple missionary baptist. Church here north longdale. There at the end. You hear her mentioned that. Dr king reverend king preached there back in the sixties. We're going to have more on. Reverend king's a historic time in north london. That's coming up sunday on chicago tonight. Black voices paris a lot of history at the church. All right thank you brandis and up next to maybe the middle of winter. But we go to the archives for a sweet treat from last july in an encore presentation of ask geoffrey but first we take a look at the weather. Chicago tonight is made possible in part through the generous support of the julius frankel foundation in nineteen eighty-four president. Ronald reagan turned his sweet tooth international news when he decreed the month of july to be national ice cream month. That's why jeffrey bayer considers it his patriotic duty to give us the scoop on some sweet creamy history in tonight's ask geoffrey. Hey jeffrey Anything for the team. Anything for the team. All right they give you the tough assignment so a few weeks ago you answered a question about the building material known as the chicago rick so tonight we have a follow up to that question. This is from mary. Alridge in ravens with gardens. She wants to know your segment on brick. Reminded me of an ice cream treat. I remember from the nineteen fifties called chicago brick. It was orange sherbet with vanilla and caramel. I'd like to know its history whether it was just a reasonable flavor and if it is still available so what exactly is chicago brick ice cream right so people can probably picture neapolitan ice cream which is divided into lateral sections of chocolate vanilla and strawberry so as our viewer points out. Chicago rip. ice cream was basically the same idea except that the layers were different. They were orange sherbet vanilla in carmel. Okay so why do they take that neopolitan ice cream and call it chicago brick. Does it actually have to do with clay bricks. Well that was my theory and as you can see this image. The colors of the flavors mixed together definitely do resemble the color palette of real chicago bricks which featured a few weeks ago. I asked jeffery any evidence that the name has anything to do with that in fact this ice cream variety wasn't even unique to chicago. We found ads for chicago. Brick ice cream of as far away as oklahoma and nebraska and nineteen in the nineteen thirties So of course not knowing where else to turn we. We asked to cargo cultural historian. Tim samuelson about this confectionary conundrum and he broke it down. He said that as far as the part of the name well that was just once a common reference to the shape of a block of ice cream no matter what the flavor of infected as early as the nineteen sixties. Excuse me eighteen. Sixty of bricks of ice cream became popular and sweet shops. All over the country. The shop would cut a rick shaped slab. Wrap it up for you to take home and then you'd slice it up into individual surveys now. This flavor called chicago. Brick started appearing an ice cream parlors eighteen eighties and it can be found in grocery stores Starting in the late nineteen forties and a few local manufacturers produced chicago brick flavor including bordon's walgreens and deans but as far as why the names chicago is in there. Unfortunately tim samuelson chemo. And if tim samuelson doesn't know you know it's a deep mystery so jeffrey can you get it anywhere today. Well it was out of stock at every store we checked. It is still made by one. Local ice cream producer called d. f. a. brands in batavia and sold under the dean's country fresh label but they only release it as an occasional. Limited edition are contacted. The faa said that if they get requests they might bring a flavor back so we can start a movement here if you want to taste of chicago history. Give them a call. I had -ticipant a letter writing campaign after this you you were holding a bowl of supposed chicago brick ice cream up earlier so what. What was that next to the brick wall okay. Well we cheated a little there. Our producer arrogant. Gunnison discovered that an ice cream parlor. And we'll meant call homers carries the three separate flavors and so she asked them to pack them into a single quart to simulate chicago brick but homer doesn't actually offer that. Are there any other chicago flavored. Ice cream flavors. We'll there there is another one and it has a misleading name south siders probably know the palmer house labor as the middle layer a rainbow. Colored image comes from down on the south side. That's tolerance five layer from the nearly century-old shop of the same name which is in the beverly neighborhood of palmer. Houses have been nila. Ice cream started with cherries and walnuts. But it was not invented a legendary palmer house hotel. According to rainbow collins owner lind sam on her grandfather. Joseph south shops founder wanted to put a chicago stamp on a new york ice cream. Vanilla and cherry flavor was paul palmer. So he added wallich to the recipe and he added the name house. Honored the legendary palmer house hotel. Oh and by the way doug bars were also invented in chicago. Chicago candy store owner leo on us invented. These are chocolate dipped ice cream bar in the nineteen fifties supposedly recklessly down the street. Every an ice cream truck he decided would make his son safer just invented his own. Basically bar all right jeffrey. Thank you so much my question and don't forget that you can visit our website for more of chicago's history while you're there. Don't forget to submit your own question to jeffrey bear. That's all it. W w dot com slash news ask. Geoffrey is made possible in part by the molin howard progressive philanthropic funding in honor of mova. Now once again. That was taped back in july. And that is our show for this thursday night don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and their website w. t w dot com slash news. You can also get the show via podcast on the ps video app in. Please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven for the weekend review now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm brandis friedman and i'm parachutes. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe. And we'll see you tomorrow Closed captioning is made possible by robert a clifford and clifford. Law offices are chicago personal injury and wrongful death firm. That's proud to serve. Its community through pro bono eagles.

chicago dr king senate north lonsdale illinois biden george floyd brady scott mcconnell brandon friedman united states north mondale lightfoot illinois legislature cova president trump President elect joe biden
April 14, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:50 min | 2 months ago

April 14, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm brandis friedman. And i'm peres shots on the show tonight. I want to be respectful. The bodycam footage of the police involved death of thirteen year old adam toledo will be released tomorrow. That and much more is the focus of our spotlight politics. President and mrs obama chose to build their presidential center. Here work is getting started at the site of the obama presidential center but a lawsuit aims to bring construction to a halt elected accountability over the operations from schools has bills to change the cps school board fly fast in springfield will hear from to cps parents about what they want to see. Mayor lightfoot office recommends using federal relief funds to pay off the city's debt why that doesn't sit well with some aldermen. A new initiative looks to boost development in black and brown communities and courage people of color to get in the game. It's impacted us in a great way from a revenue standpoint. But it's made the business very difficult to run. The pandemic has led to a surge in demand for corrugated packaging materials. How that's playing out across the chicago area it challenges our conceptions value and how a chicago artist is turning digital art into a sculpture. But first some of today's top stories bodycam video showing the fatal police shooting of thirteen year. Old adam toledo will be released tomorrow. This according to a statement from the civilian office of police accountability. Copa says. It will also release other material and that includes third party video shot spotter recordings and incident and arrest reports toledo's family viewed the video yesterday and had asked for a delay in its release. The chicago police department has announced measures. Beefing up public safety presence in the city in anticipation of possible demonstrations and illinois public health officials report more than thirty five hundred new cases of covid nineteen in the last twenty four hours with thirty one additional deaths that makes for a statewide case. Total of just under one point. Two nine million with twenty one thousand five hundred seventy deaths. The test positivity rate right now is five percent and the state announces more than one hundred and thirty eight thousand vaccine doses administered in the last twenty four hours. Meanwhile governor jb pritzker. Says he believes there are signs that this latest surge is plateauing. We have seen a beginning of maybe lessening of the rise of cases. I don't want to predict anything because this virus is unpredictable But i think at least in the short term that seems to be good news. Meanwhile a pause on giving out the johnson and johnson vaccine will go on for the foreseeable future. This after a federal advisory panel says it needs more time together information before a vote on whether to use that vaccine again. The cdc recommended applause yesterday after six reported cases of blood. Clotting in the brain out around seven million total johnson and johnson recipients all chicago area providers joined in the pause switching appointments to the shot moderna or pfizer vaccines instead. It was twenty sixteen when former president barack obama and first lady. Michelle obama chose jackson park. Has the site for their future. Presidential center at long last constructions getting started but legal action could still put it to a stop. Amenike joins us now. Amanda is it. Finally all things go hereafter. Legal delays and community groups are asking for Some givebacks here. And here's it's been all that. We also saw various drafts of what. The obama presidential center building disabilities would look like but yes things are getting started still. It is premature to call it a groundbreaking. Some ground is being broken at jackson park row. Hor is beginning as well removed by the way that the city's transportation department says it will try to spread out over the years making as well going to be inconvenient but is than any anyway still. This is the beginning of what sort of work needs to happen. Before a true groundbreaking the park district and the chicago department of transportation will very soon beginner. Utility work between midway and hayes to support Not only the existing and future park developments but of course. The obama presidential center mayor lori. Lightfoot says she knows that the obama has had a lot of suitors when they were figuring out where they wanted to build their presidential center they chose to located in and near communities that she says ben subject to disinvestment for too long something that the center of the city are going to change over the course of this long torture sheer. We've encountered numerous challenges that forced us to reckon with the socio economic fault lines That stymie the success of our residents especially those on our south and west sides until eliminate these faultlines once and for all it's imperative That are covert recovery is equitable sustainable and above all else inclusive of all residents those goals. That sentiment echoed as well by a friend of the obamas and also chair of the obama foundation. Martinez bet president. And mrs obama chose to build their presidential center here because they believed it could be a catalyst that creates transformative opportunity for our community and this is exactly the sort of investment they envisioned other dignitaries were on hand for that announcements including the governor. Now this despite the about popping up on both the mayor and pritzker schedules only an hour and a half before it was going to begin. So does she fair and right off the bat some groups long critical up. The obamas center were out with criticism of the officials lottery statements. You had jackson. Park watched co president. Jack spicer saying in a statement. The opec is a private development on public property. In historic jackson. Park is no different than someone putting disneyland or a casino there. In the public getting ten bucks in return it serves no compelling public interest especially given the major social disruption to the woodland neighborhood and by the end of the day and had also in new lawsuit filed to stop any progress or work at the site. Groups including protect far parks filed the suit in federal court. They have tried to take legal action before to move the obamas center out of historic frederick loans and design park but thus far no true avail. Now they aren't trying again. This suit alleged that the city of chicago from the onset was four square behind the obama foundation in dave a wholesale delegation of decision making authority thus the results of the city's cursory review process were four deigned from the onset. Really this lawsuit. Alleging that all the federal review that's gone hasn't met muster to federal law. So again trying to move forward there. I did by the way. Try to interview protect our parks but got no response. Their concerns are not the only one there are also fears that the obama center could bring with it soaring housing prices such that current residents aren't going to be able to afford paying their rent or their mortgage living nearby preservation for affordable housing. Billy yeager has with beheld. By city and state funding helped the organization acquire properties. that he says are going to provide long-term affordable housing. Even when as he predicts is going to happen the center spurs interest in the surrounding woodland neighborhood. It will focus people on would blonde that. I think many people haven't thought about it. And when you when you look at what's there and would lomb i mean. It's pretty astonishing. It is a lakefront community. It you know as incredible transportation access vehicle or access. It is nice architecture. So he says this work of securing affordable. Housing opportunities is more urgent than ever intense. That there are some prospects in the pipeline. Could become soon now. Backers of the obama presidential center have big dreams for it in the area more investment and more jobs will come when we bring hundreds of thousands of visitors to the obama presidential center. That helps celebrate this community. We love but it also strengthens the small businesses across this area. When people start at the center they can stop and get a cup of coffee at the currency exchange. Try that infamous potato chip cookies. That give me some sugar bakery or maybe they will soak up an afternoon of culture at the saba museum and marrying the restoration of the stolen island arts bank now with all this build up for in groundbreaking. You might have sudden. There's a pretty clearing absence. Where are the obamas nesbitt. Says they will be onsite and on-scene in the future. The president first lady will be present they will spend time here at the center they will be here for the groundbreaking and they'll be here well into the future as the Center executes its planned on the community strengthen the community and make the some better place now. Barring success for that jaws file federal lawsuit real groundbreaking is scheduled for fall harris. Back to you man. I get the sense that there's gonna be some kind of push back to this until the final brick is laid on the finish building. All right thank you very much and now go onto brandis and the debate over an elected school board brandis paris a bill that would create a twenty one member elected board oversees chicago public schools advances in springfield but some lawmakers who supported the bill. Say they're not fully sold yet. That bill would divide chicago into twenty districts each of which would vote for representative plus a city wide elected post over the board but that appears headed for changes based on concerns raised by lawmakers and mayor lori lightfoot joining us to talk about how they think the school board should be structured our. Cbs parents clayborn. Wade who favors all elected. Board and duane davis who'd like to see some members appointed and some elected gentlemen. Thank you for joining us. So in today's hearing city officials said to mayor lightfoot supports changing the board though she does not support this particular bill that would end up with twenty one board members in. Chicago's deputy mayor for education. Tout the gains that. Cps has made an educating students and the role that mayors have played in those improvements. Let's take a listen east. Gains have been realized over a period of time when the person the mayor seat was held intimately accountable for the districts performance. Kobe hold these gains in the balance. This is a time to protect the progress instability of the district. Time to focus on reopening a time to focus on recovering. Our students unfinished learning and restoring the social emotional wellness students so kleber. Let's start with you please. And i think we got the two of you swapped earlier. Our apologies for that but Clayborn you would like to see all elected board without any mayoral appointees. Tell us why. Well i think we'll we have all the school board. They give the people a chance to have their say so in it as well as parents especially when we sit down and have the conversation on the structure of how i like the school the school board should be so you think an elected school board and all elected board obviously allows more parents to participate. In how the district is governed. Absolutely i would love to see a lsc structure and then guarantees a seat for community leaders teachers school leaders and parents as well as we will focus on how our kids are educated. And dwayne. you'd like to see a so-called hybrid board where some members are elected some are appointed. Why do you think that's the best way to go. I thank you for us here this evening and i'm just happened to see to african american male. Parents here advocating for people in our youth and our city. I think the highway board model one in the history of chicago with the basically always having an appointment war. That part of having the appointments is part of the way you can hold the mayor accountable for running as a person that supports education. I've always said there's never elected officials says it against education. They may be against how funded or what the processes may be so. I think that point part portion just guarantees a little bit more accountability to the mayor. Then the elective worsen. this is where clayborn they agree. Is that guarantees that elected portion that the campaign finance and the way that campaigns are financing our city in our state and federally like those rules needs to chinese to allow parents the opportunity to run for slot to allow teachers or community members of community leaders to run for those spots because normally think about democracy as as place where we all have access but access. You have to have money in order to be able to run and we want people modest means people who represent our kids. People have kids in our schools. Have that opportunity now. Chicago public schools is deputy chief of family and community engagement also testified at that hearing today and cautioned that an elected board does not necessarily come with guarantees. Here's some of what he said. La has largest scoreboard in the country and currently there are no parents on their board. An election does not guarantee equity among representation as we've seen in the elections in california the cost millions of dollars which for most of our parents at least mine. I know They don't have which brings to the question of special interest in who's funding school board elections and for what reason and clybourn should there be limits on campaign contributions or public financing absolutely. I think we've been talking about campaign. Finance reform probably says at all thirty years of my life. And probably even before that it's very important. And that's the reason i support the llc model because the model caps the funding on campaign contributions and by the way good parents with good ideas is guaranteed to be elected to the board and just so viewers understand clarified. The model obviously local school. Councils are elected within the school. Tell us how this that model would apply to this election. As i said it would guarantee members of the community teacher leaders parents and in the bylaws in their broods it either. I think he's a cap on for a little at all that you have to raise money to run for two seats on your local school. Councils and duane. How can you ensure that parents are represented on the board. If aboard is open to elections. I think this is where writing good legislation can't can kind of put some put some fences around what what we're voting on gets gets voted on inactive in the law so To kind of riffa clayborn point if we say we have to have parents representatives so part of your petition process in order to participate is that you have to verify that you're a parent of a cps student that. That's one way to think about it. I think the other way. And i thank you for playing deputy cigarettes comments of he. He talked about in deputy mayor of civil talked about making sure that the rep resist the students that attend. Cps eighty seven percent approximately eighty seven percent of kizzee. golden chicago. Public schools are black or brown Some of the elected school boards and the models that you see that the school board doesn't reflect the constituency of the people in the families that send their kids to public schools and clybourn d- believe that state lawmakers who are crafting these bills. Are they getting enough. Input from parents know without wasn't at the table parents and i've talked to. They weren't at the table. So i had heard anything about coming to the table about. The bill was presented earlier and that does not reflect anything that depends and i've talked to. They don't agree with that bill at all. Okay and we've got about fifteen seconds left. Dwayne i'm going to come to you. Do you expect that we will see some legislation on whether on either hybrid or fully elected. School board passed this spring. I believe so. I believe our expectation is that Chicago's mayor will will put something on the table as well and As chicago politics in statewide politics go They'll be horse trading and they'll be a compromise. But but i expect to see some movement because i think it's the time the time is now to to to make a change. What's happening in our city and they've been great gain than they've been great things that have happened the time to change how we do our school board in our city of chicago one. That'll be closely watched. I'm sure thanks to claiborne. Weight and twain davis for joining us. I appreciate it. thank you up next. A new initiative aimed at boosting development in black and brown communities in conversation from sunday's chicago tonight black voices. Don't miss one of our stories get them all delivered to your desktop or mobile device with a subscription to the w. t. w. news daily briefing go to www dot com slash daily briefing. And sign up. If you were to take drive down halstead street from lakeview and lincoln park to inglewood and roseland. It would be impossible to miss. How the street goes from vibrant storefronts on the north to vacant lots on the south a pattern rooted in decades of disinvestment and racism. Now a group of black business leaders is driving to change that the chicago emerging minority developer initiative seeks to boost development in black and brown communities long ignored by big companies and encourage people of color to get in the game. Joining us are two members of that initiative. Graeme grady partner at the law firm tapped statinias and hollister llp in the interest of full disclosure. We should note that. Mr greedy is also a member of the wto. W board of trustees and leon walker managing partner of deal three realty it. Thanks to both of you for joining us. Leon walker. Let's start with you please. so in chicago. The number of black and latino people combined well outnumber the number of white people in the city which statistically then makes white people the minority. Why is there such a disparity in the real estate development world. Thank you for happy to talk about. This is a topic. That's long overdue for the past fifty years. We've been focused mostly when it comes to real estate That's and development. Industry been primarily focused on construction activity and construction participation And that's where you get you dissipation. Goals on twenty six to Focusing on twenty six percent being a minority business enterprises that are black. And you know that. Are those a lot of them. Was a great. You know objectives Not often meant but the still a very aspirational very good. And we need to see more equity in construction fees however when we are focused on in as a developer who has applied the straight and titian are in the south and west sides You know it's on getting more patient from entrepreneurs of high-capacity high-potential where neighborhoods to participate in the development process and so important because the developer is what controls the entire budget. Not just the hard costs which are targeted for the construction of the budget but the soft costs and land acquisition. All the professional services that are engaged in the process or developer is the pivotal key individual verb In the real estate development equations and grading. What would you say is keeping emerging developers from breaking through brandis again. Thank you so much for addressing this important topic here in chicago. Hardwoods keeping the The breakthrough from occurring of one attitude just with experience as well as a personal financial statement. Secondly would be a track record in terms of experience on an increasingly large jobs. The third area that people frequently referred to in terms of subject matter expertise. We have people with great education Talent know how but until you have Experience on different types of projects to grow and scale is difficult to get into larger projects. A really breaks down. Sort of into two areas wanders focusing on a neighborhood redevelopment as you mentioned earlier in this call but the other part also has to do with downtown development the redevelopment of old The big projects. Like seventy eight and lincoln yards We need to have access there as well and to tap into the professional services which exists and to develop a people to continue to be able to provide services in those areas to grow this whole sector graham. What might be the typical pathway to becoming a developer. What does that look like. It's not there could be many ways to get their basically. You know it's interesting. You mention that brand is it's really a mentor t situation. It's not like going to law school to become a lawyer. Med school to become a doctor If you look at the background of of any of the big developers they all have unique path. They've all been mentored by one or more persons and the somerset. There's always a rich uncle in the background. That either has a big capital Or a land in so some of those are real challenges for people coming from minority communities but that that really is a big part of it. It's it's the mentorship that one on one relationship and the experience which takes time and project after project to develop the expertise to grow to be a real developer and leon walker. What would you say is the business case for increasing diversity in commercial real estate development. Well just add onto graham's comments also most of our Developers covered concentrated in areas Which howard challenge demographically economically and so even watching or scaling projects in you know What are now the invest south west area which i think it's an awesome Idea that the administration city is pushing now because we putting focus in energy and using the assets of the city to appel Developers of color into projects but warmly without that intention analogy goes this way. She develops color mostly focused on projects that are in areas where banks are shining. We've where appraisals are not strong. We're tenants are not as readily available so It's you have a context in which we're trying to rain-soaked dolphins color. I'd be ramblings break point just can't focus on the to have to visit abroad and says let's look at both downtown and the major market opportunities as well as the emerging market opportunities And so now we are trying to Coordinate in b resource of referral or those Developers of color that are rising up in wanting to tackle larger and larger objects emerging minority developer initiatives. Leon how how do you ensure that you are boosting diversity in the industry and if that is allowing for development in communities of color in those communities versus gesture for -cation in those communities again two separate issues You know development obviously by very nature change but that change is not necessarily mean that there has to be gentrification When i'm speaking to meetings which we are engaged involved in you know we are transparent and honest about you know. Things are changing and changing meeting. That's going to be investment. Being made in they're gonna be new entrance but in most in south west sides versity. We have a lot of land that we don't have the population to support most of the Aspirational development plans. And so you know really not an issue of gentrification and black communities in areas it's really an issue of inclusion in so in order to be inclusive If do participate in what we call equitable development venture development. I'm you have to be intentional. Making tell you more about that. But that's intentionally is what prevents transportation in what ends up in what we call. Liz shouldn't be absolutely grading. What sort of things do you know. Big name developers. Do they not know misunderstand about disinvested communities. It's just you mentioned a so many of the big developers. i think. Bear their hearts in the right place but they don't have. The tools are experienced To bring diversity equity and inclusion in on the professional services side as leon mentioned on the construction side. there's been great progress. Higher three sixty a lot of the companies direct hiring programs onto professional services. Side other really assistant the the exposure. And that's part of what we're trying to do through this initiative along with some of our other partners may want to thank this community trust of four financing of this initiative this emerging manager bert initiative of trust recognizes that in order to close the wealth gap to close the racial wealth gap that this important real estate development sector a needs to be addressed. D i s is everywhere every born committee. I'm on from the chicago symphony to the commercial club. The economic club so my offer has a d. I initiative of this also needs to reach the real estate development community. And it's not a place where there is traditionally much diversity in the corporate c. suite with developers and graham in just a couple of seconds that we've got left. What does the city need to be doing to support. These emerging developers of the city is. The city is pushing strong the invest southwest program. That leon mentioned earlier is a great way to focus attention on some key. Areas of the city is rolling out on numerous requests for proposals for redevelopment sites in long disinvested neighborhoods. That's fantastic I think we could ask the city if they could do more to developers on the downtown full market ribbon north in the mega projects. Hq two sites a lot a lot more city a lot more work and that's leave it. Unfortunately we're out of time. Thanks to grand gradient leon walker for joining us. Thank you bring this back with more chicago tonight. Right after this And there's much more ahead on the program including details of a new plan to use millions in federal league funds to pay off the debt. But i as the development of nf teased or non fungible tokens give artists more autonomy over their artwork. And how they're shared in a digital capacity a new exhibit showcasing. How this type of digital art can take over physical spaces arts correspondent angel edo shares more on this new concept and what it could mean for the future of art as we know it. Imagine an infiniti room. Filled with mirrors and at the center sits a monitor displaying digital art that projects moving images across the room. You have just entered the quantum mirror. Those digitized moving images are known as nfc. Tease or non fungible tokens now traditionally artists have had trouble monitoring the use of their work online. But nfc's allow them to create a digital tracker if you will that. Accompanies their work wherever it sent. I get to choose. How ownership is transferred whether it's a partial transfer of ownership whether it's an ownership with royalty rights whether it's a you know in addition it. The artist has a lot of consent and a lot of power in this transaction. Which is why it's so groundbreaking. Quanta mirror is on display at the art space eight gallery and works as a metaphor. For how one's life can be entangled with technology now because the mirrors allowed this. Nfc to fully encompass physical space. That makes quantum. You're at the first ever enough t sculpture. A sculpture is any piece of three dimensional artwork. Right and so these mir's create a three dimensional world that that exists around the nfc's teaser. The core of it that are then projected reflected into infinity. This piece is exactly the same as what's happening inside of quantum mirror but this really exists here just illustrate. The difference between what is and what a physical object is and to kind of prompt that conversation just like an ef. Ts encourage artists to have agency over their work. The quantum mirror encourages viewers to have agency over themselves recognize how outside influences can inhibit that the animations quantum mirror are essentially repa- infinite repetitions of bodies in the same way that social media is creating infinite repetitions of a an aesthetic an influence an idea to the point that people are losing their originality. We need to be aware of the fact that that is happening to our consciousness. Because we're not aware of that. Then our code is essentially cracked we become entrenched in influenced in a way by social media by the screens that it changes our view of the world. Outside of us much that we're not even able to tell right from wrong anymore for chicago tonight. I'm angel edo a brave new world of sculpture and visit our website for more information on how to visit the quantum mirror exhibit at art space aid on michigan avenue. And still to come on chicago tonight. A new plan from the mayor's office calls for using federal relief funds to pay off the city's death could trigger a political fight. This is about being respectful and balancing the need for transparency. The mayor and the family of the thirteen year old killed by chicago. Police officer watched the body camera videos all that and more with our spotlight politics team and how a surge in demand for cardboard and other shipping materials is being felt in chicago and across the supply chain. but i more of today's top stories. The former minnesota police officer who shot and killed dante is charged with second degree manslaughter. The officer identified as kim potter resigned from the brooklyn center police force after firing a gun. That kill dante right during a traffic. Stop when she purportedly meant to fire a taser. The felony charge carries a maximum ten year prison sentence. Meanwhile the agency that investigates chicago police involved shootings says footage and other materials related to the shooting. Death of thirteen year old little village resident adam to lehto will be released tomorrow. Groups representing chicago gig workers say they wanna gig workers bill of rights. Those groups include rideshare drivers for companies like uber. Want the city to institute. Bill of rights to codify some workplace protections most notably rideshare drivers are asking for more safety precautions in the wake of a spike in carjackings. Here's first ward alderman. Daniela spot says he is supportive of these efforts. This what worker justice looks like. This is what we need to fight for and you are on the side of justice and illinois public health officials report more than thirty five hundred new cases of covid nineteen in the last twenty four hours and thirty one additional deaths that makes for a statewide case. Total of just under one point. Two nine million with twenty one thousand five hundred seventy deaths and more than three million illinois are now fully vaccinated against covid nineteen. That is nearly twenty. Four percent of the state's population chicago. Financial officials are recommending steps to pay off the high interest debt that the city is incurred but those recommendations could come at the expense of financially struggling chicagoans. www news reporter heather shapiro and joins us now with more. Hey heather. so chicago's chief. Financial officer recommends using half of the one point. Nine billion dollar federal relief funds coming from the american rescue plan to balance the twenty twenty and twenty twenty one budgets. So that's nine hundred sixty five million dollars in federal relief funds for that. 'cause the mayor headset in the past. She was hoping for this money to help. Balance those budgets especially to mitigate some of this controversial scoop and toss borrowing so. How does this do that. Well basically cancels all of the high interest. Dan that the city council agreed to borrow to keep the city's budget out of the red and to prevent services from being slashed in taxes being raised sky high. So essentially. what this is is as if it's a credit card that your axing every month and you're only making the minimum payment. Now this was high interest debt that was going to be paid off over the next thirty years and the mayor's position is is that it threatens. The city's long-term financial health in the city has to take advantage of the federal relief. Package to cancel that debt but some alderman weren't really thrilled about it and explain some of the feedback or pushback that. She's getting from some alderman. Who i assume would like a lot of this money to go directly to resonance so a lot of older men want to do is to take this money and use it to make direct payments to chicago who were struggling to pay their rent to keep their businesses afloat and to provide services that the city hasn't been able to during the pandemic and even before. What's different about this relief. Package than previous relief packages is there are fewer rules attached to how the city uses this money. A can't use it to pay. The city's pension detonate can't use it to lower taxes. But as far as we know so far that's about the only restriction so the alderman see this as a way to address sort of systemic stomach. Inequity that the pandemic has really shown but the mayor says the city has bigger and more long term problems to focus on us and the city already was up to its ears in debt and this latest round of borrowing certainly put the city in a worse position. All right heather. Thank you very much and stay right there for spotlight politics. 'cause you know that's up right next and you can read other story on our website. It's all at www dot com slash new. And as i just mentioned we're back with spotlight politics right after this. Don't ever miss chicago tonight. Subscribe to our podcast. Get a daily download of our show delivered to your desktop or mobile device. Go to wtt. W dot com slash chicago tonight. Podcast and subscribe mayor lori lightfoot and the family of thirteen year old adam toledo react to the video of the teens shooting death by chicago police officer which will reportedly be released tomorrow. That and much more in this week's spotlight politics joining us now. Our team finicky. Heather sharon and peres shots so The release of this video of the thirteen year old. The police shooting a thirteen year old. Adam toledo temporarily delayed by his family. Here's what mayor lori. Lightfoot had to say today i want to be respectful of the family but i also do think that something like a police involved shooting particularly. Under these circumstances it's important for us to be transparent we tried to be as transparent as we can And we're going to work with the family To move this process along. But i think we have to be respectful of them in move at their speed and heather. There's apparently been a leak of a screen shot of the tape showing adams hands up if that is the case not good for the city which has sixty days to release these tapes but heather. What are you hearing. Well it's unclear. What exactly the tape shows but we do know generally what it shows that it shows the death at the hands in the gun of chicago police officer thirteen year old boy. And that's going to be very difficult for a lot of people to watch tomorrow in. The city is on edge. If you go to downtown or north or any big commercial corridors you see the garbage trucks in the salt. Spreaders are already positioned for the mayor sort of implement her protection plan that she developed after the protests in the wake of george floyd staff last may so it's one of those moments where it sort of collectively feels like. We're all holding our breath to see what really happened on that night. Almost two weeks ago paris. We know that the mayor has seen the video as well and she has put a priority on transparency. But is that sort of a a tough balance. Well the mayor and police superintendent david brown at least publicly called for the release of this video. It was copa the oversight agency. That said well. We don't know that we can because it involves a thirteen year old. Apparently they went and consulted. The law said okay. We can released this video but not before we show to the family. They showed it to the family yesterday. The family apparently wanted to have a delay. And then it's gonna come out tomorrow and speaking with community groups Not seen the video. I mean the consensus narrative that that's forming here is adam. Toledo really is a victim of circumstances that put him in this position in the hours of the morning. Apparently with an alleged bad actor here as officers were responding to shots fired from the shots butter technology. I haven't seen the video. I haven't talked to people that have seen the video it. It doesn't appear to me reading. The tea leaves that that it would show egregious police misconduct more. So you know. This thirteen-year-old tragically being in this situation where this incident occurred but again it's going to be very difficult and there are a lot of nervous chicagoans. That do remember what happened last summer twice. And by the way that police response at least for the first time was panned by the inspector general's office saying the city really did not have its ducks in a row to protect the city. So moving over to another police involved shooting this one in brooklyn center minnesota where an officer killed dante right instead of using her stun gun. Amanda you covered the story of it yesterday. Both the police chief and the officer. Kim potter have resigned. She today was arrested and charged. What is the charge. Why i don't have to tell you or anybody watching how painful this is. Just it keeps coming. These tragic incidents of somebody dying at the hands of a police officer somebody in authority can potter in this case charged with second degree manslaughter. So cheating how did pay bond in is out but second degree manslaughter. They're one of the charges faced by derek chauvin who of course is accused of secondary manslaughter. Charge there for a derek of george. Floyd net is among other charges second degree manslaughter. Show is from. I'm not an expert in minnesota law but really showing culpable negligence or on reasonable. Taking the chances are causing death and in both cases i think a lot of protesters Community members disappointed that. It's not a hire more severe charge because just ten miles away. The trial of derek chauvin charged as you mentioned abandoned. The death of george floyd. His lawyers have begun his defense. Heather what are his attorneys goals. Because do they only need just the one juror. That's right because it takes a unanimous verdict to convict a former officer chauvin and they want to raise reasonable doubt in at least that one juror's mind that perhaps george floyd didn't die from the neck prostate his the knee prestige his neck for almost nine minutes. But that perhaps it was his drug use or perhaps it was a health conditions such as a bad hard or asthma You know they've brought their own experts to the stand to counter. The prosecution said experts to sort of raise those questions and this is really the crux of what the jury will be asked to decide You know as soon as the end of this week the beginning of next week. Which i think is sort of adding to that collective. Everybody's holding their breath moment because the city is also said they're prepared to address. If there are protests and unrest in the wake of that which i think adds to serve the tension. A lot of chicagoans are feeling tonight. So the johnson and johnson vaccine was pulled out of an abundance of caution after six people experienced rare blood. Clots out of seven million doses. That is Amanda officials concerned About underserved communities being hit by the pause on inspect seen by the way governor. Jay pritzker is among those who received that johnson and johnson vaccine. He says that he is feeling fine. Though. He is still within that window where he's got to be paying attention. The johnson and johnson vaccine is one that really was seeing as a game changer for several reasons and that it didn't go through that super cold storage and so therefore you could be more mobile with it. Also just one does and so for people. Maybe that would have a hard time getting back to two appointments. Don't have the ability. The transportation the ability to take on work maybe their caregivers kind of a one and done mentality was really seen as again a way to get out to underserved communities and so yes this is very low. It was definitely a concern. You've already seen chicago. Which something different. For the first time chicago long been asking finally going to get some extra vaccine doses from the states allotment but can cancel these big plans including walkup johnson and johnson Shots given at the united center. So yeah it. It's most certainly didn't efforts to get to hurt him over the schools Cps the high school battle escalates as teachers worked remotely today in protest of cps has plans to have teachers back in the buildings still negotiating heather. What's the latest well. The union says there's been some progress but not enough progress towards reopening plan. That would allow students to return on monday for the first time in more than a year. The crux of the matter remains what it was when we covered this win. Elementary schools were trying to be reopened. Its vaccines this time for high school. Students who are eligible for the pfizer vaccine. If they're at least sixteen as well as accommodations for teachers who are at greater risk of passing covid nineteen along to their family members who are or or relatives who may not have had a chance yet to get the vaccine now as we understand it everybody works for. Cbs has been offered the chance to get the vaccine. But of course that's not true for all chicagoans Only about you know. A quarter of all chicagoans are are vaccinated at this point in not to concern so we'll have to see how this plays out the c. t. You now has a greater ability to bargain over. Their workers can working conditions after bill was signed into law by governor pritzker. And we'll have to see how it plays out. A nothing is easy. When it comes to reopening schools in the middle of a pandemic now amanda mayor lightfoot has gotten meanwhile senator light ford senator lyford to carry her version of an elected school board. Tell us about the difference from other. Proposals will really we. Don't know exactly yet. senator light furred. A reportedly is by the sun. Times his co. vendor so she is at home she according to reporting feeling okay but tired so not sure what we're going to see or when we're going to see actually the language of the bill but would it appears we're going to get some sort of hybrid and so there's already some frustration that that is the route that mayor lightfoot is an backing Particularly by let's be clear. Ct you ever at odds had not endorsed lightfoot in the first place and so this would be something where she would still have the ability to appoint some members it to the cps ford. There's certainly going to be a whole lot of action on this. I think we have to point out the senator cam. Light furred is seen as sort of the guru of education in the illinois general assembly and she also was just the leader of the illinois black legislative caucus. She holds a lot of sway in springfield significant. Just just remind everybody. Though that senator lyford is also on the board of loretto hospital and obviously those reports of improper vaccinations loretto supposed to be doing an audit that they've given to the city. The city is sort of reviewing this audit of what went wrong if anything went wrong what they learn from it so so there. Is that connection there. Light forward carrying lightfoot education bill but also lightfoot scolding Loretto hospital of which light ford is a board member so that one is mean. Both of those are going to be closely watched. Really interesting obviously The obama center though another thing. That's interesting announcing its groundbreaking. Today take a look at what governor pritzker had to say. So i'm particularly proud of our state's department of transportation's plan working with the city to support additional greenspace in this neighborhood making it safer for pedestrians and for bicyclists to access the area improving park trails and rerouting road traffic accordingly peres the infrastructure that the governor is speaking of their cost the state one hundred and seventy four million dollars but former president. Obama wasn't there today. What's up with that. Well you know also strange about this. Press conference has a lot of reporters noted today was that there wasn't a whole lot of advance notice last night. Yeah an hour advance notice. Unusually you know the mayor the governor. They set their schedules the night before they let reporters know what's gonna happen. Ostensibly here perhaps to avoid protesters and as you know. It is amanda reported. There still is pushback to the obama presidential center. Perhaps the obamas don't want to be seen here while there's still some kind of opposition to this being built either by community groups wanting more benefits or by folks that don't believe it should be built in jackson park and perhaps they want to get the shovels actually shoveling some dirt before they actually show up. Maybe they don't believe it's imminent quite yet given all the delays. It's faced and it wouldn't be a spotlight politics. If we don't talk about a little bit of corruption rubia kosta senior political operative with ties to alderman ed burke and martin sandoval pleads guilty and agrees to cooperate heather. What's it cost us. Said he did. And what does it mean for burkin sandoval in about thirty seconds. Well he made the fundamental error of chicago politics. Do not lie to the fbi. That's just always a trip to Problems ville and rubio kosta is living there now what he has to share with the fence on alderman burke and other assorted elected officials. Time will only tell. But i am all ears and wait for The revelations that he is promised in return for a reduced sentence one of many reporters on the edge of their seats. Thanks to the spotlight. Politics team amanda vicky sharon and peres shuts up next a surge in demand for cardboard. How it's being felt in chicago and across the supply chain but first a look at the weather do thought we might be done with those thirty degree. Temperatures over the past year you may have noticed. Recycling bins and dumpsters overflowing with cardboard the pandemic led to a surge in demand for the product and all kinds of other shipping materials especially corrugated boxes commonly used for e-commerce items and many other goods chicago. Tonight's quinn myers recently showed us how the box boom is being felt across the region. Here's another look on an early spring morning at this south side. Recycling yard. Ken done is unloading a massive hall of cardboard and other paper products. Done runs resource center a recycling nonprofit which has served the chicago area for decades. We actually started by helping. Crews up pickup Cans and bottles on vacant lots Here in the south side providing jobs and money for them to pick up and then pay their salary by the materials collected. The company has expanded over the years to include all kinds of materials including one done says has more than doubled over the past year. The cardboard for from household people are buying these flat screen. Tv's since they're all home that are five foot five four foot and they come in big cardboard boxes so yeah a lot of Lots of boxes coming to homes those. Tv's and a surprisingly large number of other products are usually shift. In what's known as corrugated packaging made up of layers of paper with a wavy fleets in the middle for extra padding the corrugated packaging industry had a record. Twenty twenty as people started buying everything from groceries to playstations online really is essential to our everyday lives it brings us household cleaning materials such food pharmaceuticals tissue Over the last year the pandemic people really were concerned about toilet paper. It gets our toilet paper to us and everything in between rachel. Kenyon is senior vice president of the fiber box association or fb a a local trade group that tracks shipments of corrugated packaging. Nationwide the corrugated industry really gross fairly moderately from year to year about one to two percent two and a half percent and what happened last year with many things because of the pandemic we really saw a change and Box plant shipments so in march of two thousand. Twenty box shipments up nine percent over the previous year's march and that was when people were doing a lot of pantry stock in a lot of hoarding of products. The fbi tracked a three point. Four percent overall. Increase in shipments in twenty twenty over twenty nineteen aided by a spike in e-commerce activity ahead of the holiday season. The corrugated boom has been especially taxing for box manufacturers like acres packaging on eighty seventh street in. Chicago's burnside neighborhood. It's impacted us in a great way from a revenue standpoint. But it's made the business very difficult to run. The family run company owns plants across the midwest but says it has been a challenge to scale up their operations to meet. The recent flurry of demand to accommodate acres has continued investing in the nation. And also just more manpower. We're using as much of the capacity in our southern or central illinois and southern michigan plants as possible We're also providing overtime on a daily and on saturday basis. So we call it throwing hours at it to get more production but the company has recently had trouble. Filling vacant positions and the strain of the past year has led to longer wait times for distributors. Who received boxes from an factors like acres. I think it will sort it out. As people spend more money on vacations and hotels and less money on goods for their homes and food and things like that and also the industry spends money on machinery and equipment But it's gonna take it's gonna take the better part of the year. We really don't think things are going to change until the fall or you know maybe even until next year unlike plastic corrugated is highly recyclable. The fda says the industry's recovery rate hovers around ninety percent back at the resource center lot. Ken dunn says he's expecting the influx to continue as restaurants and other businesses reopen after pandemic shutdowns. And he'll be ready. Local systems was all recyclables is better for a sustainable planet. And i think it will improve the quality of life for all communities for chicago. Tonight's i'm queen myers and the resource center. Says they've also seen a spike in plastic bottles during the pandemic you can learn more about this story on our website and that's our show for this wednesday night. Please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven. Bodycam footage is set to be released in the fatal police shooting of adam toledo community members. Join us and the story behind the cta's bridge on top of a bridge. All new ask geoffrey and now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm peres shots. And i'm to friedman. Thanks for watching. Stay healthy and safe and have a good night Closed captioning for this program is brought to you by robert aac clifford and clifford law offices dedicated to preserving the dignity and rights of all individuals.

chicago adam toledo mrs obama obama presidential center obama foundation obamas center johnson leon walker clayborn Obama jackson park mayor lori lori lightfoot brandis friedman obama center cps school board Mayor lightfoot civilian office of police acco jb pritzker
May 5, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:49 min | Last month

May 5, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm brandis friedman and i'm peres shuts on the show tonight. We're certainly in zone. The illinois general assembly has a lot to do before the end of the month. We've got a full rundown. The us economy roars back growing more than six percent in the first quarter of the year as mass. Vaccinations make economic recovery. Possible made no secret of the fact that had been extraordinarily unhappy are spotlight politics team on the head of copa quitting and the mayor's response that much more what caused the mischaracterization of the atom toledo shooting in court by kim. Fox's office an internal investigation. Shed some light. A new report finds the vast majority of pregnancy related deaths in illinois. Were potentially preventable couvert. Nineteen has devastated. Illinois's latino community key issues community leaders want elected officials to address. You could do this if you didn't have what we have here. And the secret behind some of the most celebrated honey in illinois but first some of today's top stories. Summer festivals are back although not entirely as they were before mayor lori. Lightfoot chose the goodman theatre as a backdrop today as. She unveiled her plan for summer festivals and cultural events but those events will not include the taste of chicago at least in its normal form or the air and water show. The city also announced a music series. That would be available. Only to fully vaccinated chicagoans starting with an event at the silver room in hyde park on may twenty second despite some of these changes lightfoot says this summer will look and feel entirely different from last year folks. The chicago announcements that. We've made today are only the beginning of our targeted efforts to safely reopen our city and our ability to make more contingent upon what we do right now every day. What you do right now. Every day to fight this virus that is still very much a part of our present. The head of the agency that investigates police involved shootings is resigning sydney. Roberts who has led the civilian office of police accountability or copa for the last three years announces. That she's stepping down. Robert says the office has delivered thorough investigations and has made progress in improving police accountability. Momir lightfoot has been critical about the pace of copa investigations. The shooting deaths of adam toledo and anthony alvarez are among the many that the agency is investigating former alderman pleads. Not guilty to charges. He used political funds for personal expenses. Former twenty second ward alderman ricardo. When you entered the plea in federal court today feds allege. He took money from a political fund to spend on personal items like college costs relative sports tickets. Travel and other purchases does retired twenty nine thousand after public domestic dispute. He faces sixteen charges and all and state public health officials report. Twenty four hundred new cases of covid nineteen with thirty additional deaths in the last twenty four hours makes for a statewide total of one point. Three four six million cases and twenty two thousand ninety. Six deaths ninety six thousand vaccine. Doses were reported administered yesterday although the state says that includes forty thousand from pharmacies. That didn't report. They're weakened numbers so those vaccination rates in general have been trending downward and now brandis. We toss it back to you paris. Thank you the month of may means it is prime time for action in springfield. The legislature is set to wrap up. Its business by the end of the month. Amanda finicky joins us now with a look at what is on the general assembly's plate amanda ever and is it is a very full plate and why because of what else the pandemic truncated session last year. It means a lot of issues that would have been dealt with then our instead on this year's plate if you will and whatever is going to happen it has to be done by may thirty first so state representative mike. Celeski says it's not quite crunch time but things are getting busy in springfield meetings taking place staff review. A lot of amendments being filed where. We're certainly in zone at the top of the must happen list. A new roughly forty billion dollars state budget and once again kovin plays a starring role. Revenues are both down and are expected to have gone up. Yeah i mean as a result of any number of issues related medicaid The need to appropriately help those struggling because of the pandemic And so that coupled with revenue losses is putting a little strain on the budget. We project right now that the budget committee have to go out and close about a one point. Six billion dollar deficit not great but but also got insurmountable legislatures looking at closing some tax loopholes or some tax credits to fill that hole but making things a whole lot easier the seven and a half billion dollars that illinois is going to be getting from the federal government as part of its covid relief package but in issue being. That doesn't yet know when that money is going to actually arrive nor what restrictions are going to come with it because there will be ruled that the state has to follow when it spends that with the federal government has indicated that we should have the regulations. We need within the next week or two. I think that's plenty of time. Frankly because we've done a lot of work on budget stuff. Today we have a general outline of what it is that we need to spend money on. The question is how can we use the federal money to really kinda plug in where so that we can craft our needs around it now. Another big item. The once a decade process of drawing legislative districts. Democrats want that done by the end of session. But republicans say map-making doesn't actually have deserve a spot on that must have been by mail list because that would mean that the state would have to use faulty data to draw those maps since the federal census information isn't expected until mid august right now changing topics roy. The clock back to february when governor pritzker gave his joint budget and state of the state address. It's time to pass ethics legislation this year. Nobody should hold the title of both legislator and lobbyists at the same time governor in february had other items on his agenda to the to do list is long but it includes key priorities. Like finally authorising. The overdue second cannabis licensing lottery and passing an energy bill that protects our nuclear fleet and builds up our wind and solar industries. We'll see what happens on ethics fair now when it comes to what he was talking about. Marijuana it has been a year since a batch of seventy five licenses were supposed to have been awarded to so called social equity applicants to open up more marijuana dispensaries. That still hasn't happened a year later. Though there is a build aims to get that going as energy pritzker does have his own plan but so do clean. Energy advocates unions have their own. This comes as exelon is threatening to shut down a pair of nuclear plants. If the state doesn't pass a law that would have customers pay to keep them open but all of this has ended complexity because of the scandal surrounding com hurts skirt. Meanwhile dealing with all of this as he's facing a scandal of his own a recent on it says there was widespread mismanagement at the state veteran affairs department. This fall when thirty six died at the state veterans home in lasalle pritzker has thus far blamed his since ousted veterans affairs director. But critics say that. The governor needs to apologize in. They're calling for hearings. I think the governor needs to be a little more humble in this situation after the way that he used this last. Quincy home report as a political weapon to his advantage and exploited took advantage to that at every turn that he possibly could. He needs to be a little more humble and actually take responsibility for this because right now we see a lot of deflection coming from young that there are literally hundreds of bills percolating in the capital. Some deal with controversial topics like guns and gambling others deal with everything from midwifery to a plan that would prohibit schools from banning certain hairdos. Are we saying a lot of instances of black children across the city of chicago state of illinois in across the country who have been traumatized by outdated school policies. To put it bluntly police their hairstyles. Making things slightly complicated and getting any of this done is that a lot of these hearings are having virtually because of covid which means is many of us has had to learn this year. And you just have to roll with the zoom punches. Like when this mom's child wanted her intention while she was testifying legislative hearing. Now we're going to be seeing a lot more. Obsessed legislature is in fairly consistently through the end of the month. So look for a lot of changes progress if you want to call it that before the month is out brenda back to you. Amanda thank you and now to paris for an economic outlook paris brennan's the us economy is back somewhat. It grew at more than six percent in the first quarter. Twenty twenty one as the combined. Impact of a mass vaccination roll out and stimulus checks triggered a surge in consumer spending. This is president biden. This talked about massive new federal investments and increase tax rates on high income earners. So how long can this economic boom last joining us. Our edward professor emeritus of economics at northeastern illinois university and michael miller associate professor of economics at depaul university gentleman. It's great to see you as always michael start with you. Us gdp growing at six point four percent on an annualized basis in the first quarter. Does that officially mean the covid triggered recession is over. Well it took us within one percent of the previous peak. We hit in marcher in february of last year. I think that's close enough to say that we have fully recovered in terms of gdp. This will also give the n. b. e. r. who dates the times of the peaks and troughs a chance now to set the date for the trough of the great of this pandemic recession. Which i think that will be some time in late summer. Early autumn of twenty twenty. So that's where it appears that the economy would have bought. Bombed-out ed stewart's correct. Let's stipulate that a lot of this is driven by reopenings by the stimulus package but when that money runs out what happens. Well the good news is that and this is one of the things that i think. A lot of people understand you see these large numbers of one point nine trillion and most of that money is phased in over a fairly long period of time. So it's not just a one shot. A lot of the stimulus. Money for education and state and local governments is is programmed to last for at least the rest of twenty twenty one and well into twenty twenty two the infrastructure program. That's yet to be passed. I think i saw an eight year. Time horizon for that so it's not going to run out any time still there also some really interesting numbers in the in the latest. Gdp data that came out in january. Excuse me in Thursday and then also the personal income numbers that came out friday showing how much extra income american consumers have. And how much of that they say. So there's a lot of consumer buying power that's still in bank accounts and savings accounts that are there for consumers to spend over a fairly long period of time a lot of pent up demand a lot of positive indicators mike miller what sectors are doing best right now. What sectors are lagging. When we're seeing the the driver of the economy right now is the consumer for several reasons. There is a large amount of pent up demand for what we call consumer durables which are things which lasts more than three years. that's a cars appliances and furniture and there was a lot of buying of that happening and then the households have received a fair amount of money from the federal government. Income exploded with those fourteen hundred dollar checks to the large number of households and they're beginning to spend some of that now a lot of the spending for example on leisure and hospitality. That was not done during the pandemic. That's gone forever but people still need the washers and dryers that they weren't buying so we're seeing that the households are buying. We know that there is a boom in housing. And and then if you look at in terms of gdp. The amount of money spent for non-defense government spending. I think number. I saw was up. Forty four percent. Now that's all that distribution that occurred which helped stimulate the households to spend more and there could be more that as ed stewart alluded to. Let's hear what president biden said about the possible infrastructure plan and then the american families plan and then a plan to raise taxes on high income earners to pay for it. I think it's about time we started giving tax breaks and tax credits to working class families and middle class families instead of just the very wealthy. And here's what the american family fan doesn't do. It doesn't add a single penny to our deficit. It's paid for by making sure corporate america and the wealthiest one percent. Just pay their fair share. So i know you're both of your philosophies this point you might be a divergent but first with you ed stewart the combination of this kind of spending on infrastructure and other things like community college childcare coupled with slightly higher tax rates for high income earners corporations how would that impact the overall economy. I think obviously as you as you alluded. I think it's going to be very very positive because for many many years. Not just the trump administration but back ten or fifteen years. The american economy hasn't invested in classical infrastructure roads bridges. The american association of civil engineers said. We are several hundred billion dollars. Deficient in spending on on. What everybody agrees is infrastructure. And as i pointed out on this show many many times in the united states we have one of the slowest and most expensive internet systems in in the world so we need lots of investment in redundant and higher grade communications technology. The people in texas will tell you that we need a lot more in terms of power grid and water systems and then obviously for the new green technologies and electric automobiles. We need a much more rolled out. system of charging stations and electrical power. I bring i want to bring. Well i wanna bring mike miller in on this a tax piece might miller and these these rates for the most part wouldn't even match what they were pre two thousand seventeen what event economy we gotta understand. Corporate income taxes is less than nine percent of the total revenue of the federal government so increasing it is not going to be major increases in the amount of revenue we get. I think the president has to realize if the american people have decided or will decide in the near future that we would like to be like scandinavia capitalist economy with a large welfare state. The only tax structure is possibly deal with that is not to tax the rich. There's just not enough money there. There would have to be a much larger base where people and what we would call the middle class pay rates of forty or fifty percent of their income to the government. The way would be true and say are linden parts of scandinavia. Now maybe that's what the american people want and if so we choose by picking representatives. I'm not a big fan of that myself but we have to understand. They're just is not enough money within the rich to pay for all the plans that we have at stewart. I think you might disagree with that is is that. Is that how you sit there. Just not enough. Money there to ten superwealthy. You're extremely perspicacious. Man paris dunno. If i know that word means but go ahead. It's a good word. Sharp sided yes. Yes i think there's more than enough. There was a rand corporation study. Just done that. The transport through tax cuts and regulatory changes from one thousand nine hundred. Seventy nine until twenty twenty. The united states is transferred something like thirty seven trillion from the bottom ninety percent of the population to the top ten percent of the population. The incomes of the upper one percent of the country have grown exponentially. The corporate profits are the largest state ben a share of gdp since the second world war corporate taxes in the us are less than one percent of gdp in most other countries not just scandanavia there. At least two percent. So there's plenty of room for corporations to pay their fair share or an average share of tax revenues that most industrialized countries pay. Well this point. That'd be the progressivity in the united states. It's much more progressive than those other countries. Where the rich pay a very large percentage of the total pie and the and the incomes pay almost none of the total tax. All right we're going to have. This is a great debate will continue this at a later. debut after. Leave it there for now. Our thanks to edward stewart and michael miller for joining us. Thank you so much. My pleasure and back to brandis with more on latino unity day and issues. Latino communities are facing brandis paris. Chicago's latino community has been especially affected by the events of the past year. The coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately impacted latino residents in. Most recently the community has faced the fatal police shootings of two young people. Adam toledo and anthony alvarez joining us to discuss key issues for illinois's latino community our state senator selena the whose district includes parts of chicago's southwest side and sylvia point day. The director of the latino policy forum. Thanks to both of you for joining us. So i today. We know that it is latino. Unity day sylvia. Could you please remind us of what that day is and how it started. Sure so it's been going on for about ten years but it's basically A day long event. It's put on by a number of the tino lead nonprofits to basically show that we care. Interested are interested in and one of voice to what's happening in springfield We typically bring about three hundred or more folks to springfield to talk to the governor or legislators but also basically a to have a show of the team unity that we do have a cohesive latino community that has an interest in issues of redistricting education. How and how. I respond to our latino community. We're gonna get to at least a couple of those today. Also cinco de mayo. We know is a day of remembrance of mexico's victory. Over the french during the eighteen sixty two pueblo. Senator via nueva remind us of the significance of that day. And what it means after what this last year has been. You know. there's always this misconception that people think singled mile is mexican independence day which actually isn't september. I i think this is really about remembering the struggles. The fight for justice for freedom for independence of for people that the people in mexico on anything for me and especially for folks in in this country. It's the data celebrate our mexican heritage which technically some of us do it. All the time. but i think especially in light of the pandemic. It's really important for us. Says if the moments to really think about the impact that the pandemic and and other things have really had on our communities particularly not just mexican but latino la next communities in the state of illinois yes and as you mentioned you not enough people know about the the true meaning of cinco de mayo. Sylvia throughout the past year we know. Kobe has disproportionately impacted the latino community. Let's take a look. We've got a chart here. From the latino policy for him that shows for every one hundred thousand every one hundred thousand residents in illinois the latino community on more than ten thousand cases of covid now that's compared to about sixty four hundred for white residents sixty three hundred for black residents in thirty eight hundred four asian residents. Sylvia is kobe. And its impact on the latino community key concerned this year on latino unity day of course of course. Today's how we address the health and the escalating and actor kkob is tremendous and just to clarify Brandis it's for every one hundred thousand of that racial ethnic group so that means that for every one hundred thousand and latinos over ten thousand habur her at ovid which is more than ten percent of the latino community and with that we are the lowest tested right so we really feel that ten thousand dollars. Ten thousand per one hundred thousand is under reported and as you've noted that significantly higher than what it is for any other community and state and what we're beginning to see and hear about the impact of long haulers what we're beginning to see about the impact on baths 'cause we to know that latinos of working age disproportion are the highest group but have highest groups of that What it means for literally what i continue to call an economic health care and an education the nominee for the latino community so we're working with a coalition of illinois those which is an amazing primarily volunteer left their led effort to really come up with policy solutions but also to put needles in people's arms that they're going back now aside from kobe's impact chicago's latino community has felt the impact of two fatal police shootings adam toledo and anthony alvarez latino policy forum is a part of a coalition as you've mentioned calling for a moratorium on foot pursuits in the chicago. Police department Corinne ayala bermejo of the institute of though progresso latino spoke about this at a press conference just yesterday. We are on a course. That's headed right to disaster when you have escalated issues on foot pursuits that are inevitable heated situation with no due process. Senator van the way your district includes part of a little village or also a resident there. How have these shootings in the videos. Impacted public safety and policing as an issue for the latino community. So i wanna say this Brandis here's the thing issues of violence and let them know. Lennox communities selfless west side and a little village have been in existence and there have been organizations and community organizers who have been trying to do the interventional work for very long time unfortunately systemic issues and stomach disinvestment has led to obviously either lack of grant funding or lack of opportunities for us to be able to bring those opportunities to our community. So the reality is this The videos are very very difficult to watch I got very emotional and and again it hit me to the cord. The same way that the videos of the mcdonald and so many countless others You know have come out. We've had to see on social media but the reality is this cycle of poverty. Systemic disinvestment in our communities have been long in existence. And so these are major major major factors in what's happening in what's going on and again like my push. Continuous is continuous. Push as a former immigrant rights organizer coming from organizing communities and organizing family and now being the legislator is despite to continue to get further investment whether it's state funding whether it's different types of of funding whether it's business revitalization helping undocumented immigrants and emigrants time being able to access resources like healthcare benefits. The the reality is this. Our communities are in desperate need resources. And that's what we need in order to break cycles of poverty. More work to be done. That's where we'll have to leave it. My thanks to state. Senator selena until viewpoint table latino policy forum. Thank you thank you up next the secret behind some of the most celebrated honey in illinois. Stay with us. Don't miss one of our stories get them all delivered to your desktop or mobile device with a subscription to the wtt w. news daily briefing go to w. w. dot com slash daily briefing and sign up. There's much more ahead on the program including our spotlight. Politics team breaking down the indictments in the comment. Bribery scandal. But i is known of course for growing corn and soybeans. There's another local crops. Some say is ready for its close up honey chicago. Tonight's quinn myers has the story of a beef farm just north chicago that has become one of the most celebrated in the entire state. This is just a one to one sugar. Sugar and water. And we're feeding them because there is no nectar being produced very little right now certainly not enough to make honey. What we're trying to do right now. Is buildings colonies up. Karen engine belly never expected to become beekeepers a retired. Cps teacher and an architect they both grew up in chicago far away from any sort of agriculture let alone and apiary but in the early nineteen nineties after they bought farmland in old mill creek illinois near the wisconsin border the previous owner. Who still lived on. The property had an idea and she said. Why don't you try beekeeping. All the farms years ago all had a couple of hives appear a few years later after they befriended a beekeeper nearby and attended a few workshops. The bellies decided to give it a shot. We said we're going down to hamilton illinois to buy equipment and we're going to give it a try so she looked at me and said if we don't get into the soon we're going to be two older do doing. The bellies began with two hives and slowly expanded. They started entering their honey in local competitions than the state fair then national contests and today have racked up dozens and dozens of awards and just last year. The couple were named the twenty twenty beekeepers year by the illinois state. Beekeepers association fill is a technical hobby. But it's kind of more than right. Fashion now is now the belly. Say their secret is the diversity of local plants and trees making northeast illinois one of the best places to raise honeybees in the entire country. You could not do this if you didn't have what we have here and and if you would have told me this before we got into beekeeping northeastern illinois was magical place for me i would send you gotta be kidding every year the bellies b.'s. Feast on linden's black locusts clover wildflowers fruit trees and more creating shades of honey that range from almost translucent to dark brown colors the couple say would be hard to find anywhere else. The color is determined by the nectar source and so you have to have a huge variety of different plants and trees and shrubs french's to get the different nectar sources which will give you the different colors here. We have a a very long growing season. Actually and we have a huge amount of variety. The bellies maintain around forty hives at their summer. Peak yielding around a thousand pounds of honey every year. They do it all on their property. Also home to an expansive barn. They refer bd and a custom farmhouse. Jim designed himself but while they're operation and prestige has grown quite a bit since they bought their first hives. The belly say what keeps them going is working with the bees themselves what they call be time. There's no there's no day it's just you in the bees and you you have a bond with them and you're watching them and you're watching them come in and out of the hive and you're looking at the frames and you're seeing them move around and you're trying to be as you found out you know communist peacefully you can and they're so busy doing their job and it's absolutely no sense of time. There's nothing it's just you and the bees for chicago. Tonight's i'm queen myers not gonna do it not gonna do it not going to do the be pun or buzz. Lot of buzz growing there. Okay did it and you can learn more about the belly bs on our website. Still come on chicago tonight. An investigation into the mischaracterization of the atom toledo shooting in court by kim. Fox's office is released. Preventable deaths and racial disparities just two of the findings of a new report on maternal mortality in illinois and for people charged with conspiring pry bribe former speaker. Michael madigan to benefit comment appeared in court. Today are spotlight. Politics tackles that and more but first some more of today's top stories turnover at the top of the agency. That investigates police misconduct cases and police shootings sydney roberts. The head of the civilian office of police accountability or copa resigned today after three years on the job. That office has investigated high profile cases like the shootings of adam. Toledo anthony alvarez as well as the unwarranted raid on the home of young. Lightfoot says she did not force roberts out but says she has problems with how that agency has operated. Did not seek her resignation. But i've made no secret of the fact that had been extraordinarily unhappy with the way that they've handled a number of things not the least of which is taking over eighteen months to move forward on an investigation regarding and ginette young and a lot of that time nothing happened. That's not acceptable. Lightfoot also announced new personnel moves today in the mayor's office including the appointment of celia meza is corporation council and john o'malley as deputy mayor for public safety and state public health officials report. Twenty four hundred new confirmed covid nineteen cases with thirty additional deaths that makes for a statewide total of one point. Three four six million cases and twenty two thousand ninety six deaths and so far thirty. Three percent of the state's population has been fully vaccinated breakdown of communication. That's what an internal investigation by the cook county. State's attorney's office found to be responsible for the mischaracterization the atom toledo shooting in a hearing last month. W w news reporter met masters in joins us now with more. He met remind us what prompted this internal investigation in the cook county state's attorney's office so the with bond hearing last month. For ruben roman who is the man was arrested at night off following atoms later shooting by chicago police officer during this hearing sort of got the first glimpse into what exactly right up to that shooting on this was before the bodycam video came out so we haven't really gotten to me. Details got honestly statements. That day made by the prosecutor was handling this bond hearing it sound as though adams lehto was still holding a gun when he was shot again. This was before the video came out and when that video did come out and show that he had dropped a gun just second surp- an instant before he was shot by that chicago police this examined. Why does paul statements were made or those misleading. Statements were made during series. And what were the conclusions about why. Those statements were made and just the general reaction from the state's attorney's office said it was a breakdown in communication between different parts of the office in house some information was shared between the group that was investigating the tomato shooting. That segment was known as the law enforcement. Accountability division and the prosecutors. Actually speaking on that day on james murphy on the prosecutors language that was using the proper wasn't reviewed before you went into court on in essentially the The state's attorney said that a series of checks and balances of failed to catch these sort of things. I'm hearing went in on. A smaller level reminds me of of some of the issues surrounding the jussie smollet very quickly. A few seconds any fallout following this report. So james murphy. The prosecutor who was in bangalore that day he was placed on leave after the video team out. But he's been returned to his initial post in jennifer coleman combatants fox's first First assistant state's attorney who handled that law enforcement accountability division. She actually resigned for position this morning. All right matt. Thank you very much and you can read full story on our website. That's www dot com slash news. And now brandis we go back to you. In average of seventy five women in illinois die each year while pregnant or within one year of pregnancy. that's according to a new report on maternal morbidity and mortality from the illinois department of public health among the reports most shocking findings eighty three percent of old pregnancy related. Deaths were potentially preventable and the report also highlighted the impact of systemic racism. Finding that black women were about three times more likely to die from pregnancy related condition than white women joining us now or the to experts. Who helped put this report together. Shannon lightner deputy director of the illinois department of public health office of women's health and family services and dr robin jones chair of the is maternal mortality review committee jones's also an obstetrician gynecologist at rush university medical center. Thanks to you. Both for joining us shannon lightner. Let's start with you please. Before we get into the substance of the report. I wanna clarify the distinction between pregnancy associated deaths and pregnancy related deaths. Because you analyze both in your report. What's that difference please. Yeah pregnancy associated means the death of a woman who is pregnant or a one year postpartum from any cause. Pregnancy related is a death of a woman while pregnant or within one year of her pregnancy. Whose death is directly related to her pregnancy. In other words we ask which she died if she had not been pregnant. Okay so among the key findings of the report thirty four percent of women who died either wild pregnant or within a year pregnancy died from pregnancy related. Cause of those women. Some forty percent had some sort of mental health issue. Black women are three times more likely to die than white. Women of pregnancy related issue and women on medicaid rather than private insurance. Were three times more likely to die within one year of pregnancy dr jones. Help us to understand those numbers please. In what clear disparities you see there. Thank you let me start by saying that. Black women are more likely to die from a pregnancy related medical calls than white women. White women are more likely to calls to die from a mental health calls than black or hispanic women and when you look at the causes of death the top four include mental health disorders create existing conic medical disease hemorrhage and hypertension but understan- that we know that there are other factors that contributed to the jail on these women particularly black man. Okay and i think we're gonna come back to some of those as well shannon. Lightner the report. Estimated that eighty three percent to pregnancy related deaths could have potentially been prevented. Are we as a society failing those women. Why weren't they prevented well. One thing that just clarify that when we determine case to be prevented preventable. We need that. There was some chance that the data could have been avoided if reasonable changes have been made at the provider hospital community systems or patient levels. And it's important to recognize that among these preventable deaths the chance preventing that death range from a very good chance to slight chance to you know pretty. It was pretty preventable. So the numbers and types of factors that contributed contribute each case greatly influence a chance to prevent ability some of these cases. We see societal factors playing a huge role barriers to care such as childcare transportation lack of access to care and then sometimes we see poor quality of care so it really does depend on each situation. Each case and the number of factors. That really could've been could've been playing a role in preventing a number of factors than not all of them are necessarily within the healthcare setting correct. Okay dr jones. This is the second state report on maternal morbidity and mortality the i in twenty eighteen found black women were then six times more likely to die of a pregnancy related condition than white women. The gap has shrunk. But it's you all are saying it's not exactly a sign of progress. Went on like said. We have partnered with the cd scene and looking at factors others than or in addition to medical factors. So you're looking at social determinants of health and we're looking at structural racism and actually the cdc has led the way in this work and across the state they have provided states with the framework to look at factors such as discrimination an interpersonal racism and dr jones. You've also talked about the unnacceptable disparities at the report has identified and but role of systemic racism. Explain some of the ways that that systemic racism is impacting the health of black and brown women. We have started over the last year and looking at social determinants of health and until we have a better understanding of how social determinants of health are already while not education healthy food income. How that actually offense a woman's health and access to needed care it doesn't help cure doesn't exist in a silo. So we'll have to address those factors and understand those factors and then made recommendations that will address the social determinants of health. Because they're definitely impacting what we're seeing in our health care system shannon. Lighten how would you compare illinois to other states on on these issues i think that illinois is definitely a leader in trying to understand. Maternal mortality. Understand the drivers of what's leading maternal mortality and putting our recommendations out there Our report is held up. As an example for other states to look to to especially. We were the first state to actually name racism as a cause of michelle mortality. And this report as you mentioned dives into structural racism highlighting redlining as a contributing factor as a concrete example of how structural racism can contribute to maternal mortality. So i think we are leading the way in trying to identify the causes In putting our recommendations out there in two thousand eighteen we recommended that medicaid be extended to one year postpartum and that was just accomplished. We became the first state to have to have medicaid extended to one year postpartum for continuous eligibility with. Cms approving her waiver. So i think we are leading the way But we have a long way to go because that disparity does need to be addressed more work to be done and something. I'm sure we'll continue talking about dr robin jones and shannon lightner so much for joining us. Thank you thank you and we're back with more right after this A very busy day in court that and much more to break down with our political spotlight politics team. The name of which i almost forgot you guys joining us with more amanda finicky heather sharoni and shuts. So let's start in court for people who are charged with conspiring to bribe former speaker of the illinois house. Michael madigan to benefit Commonwealth edison appeared in court today perez. Who are these four. What are the charges. Well the thing you have to know about these four long story short as their former top executives and or lobbyists for comment and the charges revolve around the alleged schemes to give jobs and contracts to those very close to mike madigan in the lower. Those jobs where you didn't really have to even go to work or do anything in exchange for madigan helping push legislation. That benefited comment a couple of different bills. That benefited comments bottom line but caused ratepayers in chicago to pay more and clearly here As some of the courts reporters at the newspapers. Today indicated the hearing indicated that there might be more defendants. In this case that there might be more indictments coming down the road. You're looking at a person right now. Who is mentioned in the indictment but is not charged with any wrongdoing. So the odds makers are wondering if that's who they might be talking about when you hear a prosecuting and defense attorneys say they more indictments to come. Well that's right and of course. Madigan is clearly the big fish here. Amanda does this mean prosecutors. Don't have enough to charge or indict madigan yet. Is there the expectation that the four we just saw will flip on him. We don't quite know what will go on thus far they all have been fight. Loyal all have pleaded not guilty. And why don't matt there right now is because he not only has not been charged but he vociferiously denied any wrongdoing. You said if there was a bribe he certainly did not know about it What we know from court today is just that there were a defense attorneys. Talks about intimations of superseding indictment the. Us attorney's office isn't saying what that means. Would presume the yes. If they had enough to get mad again they would certainly have done so but superseding indictment that sure sounds. It doesn't necessarily have to be big. Could be just adding charges to those or but yes on it very might well lead to matt against the tribune also reporting that several former house democratic legislators so those who clearly would have known matt again in how he operates have either topped to the grand jury or have talked to the. Us attorney's office recently and that they were asked about madigan so does certainly seem like things are edging closer though again. The former speaker says he didn't do anything wrong. Stay tuned ex alderman. Ricardo munoz also rained today. Heather what happened today and remind us of what he's charged with. Alderman munoz pled not guilty to sixteen counts of wire fraud and money laundering and this dates back to alleged conduct from twenty sixteen to twenty. Nineteen when alderman munoz was both chairman. The treasurer of the city council's progressive caucus. He is accused of taking more than thirty eight thousand dollars from the caucasus. Political action committee account and using it to buy all sorts of things including trips and jewelry and clothes and to pay a relatives college tuition. that's entirely illegally. Can't use political funds for personal purposes. We have a whole range of illinois politicians. Who have gone to jail for doing. Just that but alderman munoz says he is not guilty and he is due back in court next month. As the trial progresses alderman. Patrick daley thompson was charged friday with income tax evasion and lying to investigators which he denies he is scheduled to be arraigned on may thirteenth years with the mayor said today about whether he should step down. Having been a former federal prosecutor prosecuted public corruption cases and elected officials is very hard for them to maintain their focus on their public life when they're facing such pressure in their private life and again heather unlike alderman burke who toned down since his indictment a couple of years ago. Alderman thompson so vocal. He is he participated in a committee hearing at the very moment that the indictment was unsealed and he was present although he did not participate in a hearing yesterday on summer. Violence and what. The city should do to prevent that from happening. He says he is innocent. He says it was an innocent arabic. He made on his taxes and that he will fight it and he reminded us all that. In this case the what. He's charged with does not relate to his official duties as alderman but the mayor campaigned on rooting out corruption in all forums at city hall. Which was why. I was interested to hear her stop. Just short of calling on alderman thomson to resign and remember. Remember that thomson's indictment. It's part of a gigantic investigation into that bank in bridgeport washington federal and their ten other defendants. They might know stuff about thompson. He might know stuff about them. So we'll see how this dance goes is that case develops now additionally to civilian police. Accountabilities chief administrator resigned today. Here's how the mayor reacted. I've made no secret of the fact that i've been extraordinarily unhappy with the way that they've handled a number of things not the least of which is taking over eighteen months to move forward on investigation regarding anjanette young and a lot of that time. Nothing happened now. Heather tell us what we know. Is there thought that she was pushed out over the engine. It young case dealing with this for go ahead. I asked the mayor exactly that. I asked her point blank. Did you request her resignation. She said that she did not but the mayor has been highly critical of Agency under her leadership. She was also frustrated last week when copa called for the officer. Who shot anthony alvarez in portage park to be stripped of his police powers apparently they put out that to the press before informing superintendent brown which rankled the mayor and that could have been just sort of the straw that broke the camel's back at a very already tense relationship between the mayor and the lead agency charged with investigating police misconduct. What this means for the investigation into the shooting of anthony alvarez as well as thirteen year old adam toledo is probably more delays to be quite frank note. Finally kim fox lose top lieutenant over one of her prosecutors misstatements around the atom toledo video. Amanda or sorry is actually going to go to you you know the prosecutors still working there but this top lieutenant is leaving. Fox says that the checks and balances in her office did not work. What could be the political fallout for her. With this case my guess would be not much brand because remember the jesse small case in the mistakes that were made there and confusion over whether she had recused herself or not. She didn't pay a political price for it. She still won re election pretty handily. So the you know. The views of the state's attorney cook county send tend to center around ideologically whether or not you support the approach to prosecuting. So this is kind of like a similar. Or a little hiccup here. Maybe a smaller hiccup than small. It was but judging by what happened. There i see as political fallout at this point. Yeah and it's just so far out from the next election that by the time if she is to run again there who knows what we will be talking about at that point. I do think what we have heard thus far about what is going on. I personally have not talked to fox myself. For averaging you to interview. Ron this but is not why she had not watched the video of a case. That was clearly a commanding the public's attention and she knew was going to be a big deal. When this assistant state's attorney need those statements in court on april tenth. She had not yet watched. The video wasn't until became her office. Became part of the media kerfuffle that she actually watched that really horrifying video to to see so some other politics hearing on renaming lakeshore drive after. Do sabail that exploded on monday heather. You reported that. The committee meeting was raucous and profane what happened. It was a alderman. David moore has been trying for almost eighteen months to rename outer lakeshore. Drive for john. Point do sabato Chicago's first non indigenous settlers and at that hearing the city's transportation department came out with new ordinance. They said would do that but he didn't believe them. And he erupted in anger saying that they had sand bagged him and basically introduced a last minute. Change so at the end of the hearing which lasted for more than three hours They passed that the original proposal. Which does not legally defined outer lake shore drive and used by mayor lightfoot so at this point it's really anyone's guess what happens before the next city council meeting later this month but something will have to be done to make this change legal because as we discovered during that hearing the city's co doesn't define outer lakeshore drive although everybody who lives here knows exactly where it is alderman violence prevention advocates They also want the city to us. Federal relief funds to rethink the summer approach. Paris are already up this year. What are they proposing proposing a lot more money for intervention programs. You know the mediators that go in as disputes and try to get in there before they turn violent but you know the issue is there are more people with guns. More people are carrying more more. Youth are carrying. And everybody i talked to on this issue says the same thing that there still isn't enough resources for over the overarching services that are needed like mental health. Like job training so the game. The violence prevention is one piece of it. But until as we all know i mean. Violence has has a million different causes until those root problems aren't addressed. It's i'm very skeptical. That throwing more money at something like violence prevention can really bring those numbers down for the summer. No before we run out of time we know that. Cps is losing another ceo after years of sort of the back and forth with chicago. Teachers union janice jackson is leaving heather. Dr jackson's to top administrators are also leaving. And we've heard some other announcements a folks leaving an appointments and in recent months. Is this a brain drain for the mayor. It's not a normal amount of turmoil. And i asked the mayor about that today. I said is this an indication that there are significant problems at your city hall and she said look. It's been a difficult year for everybody. Everybody's taking stock of their lives and what they want from their lives and and maybe making decisions to change however the mayor will have to fill several high profile positions just in the coming weeks on today. We did get an announcement that celia amazed that will become. The city's corporation counsel issues confirmed by the city council. She would be the first latina to hold that post another indication that diversity is very important mayor late okay and lots more positions to watch as she fills them up. Thanks to the spotlight politics team. Amanda finicky had sharon in paris shuts. And you can find more on the stories discuss tonight with our spotlight politics team on our website. And while you're there make sure to read a story about a recent catch and release catch and release of a two hundred and forty pound. Sturgeon once caught a fish. This big. it's all it. Wtt w. dot com slash news. And that's our show for this wednesday night don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website talk about in the big fish. There you know was the theme here. You could also get the show via podcast and the video app. Please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven. A first of its kind reparations program evanston is the next stop on our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series and a look inside an old building for insight. into chicago's norwegian passed in an all new. Ask geoffrey now for all of us here at chicago tonight. i'm brandon friedman and i'm parachutes. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe and have a great night closed. Captioning for this program is made possible by robert a clifford and clifford law offices pleased to give back to the community through numerous charitable initiatives.

illinois anthony alvarez chicago ed stewart adam toledo president biden civilian office of police acco springfield Us federal government brandis paris Lightfoot brandis friedman pritzker mayor lori Momir lightfoot alderman ricardo
April 29, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:47 min | Last month

April 29, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm peres shots here. In our north west side studio. And i'm brand. Friedman reporting live from navy pier on the show tonight. We're police officers part of the time. We're human beings all time. The police union says the shooting of anthony. Alvarez was justified but community groups. Say it's police. Brutality were live in little village. Last year's being quite chaotic. You know we were open. We're close. We are open navy pier summer festivals basketball games and more details on the city's latest reopen plans in my own home state of illinois. We has more known lead service lines than any other state in the country. One on one with senator. Tammy duckworth on her water infrastructure proposal. You got your copay vaccine shot. But we do with your vaccination card rundown of things to know. I'm angel edo and tonight. We'll be taking a trip down memory lane as we talk about the impact of chicago's blues legacy. You gotta get creative. You gotta get opportunistic. The nfl draft is now underway. What can bears fans expect. Gm ryan pace to do with all the teams picks in paris. As i mentioned i'm at navy. Pier co anchoring tonight as part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series. Now the begins its partial reopening. Tomorrow this is of course in line with mayor lori lightfoot announcement today about a return of summer festivals in person hockey and basketball games and so much more. And we'll have the latest on all of that in just a minute but for now appears back to you. Thanks practice and now to taste some. Today's top stories. Another alderman is indicted by the feds. This one with a high profile chicago name. Eleventh ward alderman patrick daley thompson nephew of former mayor. Richard m daley and grandson of richard j daley is charged with seven counts of making false statements and filing a false tax return. The charges stemmed from alleged massive fraud scheme involving the failed washington. Federal bank for savings that operated out of thompson's homeward bridgeport. Ten other defendants have been charged with the us. Attorney's office says is an ongoing investigation into the failed bank in a statement thompson denied the charges and the us attorney's office also announcing sixteen charges. Against former twenty-second ord alderman. Ricardo munoz charged with using political funds to pay personal expenses. We review finds significant deficiencies in the chicago. Police departments policy and training on search warrants. This in the wake of the botch twenty nineteen raid of chicago resident and jeannette young. The report comes from the civilian office of police accountability or copa. The agency says it has been in contact with cpt about four th amendment and search warrant policies but would not get into specifics in today's report. The cpi has thirty days to decide whether to take administrative action against the officers. Involved in that raid fans festivals and farmer's markets are back in chicago at least partially in a video on social media featuring team mascots mayor announced a loosening of restrictions on fans at indoor events like bulls and blackhawks games allowing for twenty five percent capacity. Four games at the united center bulls officials say they'll cap the crowds to about twenty percent doodo social distancing measures. The mayor also announced the return of outdoor summer festivals and farmer's markets. We'll have much more on these reopenings. In just a bit and state public health officials report nearly thirty four hundred new cova cases in the last twenty four hours and thirty eight additional deaths that makes for a total of one point. Three three one million cases and twenty one thousand nine hundred and twenty seven deaths since the pandemic began so far more than thirty one percent of the state's population has been fully vaccinated. The families of a twenty two year old latino man and a thirteen year old latino boy shot and killed last month by chicago. Police officers are demanding justice and they want other chicago. It's to join them. Meanwhile the leaders of the fraternal order police local lodge claims. Both shootings were justified. Amanda finicky joins us now live in little village. Amanda yes paris. I am near a mural and memorial near the site where on march twenty ninth thirteen year old added toledo took his final breasts. As you'll recall video that was released by the city. Civilian office of police accountability showed toledo running from a police officer and then at the officers ordered toledo did appear to toss a gun. He was holding. Put his hands up but he was shot by a single bullet within seconds after fraternal order of police. President john kittens are stands by the officer. Who fired those shots. Eric stillman response was so very calculated and textbook. It needs to be a training video. Even though people won't like me saying that. I really don't give a damn. But the the total control he had of what he was doing. Everything split-second that he was doing it speaks volumes. For how well-trained he was. Meanwhile just two days after that incident on march thirty first twenty two year old anthony alvarez was killed in portage park video released just yesterday shows him running from police. It is still unclear. What provoked that chase. He appears to have a gun in one hand. When officer evans. Solano shot elvis several times. Captains our defense that officers actions as well justifiable articulation on why he was even initiating the pursuit to begin with he could clearly see a weapon in the subjects hand. It does not matter that the subject is facing away from an officer when they have a weapon. There has been instances where officers have been shot and killed with even offenders who ed or and up in the air with weapon in their hands. It's a simple flip of the hand in one bullet. He says the officer was clearly fearing for his life is reaction is. I'm going home tonight. The subject had multiple opportunities to comply and drop the weapon and stop the run. Stop chasing for being chased. I should say what they chose yet again to not comply with lawful orders by the police. It is the recurring theme in all of these incidents. Whether the shootings are otherwise a failure to comply with law enforcement officers lawful direct orders but alvarez cousin says she does not understand why a police officer who was presumably wearing a bulletproof vest was so fearful. She says police are cowards. Not protectors and she also says that the city needs to immediately create and then fix a foot chase policy for the police department now. That is something that mayor lightfoot has promised will come out by summer. I know lori said that by the summer but doesn't tell me anything. Another young innocent person could die tomorrow because we don't have those Off a protocols. And i mean it's too late for us. We already lost anthony. The mayor two years into her term today reiterated that these foot pursuits are dangerous. they are also common. She says about seven to ten occurring daily in the city of chicago now. The mayor did tell reporters that she had considered completely suspending or the police to stop all foot chases pending a policy coming out but she decided against it always easy to say. Let's just stop. But i also don't want to signal to individuals particularly communities that are under siege by violence that You can avoid any accountability by running faster than the police. I think that would send a terrible message. A foot chase policy is only one of the various organizers activists like mother of five cecilia garcia. Say half to be made. She says police act with impunity with carrying out excessive brutality against black and brown people because she says there is a lack of accountability. Here's chicago and around the country. The police continue to gun down our young people without any repercussions even when a hearing to commands from police. Are you are still being gunned down. While white criminals who commit a regis times of violence are handcuffed and taken alive will not stand by while this injustice continues. We'll get back to what actions they're taking in just a bit we also have you. I see john. Marshall law associate dean sam jones. He says the communities of color have long claimed that they're subject to police brutality. He says what's changing now is awareness was different. Today is that were able to see the slow in torture. Killing of someone. Like george floyd were able to See what happens to a child like leo and so because of this awareness for becoming a cognizant of the fact that we simply have too many problematic police officers serving in apartments around the country. Jones also says that situations like to lay does in which a suspect appears to comply with officers. Orders but still is shot are particularly problematic. This endangers our society generally but it also endangers police officers because if we reach a point society where people believe that. They can't surrender to police officers safely that they can't listen to police officers. They're less likely to surrender. Their arms are less likely the hands up. They're more likely to shoot at the police officers or take other innocent hostages or engage of violent acts because they believe they will be killed anyway. Meanwhile though the thirty day minimum time after shooting has been completed officer stillman is still on. Leave the president saying that. He is traumatized by the decision. He had to make that day in the alley when etem toledo died now. Copa does recommend that officer. Evan solano be put on leave the entire time that it is investigating the alvarez shooting and it just goes to show you the bias that comes out of copa. It's not surprising. Dos sadly We we actually. I already spoke to that officer myself personally several times and i told him be prepared. This is probably going to happen because copa doesn't do anything fair. It's already. it's already saying that it's made a predetermined judgment that the officer was wrong on some level now. Solano's decision in terms of police powers is actually up to see superintendent david brown and as of this afternoon when we last heard from the cpi d they. The brown had yet made a decision. Meanwhile anthony alvarez's mother was right here just hours ago. She was wearing a shirt with her son's name on it. She and others are calling for chicagoans to come on out to portage park on saturday. That's may day where they are seeking justice and accountability for police organizers here saying that they believe that officers swallow instruments should both be charged with murder paris. Back to you all right. Amanda thank you so much and as we mentioned earlier chicago's loosening. Its pandemic restrictions. Just a bit more. The mayor made the announcement navy pier this morning. The city will enter a new phase four regulations that could have an impact on restaurants and bars as well as theaters and places of worship. As part of our weekly in your neighborhood series. Brandis friedman and producer quinn myers spent today reporting in and around navy pier as it begins a phase reopening starting tomorrow prentice joins us now from the pier with more on these reopening plans. A brandis Spell it out. What does this all mean. So immediately paris it means increased capacity across a number of industries in chicago. And we'll break those down for you in just a bit. But the city's commissioner public health. Dr allison arwady says the reason we are here is because the city's case numbers positivity rates hospitalizations and icu. Admissions have all fallen or stabilized. Seeing those numbers go down or be stable is the ticket to reopening. This is happening. Make no mistake because people are getting vaccinated. So here's what. Those loosened restrictions mean restaurants and bars can increase indoor capacity to fifty percent or one hundred people whichever is smaller large. Indoor theatres and venues including the united center can open at twenty five percent capacity festivals and a spectator events like neighborhood. Food festivals can operate at fifteen people per one thousand square feet. Now what's more guests are fully vaccinated will not count towards capacity limits at private. Indoor events like weddings. Dr nobody makes the case and emphasizes the need to get vaccinated and to encourage others to do the same. In order for the city to keep turning that dial toward reopening. Because while the city's positivity rate is lower at four point seven percent she in the mayor. warren. We're not out of the woods what we've seen too many times across the country and other places is This enthusiasm to reopen. We saw that a lot last summer and people went to very high capacity levels only to have to shut everything back down very quickly now. We're in a different place than we were even last summer. Because we have the vaccine. Now the mayor health commissioner say that if these falling cases in stabilising rates can hold steady for the next two weeks the city could join the state of illinois. Interesting that bridge phase that's where restrictions are loosened even further. Now that would be a welcome change for tourism businesses. Like steve segue near the lakefront. The owner there says he's been in business for fourteen years and he and his tour guides take pride in being some of the best. Many of his tour guides are part of the gig economy and they were able to keep working other gigs during the pandemic. but he's felt like he is urging money with few rare segway tours. He's lost ninety ninety five percent of his business a ghost town or part of a sci-fi movie how some of my tour guides have described the eerie feeling of being museum campus. Even at times today so of course. He is hopeful to see that return. Meanwhile the chicago architecture center is still requiring masks on outdoor walking and despite the cdc's guidance that folks who are outside and vaccinated don't necessarily need their masks but the chicago architecture center says that they are operating at reduced capacity as well and they're already noticing a return in interest if not return to normal. They say they've received quite a few calls from people looking to make reservations and walk up business at the box. Office on. Weekends is steady president and ceo. Lynn osmond explains that architecture is the backbone of chicago's tourism. It really signals the rebirth of. What's going on both after the great fire but now the rebirth city as we look forward post pandemic and it's fun to see buildings like the saint regis opening up and salesforce so on the architecture river cruisers loss of new buildings that have kind of crept over the pandemic year. Now osmond is also the vice chair of choose chicago. That's the city's tourism information center and while the cac says that they averaged more than eighty percent sold capacity of its tours. In april hotels are at fifty percent capacity on weekends and a survey of consumers says thirty. Two percent of those surveyed are ready to travel again so still a little bit of room to grow for a couple of industries. Now paris when we come back as we mentioned we're gonna hear more specifically about navy peers plans for reopening this weekend and what is in store here for now back to you. Thanks practice president. Joe biden made sweeping proposals in his address before a joint session of congress last night among them. A pledge to tackle a problem felt acutely here in chicago illinois access to clean lead-free drinking water and today up to ten million homes in america and more than four hundred thousand schools and childcare centers. Have pike's with let them including drinking water clear and present danger to our children's health. American jobs plan creates jobs. Replacing one hundred percent of the nation's lead pipes and service lines so every american can drink clean water and illinois reportedly has more lead service pipes than any other state in the nation chicago more than any. Us city illinois. Senator tammy duckworth has proposed thirty five billion dollars to update water infrastructure and improve drinking water across the country and joining us to discuss this effort and much. More is senator tammy duckworth. She is chair of the senate environment and public works subcommittee on fisheries water and wildlife a senator duckworth. Welcome back to chicago tonight. As we understand your bill the bill your sponsored is passing out of the senate today that thirty five billion dollar water infrastructure bill. So what chicagoans wanna know is. Will there be enough federal funds to cover a one hundred percent of leads service line replacement here in the city well. I don't know that federal by combination between federal state and city There should be enough to replace the one hundred percent of their lead service line in the city. Yes we have twenty. Three percent of the total lead service lines across the nation is in illinois and most of it is in chicago and the goal of this legislation is to provide as much federal funding as possible. They'll be some local match but the goal is to replace one hundred percent of the lead service type lines in the country. Now we should let our viewers we're talking As this bill is being voted on right now in the senate expected to pass with bipartisan support. As i understand yes very much so in came out of committee unanimously. When was the last time you heard of that in politics these cities but we got one hundred percent of the republicans on the community to vote for it. They supported it Been very bipartisan out. We were very careful when we were writing this bill to include a lot of concerns from rural communities agricultural concerns. We even included verbiage to cover tribal water treatment facilities and so this is really going to help. Americans all across great nation. So rare. a moment of bipartisan. Unity here The president as you know last night unveiled sweeping proposals. The water a part of it but also the one point eight billion dollar american families proposal that would among other things provide community college universal preschool childcare among other things paid in part by higher taxes on wealthy earners and corporations could that tax part of it Derail bipartisan hopes. On on that plan that you have to ask the a republicans that one you know. I hope that they will see a way to support the legislation. I think that the human infrastructure a needs as much investment in this country as do as our regular transportation infrastructure and water infrastructure we have to have infrastructure to support families and and the human capital of this country that means a kid should be able to have universal pre k and we know that how well a child dies in the fourth grade with reading and math starts with whether or not they attend pre k and whether one graduates high slit goes onto college is predicted. By how will they do in the fourth. Grade's all comes right back to pk and and child share and helping families be able to be able to work outside the home be productive outside of the home but also take care of their families as well. That's human family infrastructure and we need to make those investments as well as we do to fix up a roads and bridges and airports. And do you believe that higher taxes on wealthier earners corporations as the president said paying their fair share quote unquote should pay for this as opposed to not pay for it and taking out more. Debt that preparations and wealthy Individuals have done a pretty good ride. The last four years. Don't forget the re the republican tax cuts on back trillions of dollars To a large corporations who in turn went on a buying spree. They bought stocks. They did with that money back into the economy. They took that money and they bought back. Spots a wealthy individuals. People will make well more than four hundred forty thousand dollars a year. Many of them in the above forty million dollars a year. became wealthier during the pandemic in two thousand twenty the very wealthiest americans those who have the net worth millions made even more money in that time period while americans hardworking americans and working families were being laid off from work. We're going falling behind on their rent on their mortgages. So i'd say it's time it's time to Corporations like general electric which by the way has eat income taxes. You know maybe they should pay a little bit. In order to educate the workforce one day working in ge factories and it seems like that notion is starting to become a bipartisan notion. As well senator. There are a lot of priorities for democrats Infrastructure that one point nine trillion dollar proposal. Voting rights immigration climate legislation. Do anything any of these things. Have a chance at getting done without modifying or getting rid of the filibuster. I know you've said your four. Perhaps the talking filibuster right. I mean i would rather not have to find the filibuster but at the end of the day. If you told me that might choice was between voted to protect. People's voting voting rights or protecting the filibuster to protect the rights of one hundred senators to obstruct one another. I'm going to vote on behalf of the voters i mean. I spent twenty three years in uniform. Defending our constitution. Democracy nowhere now constitution is the right to the filibuster enshrined in our constitution. The right to vote is enshrined. Some always going to vote to support the rights of people civil liberties of their ability to vote. I could be bipartisanship You know i. I was disappointed with american rescued. Amount of single. Republican voted for that and that bill was desperately needed by working families. Put money in people's pockets so that they could go ahead and pay their electric bill gas bill and back and back mortgage and it paid for a vaccinations and cleaning of our schools. The kids go back to school. It really astonished. The a single republican senator voted for that when it was so desperately needed a country and it seems pretty clear to modify the filibuster to do away with it it. All kind of hinges on senator joe manchin the moderate democrat from west virginia. Who has said he is not in favor of at least getting rid of the filibuster. I'm curious if you had any conversations with him on this subject and do you think he would modify his position on it. Will you read the op ed. That he wrote not too long ago. I think he laid out in his thinking and i just let him you know people read that No he's made it clear he said. Listen the boston your court republicans obstruct obstruct obstruct. Then don't be surprised that This idea filibuster reform coming up. And he's saying that he does not support right now and in the filibuster but that's dependent on republicans actually not being the party of no the party of obstruction of party of not getting anything done. And he has said that he you know he will consider talking filibuster. I'm woke with words in his mouth. But i think that's a good intermediate step. I you know. Most people think of filibuster they think of. Mr smith goes to washington jimmy stewart standing up to. That's not filibuster. is today in practice. Filibuster today and senator can say all right. I'm going to filibuster this. And then they can go to cancun on vacation if they want to be on the floor speaking until they run out of energy to do so. So i'm talking. Buster might be a good intermediate step. Wonder what you're referring to with the cancun vacation senator duckworth you recently called out. The biden administration fray lack of asian american pacific islander representation in his cabinet to which the administration responded pretty quickly. Are you satisfied that they've solved that problem. Why why is that so important to you or the problem is not the soft but i am very pleased that they worked with and they responded literally within hours of me Indicating that i would not vote for any more nominees and the reason i did that was because i have both for every nominee up until that point Even before they were sworn into office and since being sworn in. I have been working with them. Moving forward and foreign names of api's well well-qualified and sometimes more qualified person who was eventually nominated. I voted for every white person. Every woman every man every person identifying chew every latino every black american that had been had come before the senate from the biden administration. I voted yes on every single one of them and at this point in time. Do not have a single. Api person nominated to a cabinet position. i felt was really a disservice to the american people. President biden. promise a cabinet. That would look like the american people and right now. It does not like the american people because there's not a single. Api in cabinet secretary position. So you so you want more movement on that. Although it did lead to the appointment of your former general counsel erica. More to do as a deputy assistant on a issues a senator. I wanna get to the issue of gun. Violence obviously very important here in chicago experiencing a terrible year for homicides. The president brought up his support for banning assault weapons Pity magazines closing the gun. Show loophole is there any legislation on that front. That has any chance at all a bipartisan support. Well that depends on where the republicans are. I mean so much of this. Legislation is actually supported. American people background checks for example universal background checks is supported by ninety five percent of americans support. Closing the gun show loophole. Most people don't realize this but if you are a gun store owner today you can choose to go out of business that you want to retire and you can turn your entire gun store inventory to personal use weapons and then a year later you could say you know what i wanna hang onto these dunn's anymore you can turn around and sell those thousands of weapons at gun shows without doing any background checks or selling them you know personally personally and so you need to close that loophole and that closing that loophole is is very much support supported by the american people I have a bill. That would have a universal floyd card like we have in chicago to have your firearm owners. Id card i. I have one of those myself. I don't own a fire. But i have one of those is i like to target practice. But you know i there are a lot of legislation is very bipartisan. The question is will republican senators. Vote for it or would they just continue to be beholden to the ra so avoid card apply to the whole nation at large senator duckworth. We have to leave it there. Thank you so much for joining us and up. Next monica lessons with a chicago blues legend. So stay with us really is about unity where we all come together. Chicago needs to make space for everyone. There's much more ahead on the program including what to do with vaccination card and a preview of the nfl draft but for chicago. Music scene is slowly reopening and one local artist is wasting no time getting back on the stage arts correspondent angel edo introduces us to chicago blues. Legend billy branch and shares. Some of his life highlights a head of one of branches. I live performances since the pandemic lose her monica player. Billy branch has been playing the mouth harp since he bought his first one for one dollar at eleven years old. Put in my mouth. I could play any folk melody. Or christmas carol. I could think of when that harmonica would wear out. Because i play it all the time i'd go back and buy another one. This natural skill quickly turned into a passion branch went on to play professionally for blues legend willie dixon and the chicago blues. All stars for six years pretty women jump show. It was after playing at their berlin jazz festival in nineteen seventy seven with dixon and several others. That branches own group. Billy branch in the sense of blues was born who are considered amazing to have played with such legendary greats. Willie dixon and bo diddley an oldest rush junior wells. These are the guys that laid the groundwork for the the big roxie and rock and roll brench continued his commitment to the music genre by starting his international blues and schools initiative in nineteen seventy eight. That is still active today. I've always seen part of my role as a professional musician. Too is kind of a so the seeds because when i discovered the blues the beauty of it the depth of it. I felt like everyone should know about this but despite his national outreach branch says there's more work to be done in needs to be embraced by its creators by its originators because we have situations now where there are festivals was no black performers blues festivals. Which is kind of like oxymoron. What more do you think that the city could be doing to acknowledge an honor. We know the impact that blues has had on the city. The city as a whole should even more fiercely embraced the blues in a perfect world. I would like to see people like common chance. Who are right here in chicago. Direct some of their energies in it attention to the blues and make it relevant. The twenty first century branch has received a number of accolades acknowledging his work as both an activist and musician. Last year he was inducted into the blues hall of fame and he recently created a song with artists specter entitled the ballot of george floyd that will be featured in the woody guthrie exhibit at the grammy museum. Can you make talk so then you want to do. Is branch continues to educate and advocate. He says his mission remains the to give blues the recognition it deserves. Everyone can relate to this because it is the soundtrack for the human condition. Everybody goes through struggles. Everybody has problems and the blues is away of release soon and expressing this and making it not feel so bad for chicago. I'm angel edo alone and billy branch and the sons of the blues will be celebrating the birthday of blues. Icon little walter. This friday and saturday at rosa's blues lounge visit our website for more information and still come on chicago tonight. Should you carry your co vaccination card with you or what if you lost it. We have a rundown of things to know. And we're live from navy pier with more on the city's reopening plans and the eventual return of live theater after the bears failed to impress last season. What kind of reinforcements can head coach. Matt nagy expect from the nfl draft. The first more of today's top stories lake shore drive is one step closer to getting a new name. A city council committee passed an ordinance to rename the outer drive in honor of john. Tease point do sabail. After a contentious hearing today the name change would cover seventeen miles of the drive from hollywood north sixty seventh mayor lightfoot has been chilly to the name changed instead proposing to name the downtown river walk after do sample. The proposal still faces a full city council vote and state public officials report nearly thirty four hundred new cova cases in the last twenty four hours and thirty eight additional deaths that makes for a total of one point three three one million cases and twenty one thousand nine hundred and twenty seven deaths since the pandemic began so far more than thirty one percent of the state's population has been fully vaccinated shades of the nineteen eighties. In the loop city leaders. Say state street will be. Shut down to vehicle traffic on as many as twelve sundays throughout this summer. Starting july eleventh. It'll be dubbed sundays on state by the chicago loop alliance and it'll bring outdoor dining retail performances and family friendly activities to the iconic street. The shutdowns we'll take place between lake and madison streets. And they're seen as a way to get people excited about coming back to the loop if you've received the covid nineteen vaccine vaccination card that includes your name and the dates. You received your first and second shots so now that you have it. What do you do with it. The btw news reporter kristen. Thomas joins us now to answer that question and more christian great to see you so you asked her newsroom. Staff and other folks. What kinds of questions. They have about their kobe vaccination card. Let's take a look at some of those beginning with that first question. What should i do with my vaccine card. should i carry it with me and paris and no. You should not carry your vaccine card with you after you've been fully vaccinated now you will need to bring that car to your second appointment. If you're getting a tudo shot that's either pfizer or moderna. But other than that. Everyone i spoke to said. Keep that card in a safe place with other important documents like your passport. It'd be easy to lose that another question. I didn't get vaccination card at my appointment. How can i get one now. Sure start by contacting vaccination provider where you got your shot. Whether that was at a doctor's office or a pharmacy or vaccinations. They should be able to give you a card. You can also request proof of vaccination from the illinois department of public health which keeps a record of every patient's immunizations in database. All you have to do is fill out a form to request that all right. Hopefully most folks have their car. And how about this one. How can i prove my vaccination status without carrying my card everywhere. Yeah it's a good question. The centers for disease control and prevention says to take a photo of the card that way you have a digital copy but the illinois department of public health is saying right now. Proof of vaccination is in being required at this time it most most places but the state agency is working on ways to kind of come up with a way so people can show that they are backs needed. Meanwhile chicago officials are launching their own vaccination passport that'll be rolled out this summer for vaccinated folks to go to concerts and events. We'll have to see what that looks like my my my vaccine by passport. It's funny that you said that in a safe place Let's hope all right. Chris thank you so much experience. And you can read kristen's full story on our website where you can read more about covid vaccination cards like what to do if you lose it. It's all at ut w dot com slash news and now we're joined again by brandis friedman who spent the day at navy pier as part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series brandis parents. You can tell the Whether it's a little bit the last time we spoke but Earlier today as well we stop by the chicago. Shakespeare theater which is right here at navy pier and we spoke with artistic director barbara gaines and i began by asking her with this past year has been like for the company. All theaters throughout the world have been shuttered and so it's been extremely challenging. And i think the best way to explain it would be that you know theater. People people in the performing arts have just not had any oxygen for fourteen months. And it's been tough. What's it been like for your artists and the partners. Who work with well. I think the artists are suffering the most really because the especially actors who are onstage. There's no onstage. Should be so. Our technicians are designers. the know blessed are all blessed actors. I mean it's it is really been a challenge for all of them individually and as a group you've been able to pivot a little bit over the last year though With your some virtual programming tell us a little bit about that of we've had a blast doing virtual programming. I must say the most recent Programming we've had and they're still right. Now is i cinna and i banquo directed by tyrone phillips and marty lions and the joy of these one people shows one has a child is is that it's completely creatives. It is a full production less than an hour both of them and they are so inventive and imaginative and languages so important and the performances. Truly are spectacular. And then we've got just tremendous excitement out there in in you know the web land in terms of appreciation for these two shows. We've also just done as you know to be. Four twenty three which was a celebration of life returning To the performing arts which we performed on the roof of the parking garage navy pier and that was a blast. You had singers. You had dancers interviews part of it and again this is still. You can just get on our website chicago shakes and slash to be now today. The mayor announced that For theater venues as part of the reopen chicago plan Venues including united center can host twenty five percent of their capacity. But what does that mean for you. Well i think that you know. I think for all of the performing arts is a bit of a struggle to only have twenty five percent. We have to say the only thing that matters to us chick chicago shakes right. Now is safety and health of everyone of our staff of audience members of you. I mean that is everything and once we are allowed to gather and slightly larger groups. I think that we will be gathering with joy and we will be thrilled to see people to see people back in this beautiful theater. Look at all those empty seats. We gotta fill them up. What does it mean then for you for the summer where we're typically used to seeing know chicago shakes in a in the park right And then obviously what are your plans for the fall when hopefully things are better right. Well we're doing a special project in the summer. Which i'm just you know we're just working on now so i'm just gonna keep that a little tease but it's going to be great and then in the fall we have a really exciting production of as you like it with with in the entire show. Are the beatles songs so the song like come together come together right now could be our mantra and you know so that will be In person that's the plan. That's the plan for everybody to be in person and to hear the music of the beatles and the music of shakespeare and phenomenal. Cast having a blast together. I what a wonderful way to welcome people as they look around here. I know there'll be laughter on though there be brilliant. Happy music from the fabulous four and And we really you know what this is this opening of navy pier right now is a marker it is a symbol of life coming back to all of our lives of seeing your family's again you know of going out and enjoying life and we couldn't be more thrilled that this moment is here and that was a chicago shakespeare theatre's artistic director barbara gaines when we come back baby from a less windy location We'll have a little bit more information on this location and What's in store for navy pier. In fact you are apprentice. Get some protection from that. Squall out there. Thanks and great to see barbara gains in chicago shakespeare theater up next. We dive into the nfl draft. With james big cat williams. But i i look at the weather. Chicago tonight is made possible in part through the generous support of the julius franken nations jacksonville. Jaguars select trevor learns quarterback clemson and the nfl draft and cleveland is underway. Right now. bears fans are hoping for some game. Ready reinforcements after a disappointing end. To last season the bears have eight picks including the twentieth pick in the first round. So will they finally get that franchise quarterback joining us to give his take. Is james big cat. Williams former offensive lineman for the bears from nine hundred ninety one to two thousand two. Hey james great to see you. I'm i'm getting by. I've got i'm excited here but i gotta talk about the other. Excitement happening in the nfl. Apparently aaron rodgers is not going to return to the packers next year. Are you hearing that. I'm sort of here. That's that's what he's saying right now. The packers all our. He's under contract if he chooses not to play. He's got a lot of money to get back. I don't think it's about the money. I think it's about what he's doing as far as being disrespected as far as bringing jordan love to be a backup quarterback or to be the person that is going to take over for riders and rodgers. Not knowing anything about it you know. You're you're a two-time nfl of vp. And your organization can't come to you tell you that you know we're gonna we're gonna pick up a young quarterback's growth for the future could be good news for the chicago. Bears though and the rumors are that He's he might land in denver with the former bears offensive coordinator vic fangio all right so with the twentieth. Pick in the nfl draft. The bears select who right to say seven jenkins a tackle someone that can come in right now and play and contribute to what the team needs to have done but you also have other needs wide receiver guy like terrence marshall from lsu. They could still be there around the twentieth. So there are a lot of options and the one thing about the draft as things change every second so you know a guy might be on their board that might be very high on their board at the fifteenth might be gone by sixteen so you just never know what's going to happen until it's your and everybody knows the bears wanna get a franchise quarterback at some point. This may not be the draft to do it. Do you anticipate some kind of big crazy trade. Where the general manager ryan pace a trades up fifteen pick or something like that so he can land a quarterback adult. See that happening. I think that there is first of all. I don't think they have enough capital to move up high enough in the draft to get one of the big five quarterbacks and then once you start talking about the quarterbacks after that you're talking about quarterbacks seeking go at the end of the second round early third route so you know for them to move up just to take a guy that they could probably get set second third round. We've heard this story before. And i don't think we want to see it again. Is there a good guy in the second or third round. You think they should be targeting. Well there's a kid by the name of davis mills that is out of stanford big quarterback six three two hundred. Fifteen pounds stands in the pocket. You know they're going to talk about a few issues that he's had as a as a senior coming out of high school eurodisney Heard it again after. That season was over and then had some issues whether in college he's had a couple of surgeries on it but he's the type of quarterback you're looking for big athletic. You know he's been through a lot so he can deal with a lot and it seems to be a good leader for that he was a leader let stanford to at some point like a broken clock being right twice a day. The bears have to draft a quarterback. That actually works out here in to that end. I mean the bears aren't just on the clock. I isn't ryan pace general manager on the clock. I mean he really needs to to prove something here because it's it just hasn't been as such good going lightly on those. I think every every decision maker in that building is on notice right now because if you come into this season and no matter who you thinking draft whether you're able to get who you think is a franchise quarterback or if you've taken off to tackle the twenty that helps solidify that offense line s you win. Games during the season was going. Gonna matter for these guys agra solidify that offensive line and get a good running game going. Andy dalton. Is the bears starting quarterback. Barring some crazy move tonight What can bears fans expect out of. Dalton i'm really not sure. Any dalton was a guy that was low on the list last year. When they were quarterbacks They ended up getting folds andy. Dong the dallas plays a couple of days. Thousands for scott gets her. He gets her in also. It's it's kind of just cycling through quarterbacks. Right now or quarterbacks that have the potential to be a starting block for young guy but as of right now they don't have that young guy in the ranks to teach but it could be a much different landscape again. If aaron rodgers doesn't come to the packers Suddenly it doesn't seem that scary. I wanted to ask you your reflections. You know we heard the news earlier this week that Former bears great Defensive tackle steve mcmichael announce He's struggling with aol. S your reaction to that upset upset. When i first got here and ninety one. Who as a defensive lineman steve mcmichael was one of those guys kind of took me under under his way. Richard dent steaming. Michael's fridge in all those guys taught me what it was like to be in the nfl. Things that i needed to do the way i needed the and it's hard to see where he is now and you listen to him and he still sounds like the same old mongo but then you get to see you get to see him and it's like you know everything's changed. He's not that big muscular guy that you know just had had everything on the tip of his toe and wasn't scared to say and and you don't talk to anybody in this industry footballer broadcasting. It doesn't say hey he's just a great guy. I just have the kind of things to say about him. very quickly you. You've got a high school. Football season underway right now at lake forest. How's that going. Well we're done. We're we we were able to go six to nine or so. I'll congratulate congratulations to lick for scouts. All right well and just for our viewers at don't know you're you're you're coach there at lake forest and it was a spring football season because of the strange situation with covid also. If you're watching chicago is a good place it really is. I mean so who knows. Let's not give up hope. Our thanks to james. Big cat williams. Thanks a lot too and up next brands. Friedman joins us live from navy pier. Hopefully in a safer setting with more on the city's reopening plan so stick around don't ever miss chicago tonight. Subscribe to our podcast. Get a daily download of our show delivered to your desktop or mobile device. Go to wtt. W dot com slash chicago tonight. Podcast and subscribe and checking with brandon. Friedman whose co anchoring tonight's show from navy pier is part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series brennan's looks like you got out of the elements a little bit there. Yeah we've found a better spot. Where if you yards from from where we started off. It's surprisingly better right here so right. Now we're joined by pile. Patel's he's the communications director for navy. Pier thank you so much for meeting us out here in these conditions I tell us a little bit about this location where we are on the pier briefly. We are offshore rooftop and bar on navy pier. This is the largest rooftop bar in north america. It was actually the largest rooftop in the world and documented by guinness book of world records. So this is a an iconic and treasured place for us at the pierre newly reopened. Now we know that a phased reopening is beginning navy. Pier starting tomorrow. What's in the works. So the first phase of the Reopening includes outdoor spaces for the most part north-and-south dock popa this park pier park. And what's great about. A pure park's reopening is that the rides and attractions part of this reopening. It wasn't last year when we have closed after the pandemic march we weren't able to reopen our iconic rise. Tractions like the centennial wheel wave. Swinger that will now be reopened. And we're excited to get people back on. Their rights safely will be doing thorough cleaning after every use and only people who came with will handle with you. Okay so what won't be open for visitors when they make their way back down so in spaces including the fifth third bank family pavilion inside food core areas. That's not quite part of this phase of reopening the second phase will include them. So we're using our way back in seeing how things go in these next coming weeks. And then it's sometime in may on reopening all of our indoor spaces as well. How would you describe the impact On some of the businesses here over this past year is regarded as regards to restaurants and such. Yeah there have been there. Nearly seventy businesses across the entire appear includes retail shops restaurants tour boats and cruises on so all had been impact. Obviously by maybe temporary closure but it was that closure was done with them in mind With the intention of getting them to the other side of the pandemic the operational costs would have been too high When there's not enough revenues attendance coming in so we've helped a lot of them make it to these other this other side. Most of them are coming back or so thrilled to see them. Come back So the restaurants will some of the restaurants we opening as part of this first phase the outdoor patios than those that have the capacity to manage. People inside can do so on. The retail shops will be part of the second phase of reopening. but see them all back no navy pier. You also often hosts conventions are chose other major events in the idea on win. Those might begin to return well. Today's great news that the announced will be so advantageous for navy pier right because navy pier is a popular place for private vents. Consumer shows Weddings and so while the private consumer shows are gonna take a little bit of time. Today's news will help us move in the right direction for private events that relate to weddings and corporate events and The great news about not having those who are fully vaccinated count against your capacity limit restrictions. That's going to be so great for us to be able to host Those people that want to have those private spaces including here at offshore you could host your wedding here and now the capacity will probably be more flexible to accommodate. And you've opened a new hotel As of late as well within the last year so pile patel. Communications director for navy pier. Thank you so much for joining us. in paris will have to send it back to you for now all right brandis and be careful out there. Looks like it's calm down for now but you know whether in chicago especially among the lakefront Can change in five minutes. Five seconds even all right and that is our show for this thursday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website w. w. dot com slash news. And you can also get the show via podcast and the pbs video app and please join us tomorrow night. At seven o'clock for the week in review and we leave you tonight with some more from chicago. Blues legend billy branch now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm shuts and brandon's friedman stay healthy and safe and having a were closed. Captioning is made possible by robert clifford and clifford law personal injury and wrongful death for that is proud of its partners named illinois meeting lawyers by the law bulletin publishing company of chicago.

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May 20, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:49 min | Last month

May 20, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm parachutes brandon's friedman is on assignment on the show tonight. I know that you know what your community needs. Best on the anniversary of her two years in office mayor lightfoot announces a multimillion dollar community investment plan plus alderman. You're here to share their half term report. They neighbors that. I used to know like they're not there anymore. We there's a little square for more on. Gentrification concerns kovic impact on businesses in the community and much more she was the ultimate agitator and feared because of the life and legacy. I'd be wells. A new documentary details groundbreaking journalists and civil rights icon pursuit of justice. Your now wacker and you can have a trip through the universe. It's really amazing. Experience art on the mar is in full swing. And we've got a preview of the summer lineup and a calabasas on the loose in lakeview. What the heck is that. We have details in tonight's ask geoffrey in paris. As you've mentioned i'm in logan square tonight our latest chicago tonight in your neighborhood series will have the latest on a protest happening right now near mayor. Lawyer mayor lightfoot on that two year anniversary of her becoming mayor also speaking with some community leaders who want greater protections against us placement some body from an affordable housing development that is being built here and also a brand new business owner on what that post covid retail world might look like i tossing it back to you. Thank you amanda. And now there's some of today's top stories. The mayor doubles down on her. Move to give exclusive interviews to journalists of color to mark her two year anniversary the most controversy and mixed reaction with some groups praising the decision to elevate the issue of more diversity in journalism but others are questioning lightfoot tactics and timing and criticizing her for picking reporters based on skin color. Lightfoot says she wanted to send a message to local companies to hire more diverse journalists so one day on a three-under sixty five. I say that. I'm going to mark the anniversary of my two years in office by giving exclusive one on ones to journalists of color and the world loses. Its mind how about we focus on doing what is necessary to step up make different and better hiring decisions to diversify the ranks of the chicago press corps and we'll have more on the mayor and reaction to her first two years in office and just a few minutes illinois public health officials report more than fifteen hundred new cases of covid nineteen in the last twenty four hours with forty two additional deaths that makes statewide total of one point. Three seven million cases and twenty two thousand five hundred thirty six deaths. The seven day positivity rate right now is down to two point seven percent it's official the university of illinois. Chicago has a new name for its law. School was the uic john. Marshall school of law will now just be called a uic school of law. The university's board of trustees approved the name change today and it'll take effect in july. The john marshall school all was independent until twenty nine thousand nine when it merged with the university and as you just heard it was two years ago today that chicago got a new mayor lori lightfoot was sworn into office becoming the first black woman to hold the job for later chicago tonight in your neighborhood series we visit lightfoot logan square on the city's northwest side armenta finicky and producer. Quinn myers spent the day in that area and amanda joins us now from the square on the avenue. Amanda are their protests bubbling. Up there right now. Protesters are near by here. Peres ask you know is. Logan square is a hip neighborhood shops and businesses along the walkie avenue and also along the nearby boulevards as well as some stately homes and greenspace and yes because it is where mayor lori lightfoot lives it has also become a frequent spot for protests now dozens of community and social justice groups. Right now should be nearing. The mayor's home as they call on her to enact a wide range of policies like community oversight of police. Now we will have more on that coming up later but earlier today also just blocks. From the mayor's home. We came across a smaller action in unity. Parking at this was organized by the logan square neighborhood association. A couple of other groups calling for an elected school board. The neighborhood association says it is about ensuring that there are a community voices heard in education policy. It's one of the many issues that they've taken on in logan square. Another is mutual aid during the pandemic the association's leader says it has provided hundreds of thousands of dollars to residents in need when the government failed to really provide them safety nets around especially undocumented. Immigrants are mothers in our in our schools or parent mentors and our young people. We started raising funds right and started getting families. Emergency cash assistance Rental assistance sometimes burial assistance over. We're getting close to about three quarters of a million dollars just through. Our small community based organization has been funneled through us back into our to our community through our schools. Monica espinosa coordinates. The neighborhood associations parent mentor ship program. She says she still has hopes in believes in maryland foot considering her a strong black woman they met once. She says she told the mayor where she lives at their near neighbours and the mayor called her homie. She says she hopes that lightfoot remembers that espinosa wants to be sure that there's not only an elected school board but one that allows for undocumented immigrants like herself to run four board seats espinosa has in logan square since she moved from mexico about twenty-three years ago the area she says has changed in that time three story homes have gone up where there used to be vacant. Lots neighbors she used to know moved out. They couldn't afford to live here. A super hard like the neighborhood is changing as becoming unburied different than what it used to be by just can hear gunshots in the in the cornell my house and we have those wonderful beautiful houses people seeing seo getting murder in or day-by-day data that has become saw like. I don't wanna say so normalize but as something that happens like almost all the time they do kind of get used to that libya. Juliet vasquez also grew up in logan square though. She says she couldn't afford to live here again. After she had moved away for a job she now works for bicker dyke development corporation which manages more than a dozen affordable housing complexes in humble park west town and here in logan square latest project transforming a parking lot in logan square into a one hundred unit apartment building. Every one of those units will be affordable maker dyke expects to soon opened applications to potential residents the have to be within sixty percent of the area median income. That's about fifty five thousand dollars for a family of four. She sets the emmett street. Apartments won't just be affordable when they open next january. She says they'll be nice with a mailroom bike. Racks onsite manager and janitor. And they're right in the heart of logan square within spitting distance of the blue line station. The people the one hundred families that will live in logan square or amateur departments will have access to everything. That's around here. So they'll have opportunities for employment because they have direct access to two trains and buses. They'll have opportunities for two grocery shop to shop. There also be some onsite retailers one business that had long been a staple in logan square city. Let books closed during the pandemic but it is poised to reopen as early as mid june. former librarian. Stephanie kitchen says the pandemic made her realize you only live once yolo and it has long been her dream to only bookshop even if it is a dicey time to open a small business is more people continue to work from home. She says she hopes they realized the need to support their local stores. If they want somewhere to walk to to visit to discover just had like a place for the community. I mean that's really what it's about building community and And you know having people just get together a place hopefully to hang out You don't want to get events going again or book clubs Story time for kids. You know just a place where people can gather and In enjoy Some free events and then also hopefully make some new discoveries. Both city lit an emmett street. Apartments are close to that. Can't miss it obelisk. That's become an emblem of logan square of that monument celebrating. Illinois's nineteen eighteen centennial. Though is among the five hundred sculptures in plants that are under review for public. Discussion is part of the chicago. Monuments project identified issues like promoting narratives of white supremacy or demeaning characterization of american indians. Now this is also where tonight's protest kicked off and we'll have more on that coming up but first paris back to you. Amanda thank you very much good job. As always out there and logan square and mayor lori lightfoot she surged from near unknown status to become the first african american woman and openly gay mayor of chicago. She vowed a new era of transparency. And curbing the privilege that alderman. I'm sorry we're gonna we're going to get into more of all dramatic reaction to the mayor's First two years but we'll be back with more in just a second. What the hell was that to your desktop or mobile device go to w w dot com slash chicago tonight. Podcast and subscribe. Thanks amanda a multimillion dollar community investment project plus reflections on a year of a global pandemic and a racial reckoning w news reporter heather show and joins us now with more on how mayor lori lightfoot celebrated or two year anniversary in office heather. The mayor announced the chicago. Works community challenged today as part of this press conference marking her two year anniversary. What is that and how will it work. Well it's going to take one point. Five million dollars in each of the city's seven planning areas to spruce up city facilities like libraries or community centers or to fill in vacant lots that are owned by the city. This money's going to come from the city's five years three point seven billion dollar infrastructure plan that launched last month so this is just a small part of that overall effort but the mayor was in auburn gresham today to really renew her campaign. Promise to breathe new life into areas of the city lake auburn gresham which have suffered for decades from dispe disinvestment and systemic racism. Part of that is that she listened what. She sees her accomplishment from the last year. Let's take a listen. These last years have been very different than what i would have been so but in many ways i win turning a second of. It's been hard speed talking. There are times when i felt despair. What your takeaway after listening to that. You were there today was. She has a lot of accomplishment but she was very clear that many of her plans were outright derailed by the covid nineteen pandemic the economic catastrophe. And of course the civil unrest that swept the city just about a year ago With after the murder of. George floyd in minneapolis police custody so there are a lot of things undone and the mayor tried to paint a picture today of of better days ahead in more accomplishments to come. We're just about to hear from some alderman and their take on all of this heather. Sharon thank you so much things. Paris all right sorry about that makes up before lori lightfoot surge from near unknown status to become the first african american woman an openly gay mayor of chicago. She vowed a new era of transparency. And curbing the privileges that alderman had long been used to in the bombshell scandal involving longtime alderman. Ed burke oath of office two years ago today and could not have anticipated. What lay ahead historic teachers strike skyrocketing homicide rates and a once in a generation global pandemic and joining us now to share their thoughts on the mayor's tenure so far alderman ray lopez of the fifteenth ward on the southwest side alderman. Brian hopkins who represents the north side. Second ward alderman anthony beale who represents the ninth ward on the far south side an alderman jorge cardenas of the twelfth ward also on the southwest side. Good to see all of you. Folks alderman beale. You heard the introduction there has mayor lightfoot led the city in a positive direction here at our midway point absolutely not when you look at the failed policies that have been put in place when you look at the looting that has taken place when you look at the crime and the murder rate that has run rapid carjackings all over the city. And we're not talking about any of those things and so. I'm very very discouraged there. We're talking about pennies putting in wards when we have people die in the street and nobody's saying anything about that they're taking all our police out of our districts and sending him downtown to stand around and do nothing. And so. I'm i'm very discouraged on you. Know we're trying to deflect was really going on in this city and instead of addressing the real issues that's played every single on that issue of crime. Murders are up twenty two percent this year to this point. They were up last year in the seven hundreds from under five hundred year before shootings up thirty three percent. Olbermann brian hopkins. Does the mayor wear the hat for this every mayor would. That's one of the top questions that i get asked. It's a. It's a concern to the residents in my ward. And i learned early on in my tenure as an alderman. The last thing you want to do is to dismiss people's fear when they're afraid for their own safety and they hear the statistics the lesson you want to do is to try and downplay it and say oh you know. Crime is down if we compare it to two years ago because that will sound like an excuse that will sound like you have no idea what to do in response to it and you're trying to deny that it's a problem. She made that mistake today in her press conference and i know that does not go over well with the people in my community And you know when you talk about. The police department alderman ray lopez you. You've seen the resignation of eddie johnson because of personal scandal the interim term of charlie beck and now a david brown also seen a lot of retirement in the top ranks of the police department. What about her handling of the department. I think peres. It's not just the issue of that department. It's the entire city government our government the breadth of the brain. Trust of city hall is running around on empty right now because we have so many individuals who do not want to be a part of city government anymore. They are tired of the abrasiveness. You're tired of the abuse. They're tired of the dysfunctionality. That is lori. Lightfoot let's get something straight before pandemic she came in with so much hope and promise people believed in something different coming to city government and she's failed at every turn at most of the time from southie wounds and all we get our buzzwords are those key phrases thrown at us to the point where they are meaningless now as we look and see everything that's going on the only thing that's been equitable in the city is the fact that we're all know living in fear of being shot or carjacking. The city of chicago and one of the things she came in doing at that inauguration was turning around and looking at all of you and kind of pointing their finger saying all their medic privileges gone and the the life that alderman had known going to change them. What about on the issue of police reform alderman jorge cardenas. There seems to be majority support in city council now for a civilian police review board. Mayor lightfoot doesn't support this plan she said for months she's going to have her own plan but we don't know the specifics of it. How is she done on. Police reform will need more needs to be done. I think you're my colleagues talk about accountability. Under the mayor of the mayor wears the jacket violence in the city of for economic development. And everything you could throw in there Fact of the matter is that is a tough year This pandemic really took us down in a big way so she is accountable to constituents on of leased and police accountability. And i think she's saying that that she wants a bill or an ordinance that reflects that So we're all on annette together. More needs to be done. She came in anti-corruption status quo. And that's what you're getting at. No one's a lot of folks are not happy about it But that's which came in and said she was going to do I don't like the elementary privileged stamp on it. I think there's a lot more that we weigh in and his constituents to to have their alderman way in of topics So i disagree on that But i rewind on her one thing not the status quo. No longer be held in the city needed to change in many directions. And you're seeing of a of an earthquake in so many different ways a lot of it. It's it's related to the pandemic a lot of his related to the aftermath of that But there's a lot of good things in the city. I was watching the plan commission. I mean projects in the hundreds of millions of dollars investment in the south and west side which was never attended to by previous mayors on and know the government and i notice critics but the garbage is being picked up Police are doing out really Nowadays their best job in some of the district's said that that we're not getting resources. And i look at again half full versus half-emptied at depending where you're at If you put your your your your hands If you want to be part of it if you want to work to make the city better things are going to happen. And that's that's so you're mentioning the summer for her accomplishments here and making a lot of news about investing in neighborhoods like auburn gresham alderman Bill you know you represent roseland. There was investment in your in your award under the previous mayor. Do you think that This mayor has amped up those investments. Absolutely not when you look at a lot of pro projects that i've been able to bring to the table They some of them have been derailed of tried to work with this commissioner of planning and he is not receptive to our ideas. He wants to circumvent us. He wants to work around us. Because we don't all know what's best for our community and that all comes from the top i have invested over a billion dollars in public private investment in my community. I think we're doing a great job creating jobs and opportunity here in the ninth ward. When you look at some of the things that i'm trying to do. When i brought amazon to the to the city you know they went to the mayor and they said well automobiles city as i'm as she said well. I don't know anything about amazon. And you know that's not a done deal. Automobile is getting ahead of himself. Embracing me bringing amazon to my wars to ion who deserves credit for bringing some development to your ward alderman hopkins. She has faced criticism not unlike criticism. We're hearing tonight being vindictive or bullying in her personal style. What is your working relationship with her. I don't have a very productive working relationship with her Don't have much of a relationship at all. I've had you know just a handful of conversations with her In the past two years that she's been mayor. I will say that one of those conversations was decidedly uncivil The others were very civil. And i would argue somewhat productively. Something positive came of it but overall she just lacks the ability to form those types of relationships in politics remember she she was not a politician is one of the things that she presented to the voters of chicago as an asset. When she ran as a candidate she said look. I'm not a politician. So i'm different so vote for me. Well there's a flip side to that coin. You lack the political experience that you need to build relationships. You need to build coalitions. You need to advance your legislative agenda. You need to have a relationship with the companion piece of government. She's the executive branch were the legislative branch. We have to work together. She came in with the assumption that she didn't need any of that. It was not a skill she had and it wasn't a skill. She was interested in developed at the same time later. And she still hasn't developed. At the same time the two budgets they have passed with majorities non giant majorities. But all you need is a majority. So is that evidence that perhaps That may be more stick. Approach is working though. I don't think so because the only only leadership quality the mayor has brought his division and the fact that she that she prides herself on only having to lead to reach twenty-six as opposed to building to fifty which is the entire city of chicago shows that she's not about trying to be a coalition builders. She's not trying to unify chicago. She just wants to get through it and get through it as quickly as possible. And i hope that she figures out how to write this ship with her leadership style because as much as i disagree with her her failing chicago's failure and i think that's something we can all agree on that none of us want to see this city fail and one way or another we will make this right and i think that requires a city council start stepping up and filling the leadership vacuum that she is allowed to exist for the last two years. I'm hopefully stops in the next two. I'm sorry if someone wanted to do you want to jump into. Do you see that happening. where city council might override some of her initiatives now that there's a majority and opposition to someone what she wants to do. I think you're starting to see the building of coalitions that are around issues and that are coming together to show support and unity for the good of the city of chicago. Unlike what people would call the council wars of the past. This isn't about races about our city. This is about our future. I got something to turn over to our children all cardenas. What about city finances. Always a big issue. You know the last budget obviously impacted by cova balanced with some barring. Hopefully she wants that federal relief money. You all want that federal money to pay back. Some of that borrowing has improved. The city's financial position at all. Have you all improved the financial position of the city. Here no doubt about it. But i think that we do have some help from the federal government coming in and the thing that's going to alleviate a lot of pressure to have an increase in taxes and fees all would have to balance the budget. So that's a debate to the habit in the inner city council and i love to To to f there isn't as possible. September weekly set a deadline for at least releasing parts of the budget. So we can get started on how this this money is going to be. used ice. Expect the healthy debate from my colleagues. You hear that they're definitely not happy with some aspects of our administration. I've talked to the mayor. I think that you know in the council of much needs to be done to collaborate Mccracken collaborator. I got along with daily Very very well. I got along with With manual as well and i get along with life would So that's that's my approach. The working finding a way to work together with person in the fifth floor benefits might community benefits to chicago. And that's what i'm about. So i'm gonna talk to my colleagues about how do we collaborate and how to get across. How do we speak the same language. It's thank you have a different relationship with the mayor. Then some of your colleagues here on this panel alderman beale. What about her handling of code. You do see the rates down you do see. Vaccinations up. You do see an effort at least try and have vaccine equity. How does she handle this once. In a generation crisis. I made a recommendation to the administration not to use chicago state because i thought it was a very bad location and you know they had already made a decision to use chicago state tax nation site. And right now. They're only averaging fifty three people a day out of that site and they're supposed to be doing over two thousand and i told him it was a bad site. They didn't listen to me. they went in anyway. And now you look at what's going on and that just goes back to what talk about. Is this administration does not listen to us. They do not. They say that they do but they don't listen to us and you see that's why you say the sitting in a situation that is an automated lopez warn the mayor about the looting and told her it was coming. She told us. I don't have time to chase rumors. You can chase rumors to george floyd last sunday so we try we all try to help this administration and we all fail in one way or another and again you governing for twenty six when you get to twenty five. You're going to have problems. So we're we're coming together as a city as a city council and we're gonna do right by the city because we have to right the wrongs. You can't tell people that you know we're going to move the city forward but then you tell him. Don't ask me for you know what for the next three years. If you don't go for my budget what kind of leadership is that. I don't have to like you to help. Your people provide a better quality. What is all about a lot of challenges that you all face and two more years in this current term we have the economy opening up again after covid. We'll see how city council and the mayor work together to some of these challenges. And we hope to see you back here again soon but for now. Our thanks to alderman. Ray lopez brian hopkins. Anthony beale and george carnage. Thank you all so much thank you. Thanks to summer preview of a very public art display. So please stick around. Don't miss one of our stories get them all delivered to your desktop or mobile device with a subscription to the w. t. w. news daily briefing go to w. t w dot com slash daily briefing and sign up. There's much more ahead on the program including an inside. Look into a new documentary about trail-blazing journalist be wells. The first one of the city's free public art experiences is back with a trip through the universe. Arts correspondent angel edo shares. How art on the mark is working with cultural institutions to bring their work to wacker. Dr wacker and you have a trip to the universe. It's really amazing experience. It's the light show unlike any other if features work from the adler planetarium and work from the art institute of chicago featuring work from artists. Be so butler. This really highlights what we are so excited about which is that. We can be a platform to to amplify the work that other cultural organizations and our great city Have been creating even in. The midst of a pandemic aren't on the marts. Unique location projected across the massive face of the building formerly known as the merchandise mart makes for optimal views and the skyline that makes the adler planetarium's current trip through the universe. That much more exciting visuals. I should go through four different sequences. it starts with earth. Our home planet. That's what's going on behind me right now. Then it moves into planets and shows different worlds takes people to two different worlds like saturn and mars. Then we go to the stars we show people how stars evolve in changed time and then finally go to beyond we go into the more speculative realms we show people to scale of the of the observable universe and how the universe came to be the way it is now now. This galactic excursion is paired with teens provided by sunrise. A jazz composer known for his cosmic sound. Which can only be heard from speakers along the river walk. Sun rose from outer space. I don't know if you knew that. He he arrived on the planet and his plan was to one day. Bring all of his people back into outer space with the power of music building a spaceship out of his music. And so really. His music is is really eclectic. This tricky space is just one of many projections showcased on the merchandise mart. The thirty minute shows also feature work from chicago public school students and the obama portrait's and while artem the mark continues to partner with existing institutions. They also recognize the importance of showcasing local artists. That's why they're always taking proposals over the long duration of this project. We're going to be able to show even an even greater and more diverse range of projections and so we invite you know everyone's participation for chicago tonight. I'm angel ito student. Projects officially joined the lineup. This evening and we hope that you enjoyed that sneak. Peek of the obama portrait's they officially joined the lineup. Starting june seventeenth and you can catch art on the mark every night at nine and nine thirty still to come on chicago tonight. We're live from logan square with the neighborhood's alderman. Plus the latest developments on a protest. Near mayor lightfoot house a new documentary detailing the life and legacy of civil rights icon. Ib wells that airs tomorrow night on. W. w but we give you a preview in caliphs yes a calbos on the loose in lakeview. Find out all about that in. Tonight's ask geoffrey but i am more of today's top stories. The mayor response to a vote of no confidence from some rank and file. Police officers members of the f. o. P. police union issued the vote of no-confidence yesterday in the mayor as well as superintendent david brown and first deputy superintendent carter f o p lodge seven president john heiresses. The membership spoke loud and clear what this vote but mayor lightfoot shrugged off getting a vote of no confidence from that guy is a is a badge of honor accepted. So as i said there's always gonna be critics. that goes with the territory and chicago. Officials say they will allow full capacity block parties to return to the city streets and neighborhoods starting july fifth as the covid nineteen pandemic continues to wayne but the city will not allow the parties to feature bounce houses. Street parties were banned throughout the summer of twenty twenty as officials struggled to stop the spread of covid. Nineteen chicago department of transportation will start accepting applications to close up to two blocks of streets. Starting june sixth and now we check back in with amanda finicky. Who spent the day in logan square as part of our chicago. Tonight in your neighborhood series. Amanda what he got fairs. We are joined now by thirty fifth ward alderman carlos. From europe's arosa. Thanks so much for being here now you have been a frequent critic of mayor lori lightfoot and of course there was sizable protests. Right here in the storage civita. Go near her home. What should already the now in the second half of her term. Well i think there's a lot of ground to be made in rebuilding trust with the public has been a lot of broken promises. Look i've been a critic of the mayor but also partnered with a number of times on a number of things. I know they were just out here getting her report card. I don't think she got fs on everything i would give her. Some seasons c. Plus says especially on things like housing But i think there's a lot of broken promises on a look at school board civilian oversight of the police. We've got to get those things done now that we're going to return to normal. We have more capacity to look at other things other than responding to the pandemic in you do back civilian oversight of the police. Is that something that you foresee happening while mayor lori lightfoot is off all the mere promise to get done in first hundred days and thus far we do not have an ordinance from her the that has the support of the black caucus hispanic caucus progressive caucus. Right now it includes the provision that mayor lightfoot campaigned on it includes provisions that experts on police reform have said we need to have. We're going to get it right so quite frankly. I don't understand why to me is opposing this ordinance. At this point in time we need her to join with the community groups who come together to support the empowering communities for public safety ordinance and to support the caucuses in the majority the city council that want this ordinance to pass mentioned that one of the areas in which she's done relatively well is affordable housing and we spoke with someone earlier. Who's part of this affordable housing complex one hundred units. That is going to be going up just near here. How important is that for. This area will look. We have seen so much displacement in neighborhoods like logan square. Chicago has such an ugly history of segregation we need to create integrated neighborhoods and the diversity that exists right now where we want to build upon that we want to preserve that and it should be a model for the rest of the city. So if we're going to preserve that diversity and that integration in this neighborhood we need to do more things like the hundred unit affordable housing building that we're building just down the block more changes coming including right here too with the i was going to call it a square but really it's more of a circle changes coming. Can you describe what's going on. Yeah so we're in beautiful logan square right. Now milwaukee cuts right through the square proper. We're going to close that off and create a true roundabout so you're going to have beautiful green park space. And then we're also going to re-route kids avenue This was a years long project that was initiated by the community. We're going to create a plaza. Where is that right now. And we're going to re-route kenzi through the bus turnaround at the logan square trains. Stop so he's gonna go right in front of our hundred unit affordable housing building Really great project. We've been working on it for years. We have the funding in place. Were hoping based upon the latest news. We have from c. dot. That construction will start this fall. Know as you and i talk seems like there are some restaurants in bars nearby that are bustling of course we are still however a pandemic and also spoke with a new business owner. Who says things i. It's kind of scary to be opening up right now. What can this city council due to to boost retail to boost activity in neighborhoods. Like this one. Well you know. There's no question that the pandemic really hurt our small businesses. I think we need to use the the american rescue plan and the money. That's coming in from the federal government to help support our small businesses. I think we also have to convene stakeholders small business owners worker advocacy groups to talk about. What are the types of provisions. We can put in place to make sure that as we get back to work. That people are safe and that our economy's working for everyone. I think that we have seen that. A lot of low wage. Jobs are not good jobs that are providing people with living wages that they need particularly in the restaurant industry. And that's why we've begun to see some places like mcdonalds begin to offer eighteen dollars an hour. I think we need to see more support for workers to really make sure that they have the things that they need. To thrive in the workforce. Thank you very much a once again. That was thirty fifth ward alderman. Carlos ramirez rosa. We'll be back with more coming up back to you. Guys won't say for details on a new documentary about a trail-blazing journalist phil harris a great risk to expose the horrors of racism and fighting justice through her investigative journalism civil rights advocacy wrong subject of the new. Wtt w chicago stories documentary. Thrill airing tomorrow night. Film commerce wells early life and work in the south as well as her ongoing legacy today in her early thirties. Movie chicago after racist. Mobs destroyed her memphis purging press. She had lost everything at age. Thirty not only her physical property and her printing press but also her friends which is no small thing. Having lost my paper had price put on my life and been made an exiled from home for hinting. At the truth. I felt that old it to myself an to mount race to tell the whole truth now that i was where i can do. So free and joining us as the writer and producer of the documentary. Stacy stacey welcome to chicago tonight dan. Congratulations on a really outstanding documentary about a woman. The new york times called in a recent article the most famous black woman in the united states of her time. Why don't more people know that. I certainly didn't i thank you for having me at. That is a very good question. I think most of us had heard the name have heard the name i to be wealth for starting to learn more about her now But i think it a some of it has to do with Perhaps help outspoken. She was in her own day that he was kind of written out of history and possibly because of how we Lack interest or emphasis that we that we have on On women in history and especially african american well as a writer she is probably best known for the investigative journalism she did investigating and reporting on lynchings in the south and there was a pivotal moment in her life which you described in the documentary. Tell us what that moment was. Well really she had what happened. Was there was a lynch dame in memphis and it occurred in an area known as the kerr and there were three gentlemen that were that were lynched. They were murdered and one of them was actually at a very very good close friend of either. Be wells billy. She felt that he was like family and I think that really that activated her in a way to do something about it. I think that she had in some ways off into this false narrative That was pervasive at the time of the reasons behind. Lynn link chain. Which was usually there was a criminal act or that black men had raped white women that was very typical but in this case she knew that was not true. And and it activated her and i think I think it it changed her in a way and she decided to To use all her journalists journalism efforts to fight back against the of mentioning and she went on to do that with investigative pieces. She investigated lynchings throughout the south and reported on them route to brought them to a public consciousness. Not just in this country but also overseas. How dangerous was that work for her. To look into those Incidents to look into those acts of violence. I have to imagine that it was i. I can only imagine how how dangerous it was. It certainly was not certainly was not common for african american women in the eighteen eighty s and eighteen ninety to be to be traveling alone in the south much less kind of looking into into the truth behind these atrocities. She's been referred to as a muckraker. And i believe she really was but she put herself her life at risk. There's there's no doubt about that. Men women and children were being lynched in the south and she and she was at risk of that kind of retribution but She was she was unflappable. Choose shoes determine. And i say that. I don't think that she probably thought herself at a to be some sort of a hero or a martyr martyr in any way i think she just She believed that needs to be done and she was gonna do it. I think it was more determination than any desire to be placed on a pedestal. Connect the dots. Would you please between her life. And the work of african american activists today hub directors link. You know that's a good question. I think in the during the making of this of this documentary. We saw a very very significant through line. The way expected we knew it was there. But really i think i'd be well as really she lays the blueprint for the things that we're fighting today. There was a lot to be looked at one the way that she excuse me. There's a noise next door but for one the way that she that she was willing to to use research and kind of data investigation to Fighting cancer is narrative that was going on. That's very much similar. Things that we see in the black lives matter and even an in say their names as well where where we bring to light the facts behind some of these atrocities. And that's what she did. I think that that's very pertinent in the black lives matter as well and also that it's kind of it's kind of a on it say it's a movement at ordinary people can can become activated into something and then and then make effective change that changes our world for the better was if would put herself in that same same camp is just an ordinary person who was willing to fight. Stacey what is it. You'd like yours to take away from your documentary. Well i think like them to have turned to two for one. have increased appreciation friday whilst because she was phenomenal. She's terrific. I am a big fan now but I i'd also i think like them to take away a perhaps different perspective a more wider perspective of american history from a voice that we haven't heard before i think i think that report matters. We need to hear stories more stories from a a wide range of people. Item e wells is a new is a is a fresh perspective on the history of our country and it helps us understand where we are today. Stacey robinson thank you so much and again. Congratulations on a really outstanding piece of work. Thank you and i to be wells. Chicago story special airs tomorrow night at eight right here on. Wtt w. and i'll paris we go back to you. I feel look forward to that documentary and now we go back to amanda finicky. Who has spent the day reporting in logan square as part of our in your neighborhood series. Amanda how's it going out there. Well various just a little bit ago. We spoke with reverend marcus era and also tanya watkins. They are with south siders organized for unity and liberation or soul one of the groups that organize this evening's protests and i started out by asking them what they think of how mayor lori lightfoot has done these past two years. Oh she done So this on this to you anniversary. She's made campaign promises already that she was going to care for lat next communities communities of color And she hasn't done so instead what she does is she takes The money that she says she's going to actually put into those communities puts them into things under the guise of community centers such as the discover. Call center down in my neck of the woods there and really it's just a ploy to get to build the cities. Revenue closed at one point two billion dollar deficit in the budget And so really. She's proven just time and time again that she's not caring for the communities that she says she's going to care for anything to add there. I completely agree. I completely agree with the pastor. You know we need a mayor. Who was focused on equity She committed to you know reforming the police. That has not happened. In fact they are worse than chicago. She committed to investing in schools and now fighting against a An elected school now. So like you know. Meaning the mayor's short for the most marginalized folks in communities and more life. It just has not done that in chicago. Why come to logan square to spread that message. Her neighborhood like we feel the trauma in our who particularly on the south side. We need to come speak to you where you have. You gotten any sign because it is not the first protest or action in logan square that she has heard that i would say no. No i mean just flat out no period that because if she had heard that then she would have come to the table win seats. You was striking against. Cps she would come to the table when we're calling to fund the police you know but instead she says she's going to reform the police and instead like Like tanya said there are worse than when they started when when she came in You know she. She started this. The new ticketing program. Where if you go six miles per hour over the speed limit you get a ticket. Nobody's saying that we don't want people to be safer in the communities right but the data has already shown time and time again that speed tickets. Don't actually you know the cameras don't actually Slow anybody down. All they do is is create revenue for the city. And that's what she's doing in the midst of a pandemic when people are hurting. The most hopes were pinned on mayor lightfoot by some progressives early on particularly what she ran on she is a black woman who is gay. Something that she says. She has made a lot of inroads in many of the areas. In which you talked about done anything that you applaud you know. What's what's unfortunate. Even you know about this conversation. Black and brown attracted ls. The what type of person we were getting mrs somebody who was leading the police when they were doing some of the most egregious acts to chicago was particularly black and brown folks around the city so like there were post absolutely knew what type of person lightfoot was and you know unfortunately people just didn't get it and so now we have to expose what's happening at city hall expose what's happening in communities and get folks to understand that like we need a mayor that works with us and not against in again. That was tanya. Walk ins. And reverend marcus carreira both with south siders organized for unity and liberation or soul organizers of this evening's protest here in logan square paris bhakti automatic harsh grades from those protesters. Thanks very much. We should mention to our viewers. We did invite mayor lori lightfoot on for a one on one tonight to mark her two year anniversary on the job. She did decline our request and up. Next brandis friedman in jeffrey bear in an encore presentation of ask geoffrey but first we take a look at the weather do chicago. Tonight is made possible in part through the generous support of the julius frankel foundation history buffs are big fans of historical markers. Those often looked plaques. Tell tales of events in that spot from years past our own history buff. Jeffrey bear is here to tell us about some historical markers around chicago. That don't quite hit the mark in tonight's ask geoffrey. Hey there. Jeffrey is so. This question comes from larry and lake view. It is a brass plaque on. The side of an apartment building at byron and clark says something about a callas. What does it talking about okay. Well i was so excited to get this question because it's about one of my favorite chicago oddities on. This is a nineteen thirty. Seven chicago chartered. Jubilee marker these were historical plaques were installed all over the city to celebrate. Chicago's one hundredth birthday. And most of them are long. Gone now okay. So before we go a whole lot further when you say calabasas what are you talking about. Yes well i had to look this up myself. It turns out cala boosts term for a jail so this plaque marks the site of the jail for the town of lake view which of course is now a neighbourhood was annexed to chicago in eighteen eighty nine but as with many of these jubilee markers you mentioned this the histories questionable. Even though each marker bears the inscription authenticated by the chicago historical society now. I want to say right off the bat here. We have nothing. But the highest respect for our friends at what is now. The chicago history museum collaborate for years but a town of lake. You records put the original callo boosts in the town hall nearly a mile away from this marker at anniston halstead of course it is possible that there might have been earlier jail here another plaque that you can still see in chicago with dubious history. I'm is on the northwest side in the saga nash. Neighborhood and it marks the quote old treaty elm which stood until nineteen thirty-three. It claims that this was the site of the indian treaty of eighteen. Thirty five events were says on the plaque trouble is there was no indian treaty of eighteen. Thirty five of the treaty of chicago took place in eighteen thirty three and it wasn't signed here it was signed at for dearborn near the mouth of the chicago river. Any idea why it was placed there. Well yes i'm the plaque does correctly state that this property belonged to a mixed race. Native american named billy caldwell are soggy nash on the us government had given him this land in exchange for help in negotiating treaties With non native settlers. So maybe that's where the confusion came in. Now billy called hand to live way out here because of something called the indian boundary line and that's marked by another plaque. That one is at rogers and clark streets on this line was established in eighteen. Sixteen to keep native americans far from chicago as you can see the plaque was later obscured by a traffic control box. And it's evidence that he will had really lost interest in these markers after a while and you can barely see that one how many of these plaques were put up the chicago charter. Jubilee committee installed more than seventy of them as part of a months. Long celebration of the centenary of chicago's eighteen thirty seven incorporation as a city. And only about a dozen or so are left many were stolen or just scrapped. When the building was torn down despite their wobbly accuracy they do give us an idea of what chicago was like in the early days and maybe even more. Interestingly they reflect attitudes in nineteen thirty seven when they were installed so good example of this is the marker for the kinsey mansion which only recently disappeared. The construction of the apple store at michigan avenue and the river. It read here was born in eighteen. Oh five the city's first white child ellen. Marion kuenz a it all but ignored the fact that this homes first owner was a person of color. In fact chicago's first permanent resident giambattista went to sabail and by the way they also got the date wrong. Ellen was born in eighteen. O four another loss plant nearby that identified in an earlier homo billy caldwell describes him as a quote half breed. Okay so you know. Maybe it's just as well those others are gone. we're others more accurate or less offensive. Yes many of them simply marked. I for example the first drawbridge across the chicago river dearborn street. I love this one. This wouldn't contraption got stuck so often that up citizens hacked into pieces with axes and in addition to the downtown plaques were out in the neighborhoods as well yes. That's true and you can actually still see when i love this. It marks the first home with a telephone in the lakeview. The neighborhood the home belonged to john in hill. Problem was the only two other phones he could call where in the town hall and in the local bar others marked plank roads on the west side in the south side of chicago. These were wooden war roads that warped and rotted on the prairie there so bumpy settlers nicknamed them corduroy roads and they sometimes stole the planks to use them for firewood or building. Materials still other plaques marked an eighteenth century french mission in albany park a civil war. Pow camp on the south side around thirty fifth street and even underground railroad. Stop in beverly and geoffrey. You mentioned that the plans were only part of the nineteen thirty seven and celebration. Yes there were parades and pageants and even presidential visit Way more than we have time to talk about here but we have lots more about the charter jubilee celebrations on our website. Lots of fun facts very interesting. Thank you jeffrey. Sure and had our website to find out more about the charter jubilee celebration and other ask questions. And while you're there get your gear sending your own questions about chicago to ask geoffrey back to wrap things up right after this and that is our show for this thursday night. Please join us tomorrow night at seven for the weekend review where we'll dig more into the mayor's midterm report card and now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm peres shots. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe and enjoy that warm weather out there. Tonight Closed captioning is made possible by robert eight flip and clifford law offices a personal injury law firms serving chicago for thirty seven.

logan square lori lightfoot chicago alderman mayor lightfoot George floyd alderman beale Brian hopkins Anthony beale lightfoot espinosa Lawyer mayor lightfoot chicago press corps auburn university of illinois Marshall school of law john marshall school lightfoot logan square armenta
May 27, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:48 min | 3 weeks ago

May 27, 2021 - Full Show

"And welcome to chicago tonight. I'm shots brandis. Friedman has the evening off on the show tonight. We know that certainly not done a budget in ethics package at the top springfields to do list. We have a rundown of what else legislators have been up to. We think we've hit the right note with this interim polyps breaking down the chicago. Police departments interim foot pursuit policy and looking at its potential impact on the grounds and a lot of people. Here also don't want to beat you raced. We're live in humboldt park. We look at some community members efforts to slow gentrification in the area as a hip kind of happening place you know it was just cool a new documentary about the chicago nightclub. Mister kelly's which launched several legendary careers airs tonight. We have a preview and jeffrey bear on the history and restoration of a well known chicago building in this week's ask geoffrey and peres. You mentioned. i'm in humbled park on the northwest side. Where i'll be reporting live as part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood. Series will hear about affordable housing for local artists that challenges. The pandemic has posed for teens. And how a holistic co working space is fighting back against gentrification but for now back to you all right nickel out on the docket there and we'll look forward to that in a bit but first some of today's top stories federal prosecutors announce a major drug bust today after a multi year investigation illinois. Us attorney for the northern district. John laos announced charges against seventeen for allegedly attempting to distribute heroin and cocaine throughout chicago. The sweeping investigation dubbed operation tragic blow was conducted along with federal homeland security department and the chicago police department lower says the us department of homeland security has cd relied on quote extensive undercover and covert surveillance operations to conduct the investigations during the probe law enforcement seved multiple kilos of heroin and cocaine including a fourteen kilo cocaine seizure in the belmont craig neighborhood in chicago and two kilo heroin seizure in chicago's winter park neighborhood on the north side and illinois public health officials report more than eight hundred new covid nineteen cases in the last twenty four hours with forty two additional deaths that makes for a statewide total of one point. Three seven nine million cases and twenty two thousand seven hundred eighteen deaths so far more than forty percent of the state's population has been fully vaccinated and the big memorial day. Travel weekend is almost upon us and now folks hit the road can get vaccinated along the way. The state announces vaccination clinics major travel stops like chicago's union station and travelcenters highways downstate. In places like mount vernon effing him bloomington in pontiac appointments or necessary and only those eighteen up are eligible. Whether won't be any relaxing or unwinding this week in illinois. Legislators they're heading into the holiday weekend as always with a jam packed to do list and they've got through monday memorial day to get it all done. Amanda finicky is in springfield and joins us now with more. Amanda legislators have been meeting all week on any number of things where things add. Well paris the big ticket items. Those are still in the works. Ethics legislation a major energy package. And we'll actually be talking. Later in the program with governor jb pritzker lead negotiator on that and also to budget budget. Picture is actually actually rosier than expected given the pandemic with revenues coming in higher than fiscal forecasters rigidly predicted. And then plus the state getting seven and a half million dollars from the federal government and covid relief funding republican. Legislators say given that there is no need for was have paper. It's on the ground but a whole package of nine hundred thirty two million dollars annually. What the governor calls corporate loopholes but senator jill tracy. Republican says. It wasn't all that long ago. That the governor actually signed some of these corporate loopholes into law as part of a bipartisan infrastructure. Deal and once that he championed around the state as essential job creation tools unfortunately what he wants viewed as valuable job creation and senator. He now calls loopholes in his effort to reverse his position. Let me be clear. Any tax increase as part of this year's budget must be off the table so now the fate of those taxes here they got that paper. Pat is still unknown among them is one that regards. Private school scholarships so private school administrators and parents are really fighting to keep in place. The current tax credit that goes to donors for helping to fund. These private school scholarships also wrestling over how to use that covert relief money now pretty much. Every interest in there are plenty of them here at. The capitol has a demand latino. Legislators say they want some of that money to be dedicated to immigration. Welcome centers and programs programs that have an imperative in our response to covid nineteen pandemic as this programs have literally been lifelines for individuals and families locked out of federal relief funds for rental assistance. We are also working to continue to expand eligibility for medicaid for undocumented older adult years ago we passed tobacco so spending plan that is still unresolved harris poll lot of action under the capitol dome. I'm kind of envisioning a bunch of bills like a flock of seagulls floating and flying over to governor pritzker office for him to eventually take action on. So i'm going to highlight a few of them right now. One makes june nineteen. That's you a state. Holiday violate in march today when a federal troops arrived in galveston texas in eighteen. Sixty five to take control of the state and ensure that all enslaved people be free and it was the time when the end of chattel slavery was done away with in this country now. Also passing with bipartisan backing in extension of a law passed during the pandemic that allows establishments to serve cocktails to go this time though. Wine also is allowed to be taken to go in the plan. Also let's bars through part of the summer. Anyway give patrons a free drink if they show proof of a covid vaccination. Now you're going to see in exchange between representative kice wheeler who's actually on camera with the measure sponsor representative mike celeski. Who you can't see on cam is a shot for a shot is that we're looking at like a shot for shot shot and a beer. It's got many permutations but it's designed to help people get vaccinated this case. I say let's give it a shot. Thanks thank you sir. You hear those groans of good natured. Groaning of humor there but backers say that this is actually something that could make a serious impact. I think this is a great initiative to really do two things that are important in our communities right now. One is to support the food and beverage industry. These restaurants bars that were so dramatically impacted over the course of the last year and are now starting to reopen their doors to invite people back in to your to your local watering hole. See friends and family and neighbors. I get together once again. This is a great way to do that. And it's also at the same time as promoting an important public health initiative of running vaccination that is just a sip of flavor. If you will of the measures that passed also passing a bill that we've reported on that aims to ban schools from restricting students hairstyles. So think afros and briggs an and then you have other pieces of legislation that are still held up like an elected school board for cps negotiations ongoing there and then a plan his stalled to require mandatory fingerprinting in background checks. Whenever someone applies for a state gun licence a void or firearm owners identification card illinois is already very behind on issuing these avoid cards to the point that the state is facing numerous lawsuits over it but backer that this measure is about violence prevention. They call it the block. Legal ownership for bio. Bill can look at your newspaper. You can turn on the news. You can ask your neighbors. You can ex- children your community. Why do we need to pass the bio bill because we need to do our one job and saved the lives of our children in our community members so some of those stalled measures. There is still time for them to quickly pass with session carrying through monday. One to watch out for. There is an effort to repeal an illinois law that requires parental notification for anyone under the age of eighteen can have an abortion by the way just before we went on air. We've been talking a lot. This week about redistricting democrats unveiled new maps for the illinois house. And the senate they say. They've taken into account feedback that they received yesterday in tuesday had the chance to look them over yet to see if that will do anything to a slash a lot of the complaints from the gop and from a lot of community organizations also on the dock of this weekend. As i noted earlier that major energy package and we will be back later in the program with deputy governor christian mitchell to learn more about it so for now back to you with those mass like we talked about last night that i pass was kind of a strategy to then come back with a another version saying hey we listened to everybody anyway. Thank you very much. We'll see you in just a bit here this there. You go all right. Shifting gears pass sale bore equa- division street in humboldt park has been the heart and soul. Chicago's puerto rican community for decades as a neighborhood is recovering from covid. Nineteen local leaders want to ensure the people who've called humboldt park home for generations can stick around as part of our chicago. Tonight in your neighborhood series reporter nick. Bloomberg in producer. Quinn myers spent the day in humboldt. Park and nick joins us now with more nick. Perris you've ever been to this part of division. You can't miss the giant. Puerto rican flags sculptures stretching across the street. This area is also home to dozens of murals created by local artists. But for many in the arts making a living can be tough so to help keep them working and living in the area. A new building going up on division will feature twenty four units of affordable. Housing live workspace for some of the people that helped define this neighborhood. It's been in the works for more than a decade and a half and it's a passion project driven by water water show a humble park native. Who says gentrification not going to erase this community a project like this is going to make sure that we're going to be around for a while as a community it's going to be an economic anchor To stimulate not only the longtime businesses. Here ben create new businesses and the allow longtime artists to really you know. Continue to consider by sailboating guac. Unbe park their home. The building will also feature a gallery retail space including a latin wine and spirits bar and a ninety nine seat theater which will be the new home of urban theater company currently located just down the street at the feet or actually celebrated its sixteenth. used day cofounder. ivan vega says. The company's mission is to represent its community especially for young people in the audience who might not think theaters for them at first if they don't see black and brown faces onstage they cannot relate to the work and it is important that we make sure that these stories are accessible in when we have that access for our youth we are automatically grabbed them And it's important You know theaters transformative through theater. We can really stay connected. Not only to to work to our community as a whole after a difficult year. Where live theater was more or less shutdown. Vegas message is pretty simple. Support your local theater. you know. That's the most important thing He a lot of people have a misconception of what theatre is in theaters like ourselves. Who are extremely connected to community and an arts is important so if you see theaters are local organizations in your community. Support them now. A short walk from the theater is the lalita. Lebron family learning center where young parents can drop off their kids so they can attend nearby obese combos high-school cope it's been difficult for many students. Juggling remote learning some of whom need to work to help support their families but mentor. Crystal morales says they're still defying expectations. Having kids at such a young age a lot of people says that they're never gonna accomplish anything But seeing them five for what they want and accomplish that go go to colleges have their curvier. It's amazing to see that the learning centers giving away food to the students and children. It serves and donating leftovers to anyone in the area who needs groceries down the street. At the honeycomb network co founder cristina gutierrez is also thinking about education and wellness with an eye toward inclusion. Honeycomb is boutique apothecary and co working space that offer things like mental health resources and workshops on herbalism. There are a lot of spaces that are white lead. Don't create safety for folks. That are unpacking things around wellness And you know we are a co working space but many of the people that co work here are working in the community Doing outreach working on things that that have challenges around them and so the feedback that i've had consistently from people that come here whether it's just a visit to shop to work to hang our is that they feel so safe here. Now honeycomb open in october twenty twenty and despite the challenges of the pandemic gutierrez says. She's proud to say it was one hundred percent community supported. that was the message from eduardo. To who said a lot of people had to come together to make the arts building happen. we don't have j. Lo money But you know it took us with a lot of determination and took us twelve years to get the financing just to make this happen and so it's it's been talked about many years but now it's finally happen and i think it's bringing a lot of hope to a lot of the businesses and a lot of people that come here for services And it's making a lot of people happy we'll have more on. How organizations in humbled parker helped meeting the needs of young people in the community. But peres for now back to you. All right. we'll see just a bit and up next a look at the long anticipated chicago. Police department foot pursuit policy. So please stay with us. lori lightfoot in chicago police department out with new interim cpt foot chase policy among other things. It bans officers from pursuing suspects on foot if they're suspected of a crime lower than a class a. misdemeanor it also details tactics to avoid pursuits. Such as quote continual communication with the subject officers must also activate body cameras to record pursuits in full and it prohibits foot pursuits stemming from minor traffic offenses and joining us. Now with their take on this. Newly announced policy are robert boy from the chicago police department. He's the executive director of the office of constitutional policing and reform array will karen winter's a co chair of the community working group. That was assembled last summer to provide community input on police. Reform retired police officer. Richard wootton founder the nonprofit gathering point community council and nusrat chowdhury legal director at the aclu of illinois. Welcome all of you back to chicago tonight. Rubber boy The first question. I have when looking at this list of rules is. It's a lot of things for officers to keep in mind. It's like a checklist. They have to go through in a situation. That could be heat of the moment. So how is an officer able to go through all these things when deciding whether or not to engage the one thing this policy prioritises is not only officer safety but safety or the community as well. It really creates several bright lines for officers. Were they have to weigh the risk of engaging in the pursuit with the need to apprehend the offender in enhances supervisor responsibilities. Such that officers really are taking direction on a continuous basis. And then again. That's designed around in instant safety and nusrat chowdhury. This comes in the wake of the toledo and the anthony alvarez shootings that came after foot pursuits. Do think that these new rules help prevent future situations like alvarez in toledo. These rules unfortunately jungle. We know that chicago has a problem. With deadly pursues borne out by the killings that you just mentioned but also years of data and the monitor's recent findings what we need a policy due to do is to be clear and easy to understand for officers to really grasp and implement in real time under immense pressure and unfortunately this policy is very long it includes language and a dozen put a clear enough arbil especially with respect to prohibiting pursuits for minor offenses. You refer earlier classy misdemeanors. There are lots of exceptions for classy. Seen two meters here in this policy it's worth underscoring that something as low as deep bring possession of alcohol by a minor. Possession of drug paraphernalia does or the kinds of offenses which put pursuit would still be permitted to this policy. All right. I want to get back to those things in a bit but yesterday superintendent david brown emphasize that he felt it was important to listen to the community. Here's a little bit of what he said. We likely we're here's something that we didn't think of. And we want the benefit of hearing that from a community that we need to include in this policy. So it's worthwhile you you'll never hear me say engaged in the community is a bad thing and if you think you know everything. The community needs to be engaged with every opportunity to help us build trust karen. Winter's do you think this policy was a result of community input absolutely in his family started. You know prior to even the coalition coming for the consent decree because historically this has been happening over and over and over and over time and time again in black and brown communities. So i i definitely think it was from the people. You know the pressure from the people to not only have the consent decree but to have police reform because it is very necessary right needed in the city so in this policy. So you're saying it wasn't enough input from the community as superintendent says he wanted to listen to the commute. And this and richard wootton as a former cop. I'll present this question to you How do you go through in your head well. Is it a class a misdemeanor or above his this person going to be a threat to the community. Go through this checklist in a situation. That can be very heated. This is good more stress on the officers and is also causing big stakes because when they got to determine you know win is a good time to chase him with. It's not a good time to chase. You wanna put their lives in danger. And i think the concert should be more pacific more clear in actually address. Exactly why they. I mean what can chase for and women can chase because you know when i was going through the policy myself You know it is just so wishy washy and it also leaves our whole lot of least go for air all right. Well robert bork. Their spot is here. I need you to respond to so you've heard the criticism not enough Community input. It doesn't go far enough It's too vague in its language and that it could be dangerous for the police. Having to consider all these things your response to some of those issues. So i want to start with you know the engagement because it's just not true say this policy wasn't developed with any community engagement in fact Miss winters group met with us several weeks ago and we talked extensively about what should be included in the pursuit policy. But what i would also say is that acu and others really are seeking special treatment with respect to engagement and what we've put forward is a very comprehensive plan. The most comprehensive plan that the department has ever engaged in to get feedback not only from the community but also from our officers including a webinar on june first two community meetings born in june one in july. The policy is open now for public comments that we really invite public comment from everyone across the city of chicago and what we're really hoping to do is to have really broad commuting aged men and desire from every community across the city with respect to the policy itself again it prioritises officer safety. It does create a bright line and agreed clear responsibilities for supervisors and nusrat chowdhury. The police department mentioned that this is interim they're still studying this. They wanted to get something out really quickly in the wake of alvarez and toledo what are the things that you believe should be in a permanent more complete foot pursue policy to underscore that you a real and others could have been given the chance to give input on this policy. Even as developing an interim policies making that point clear this is not about the aclu is people from directly impacted communities and in terms of what the policy should actually include. This policy does not include early and a clear statement that foot. Pursuits are extraordinarily dangerous. We know the city has a problem with deadly for pursues and that has not made clear in the purpose of the policy worth alan will begin instead are as others have mentioned wishy washy stevens that leave a lot of room for officer discretion to engage enough for pursued even when there are minor offenses even categories of offenses that are identified in the pursuit and that is not the kind of clear easy to operationalized guidance and soon restrict what has been eat deadly practice in the city of chicago for aviary montana. Oreo karen. winter's community groups did suggest dozens of recommendations many of them did not make it in here. What do you believe should make it into this policy. That was left out of cliche W with not. I can't say honestly that we had an extensive conversation. Initially they introduced concepts to us but we didn't have like a written reading receive anything written so we really didn't have a chance to process in go through to even wholeheartedly make recommendations but in twenty nine team the coalition did submit some things. But when i'm more concerned about is the prohibitions. Against any prohibitions listed. And one of them you know for me. As so many of our young people are shining their bats. Why they're running away while they're flaying they say that they're a threat to the community but really the event. They're only a threat to themselves. So how can police officers engaged threat without killing them without harming them. And so. That's when i think of several protect this might even the worst case scenarios where they have a weapon not have weapon if they're not openly shooting at any wine which in most they're not running away most of them are climbing exists and they lose their lives. So i wanna see our police department engage with our especially in young people in our communities where everyone can come out safe richard. We'll see the prohibitions. I see richard how police officers feel about foot pursuits. In general do they feel that that they carry a whole lot of risk and danger with them. Would they rather not engage in a foot pursuit or would they rather be able to engage that way. Let me say this. Very susan's armitage. You understand it in night. Also nineteen two thousand one. We lost a great officer. There were meeting with district crystal. Who was actually shot by an offender but we need to understand that soups sometime As just not necessarily you know when you have gambling in a black and communities these are most of your foot pursuits comfort. Gambling suspend a driver's license drinking on a public way or some other minor incident where you know the individuals return back around in that area against you know next day you know. So why pursual will you know. They already want to be there. But what happens when officer actually see these particular crimes You know in his act. They begin actually their kids in and then they go. Running gave is a statement. But then ozzie says we will not chase anyone. A less is life threatening and is a classic Up knock on the net. It should not gay for Because you put the Danger and you also could busy. Individual investors will be called the police all right and there's a policy mentions there is more to come on this. They're going to have a community review process and come out with more specific proposals in september. We'll have to leave it here for now. Our thanks to arroyo. karen. Winter's nusrat chowdhury richard guten and robert blake. Thanks for joining us. The queue and we check back in with nick bloomberg. Who's live out in humboldt. Park is part of our chicago tonight. In your neighborhood series nick. That's right paris. i'm here with dr melissa. Lewis principle of pedro of compost highschool in a member of the puerto rican agendas education committee. Thanks for joining us out here. We appreciate it Everybody's been dealing with remote learning in one way or another in the education setting over the past fourteen months or so but you know not everybody has the same access or the same resources played out for some of the students. You work with you know some of the students at at that. We work with at actor. Abusive compass high school are really struggling right. Now they're having to really understand how they balanced being students being full-time students but also having to work fulltime having to release sustain their families. You know that's something that we don't normally talk about. What does the working scholar have to do in a pandemic to sustain their families. We're not really discussing that right now. And i i would imagine. There's an element of stress of of mental health support. That are that's needed. They're balancing so much. That's something that you've seen. Yeah wrap around support definitely needed. We need mobile health clinics that are in the communities that are able to really address the needs of our students. You know there's so much going on right now and that fear is ever president. Our young people's lives we need to address it. is that the the kind of thing that sometimes goes unaddressed. That maybe it's it's one of those unspoken things but you kinda need to bring out in to confront right. I think that young people right now are dealing with a lot. There's a lot of anxiety a lot of fear and they tend to be strong and they're going to be resilient but they need to. They need to talk about their feelings that we need to model. What does that look like. When adults around us can really be honest about what's going on in what we're feeling right now because educators are fearful to right now in this time you know we need to model. What does that look like. And how do you have honest conversation. So as vaccination rates start to go up cova cases going down deaths going down thankfully. Are you hopeful that you can have a return to a more normal in person learning model you know for me. I'm hopeful that. I'm able to meet the needs of my students if my students need to be in person because five days works for them and that's what they need. I want to do that but if a young person has to choose between working thirty thirty five hours a week and school. I don't wanna have to make that choice. When i want to be flexible. Wanna make sure that there are options. I don't wanna have to force students choice. So as we're heading into the time of year where chicago unfortunately tends to see an increase in violence as an educator. What's on your mind in terms of making sure. Your students stay safe in the warmer months. Well i understand that my people have been forced to enter the workforce and really work right. Now i am so thankful that they are you know. The vast majority of my people are working thirty five hours a week. And if you're working you're not on the streets. You're going to be safe you're going to be able to be in a space that that sustains you end your family and i needs to really support that in really honor that experience for me you know in this past year. We've lost a handful of young people. And i don't know how much more we can endure as a as a school as a community. We've got about twenty seconds left or so. Are there some specific resources or needs that you think. The humble park community really needs in terms of support for kobe recovery. I think that. I need to uplift the work of the puerto rican agenda you know. Having a community a collective of of organizations and individuals that are really pushing the policies that come from within the community is key they understand we all understand what community is facing and we understand as a community what we need and the pretty. We really does that. Well all right we'll morris louis. Thank you so much for joining us. We appreciate it. Thank you and paris back to you in the studio all right. Nick thank you very much and still to come on chicago tonight. Illinois's energy future were live with the deputy governor to talk about negotiating and build. That could impact. What you pay for. electricity. I i came to chicago when i was twenty one years old to sing at mister kelly's familiar voice their documentary dell's into an iconic chicago performance. Venue and we guarantee you're going to recognize some of the famous artists. Who perform there and jeffrey bear. Quizzes us on our knowledge of a chicago landmark. That's being partially restored in this week's ask geoffrey but i more of today's top stories mayor lori. Lightfoot says she has a new compromise plan for those who want to honor. Chicago's first non indigenous settler jean-baptiste point to sabail this one day after an ordinance to rename lakeshore drive. Do salvo drive punted until the next meeting. The mayor is proposing an annual. Do salvo festival to be held in august this. In addition to a promise the name of the river walk after him and spur on a forty million dollar public private plan to finally complete do szabo park. that's a little slice of land. Just north of chicago river on lake michigan and alderman in support of the lake shore drive name-change have been chilly to the mayor's counterproposals to this point and state public health officials report more than eight hundred new covid nineteen cases in the last twenty four hours with forty two additional deaths that makes for a statewide total of one point. Three seven nine million cases in two thousand two thousand seven hundred and eighteen deaths. The seven day test positivity rate right now is down to two point five percent. And how about this. This is such an incredible and improbable baseball play. We had to talk about it in case you haven't seen it yet. Checkout cubs slugger hobby by his third with two outs in the top of the third time. Talented i decide to get into a rundown between home. And i when all the pittsburgh first basement had to do was step on the bag in the innings over so causes run the score cubs go up to two nothing and then an error bias takes. Second amazing comes went on to win this game by a final of five three. Just when you thought you'd seen it all in baseball el mago strikes again and amanda finicky strikes again. In springfield amanda. What do you have various. I'm joined now by one of governor. Jay roots cures deputy governors and that is christian mitchell. He actually previously served is a member of the illinois house. Speaking with you because you are the lead negotiator on this major energy package. This is complicated stuff. But give me a rundown. I'm told that we have a whole lot of meetings. We're beginning to see a framework. What's in it absolutely first of all. Thanks for having me look. The governor put forward principles many many months ago and energy and we believe that a final package is going to need to track those principles. We want to lead with ethics. We wanna make sure that we are doubling our commitment to renewable energy but also preserving our nuclear fleet. We wanna make sure that we're taking major steps forward decarbonization phasing out coal and gas and the next two decades getting no one hundred percent zero emission power twenty-fifty and making illinois the best place in the world to make manufacturer drive electric vehicle. We think this package cannon should do that and we'll also make sure we end some of the things like formula rates that got some folks in trouble in recent years. Got some folks in trouble talking about that. Corruption scandal comment admitting to a long running bribery scheme. Now a part of that. However come ed's parent company exelon is asking for something like a half billion dollars from ratepayers. They say it's needed otherwise. They're going to close a pair of nuclear plants that would mean losing jobs and also attempt attempts to reach those clean energy goals. So how much appetite is there for a given the corruption that we've just mentioned to give excellent more money in what sort of figure is appropriate for ratepayers to to be giving over the. Yeah well first of all this is why. The governor took a very different approach. It's been taken before. We did an independent audit that looked at their finances said. Do these guys need help. Do they not turns out those plans to do need some help. The right question is what is the right deal for taxpayers. How do you make sure your rights is that because the governor believes in preserving the nuclear fleet but the lowest possible cost to ratepayers negotiate. Negotiations have centered around. What does that look like. How long is that period of help and we believe that we think we can still get there in these next couple of days because i think reality sinking in for folks that there isn't a ton of appetite to pay more than we need to for these plants that look like for an individual ratepayer. What could they see tacked onto their bill. Or what else would they be getting out of this. We'll look your nuclear power is roughly fifty percent of our power in the state of illinois. I think it's more than sixty percent of our clean power. We need to preserve these fleets preserved. These good union jobs. The governors committed to that where you're looking at probably just a few cents on a bill but we wanna make sure of given everything that's happened in covid and how people are hurting right now that we are doing as little as possible to make sure that we are. Yes preserving these jobs but not hurting the average rate payer. that's the governor's principal and the legislature agrees on that and then we also have fifty democratic legislators signing on just this week to a letter saying that there is a set date for illinois to go carbon free. They aren't going to be for any package. You mentioned something about this. What might that date be. Will that be part of this plan. Well the governor's proposed phasing out coal by twenty thirty natural gas by two thousand forty five. We're having conversation with the legislature about that hundred percent. Clean power by two thousand fifty but the governor said he's not going to sign a bill doesn't do significant steps on climate change significantly decarbonize electric sector. So we we believe that. And frankly it's not gonna get to his desk at fifty people are saying they're not gonna vote without exactly once again. Thank you so very much for joining us. I know this is complicated stuff but we of course will have the latest on it as things shape up. Thanks again to deputy governor christian mitchell back to you guys. Yeah amanda. these energy bills always tend to be so complex with so many prongs. We'll see how it makes it down to the wire only a few days to go and now check back in with nick bloomberg who spent the day in humboldt park as part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series nick paris earlier today we spoke with to carter director of early childhood education for chicago youth centers which offers programming for kids under the age of five at its facility. Just west of here. I began by asking her about the lingering impact of the pandemic on the kids. She works with most of our work. We've done pre pandemic has been very much social emotional focus on working on children in terms of their relationships with each other and so took now shift. And so now. We're separating them in separating toys and separating their friends and wear masks in every most of our workers contingent on being able to communicate with the children in skip a sense of how they feel and read their emotions and so having to whether mass in just shift to that and then shift to virtual. We've worked two shifts for most part of this year shift our programs to partial platforms so that we can really meet the needs of families get resources out to them. Most recently with returning back to in person and was really making our facilities and preparing them for the children so individualizing their materials really working to still meet the needs to then but in a different environment and with a different focus and so i think the children have been so resilient and they wear masks better than adults and what we wanted to continue to make sure that we tapped into that social emotional development of our staff. Teachers is really missa. Them have families that they're trying to take off teach virtual as well as children. So just shifting to me all of those needs while we wanna maintain enroll man finding some of our enrollment drop because a families were not ready to come back and it's a matter of ensuring them some of the protocols. We put in place safety protocols and went on how we receive children Distancing outside on our families are not coming back into the classroom at this moment and so making sure we keep that communication with the parents as well of letting them know how they how their children they and and how challenging can that be focusing on that social and emotional learning you know mental health sort of in person. Interactions all those different things when you're in more of a virtual environments or even a a socially distance masked environment et is when you think about touch and you know we're picking up. Children embracing them when they come in. Hey good morning and giving them those embraces and so really figuring out a way to do those different as a way also to keep the families engage. Virtually so having you know meeting those needs if appear was working. You know a nontraditional shift. Then we have to figure out how to meet that need and have a time navy. Six o'clock instead of three. And i know we're all hopeful for the recovery in coming months. What are you going to be looking for. What are the the young folks that you work with here. Here need for that recovery. I think just one a sense that the teachers feel great about that recovery and coming back and welcoming them and then that we're still here. We're still here to start. Families provide those intentional early childhood experiences in early learning environment. That's safe for all and selena. Carter says she knows. Some parents might still be hesitant to send their children back but the chicago youth centers. They're doing everything they can to keep kids safe and keep their development on track. That's all for us from humboldt park paris back to you. Thanks nick. barbra streisand peterson. Richard pryor dick gregory if you were performer and you played. Mister kelly's on street you knew you were on your way a documentary airing tonight. On w. w shares the history of the iconic performance venue that launched so many careers live at. Mister kelly's tells the story of the legendary nightclub a place that puts chicago on the map and helped define american culture through jazz and sometimes subversive comedy performances and so much more mind. There are two uniquely american art forms jazz and stand up comedy. And mister kelly's was essentially incubator for both many of the most talented and famous recording artists in the history of popular music including ella fitzgerald billie holiday. Sarah vaughan della reese and anita o'day record live at mister kelly's familiar voice narrating there and joining us as the film's executive producer. David marian thal his father george and uncle owned and operated. Mister kelly's as well as the performance venues the london house and happy medium. David marielle welcome to chicago tonight. So nice to speak do parents. I'm glad you're a big fan of this era. Absolutely and we look forward to the documenta just after this show so for those like myself. Not fortunate to be around to get to go to me. Kelly's or the london house remind viewers the kind of reputations they had not only in chicago but across the country will l. They were known as the as the tastes bankers to the nation and they brought in they literally curated the best up and coming talent From around the nation and brought it to chicago and gave these stars applies to really hone their their careers. And you know we mentioned the names at the top. And you add in people like bob newhart or steve martin. Was it just that your father and uncle had their finger on the pulse. Who was up and coming. And that's how it developed a reputation. Mr kelly specifically as as place to catch the hot acts well starting in nineteen fifty three when it opened my uncle. Oscar really had an eye for talent he was in and out of new york and la and he brought people i- streisand and the smothers brothers out of the coffee houses of new york city and brought them into chicago and for years. He had this vision of a singer and a A standup comic and he was not not shy. To bring in as you say. Controversial groundbreaking groundbreaking acts as we mentioned putting chicago on the map and a lot of artists. Like sarah vaughn. You saw that. They loved the atmosphere. Mr kelly so much that when they cut their live albums they cut it there. So tell us about the atmosphere mr kelly. What was that like well. You're correct these. These obviously established stars irvan ella fitzgerald billie holiday. The came into kelly's and you have to remember that these stars were playing ten shows a week to week and three on weekends up to two three in the morning and they'd stay for two and three weeks so it was an amazing Venue was very intimate. Sp- earth the kid talks about in her interview with studs terkel that it was almost like you were part of the audience when you were when you were performing there. And they had great food. That was something that chicagoans required The best steaks the best fish and my father really took care of making making that right and making sure that customers retreated right and the staff. They were very good to their staff of of all all kinds of colors. I that employee's that stayed with them for years. The slogan at the london house was make a date with a steak or something like that. And you mentioned that. Your father and uncle didn't shy away from controversial subjects. Let's listen to chicago born legendary comedian. Dick gregory on why he loves playing. Mister kelly's african americans as well where it kelly's oh yeah kelly's no place else no place else. That was one of the safe places. We knew we couldn't go so they're bringing an african american artists. Latino artist male female and crowd you hear. Dick gregory saying african americans feel. That's a safe place for them to go one of the few safe places. An integrative place. Was that important to the. Mary falls to cultivate a place like that in controversial times. Well you know. I never heard him preach it as such but my father told me you know he. There was only one rule and that was the goal and that she should treat people fairly and obviously that didn't restrict people have any color. And so you know they certainly were forward thinking. It was a sign of the times. They want a few clubs in chicago that we have the article from the chicago defender. That says they these venues now. Welcoming the sepia trade. It was called in so there was it will along with professional sports Things were opening up. But the mary doll brothers made sure that that you know. People felt welcomed. We have a great story about ernie banks sitting down in the restaurant and a white couple next to him got been walked out and my cousin who is working the dying down and had dinner with ernie so they made sure that everybody everybody felt felt good and it wasn't just that but also comedians comics around the sixties. Start to really stretch the limits here of what's appropriate as especially as we get into the late sixties and things get really turbulent How come you're father and uncle were cool with that. I mean they didn't shy away from comics. That would come in and and sort of test out there really controversial material well it. It was a combination of willing to push andres and they were running businesses. Well it was just a very interesting because they could have a very not only was the cloud integrated but it was It was business people conventioneers that were coming in families From the suburbs as well as you know the the hip crowd the time and so it was. It was a real mix if we're willing to get together and share and watch somebody like the spa run entertain at the same time promote free speech and anti war and i think that it was. The the common ground is that this was entertainment. Were laughing and so you could you. Dick gregory does tell jokes which. I don't know if you could get away with today or not about about Slum clearance about segregation and People were laughing and that's what really brought them together. And then you had acts like tim and tom. Tim reid and tom teresa from harvey who they were black and white act. What about you. I mean you were young when it was still around Do you have any memories of favorite accent you saw at. Mister kelly's well. I have a lot of great great memories and the film is really a combination of social events that you're talking about the great entertainers. They got their start and somewhat of my personal and the brothers family. Our editor scott doppler and director. Teddy osiander able to interweave these stories. And i feel a very engaging way and so as a kid i would go in and you know my favorite acts were were wants to refund i love. Let's mccann who was jazz pianist. Bowen by father would entertain all the entertainers and less would come back and play with myself from my brothers. The smothers brothers would just goof around with us and be funny. Of course. I was blown away when i saw barbara streisand at twelve years old. Who walks up is really a kid. Not that much older than i was and she opens her mouth. You knew you were the presence of genius and you actually opened the film with voice over from barbra streisand. Talking about how important. Mr kelly was to her and then she went and did a photo shoot on oak street beach which became the cover of her famous album. People so there's so many great stories and which we could tell them on chicago tonight but viewers are gonna get to watch the whole thing and just a bit and our. Thanks right now to david. Marion all thank you so much. We'll there's there's a lot of great stories on our website at www kelly's chin dot com. And you'll be stone several times this weekend and then released nationally in the fall of length. Version all right well. Congratulations on that and live at. Mister kelly's airs tonight at eight right here on. W. w as we mentioned up next a special pri memorial day encore presentation of ask geoffrey but first we take a look at the weather. Chicago tonight is made possible. In part through the generous support of julius frankel nation piece. Civil war history is being restored in one of chicago's most well known public buildings. But what was it doing there in the first place our own. Jeffrey baier has the answer in this week's ask geoffrey or does he. Hey jeffrey how's it. Going grey peres are you. There was some mysterious. And this there. With the way i ask that question are letters from elizabeth neale from elmhurst. She says i heard that g. a. r. section of the chicago cultural center is being restored. What's the story of why the g. a. r. had claimed to space in the building in the first place. Okay well you know. I thought we'd start off a little differently. This week pairs. I'm going to ask you a quiz question. I knew something was subject. Yes this is up. And i'm gonna make it a little easier for you because we're going to give you a multiple choices here and actually your your lead in kind of gave away the answer. But let's see what we what we've got here. So what does g. a. r. stand for does it stanford gentleman authors room be grand army of the republic see garfield adams and roosevelt or d. The general archive and repository. Well since we mentioned the civil war in the lead and you said that kind of gave it away. I'm gonna have to go with grand army of the republic meaning. You are correct. It stands for grand army of the republic so the g. a. r. was essentially a fraternal organization and social club for veterans of the civil war on the union side was established. There were hundreds of chapters actually established across the country in the second. Half of the nineteenth century The group had regular meetings and even held parades a love this picture look at the guy. Hanging off the roof. they're commemorating their time in the service in some ways. It was kind of like a pro. Vfw the jr also had an annual nationwide needing known as the national encampment. In one thousand nine hundred was held right here in chicago and you'll notice In the top left corner of this poster a building that might look familiar to you. labeled memorial hall g. a. r. Do you know what that building is. Well jeffersons we. We mentioned in the letter the cultural center. I'm gonna say that's the chicago cultural center. Which i think was the first chicago public library. But you might correct me on that. You know your history. That's right it is what we now. Call the cultural center on located prominently on michigan avenue across from lennon part but it was originally chicago public library all right. So how did the g. a. r. The grand army of the republic managed to score space at the library right. Actually we might ask how to the library. Manage to score a space in the g. a. r. hall because in the late eighteen hundreds when the city was looking for a site to build a central library on they decided on what seemed at the time to be the perfect location on michigan avenue. But there was catch. Portions of the land were owned by. You guessed it the g. a. r. Which hoped to use it as a civil war memorial had been given to civil war veterans groups by the state of illinois legislature. So the city got a compromise and parts of the northern section of the building became the. Gr's chicago headquarters where they held meetings and also hosted an exhibition of civil war memorabilia and glass cases today the space is used for all kinds of private functions at public events including the chicago architecture. Biennial seen here in two twenty nineteen Questioner mentions the g. a. r. Rooms are undergoing an extensive restoration project. This includes refurbishing the domes beautiful dome outside the jr memorial hall and kind of the rotunda. They're designed by the building's architect. Charles coolidge along with louis comfort tiffany and fabricated by the renowned local art glass company. Helium malay- and this is by the way not to be confused. With the more famous tiffany glass dome in that same building at the southern end which was magnificently restored. A few years ago the project is also restoring many of the more than century-old surfaces and walls in the gr memorial hall ornamented with symbols of war from throughout history. All right. thank you jeffrey. And don't forget that you can visit our website for more details about the history of the and while you're there. Don't forget to submit your own question to jeffrey bear. That's w. w. dot com slash. Ask geoffrey back. Wrap things up right after this programming coming up. And that's our show for this thursday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website w. w. dot com slash news. And of course you get the show on podcast and pbs video app as well and please join us tomorrow night at seven four the week in review and now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm paris shots. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe and warm and have a great night closed. Captioning for this program is made possible by robert clifford and clifford law offices pleased to give back to the community through numerous charitable initiatives.

chicago illinois nusrat chowdhury humboldt park Mister kelly christian mitchell jeffrey bear chicago police department John laos federal homeland security depa us department of homeland secu belmont craig neighborhood Amanda finicky governor jb pritzker senator jill tracy
June 24, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:51 min | 1 year ago

June 24, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to Chicago tonight I'm Brandon Friedman here on our North West side studio. At, a pair of shoes reporting live from northwest suburban Elgin on the show tonight. The. Chicago public. School Board votes whether to keep police in schools. The search for Kobe. Seen! A report on banks lending mostly to predominantly white. Chicago neighborhoods. Are Activism as seen on boarded up throughout the city. In a teenage Mariachi group that recorded an album during the pandemic. First Brandis I am co anchoring tonight from Elgin, this northwest suburban city of about one hundred fifteen thousand is dealing this evening with some unrest over police and community issues, as it prepares for phase, four of Covid nineteen reopening, so have the very latest on all of those things and just a bit, but first back to you for the latest developments from today. Paris thanks. We'll see you soon. Residents more Chicago. neighborhoods will be able to dine outdoors this weekend. As the city closes off more streets to let restaurants spread out, the city says the pilot program will expand to neighborhoods including Andersonville, Chinatown Little Italy. Edison Park and grand crossing neighbors in Lakeview Gold Coast, an heart of Italy already have outs access to outdoor dining, restaurants and bars can reopen indoor dining services on Friday, but must limit their capacity to fifty people. Illinois blood banks are at critically low levels. The Illinois Coalition of community blood centers, says the COVID nineteen pandemic has led to massive cancellations blood drives leading to nearly sixty percent drop in donations, since March, about seventy to eighty percent of blood drives have been canceled. However, the coalition and the Red Cross are still taking donors, requiring masks, social distancing and. visit our website for more on this story including how to schedule an appointment. The trump administration is ending funding for thirteen Kobe nineteen testing sites across the country, including including two here in Illinois. The Illinois. Department of Public Health tells crain's Chicago business that it requested an extension of the funding, but was denied meanwhile state health officials also report another sixty four people have died from the corona virus. The state now has more than six thousand seven hundred deaths. There are around seven hundred newly reported cases bringing the total statewide to more than one hundred and thirty eight thousand. And while fireworks seem to have been set off all over the city this past weekend or this past week, the summer tradition will not be taking place at one conic attraction. Navy peers annual fourth of July fireworks display is canceled to prevent a large gathering of people. Instead the city will present a number of alternative events on the fourth, including the Chosen Few deejays annual house music festival, going virtual more details are on our website at www dot com slash news. Barring any last minute change of plans, communities throughout Illinois will move onto phase four reopening Friday. That means limited capacity will be allowed for dine in restaurants and other indoor activities, parachutes and producer Quinn Myers ventured out too far northwest suburban. Elgin today to get the low down on how that community is coped with the Covid, nineteen pandemic and shut down at the same time. Elgin is facing civil unrest of its own over police involved. Shooting parachutes joins us now from downtown Elgin with the latest Paris. A brandis as we join you from the Fox River here in Elgin, the city's mayor and city council are in a meeting right now as elgin prepares for phase, four of Covid, nineteen, reopening on Friday, and just before this meeting a couple of hours ago, a few dozen protesters demonstrated. The municipal building. They're demanding the city. Take Action on a two thousand eighteen police involved shooting. This incident happened when police Lieutenant Chris Jensen a white police officer shot, and killed an African American woman to Cynthia Clemens after a standoff on the I ninety. Highway Jetson was reinstated the force last year after multiple investigations, including from an outside security firm that elgin contracted with found no basis for any criminal charges, but protesters believe the killing was unjustified and they're asking city council to remove him from the forest. Everyone had their opinion to it. and. The city found that they found that group. A group of civilians citizens to go out there and do our research and homework and find the group that we're comfortable with going after questions that we want to ask. Those questions are made up just for that. We don't know what goes on behind closed doors. He never will until we actually do this or we get in there and we saw faces. We'll have the reaction on this. From Elgin's mayor later on meanwhile, Elgin prepares for phase, four of reopening on Friday as restaurants downtown have sprung to life with outdoor dining. Negligent is a blue collar, diverse city of about one hundred fifteen thousand residents, half of which are African American, and Hispanic Latino. It's home to many mid size manufacturing companies, nine retail malls and thousands of small businesses, one of the largest employers here is the Grand Victoria. Victoria Casino which sits on the Fox river, it has been fully clothed since mid-march, and like other casinos will be allowed to reopen. We think at some point during phase four, but state leaders in the Illinois Gaming. Board are still determining when that's going to be and what the regulations are going to be. The Casino provides about twelve million dollars in tax revenue each year to the city and hundreds of jobs. All sorely missed right now. There are a large employer in the community and our top ten list of large employers, and so the impact of not having them here, not having them come out to lunch and buy lunch in in the downtown area throughout the area, the folks who are coming from all over the state to be on the boat. That's a significant impact to the community. But the town's chamber does note that Elgin is diversified economy and many businesses were allowed to stay open as essential business throughout the shutdown now els cafe. Creamery is a local staple here. Downtown that says that the new out door regulations have allowed to recover about eighty percent of its normal revenue, so the restaurant doing that by staggering reservations outdoors throughout the day. Before. I go home for serve nobody reservations in respect reservation in such a way that we still do quite a businessman. I saw, even though we have only at forty percent capacity of seating, and I'll be doable. It's eighty percent of the business that we normally. Elgin is also home to the Elgin Symphony, which is determining right now how it plans to move forward with limited indoor capacity, following the lead of the CFO and other symphonies around the country, trying to see what they're going to still being worked out whether that means concerts for fifty people in attendance, while hundreds more paid to stream online, or whether that includes outdoor concerts. A Community of one hundred and ten thousand people and it's it's economic and racial diversity makes it. Just A. Unlike a lot of communities as support, an orchestra of our size that is. A huge asset for us because we are able to bring the community together in a different way, we're able to be true, economic and social advocates for for our community in a way that you know that orchestras in in wealthier communities in less diverse communities aren't able to offer that kind of support to their audiences. While this community has been hit harder with covid nineteen than other communities in this region more than two thousand confirmed cases in the three ZIP codes that make up elgin South Elgin and some of the surrounding Metro area and other Greater Elgin Family Care Center has been conducting testing since April there reporting that the positivity rate in Hispanic. Latinos is a wapping eighty-five percent eighty five percent of test coming back positive in that community as opposed to fifteen percent for non Hispanics. So a very significant disparity, and it's not surprising to us on knowing the community is. We do know that there's a lot of families that are you know for a bunch of reasons living a multi generational households working in service industries You know there's a lot of factors that goes into that. So a lot of issues being out in Elgin, just like Chicago only on a smaller scale, and we'll be back with a lot more on all of those in a bit but brandis. We toss it back to you while Perez that is able to recover eighty percent of its revenue the way it says stacking the reservations. That's pretty impressive. Thank you. Chicago School Board has rejected a measure that would have removed police officers from the city schools. The vote was close though and the issue is expected to pop up again. Amanda finicky joins us with more Amanda what happened today. We'll bring this. was as close as it could have been four to three against terminating Chicago public schools thirty three million dollar contract with the Chicago police departments to provide officers to schools. Some activists in groups have long at the schools are no place for the police. This issue has really gained momentum since the killing of George Floyd and the national black lives matter movement that his death triggered including rush merchants today that saw a coalition of progressive organizations including the Chicago Teachers Union taking to the streets specifically Federal Plaza also outside of school board. President Miguel Baier's. Critics, point. That show black students, also those with learning issues that require individual education plans as far more likely to have an encounter with the school-based police officer known as a s are. Basically that a? Lack children on a small to prison rather than school to college pipeline. We can create interventions. We can create the ability to empower teachers to have training to de-escalate as opposed to saying hey I need a police officer to come into my classroom to escalate a student wise the criminalization of black and Brown utha party for the city Chicago, but educating members, not a priority. Wilson says he wants to Congo to come out of this ten Democrats stronger community. He says that means putting that thirty three million dollars to better Houston, threatening and harming children such as Mass January. When Russian Howard says, police dragged his sixteen year old daughter down two flights of stairs at Marshall, Metropolitan High School and he's her. He says she's been in counseling since that attack. She wakes up screaming in the middle of night. She wakes up crime me in who talk. Every day about the situation. And she always asks me Dad. They were supposed to protect me. Why would they beat me like that? Now School President Miguel de la says students can also experience physical and psychological trauma. If there are no please to protect them just before the vote this afternoon on zoom meeting. Of course he shared bit fifty one years later. He is still scarred from what happened to him when he was a CPS student. I remember being beaten by gang members, and this was in eighth grade. In the basement of school. And having no one come to my. Assistance. And Delphi as says that he believes that the CPS board does need to take it off most of concern, the safety of its students. I don't want a police officer with complaints filed against them in our schools. Under no conditions do I want to but I. Ask all the organizers to come up to the communities and finding ways in addition to working on this issue and working directly with local schools UNDIS-, issuer in welcome that I also asked them to work on a plan to reduce the level of violence, one hundred and six shootings fourteen killings. Now that was a reference to the heightened violence that Chicago saw this past weekend. The by the way appointed to position as head of the Board by Chicago Mayor Lori. lightfoot his position dovetails with CPS, says, and with its CEO Genus Jackson's. For many of our students in in the communities that they live, the school is often times most safe place for them outside of their homes as we put our safety plans together as a district. We know that we have to get this right, not just because it's our job because we are literally making life or death decisions every single day for our Kea. Jackson says CPS will play a critical role in dismantling institutional racism. She says the district has already taken steps to make sure that student resources officers are better trained than they do not have a role in actually disciplining students. She says on this matter of safety. She doesn't want to take a rush top down approach rather she says whether particular schools should have school resource officers should be left to their local school councils. Now the mayor sponsor, the motions that is says her action is anything but rash or reckless. It is not a conclusion that I came to. Because I am or was overly emotional, or because I cater solely to loud voices, this is an evidence base conclusion informed by decades of research and listening to the voices and organizing a black and brown young people in this city. Now CPS contract with the Police Department actually ends while students are on their summer. Break now, so the board is going to have to vote on a new contract next month or in August. There is a whole lot more to this feed. School board meeting lasted nearly six hours in for a detailed detailed recap of all. It went on to see. How were members voted as well? You can check out our website for WTT W news reporter. Not Addison Story. That's on W, T. T W DOT com slash new. Back to you, yeah and Amanda. The breakdown of that vote is actually pretty interesting. Thank you Amanda. We'll see you soon. stick around for a spotlight politics. It's GonNa be later on in the program to hear how some local Alderman weighed in up next the search for Covid nineteen vaccine, but I look at the weather. Teams around the globe are racing to develop an effective vaccine or treatment for covid nineteen. The fastest a vaccine has ever been developed was for mumps, and that took four years, but with twenty six states now reporting corona virus cases on the rise and a US, death toll of more than one hundred twenty thousand hopes are high for a safe and effective effective vaccine or treatment as soon as possible. Joining us to share. His insight is Dr Robert Murphy Professor of Infectious Diseases at northwestern. University Feinberg School of Medicine and also executive. Director of the Institute for Global Health Dr Murphy thank you for joining us. Thank you for inviting me so i. how does a vaccine work into all vaccines work the same way. I'm beck scenes work by presenting the body with a piece of the virus or in. An altered virus that doesn't replicate and the immune system recognizes it as the real thing, and makes antibodies and other protective things against bars that protect you from getting the real thing. So, there's many ways to make these viruses. Seven or eight are commercially available now they each have their different manufacturing type. Ways of are better than others. And there's like two hundred of them in development right now and thirteen eventually into humans so yesterday, the nation's top infectious disease expert Dr Chee said that he was optimistic. That vaccine could be developed by the end of this year or early next year. Here's a little of what he said about the effort to accelerate the development of a vaccine. We are taking financial risks, not risks to safety not risk to the integrity of the science, so that when and I believe it will be win, and not if we get favorable candidates with good results, we will be able to make them. To the American public as I said to this committee months ago within a year from when we started. Now typically, it takes most vaccines most vaccines about ten years to develop before they are widely available, so is it possible to really accelerate the process for this virus or for this vaccine? Be Certain that it is safe and effective. Yes the technology has advanced enough that the vaccines can be developed much quicker. and. Dr Fauci was just talking about. How they're investing all this money now and the resources, and that they're actually building plants and starting manufactured the virus before it's been proved to be safe or effective. This is going to cost many many many millions of dollars. Nobody would ever do this before, but we're in the middle of a pandemic and what he's saying is they're willing to just throw that all away. If if that vaccine product doesn't work, because vaccine is going to be like a different sort of. Manufacturing facility, so if they get to the point where the study's done and a dozen work. They just abandoned all that investment. Okay, so there are reportedly more than one hundred vaccine candidates candidates alone being worked on around the world right now, hundred two hundred. Thank you so much because we've. We've heard some stories of apparent breakthroughs. How would you assess the status and where we are in the search were viable vaccine. Well, you start with the preclinical on your. You give it to Animals A. Stop, and then you go into humans. As a single doses low doses you increase, there are three different phases of development in the second phase. You figure out the dosing. A booster whatever and then when it gets to phase three. That's when you're comparing your ideal vaccine product does go into the market. If this thing works and you compare it against Placebo, which is the standard of care because there's no other treatment? and that takes thousands of patients, and but because the krona virus infection is short, the incubation period is short all that can be compressed the Oxford Group. Thinks that they may have a vaccine available actually in September of this year. Just being available doesn't mean it's going to be worldwide available, but available Louie's tens of thousands of people. If it works if it works, so does the vaccine have to be one hundred percent effective to stop the spread of covid nineteen? Does everybody have to get it? or how many people do have to have that? That's a great question. I think what you're getting at a thing called herd immunity. If you vaccinate enough of the people you actually will eliminate the virus. You'll change. The are not factor which is the number of people that get infected of from one particular person. Once that goes below one. The whole epidemic basically begins to go away, and that's the goal, so we don't know what percentages with measles. It's quite high with the the flu we're talking in the ninety percent eighty ninety percent range when you start dipping below that there's still enough people at risk to keep the virus so floating rob. Okay so here's what president trump said about the search for a vaccine back in March, okay. Want to see if we can do that very quickly we're looking to. When I say quickly will look into. Get it by the end of the year if we can maybe before doing tremendously well. Or anything about the president's assessment at the time. Well, you know his. His assessment is wishful thinking. He doesn't understand how a vaccine is the ball and he doesn't necessarily listen to his advisors. What is true? Though, and what Dr Fault she also said I believe what Dr Fauci says is that there will be vaccine candidate ready by the end of this year. Now be ready does not available on the market. So. More like one year from the start of the development, so in first quarter of twenty one most likely. So that means the rest of US won't be getting, it, probably until. As, you said first quarter of twenty one evenly. We would be getting until probably later in two thousand one because say you want to vaccinate everybody that wants to get vaccinated. which is another issue altogether? To manufacture all that now granted their manufacturing this stuff as we speak, you know the which they may have to throw away doesn't work. But. If all that is ready to go still to deliver save. Three, hundred, two, hundred and fifty million people are willing to take the backseat or three hundred million people. It would take some. Relief. Absolutely, Illinois, I'm sure we'll million and I'm sure we'll have you back to discuss it. As we learn more and more my thanks to Dr Robert Murphy for joining us. Thanks so much. Thank you. Still to come. Still to come on Chicago tonight, the disparity of whole lending in Chicago neighborhoods. We are literally making life or death decisions every single day for our kids. More on the vote to keep police in Chicago public schools in tonight's spotlight politics. How one organization is taking up the cause to beautify boarded up buildings ACROSS CHICAGO? And meet a teenage mummy. Ci Group that recorded an album during the pandemic. But first we check back in with parachutes co anchoring from northwest suburban Elgin Paris. Brands were joined right now by Illinois State Senator Christina Castro, whose includes a lot of elgin south elgin. Thank you so much for being here on the Beautiful Fox river with us You heard the numbers before eighty five percent of Hispanic Latinos being tested with the nasal swab tests at the greater. Elgin family care. Center are testing positive. What do you make of that I? Mean that's part of one of the things that we've been talking about I've been a part of you. Know the Latino covert initiative which is kind of a statewide. Statewide Group of folks elected local leaders, state leaders, federal leaders and also healthcare professional social service agencies who've been looking at and studying that a lot of those folks are working many have to provide for their families and many of them. Especially, the ones who are undocumented didn't qualify under the Federal Cares Act because of the current administration's choice, not to allow them to apply for a lot of the help, so one of the things that we did in the General Assembly is for a lot of funding to help give folks access. We knew this early on the testing and that's why the importance testing in the expansion of testing was very key for our especially this district because we're seeing that we're seeing you heard the president today saying that some federal funding for testing sites to Illinois we'll go away Do you anticipate that testing to remain? At the level it's at right now. Governor Pritzker has said he's going to continue funding testing I. think that's very important. You know, let's. See, what the foolishness is going on in the White House? It's working. It is important you are seeing it and and it's imperative for us to continue testing, so we can actually see what's going on in our communities where the hot spots are whether or not, and especially when we're doing the reopening plan, testing is key for us to reopen safely. Obviously, we're. GonNa go to face for. Many of my district are excited about that, but there are also folks who are a little concerned to some of them are still not ready I mean I've talked to a few of their like. Are we opening to quickly? You're looking at other states like Texas and Arizona. They're seeing this huge uptick an positive cases I. my sister lives in Houston. She was talking to me about how the Children's Hospital is. Now taking adults because the regular hospitals are just. Just overwhelmed with patients, so I think testing is important so that way we can properly and safely reopen the Shirley the numbers show that the the nation as a whole of seeing its highest level of new corona virus cases now in some very scary situations in Texas and other places, hospitals in Illinois doing a lot better in terms of their capacity, so phase four reopening at some point that will include casinos like the one behind us here. The Grand Victoria. On the river in Elgin Win is the casino going to reopen I. Think Right now. We're waiting for the governor's guidance on that. At this point stage you know and face four. That's not part of it I, know it's a constantly an ongoing discussions I have been in discussions with not only Mike Casino but other casinos as part of the Senate gaming. Gaming working group that we had prior to returning to the General Assembly and many of them are starting to put in place. Different procedures ways so that way people can safely game, but you know until it's safe folks to go into the Casino. It's not happening anytime, so you don't think it will be part of phase for at all I don't. Don't know yet. I don't WanNA put words in the governor's now so we keep in touch with you know I d Ph as well as CEO formulating those guidelines I. think that's where testing very important again you know making sure we don't as we start to reopen the economy and face four. You know we also don't want a huge uptake because then. then. We're going to be back at the same problem. We were early on which we don't want. Flood our hospitals in our ICU beds, so we wanted to everything safely, and I think as things are done safely, we'll go ahead and and I'm sure the casino reopen all right state senator. Christina Castro thanks for joining US tonight. Thanks Paris for coming out. To be here and we'll be back with more from Elgin and just a bit but first brandis. We toss it back to you Paris. Thanks. We'll see in bet. Up Next. A report of alarming home lending practices in Chicago. Do A! There's. There's a big difference between how much money is loaned to home. Buyers in majority, white neighborhoods, and how much is loaned in majority, black and Brown neighborhoods in Chicago. That's the subject of a recent report by city bureau and WBZ that analyzed home lending data from twenty twelve to twenty eight in the city of Chicago, joining us to discuss what they found are Andrew Fan who reported the story for City Bureau, but is now a data reporter for the invisible institute, both of which are journalistic nonprofits and wbz reporter at Linda Lutton. Welcome both of you to Chicago night and thank you for joining us. Thanks so Andrew. Let's start with you. Please what What can you tell us about the data that you examined and what you found? Yet, so he exempts Data Corp. Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data is data in basically every bank has to report Every every single loaded does that's that involves housing so actually when you put all of those different submissions, all banks across the city all the different, you know other lenders across the city together you end up with a really vivid picture of wish. Neighborhoods are getting arrested for banks which. which are as so what are analysis really showed? Is that a huge difference between the amount of money flowing into white neighborhoods versus black or art worldwide next neighborhoods for every dollar that goes into white neighborhoods we we saw that banks put in about twelve cents into neighborhoods in about a thirteen cents next neighborhoods so a huge doubt, and also some of the biggest. Thanks the city like bank. Actually had larger larger gaps in suitcase. Big Excellent Forty Times much money in what neighborhoods compared to black. And Andrew as we're speaking in a, we were showing viewers graphics showing that in white neighborhoods. Almost forty billion dollars was loaned in those neighborhoods compared to Latino neighborhoods about five billion and black neighborhoods about four point six billion. Andrew, you previously worked in the banking industry for your part. What was it that prompted this story for you? With actually so before I reporter I worked at a small community. Development Bank called partnership on the Senator Congress based in the neighborhood of Chatham and what was really notable. The me was I worked for a really small bank in a tiny tiny speck, compared to some of the really big. Lenders like no chase bank or guaranteed rate or quick? In. One thing I noticed was in the neighborhoods. We worked in on this outside. We were one of the largest lenders came to a lot of different kinds of loans. You wanted to buy an apartment building. We were one of the only lenders, really big lenders in that in that market not only struck me because I knew that we were small, and I didn't really understand what the other banks for Actually one thing that happened was that later on in my time there I ended up. You know England responsible for doing these reports detailing all. All lending and that's really what on me that. Oh, I could use to figure out you know it chase. Thanks. Another bank is here, you know. Where are they at Who is actually this neighborhood alongside the bank that I was working for and Linda, you found that during twenty, twelve, twenty, eighteen, more than two thirds of the money loaned for housing purchases went to majority white neighborhoods in Chicago as we've mentioned Can you give us some more context on home? Lending in Chicago and explain why that might be the case. Yeah there's we heard several reasons, and we talked to both folks on the ground, so folks in nonprofits folks trying to promote homeownership for instance in black and Latino neighborhoods, and we also talked to academics and heard a few things I guess the first thing we heard is just how important legacy as The. is of lending in Chicago's neighborhoods. In nineteen, thirty nine the federal government made redlining maps, of Chicago and many other metropolitan areas around the country, and those maps clearly drew red lines around neighborhoods that were considered dangerous to Celendin, and that definition was often a determined based on race of the population living there so lack neighborhoods were redline, and oftentimes immigrant neighborhoods, certain types of. Of, immigrant, neighborhoods were redlined as well and and banks really did not lend their, and as you go through Sir History. you know we heard again again that this disinvestments it's layered over disinvestments so once redlining became illegal. You had a history of this investment in those neighborhoods you had lower values and you had simply less money's flowing in We also know that the end of redlining sort of official redlining did not end redlining really, so we saw that we're also. We also heard extensively from folks on the ground that banks are not offering the types of products that people in communities need. We heard you know. Decades of disinvestment hasn't have left as many properties in deep need of repair, but oftentimes folks wanting to buy properties, there are unable to get loans. Loans because the properties need repair, so it's this sort of cyclical catch twenty two where banks don't WanNa lend because there's too many repairs needed. folks WHO WANNA buy can't can't get enough money to get the property the by because there's no a they need alone. That includes repairs for that's often not included and Linda. Where are some of these communities with these lower rates of home lending? While we saw lower rates of home lend name An. Dollars flowing into a black communities. You've already mention and Latino communities. We see this across the board. Even and I think this was a surprise me. We saw this. Even in communities that are sort of historically middle-class. We saw in particular some of our largest lenders of avoiding those Communities Chase Bank. Was the second largest lender in terms of the hall dollars given out in loans for the Chicago for Chicago a proper. But in our in our analysis over the seven year period, we looked at chase, loaned and average of three made an average of three loans in Chatham, which has historically middle-class black community, so we really saw very stark differences I mean another that comes to mind I think we saw a million dollars given an inglewood. West Englewood and nearly I want to say it was eight hundred million given in Lincoln Park in the same time, and of course you know viewers vendor fees. Sorry to interrupt time, but of course you can find out more by visiting our website in the meantime I want to thank both of you Linda Lutton and Andrew Fan as always outstanding reporting and journalism. And we check back in with parachutes. WHO's Co anchoring from northwest suburban? Elgin Harris. Yeah Branson just a few hours ago, we spoke with Elgin's mayor David captain amid some contentious protesting happening right outside city council because of a police involved shooting here. We talked about that, but I began by asking the mayor whether or not Elgin was ready for phase four of reopening. Eligible have been ready for quite some time and we've had some had some great conversations with people Obviously there's people all over the map. Here's what they wanna see what they wanNA have happened. For a community go earlier and we've been following the state's guidelines. We stuck to them and we're going to continue to do that, so it's been I think it's worked out well for us. You know we're a large city. I think one of the things that make cells in different than maybe many of the communities around us is that we're a minority city were. Were fifty percent minority. We are one of the fastest growing senior population, so our population is very much at risk and I'm very. I'm a senior myself, so I'm very much in tune to what's going on. My job is to make sure that people are safe and stay well so I'm very cautious about how we're doing opening and we're going to continue to do that. Dave Relations as we take. Protesters in the background about the his decapitated. One of the things on their minds. Involved shooting. Of African American than here a couple of years ago on I ninety, that was tenant Christians. It involved in that shooting. Been reinstated the police. Force. said that. While he was found innocent by the state's attorney in Chicago, no criminal charges and we work through the process and he received what every whatever you citizen gets his due process. We went all the way through. State police the state's attorney in Chicago and through a independent consultant that looked at our policies to make sure that he did not violate our policies, and he was found innocent of all those in our chief chose to reinstate him. A justified shooting based on. Politics! That's correct. And you see the conversation advocacy of at the. Police Department of taking. Public, school you have the second largest school district state. Your, we do, yes. Is eligible taking up some of those. Who are working out where we're taking a close look at some of those things and let let me go through them one at a time here. I guess the For one thing at the school district. U Forty six involves more communities than the city of elegant there five or six, so they have their own issues. They pay for some of their police to go in as well and it's a determination that will be. That will come from the school district if they want to remove those. Officers from the from the schools as far as the city as we look at defunding. Kind of thing that needs a definition for us, and I've used the example in Elgin, and I've talked about this for four years that the city of Elgin has started to in our police officers has started to pick up some of the obligations of the State of Illinois because they quit funding. Human Services they funding Drug Rehab. They could funding mental health. They could funding homelessness, so the burden started fall back municipalities to pick those things so our budget goes into those things. If you want to de-fund those things, somebody's going to have to pick it up at the. State and federal. Level Satan woke on a state level to take care of itself state. Resources back into. Better. Absolutely and I, you know I said that the days of police officers chasing the bad guy down the alley of have pretty much diminished eligible for sure and we have our, so our police officers do social work. We have people set aside that do work with the homeless. We have people that work with mental illness as well and work been serving drug task forces for a long time, so yeah, that that job has expanded and it's. Not because we wanted to do that is because I think of need and it's A. We can't let those people go. Without assistance. Something! We've heard from public officials all across the region and from police in law enforcement officials to that police have taken on too many duties more than they used to so brandon! Chat with Elgin Mayor David Captain. We'll be back with some spotlight in just a second near Paris. You've also been hearing the voices, and the the Jingling of the protesters quite a bit during your interview, but then again. Just throughout the region, we've been hearing them. Thanks. We'll see you in a bit spotlight. In Arts Alliance has been beautifying boarded up down town, and throughout the city in a form of protest arts correspondent Angel Edo shares more on why the organization is painting the city. This piece is going to deal with what's going on in society of. Lies mattering Rights and looting, and all that stuff, but. Also have a piece of tranquility. Sense of there's going to be some peacefulness in it. Because that's what we kinda need. For sure fight the good fight, but you got to keep spirits high to. That's one of the many goals of the art initiative. Paint the city co-founder Barrett. Keithly says they're using art as a way to respond to how the world is currently understanding racism. Awful activism as artists is no platform and the businesses connecting the look artist Solo practices gives us. That platform has to say a piece and speaker must be valuable. In every part of history has been artists. Kinda like narrating that part of history. Fuss, there's no different. So, we wanted to make sure voices while here. In a major way comprised of seventy five artists who volunteer their time for Free co-founder missy. Perkins says they've painted boarded windows throughout the city since protests began. Why would you say that? It's important for people to see this artwork downtown? Specifically downtown was obviously affected a lot with the protests and the riots. and I think it's actually good and important that the businesses are here. Actually supporting the black lives matter through that you know. It's interesting to see that a lot of them do understand that a message needs to be fun and created so when you're walking down town, and you see why Anson Tiger is an exotic jungles. You're reminded of a bigger message and the art that we're doing on these businesses I. Think kind of opens up for the conversations to happen. And kinda peacefully happened where people try to understand where each other's coming from as the city enter space for and more businesses began to re open paint. The city hopes to take the boards down and display them in art galleries. The cofounders also want to encourage people to vote by turning the boards into voting booths around the city penalty have the city has had not cows painted, or the dogs are painted. WE'RE GONNA. Do the same thing to Kinda. Get people knew in the in the sense of getting motivated vote. This was upcoming election. And that's another form of protests. Another form approach is another from activism. In the meantime. Their primary goal remains the same. Goal is to heal the city through art. In all forms. For Chicago Tonight, I'm Angel Edo. As we mentioned. The artists are volunteering their time and supplies. That's why paint. The city is asking for donations to pay the artists in a current gofundme campaign. There's more information on that on our website. A contentious vote on discontinuing the Chicago. Police Department contract with Chicago Public Schools based four of reopening starts Friday and a plan for in person instruction at schools in the fall here with all that and more is our spotlight politics team of Amanda Finicky Parachutes Heather. Sharon again, everybody. Amanda, let's do it with you. You know we just heard from you about the Chicago Board of Education voting on this contract for. Police officers as our rose in public schools. What's your biggest takeaway from what happened today? Who Don't know if I can pick just one I will say that I is going to do really keeping an eye on these local school councils, because as I noted you're going to have the board have to make a decision again to approve a new contract. And they said well, maybe that will be a whole lot less than thirty three million dollars. If you see local school councils saying no, we don't want to have police in our individual schools also notable I. Think was the breakdown of the is noted. It was four to three that also. Also broke down. The gender lines with the four men who were on the board of education voting to keep SRO's with the women. Boating knows so. That's an is sort of interesting breakdown, and also you're seeing the Chicago. Teachers Union disappointed in this result, saying that this goes to show why something else that they have long been calling for needs to happen. Now is an elected school board in Chicago. Yeah, the I'm interested to hear is more comes out about this Amanda Heather. There was also an ordinance on this very issue in city council last week. Let's hear what Alderman Carlos Ramirez Rosas said today at the Chicago Board of Education Meeting. I urge Chicago Board of Education. Today to vote to end this contract and please note that this fight is not going anywhere. We have introduced an ordinance and the Chicago City Council to terminate this contract on the city events This has tens of thousands of parents support this THEY WANNA. See it get done. We're going to continue to get this done because we have to stand up and do what's right for children. What are Alderman doing now? While that ordinance still mired in Legislative Limbo, so there won't be a vote on that anytime soon, but the next date to keep an eye on July second when a joint session of the City Council Education and Public Safety Committees meetings will look at a two year old on it by the city's watch job that found serious and significant problems. The School Resource Officer Program and he found that it was more likely than not to actually sort of pushed teenagers students into sort of the criminal justice system than help. Keep them. them out of it, so there will be a lot of discussion about that audit and I expect Alderman will once again try to sort of force vote end the contract from the city council side, but man does exactly right. This is a battle that could end up being fought local school council by local school council, just before the start of school in the fall and Paris Chicago Teachers Union of course very vocal, and they've been vocal on this issue as well. Isn't this about safety in schools? What are they saying? Well, they say that real safety in schools right now is having that money that thirty two million dollar contract for Covid, nineteen safety, plus they also note the fact that there have been tense situations between some police in schools and students student who was taste and drag down the stairs at the same time. The Chicago Teachers Union in recent years is trying to assert itself as the political organization in the city when it comes. Comes to sort of that democratic socialist space they back Toni preckwinkle for mayor, although she lost to Lori Lightfoot, so they've tried to assert their political power, and this issue right now is front and center in in that sort of democratic socialist space, so the Teacher's Union is all over it absolutely, and we'll be hearing more about it moving onto following up on something that has been reporting on. You did some digging. And found that the dispersal orders that police are issuing with regard to the stay at home order. To people congregating enlarge ish groups were distributed disproportionately. Tell us what you found. That's right, so if you cast your memory back to the months of the late, March April and May, we were all supposed to be staying home to avoid. Helping, spread the corona virus and mayor, lightfoot had faced criticism that those orders were being enforced more robustly in black and Latino neighborhoods of Chicago. So I asked the police department to send me the data, and I dug into it, and found that nearly half of all of the dispersal orders were issued in three westside least districts, and those police districts are among the most violent. In Chicago in the mayor says that that was due to the fact that there were more calls for service for this first large gatherings in those areas, but it certainly raises additional questions about whether Chicago is policed equitably. When you're looking at white neighborhood, some of some of which only saw four dispersal orders for okay wow. So, Paris the city is also seen a very violent couple of weekends as of late. You've been on the ground in neighborhoods all over Chicago outside Chicago tonight here in Elgin Give us some perspective on this violence. Well, this is what community groups had been fearing for many months, and by the way we've been in many of the neighborhoods that have seen some of the highest rates of violence in the last few weeks. They worried that as a summer months approached you add Chicago's historic problems with inequities and in poverty in certain neighborhoods with the COVID, nineteen shutdown with such a high rate of unemployment in many black and Brown communities with the mental health problems stress. That comes with this kid's home from school, not able to go to. After school programs or summer programs, and it's a cauldron that everybody feared would cause exactly what's happening right now? which is a higher rate of gun violence so at all then on top of disinvestment? That's gone on for decades which you talked about. Add that onto the easy way that a lot of folks can access illegal guns through Straw. Purchasing in these communities in this issue gets politicized unfortunately. Caution. People not to jump to a very simple conclusion about this because there are no simple answers, there are a lot of factors that are leading to this hopefully. Police and the city can get a handle on this, but. This is what people were were fearing. Yeah, well said that there are no simple answers. Reopening were approaching that in just a couple of days, heather, the mayor is expanding outdoor dining for even more neighborhoods tells what's going on there. That's right so sheets, said today that the first three expanded outdoor dining areas where they shut down streets on the Gold Coast Zinin Lakeview and in the heart of Italy neighborhood had been an emphatic success, so the program will expand to five more Chicago neighborhoods, including Edison Park grand crossing, and this is really designed to throw restaurants and bars a lifeline since they've been closed since mid-march and are really struggling to get back on their feet on Friday. Indoor dining will start to be allowed at no. No more than fifty people or twenty five percent of the restaurant's capacity, so things are ramping up slowly, and we may see increased allowances on if the number of cases of coronavirus continued to decline in Illinois and Chicago, meanwhile also reopening museums six. Oh, six six trail, the Lakefront Path, a lot of residents of course looking forward to getting back on both of those but as Illinois Corona. Virus numbers are down. It's spiking in other parts of the country Here's what Mayor Lori lightfoot said. About if numbers should go up here again. We've been following. These surges and other cases with great concern. And if it happens here, we will not hesitate to take the necessary steps to keep covid nineteen from rapidly spreading here again. And such steps include moving us back to phase three. Paris quickly if you can, what happens if things shut down, yeah. Well I think re retailer by the way medical people we talked to are all monitoring this and concerned about this. To what else say about retailers is. They're very concerned that they get shut down in months like November December which is where they make the lion's share of their money because the holiday season, so if you have to be shut down, the spring isn't the worst time to do it well. There's no good time, but they're saying game over for retail if it happened the FAW. They're very concerned about that. Okay and Amanda really quickly, you know. The governor released a plan for schools twenty seconds. What parents expect? I can expect evidently to send their children back to the classroom that set. There's a whole lot of hesitancy. It's rare while C., t. you and the mayor continually butt heads. You don't see a whole lot of union pushback for governor jv Fritz, during yet. That is what we are seeing, so it could look a bit different, even if they're going back to the classrooms. Perhaps not every day. There's a plan for remote blended learning. We're going to be following that. Uber Okay thanks to Amanda. finicky parachutes and Hetero Sharon our spotlight politics team. Thanks guys. And you can read more on the school board vote and several other of our political stories on our website. That's at W. W. dot com slash news. Talented band of Chicago teenagers recorded a new album during the pandemic expectations are high because they're 2017 debut recording earned a Latin Grammy nomination. Arts producer mark vitality. Meant Mariachi had NCO on a rooftop in Pilsen. Mariachi music is something that we learned and earned from our ancestors or grandparents. Parents something that we are trying to bring back. Mariachi consists of pride for Mahyco. We are trying to connect to our roots. We are playing this wonderful beautiful music tradition, from Mexico, and really what we're doing is that we are sharing this beautiful culture with the world. We met just a small portion of the group which has eighteen members and music transforms every one of them. showed me how to be a team player I. Shown you a different side of myself. Most band members went through Chicago Public Schools Mariachi heritage program which we featured on Chicago tonight in two thousand sixteen Moscow Moscow. Papa. Mariachi had NC made their new recording with remote assistance from elder Mariachi master quarantined in Mexico City. Unfortunately don't go down federal, which is our arrangement? Composers while Israel musical director was unable to come because of the certain circumstances that are happening right now as we speak, and we had a challenge, so I was given the amazing opportunity to move guide Michael. Genius to get this album done and send out to the world for everyone's enjoyment. The clothing they wear is very much part of the tradition. It is like a way. We show our pride towards what we play, which is music? It's the image of anti really is is the what the fines like the look of in? Their family members definitely approved. They're very proud of me because they see that I'm one of the only woman in my family. That was able to do this. And they see me as like. That can be something in the world. It's so wonderful feeling really to get. Kids and people from our generation to enjoy what is beautiful John, Mara Mighty Music, and not only that, but to also appeal to our parents and grandparents generations as people who come from Mexico. People come from hard times, but also this beautiful traditions, beautiful daughter music with them as they came to United States St. Four Chicago tonight. This is Marco tally. The new album from Mariachi ANC is called a Cynthia volume to find out more and see more of the band's performance on our website, plus you can hear the group perform and be interviewed on our sister station W. F. Mt Saturday morning at eleven. That's our show for this Wednesday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for daily briefing and you can get Chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook. Youtube and site W. W. dot com slash news. You can also catch the show via podcasts and the PBS video APP, and please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven right now for all of us here at Chicago Night Brandon Friedman and there's a train Paris. There's are trained just on cue the end of the metro line. Here I'm Paris shots. Thank you so much for joining us. We'll see you tomorrow. Close captioning is made possible by Robert De Clifford and Clifford Offices, Chicago personal injury and wrongful death firm whose pro bono work kept open, a church shelter for the homeless in Chicago southern suburbs.

Chicago Elgin Illinois Paris officer Police Department Amanda Heather Chicago Public Schools US Elgin brandis School Board Chicago Teachers Union Covid elgin South Elgin CPS COVID Grand Victoria producer
April 1, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:47 min | 2 months ago

April 1, 2021 - Full Show

"Good evening welcome to chicago tonight. I'm paris shuts. Spread is freedom. It has the evening off on the show tonight. it's chicago it's nostalgia. It's america. Baseball is usa in person. Baseball is back. We'll have all the latest on all things opening day. Live from wrigley field. Her in a demand to be answered as workers in alabama. Decide whether or not to unionized amazon. Employees in chicago organized some labor action as well with the loss of so many lives. Businesses jobs homes over the past year is grief the next pandemic. there were so many sides to him. The first of his four wives remembered that he defied geometry new documentary. Airing on w. w explores the life of legendary writer ernest hemingway including his childhood in oak park. April showers bring may flowers and overflow how to lighten the load on. The city's sewers this spring. Jeffrey bear on chicago's surprisingly beautiful. Utility buildings in ask geoffrey and how does gospel. Music vary from other music genres. We check in with a local gospel group to find out more and peres you mention. I'm in wrigleville where i will be reporting live for latest chicago tonight in your neighborhood series was the first time since twenty nineteen. That fans were allowed back in the friendly confines of field. We're going to hear about the safety precautions. That will be in place all season long and also checking in with how some of those iconic wrigleville been after what was really painful year but first back to you and we'll look forward to that. Amanda thank you very much and now some of today's top stories more emotional testimony in the trial of former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin charged with the murder. Of george floyd floyd girlfriend courtney. Ross testified that both she. And floyd were addicted to opioids defense attorneys have sought to portray floyd's death as likely caused by drug use instead of his fixation. After chauvin kneeled on floyd's neck for nine minutes ross says they're opioid use began as a way to treat chronic pain. We've got addictive and and dry really hard to break that addiction. A police oversight agency is looking into a police involved shooting that led to the death of a thirteen year. Old boy early monday. The civilian office of police accountability in a statement said quote while copay is in the very early stages of this investigation. it has been determined. That officers were responding to the area as a result of shots fired and encountered two suspects. The chicago police department called the incident. An armed confrontation that occurred in the southwest side. Little village neighborhood superintendent. David brown says the department is fully cooperating with copa and called for the public release of bodycam footage and any other video related to the incident. And this comes. As first quarter homicide numbers out for the city and as expected they paint a bleak picture homicides and shootings are outpacing last year with totals up fifty percent and sixty percent respectively in march alone of this year over last now some of that is driven by two mass shootings in recent weeks including at a pop party in ashburn and another in park manner. Number of officers shot also outpaces last year. You can read more about this on our website. Meanwhile state public health officials report more than thirty five hundred new cases of covid nineteen in the last twenty four hours and twenty five additional deaths that makes for a total of more than one point two million cases in twenty one thousand three hundred and twenty six deaths. The test positivity rate has ticked up to three point five percent opening day. Twenty twenty. one didn't go the way the cubs might have wanted at least on the field cubs starter. Kyle hendricks got roughed up early. Here he is giving up this two run homer to pittsburgh batter ke bryan hayes and the pirates never lows back final score today. Pirates win five to three. Meanwhile the white sox play the angels in anaheim tonight at nine and while the cubs may have lost opening day. Fans are still considering it a win for the first time since two thousand nine hundred some ten thousand of them were able to watch the game from wrigley. Field are amanda vicky outside the stadium. Now she and producer. Quinn myers spent the day and wrigleville on the north side for this week's chicago tonight in your neighborhood series and amanda joins us now from enemy territory for her man. That's probably been a while since you've been around there. Yeah go sacks it has been awhile but not just for me for a whole lot of people which is why. Tonight's game was so big literally. It's not just baseball. That has been on hold for spectators. It is all sports really also concerts conventions this is in fact the largest sanctioned gathering that chicago has had since the start of the pandemic and who kicked it off none other than the two doctors who've been calling the shots who've been navigating corona virus restrictions and rules for the city in state throughout the pandemic. That of course is chicago's health. Commissioner dr allison arwady in illinois public health director dr and goes k. Typically of course you have celebrities that are called on to throw out that ceremonial first pitch. And i'm not sure that the doctors would consider themselves celebs but they certainly. This past year have become household names in their presence was felt even after they left the pitching mound to government restrictions that kept wrigley to twenty five percent of its regular capacity. It is one of the many ways that today's game was different than those in years past fans coming here for the first time in almost two years will witness or experience. A touchless cashless distant experience. Come in the ballpark. But at the same time there are many things that will remain the same at wrigley phil when you look at the The beautiful green grass. The iv the manual operated the traditions. That people have come to know and love about wrigley. Fill those things will pretty much the same. Get back to those differences for just a moment ticket holders had no actual physical tickets. Their tickets were on their phones. Part of fat touchless system fans were told to enter through particular gates and then to stay within those zones throughout the game. Everyone still does go through a metal detector but it is now also a touchless system. It doesn't require anybody having to take their keys or their phones out of their pockets or in my case rifling through a very full purse and then if you want to order any beer food no cash allowed that all has to be done over an app though. I did speak with one season ticket holder. Who told me that he was not all impressed with that. Setup comparing it to having to do dial off over a o. L. still that fan said that he was glad to be back lead. Baseball was back and he was not alone. So many others. Just take it all in because you know and twenty years. I'm going to tell my kids about this. You know. I was one of the first. Ten thousand people go to wrigley and goal plan. Now that was zacks second only ever cubs game in his first opening day. On the other hand you had kim dunham of oswego said that her family has been coming to really for opening day for twenty plus years except of course last year when they were allowed all season. Long in twenty twenty they tried to make it as best as possible in reenacted opening day at home. We hot dogs. We had cold budweiser. We had pena's crackerjack We even caught a ball on our patio in a beer and chugged it It was it was pretty fun. Still it wasn't the same. She says she wasn't missing. Today's game for anything it's chicago it's nostalgia. It's america baseball is usa. It's sports. it's the best normal that i can get right now. The recent rise in court cases didn't deter any of the fans that i talked to including one who drove up from springfield to celebrate his birthday. Yeah i think driving into town. The highway signs said mask up your hot cova zone. But i'm really safe on everything. I'm always wearing my masks stain safe. And we're all going to do here today and have a great time. No matter what. Cooper planned to embrace tradition and drink some old styles at the game. Plenty of folks. Who weren't able to score tickets for the same. At one of the many nearby watering holes regionals bars after all our as a conic as the wrigley field itself self proclaimed dive bar ni say lounge is believed to be the oldest in continuous here and wrigleville. It opened in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty one needs a means. I believe second generation. Japanese and wrigleville used to be a predominantly japanese neighborhood. So this was kind of a to stay safe haven like staple bar after world war t- when things were super tumultuous. She says every owner since his tried to preserve history and a sense of the place. She says to her niece as staff in patrons like family. She's been a bartender at nissan for sixteen years. Serving up her signature muerte. Now the bar did stay open throughout the tumult of this past year and continues to practice cova precautions. Normally you say it would be tapped before the game after game during two probably but today they gave notice in advanced to regulars that reservations would be required. Still liu says that nissan spirit remains now bartenders. Servers aren't the only ones who have been struggling throughout the pandemic without fans. Of course nobody was around to purchase cubs gear. It did talk to a vendor who says that today's sales were pretty good in this chilly weather. Lots of folks. Buying blankets knit hats. Also cub themes face masks. Now we will be back in a minute to talk with the head of chicago's emergency management agency as it is handling gatherings like this one now that they are coming back some so perez back to you that reserve table at niece say not exactly like a reserve table biagio or something like that but looks like you're having fun actually knife all right. We'll check in with you in just a bit and all this week. National labor relations board officials have been counting the votes in a historic unionization election and an amazon facility outside birmingham alabama. It could become the first ever union workplace for the nation's second largest private employer here in chicago workers demonstrated this morning outside and amazon warehouse as they put pressure on the company for accommodations to what some employees call brutal conditions chicago. Tonight's nick bloomberg reports on january twenty fifth amazon employees. Say they were told. The company was shutting down. Its one hundred fifty thousand square foot distribution center in south side. Mckinley park known as d. C. h. one amazon's been expanding fast in the chicago area this past year. The company says d. c. h. One is one of its older facilities. So it's not renewing its lease and is instead transferring workers to three newer sites to better serve customers some employees say. That's not the whole story. The workplace was just filthy. They had so many safety issues. Last april group of workers at d. c. h. one now known as amazonian united chicago land organized what they called safety strikes demanding p. p. e. cleaning protocols and other covid nineteen safety measures. People are getting sake and we weren't notified about it. They were broadcast themselves on social media leading us like informing us themselves that they were saying or they hit the covy so we like we as a group decided that something must be done. Amazonian united says its efforts were largely successful. now they're organizing has a new focus. Employees say earlier this year when they were told d. c. h. One with shutting down they were also told there hours would be changed shifts called megacycles working ten and a half hours from one twenty. Am to eleven fifty. A m mothers have to be home trojan close like they have eaten learning or they have to get them up anymore. They have to make sure that you know that they're down for the night. I basically have medical issues. And i just found out three months ago about that. I'm a diabetic. So that's even that's interfering with like the schedule that i have to Ensure that might have taken the medication that i need. Workers came up with a list of accommodations for people working megacycles a two dollar per hour raise accommodations for employees who can only work part of the shift because they need to care for children or for medical reasons rides to and from work which they say. The company provides in new york city and full twenty minute breaks without managers cutting them short whether we need to keep handing petitions or we're going to go back to the route of doing protesting or something. Something else are what. Nah we'll we'll take those actions that are necessary because we been putting way too many situations not be given the privileges that we're asking for that are given other facilities as well. Amazon declined requests for an interview. But in a statement called its employees the heart and soul of the company and touted the pay benefits and flexibility that employees are offered you. Pride yourself on taking care of your workers or you. Pride yourself won't ensuring your worker safety our doing is holding utility. They can be really sensitive to any kind of economic political or community pushback labor and employment relations professor bob. Bruno describes amazonian as sort of alternative labor organization groups which he says have been effective in the restaurant and garment industries. Even silicon valley recognized as formerly labor union under the law but they but they advocate for workers and they use public advocacy campaigns. They could also use lawsuits To try to improve working conditions. Bruno says labor unions have the greatest legal weight behind them. And that if amazon employees in alabama vote to unionize it could have effects in chicago and around the nation dated once a beachhead is created right. It creates the opportunity to organize another places the workers we spoke with. Say they're open to the idea of a union but it has to be responsive to their needs for now as workers from d. c. h. one transfer to other locations around the city. They're focused on getting accommodations for employees working megacycles and keeping up the momentum behind their organizing. Unfortunately these issues are not just in one site. I want every buggy. Where's this vast to know that it doesn't matter if you're by yourself or your with the whole shift standing up for yourself is is important for chicago tonight. I'm nick bloomberg amazon's h one facility. The side of the covid related demonstrations is set to shut down tomorrow amazon also facing charges at the national labor relations board that had intimidated employees. Who participated in those actions and is currently in talks with the board and now to phil ponce for a look at how to heal from this past year of loss due to the covid pandemic fill purse. There have been more than five hundred fifty thousand covert related deaths. The last year in the united states and that number continues to climb that means there are millions and millions of people who were grieving for twenty five years. Our next guest has been leading bereavement workshops and writing books on grief including the new york times number one bestseller motherless daughters. Her latest book is the after grief finding your way along the long arc of loss joining us now is author and northwestern university alone. Hope element hope edleman. Thank you for joining us. A welcome to chicago. Tonight and phil you say that grief is the next pandemic. What do you mean by that. Well but i mean is that grief goes in cycles and we tend to see what are called grief spikes or urges of brief around the one year at the at the one year. Mark out on your anniversary and we are right now. Experiencing the one year anniversary of the lockdowns and a surge in kobe death. So we're expecting to see an upsurge of grief right around this time and it needs to be expressed needs to be acknowledged because suppressed or postponed or or repressed grief shows up in our bodies and our mental faculties in different ways. Ro- quickly in. What ways does that show up well. There's a compelling evidence that it leads to depression it can lead to anger. It can lead to immuno-compromised states or immune various immune diseases hypertension even some forms of cancer as you know as one just looks back at the past year. It's obvious that traditional forms of grieving funerals great side services sitting shiva and that sort of thing. It's not happening has not been happening. So how do people process with. They're going through without those rituals. Well you're right. We have been detached from the familiar and comforting rituals. That define us as mourners. In american society. People now are having to do a lot of that work alone or that. Inner adjustment alone. I think it's important for us to create rituals of our own even if we can't engage in the ones that we're accustomed to. That's lighting t light in front of the loved ones picture every night or telling stories about them or writing stories down which is a great way to keep their memories alive or wearing a piece of their jewelry. It's really important to ritual. Is they the relationship and the passage of that relationship because rituals connect the past the present and the future. And that's also something that it has disrupted for us while you're talking about personal rituals and yes one of the things you write about. The importance of community grieving are those personal rituals as effective as community grieving. Say at a funeral on. Well they are they're supplemental. Let's say i believe that. Grief is a social experience. It was for millennia before the twentieth century when we started thinking of it as something that we had to do on our own internally so we do need the comfort of other human beings and that's why i've been when i interviewed about funerals and celebrations of life and memorials. I say we need to have them. Even if it's two or three years after the death because it's so critically important that the village have an opportunity to come together to commemorate one of its own. So we hear of a so many instances where somebody is not allowed to be in the physical presence of a loved one when he or she passes What is the impact of that. How are people handling that. Well we're suffering for it and let's not forget that the person is dying if they are conscious and able to communicate are missing out on their opportunity to say goodbye as well you know. We have an expectation that there can be a physical goodbye at the end that we can be with our loved ones. We can hold their hand. We can hear their death that request if there is one and so when we're left to do that on our own it has to be done in the imaginary world. Might they have said to me. What would i have said to them. There are ways clearly second-best but of having a conversation with them of writing them a letter but We're hurting as a result of this and this is why it's so important that we'd be reaching out to and supporting each other at this time. One of the things you write about is something you call companion. Inning companion mean means being good companions sitting with the mourner not trying to fix them but just existing with them in a state of curiosity and compassion. What does this like for you. tell me They did a more doesn't always know what they need. so saying. what can i do for. You isn't necessarily helpful. But just sitting with them holding the space for them to have their own feelings to remember that grief is a very individual experience. Everyone's going to do it differently. So not to impose any kind of structure or judgment on them competiting just means listening and being there which is really what more needs most given the fact that there have been roughly five hundred fifty thousand cova deaths. What is the impact of it. Numerically what is your research. Tell you about that well. There's a study from pennsylvania state university who says that for every cova death there are nine close loved ones. Who will mourn them so five hundred and fifty thousand colon deaths means close to five million mourners and those are just the ones who are close to them and let's not forget that two point eight million people in america sadly die every year so that's in addition to the cova. Dels because those people weren't able to be more in the way that their loved ones are familiar with either. You talk about people some people experiencing what you call a big dip. The second vaccination. What does that yeah. This is something that i think we need to be talking about. I'm observing it among friends and colleagues. It's either after the first vaccination if you're doing the johnson j. and j. or after the second phase urban return shot this sense that i'm so relieved to get my first shot. I'm so hopeful about my second two weeks later i'm ready to reenter the world but the world is not the one that i left behind. We are just like in bereavement going to have to adjust to a new normal. That's what we call it in the grief world and people aren't necessarily prepared for that and sometimes there's a little bit of a dip in functioning or in mood when they realize it's not going back to the way things were before even though i feel more protected now new normal indeed hope elman thank you so much and again. The book is the after grief finding your way along the long arc of loss and up next we check in with amanda vicky from wrigleville as part of our in your neighborhood series. So please stay with us. It really is about immunity where we all come together named chicago needs to make space for everyone. We're going to go back to amanda finicky. Now who's joining us. Live from wrigleville as part of our chicago tonight in your neighborhood series amanda paris and right now i am joined by the head of chicago's office of emergency management and communications or emc. So thanks so very much to rich guy for being here now. This was the largest event that chicago has had over a year ago. We've been waiting for today. And i think we're ready. We had a good plan in place. the outcome was what we had hoped for cups today. And certainly whether it didn't really cooperate as well. It's more like a bears game. But overall i think today was also chocolate of its success from an operational sampling. Any hiccups are elements. That you're planning to change ahead of even weekend games or before. Sox have their home opener next week. Certainly we're expecting some nicer weather coming into the weekend which would probably be mean a additional crowds in the neighborhoods. So we're expecting that we're going to have a plan in place additional resources on site monitoring the crowds in making sure. Everybody comes there safely and leave safely. Are you concerned that events like this or we're going to become super spreader as if not within the city of itself but the many people who are having fun frolicking in bars and wealthier neighborhoods in general. So that's been our message. And i think the mayor's really taken the lead on that with dr awadhi making sure that You know these types of events were taking steps in the right direction. Wanna make sure we keep moving in a positive momentum moving forward Certainly the messages be safe. Operate safely operate within the guidelines. Given by the cdc cdph and We should be able to get through this thing. So when you talk about you you have manpower people in the neighborhoods. What does that look like visiting bars. Making sure that they're at capacity. That people are wearing masks. What is it look like on the ground. There's a series of meetings leading up to today. I mean we've had meetings Even up to yesterday meeting with the bar. Owners restaurants in local alderman Certainly are public safety teams Be acp business affairs. Consumer protection has been out here. The part of our public safety strategy on with fire department police department in your typical Cover chicago police department personnel and certainly the nineteen th district. Police station really has a good relationship with the business community. Wrigley field chicago cubs in and everybody in the surrounding areas. They do a good job of Are saying in touch with the community so if you consider this event having gone all rights people are looking to warmer weather getting back to real life. What are the prospects for say lollapalooza taster chicago. Yes so. I think that you know it's all based on what see in the next Next couple of weeks if things go well you know. We had a little bit of an uptick windstar training in the direction that we that we that we wanna go going so we're keeping a close eye on it and it's really going to be based on situations like opening day at cobb's open at saks. And seeing how those go how. Well that Everybody really pays attention to the rules and regulations that are that are going forward deadline that you have to have a decision made for those sort of big events so much planning goes into it the to time for people who actually organized these events to make sure that the events is done right on correctly unsafely thank you so very much for joining us once again that was head of chicago's office of emergency management and communications rich guide. Us back to you in. The studio are in amanda. One day one game down a few more to go this weekend and then the white sox Open next week. A lot for public officials to think about especially as those covert rates are creeping up again and we will see amanda vicky and just a few minutes but still to come on chicago tonight. Now that we're entering the rainy months we share tips on conserving water to help. Lighten the load on. The city's sewers a new three part documentary by ken. Burns and lynn novick explores the turbulent life of legendary writer and adventurer ernest. Hemingway they may be built for function but there nonetheless ornate jeffrey bayer gives us the striking history of chicago's utility buildings and ask geoffrey. I and we introduce you to chicago. Gospel group eighty four l. Talk about the power and impact of gospel music. But i some more of today's top stories another day of emotional testimony on day four of the murder trial of former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin the witnesses included. George floyd former girlfriend who testified to their collective opioid addiction. She also spoke about floyd's close relationship with his mother who had passed away a few years earlier if he was broken. He thinks more to come tomorrow on that trial. Kovic vaccination is going mobile chicago officials announcing a partnership with the cpa to provide a vaccine bus to take shots all across the city. The first stop was wednesday at the atlas senior center on the south side in a pilot of the program. Now officials say this program will prioritize locations that currently have low vaccination rates before april showers bring may flowers. they could bring enough water overwhelm. The city's sewers to help prevent this from happening. The metropolitan water reclamation district has dubbed this month overflow action awareness month. Wtt w news reporter. Patty joins us now with more so patty. If we see a lot of rainfall this april what could happen. You know be has the city. System combines are wastewater and stormwater When we get these heavy quick rains that can really overwhelm the system. And in some of the rainiest months. I'm they had to let some of that flow into the chicago river and the little kalua matt And by overflow we are talking about wastewater and sometimes untreated sewage. So that's not a good thing for our waterways. Certainly now what you want in the river. So what does mwr d. and friends of the chicago river suggest that folks do to help control this right so they're getting out ahead of bisbee because these can be some the upcoming rainiest wettest months in chicago you to sign up for these River at overflow action days. There's a link on our website in the story to that. And it'll give you some tips. I some short-term you can do on those days when you get a notification like maybe hold off on doing laundry or stop running the fox set when you're brushing your teeth but also to get people to think about some longer term solutions like planting rain gardens if that's an option or also on disconnecting your downspouts from the sewer system in maybe reconnecting it to a rain barrel instead just to keep as much water as possible. Out of that combined system on super rainy gains all right. Good things to think about and we'll check out the story. Patty thanks so much thanks fears and you can read that. Aforementioned full story on our website where you can also find out how to register for virtual tours with the metropolitan water reclamation district. It's all at w. w. dot com slash news and speaking of water treatment. Jeffrey bears joins us with the story. Of the o'brien reclamation plant and other ornamented utility buildings in ask geoffrey. That's coming up. But first we check back in with amanda finicky who has spent the day and wrigleville as part of our chicago. Tonight in your neighborhood series. Amanda what he got he peres earlier. Today i spoke the president of cubs business operations crane kenney about the return of fans to wrigley and i started out by asking him about in this age of social distancing. What about one of the traditions here at wrigley of course is food and beer. Vendors so vendors will be in the ballpark There'll be less shouting. Obviously we don't want to have as much ex expect duration of of of of of of breath. But what you'll see then is one is You'll have zone and your zone. We'll have designated vendors so those vendors will have card readers so when you buy your hot dog and beer or your pretzel. You'll use your credit card. Swipe through a reader and pay for it rather than having cash. Now you said. It's a great day of opening day. First time that you've had folks back in the park to watch a game and yet how sustainable is twenty five percent capacity well-sustained sustained. Well obviously the ballpark in easily holds. Twenty five thousand and it can do it in a socially distanced safeway from a business perspective. That's not a sustainable business. It's a that will lose money Over the course of the year. But listen we're we're just excited to get started. And i think the path to back to one hundred percent is in front of us Really important milestone to get people in the building you know on opening day As we saw with the bears you know they were unsuccessful in doing that and the bulls and the blackhawks also unsuccessful because the virus wasn't in a in a place where it could happen. So we're breaking the seal on this and it's really important for our city To see you can bring ten thousand people together safely When we started thinking about the the importance of tourism economy in general. So it's a big day for us a big day for the city and clearly for our fans and yet of course it does come as we are seeing a potential another surge very least to rise in cases. How are you prepared for that or do you feel confident. Fans getting here you telling what what can you tell fans mc them confident and what would it mean if this has to be rescinded if midseason it has to turn into nope no more allow. Yeah so we're we're fortunate in a year later a year into this we've seen a lot more So we saw the nfl in eighteen different locations host one point two million fans and not a single case of contact tracing lead back to one of the nfl games every public health official. All those markets didn't identify cova covid transmission occurring in any of those venues. The same thing. True with the world series down in in texas again we hosted Thirty five percent of the fans In that stadium and again public health officials were able to identify any issues there. And then raymond james stadium for the super bowl again. Thirty three percent community. So we're starting to understand that or activities are much safer than indoor activities and there was a recent study that showed actually one thousand nine times safer. So you'll have nineteen times less cova transmission doors so for all those reasons we think in outdoor activity like this is safe as long as we follow the right and we're confident that we can do that if the numbers continue to spike and go the wrong direction. Then we'll have to revisit whether we can have this this capacity but for the moment where we're excited to be here We're encouraging people get vaccinated. Wear your masks and when you come to the ball game keep your mass gone and we'll do this safely and then enjoy enjoy great baseball and again that was crane kenney he is president of business operations for the chicago cubs paris for a toss. It back to you just want to say sorry to you and all the other cubs fans about the loss today will do root for the white sox to me chicago win. Is chicago win. So sorry and better luck this weekend. Fact you guys in the studio. Thanks amanda the life of native ernest. Hemingway is the subject of ken burns and lynn noviks newest. Pbs documentary set to air on channel. Eleven monday after chicago tonight. Here's a short clip his seemingly idyllic childhood in the western chicago suburb ernest miller. Hemingway was born july twenty first eighteen ninety nine the second of six children and enjoyed what seemed to be an idyllic boyhood he had four adoring sisters and a worshipful younger brother. They all lived in a big home in the prosperous chicago suburb of oak park complacent well mannered community with no saloons and so many churches to call itself saints rest l. Park looks exactly the same now as it doesn't those pictures joining us talk about. The legendary writer is verna kale professor of english and associate editor of the hemingway letters project at penn state university. Welcome to chicago tonight. So we did an event for wcw members with. Ken burns lynn. Novick about this and the film starts off with his childhood in oak park as you saw too hot topic among locals there that he referred to it as a place of broad lawns and narrow minds. They say never said that. So how did oak park influence would become. I think his childhood in oak park was very important for ernest hemingway. He had a good education there as a student and a lot of opportunities to go into chicago and go to the art museums and the natural history museums and to participate in community events in oak park. We know he took music lessons. And he read widely and and he was In little programs. That church and things like that so i think Growing up he had no kind of a rich education and exposure to the arts. And i think that that probably had a good effect on him as a a young man who would grow up to be a famous writer. Of course those pictures we saw. He's up at his family's vacation compound in walloon lake michigan. And as i mentioned we did an event for www members. We talked to ken burns. I pose the question to burns about oak park and then the war's influence on hemingway. Look you have a victorian world slamming up against the world war and there's nothing that's going to survive that contradiction as we say in the film everything. His parents had prepared him for was no more. That world is gone so as you well know verney goes off to our. He comes back and he starts to build the myth of ernest hemingway as he starts his writing career. What why was it so important to him to create this mythologised version of himself. Well you know we have to remember that when he comes back from the war he's really young and he's still Trying to figure out who he is what is going to be and he felt that he was going to become a writer but up until that point beyond just publications for school. You know he. He hadn't managed to write any fiction you know. He had worked as a journalist he had worked writing. Sort of ad copied not very successfully but he hadn't yet made his heck made his mark as a fiction writer. And so you know. He's trying to present himself in a way. That's gonna launch him into this world that he wants to be a part of and it's kind of interesting to think of it that you know. He didn't yet know for sure that he was going to be able to do that but he was a. He was a guy who really loved excitement and friends and living life to the fullest. And so it's it's kind of Charming in a way to see that side of him and also a little bit if we look at it as a possible reaction to the trauma of war that he had experienced can also look at it in that way as well and feel some sympathy for him and in the film you know there's a narrator that says the reality of ernest. Hemingway was more interesting than the myth. And it's not as if it was a total myth. I mean he hunted in africa. He was a fisherman. Did all these masculine things so to speak but you have been privy to all his personal letters. What what was the reality behind the myth. There's there's a great quote in the film of his wife hadley saying that he had so many sides that he defied geometry. And that's really true because it's really hard to nail down. Who was the real ernest hemingway. Because he really did have all of these different aspects to his personality So he really was the great adventurer he really was the literary guy but you know he also had a sensitive side you know he could be a devoted father and husband and friend he could get his feelings hurt by his friends. That's one kind of surprising aspect that we see in the letters. Is you know a lot of the raging that he does and blustering on the surface. It's part of him reacting badly to being snubbed in a review or being snubbed by a friend. And so you get a sense that he was actually kind of sensitive guy clearly wanted the adoration of the public and the guy. We haven't even talked about his writing style yet. There's so many things we could talk about but you know one theme that constantly pops up his death in his short stories in his later work talked about. How deaf kind of is the overarching theme. And so much of his work yet. It it definitely shows up in his work. And i one of the passages that i just find so in is in a farewell to arms where there's the when the the main character frederick henry gets wounded and he feels his soul pass out of his body and then there's this interior monologue greens like to think that it just ends. This is what happens and you get this very vivid description of what it feels like to die and then go back into your body and you can't help but wonder did ernest. Hemingway take this description from his own experience of of being blown up on the banks of the river and so if he's obsessed with death maybe it's because you know that's something that he confronted at a young age and one of the themes that goes through his work life as a fixed race. Because you know you're not gonna survive it and you know. There's the title of that short story collection winner. Take nothing everybody's eventually going to meet death. And so he's just his his his work really does explore that idea and we only have a few seconds left but the style. The short declared of sentences were were so crucial to work. How did that impact. American writing after after his ear forever. You know he. He wanted to have big ideas with as simply stated as he could make it and That has been something that people have gone on to emulate to such a degree that it really permanently changed short stories and the novel and creative nonfiction as well all right well. There's so much to unpack here and there six hours of documentary to unpack with ernest. Hemingway are thanks to kale and the three part documentary. Premieres monday on. W. w right after chicago tonight and up next a surprisingly ornate history of chicago's utility buildings in an encore addition of ask geoffrey but first we take a look at the weather. Chicago tonight is made possible in part through the generous support of the julius frankel foundation when it comes to designing buildings for may follow function. But that doesn't mean function has to be without form. Jeffrey bayer joins us with the story of the o'brien water reclamation plant and other ornamented utility buildings in this week's geoffrey