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Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 6 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

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Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"queensland university" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

04:32 min | 10 months ago

"queensland university" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Randomized trial of Amoxicillin for pneumonia in Pakistan by FISO. Jihan from Aga Khan University Karachi Pakistan. The World Health Organization recommends ORAL AMOXICILLIN FOR PATIENTS WHO have pneumonia with to Kip Neha yet. Trial data indicate that not using amoxicillin to treat. This condition may be non inferior to using Amoxicillin in this randomized non inferiority trial at primary healthcare centers in low income communities in Karachi Pakistan a total of four thousand two children who were to fifty nine months of age, and who met who criteria for non severe pneumonia with to Kip Neha were randomly assigned to a three day course of a suspension of Amoxicillin of fifty milligrams per milliliter or matched volume of placebo, according to who weight bands. In the per protocol analysis, the incidents of treatment failure was four point nine percent among placebo recipients and two point six percent among amoxicillin recipients. Results were similar in the intention to treat analysis, the presence of fever, and we's predicted treatment failure. The number needed to treat to prevent one treatment failure was forty four one patient in each group died. Relapse occurred in two point, two percent of children in the Placebo Group and in three point, one percent of children in the Amoxicillin Group. Among children younger than five years of age with non severe pneumonia, the frequency of treatment failure was higher in the Placebo Group then in the Amoxicillin Group A difference that did not meet the non inferiority margin for Placebo. And Chang from the Queensland University of Technology Brisbane Australia writes an editorial that the findings in these two fairly short term trials are emblematic of the persistently high prevalence of malnutrition and the sub, optimal prevalence of immunization, approximately fifty to sixty percent in these countries research on preventing pneumonia and studies of longer term outcomes are still required. Data from studies that examine the duration of chronic symptoms, such as wet cough, lasting greater than four weeks, respiratory associated hospitalizations or persistent avatar maladies on chest radiography after pneumonia treatment are lacking whether longer courses of antibiotics may benefit. Some children with pneumonia is unknown, but such benefit is plausible because the longer course would increase the likelihood of pathogen clearance from the Airways and reduce the risk of persistent inflammation and airway injury. Indeed the results of Of Trials, involving children younger than two years of age with Otitis. Media have shown poor clinical outcomes with shorter courses of antibiotics. Prospective data have shown that pneumonia may reduce future lung, function and shape lung function trajectories, thus pneumonia, and its consequences have public health implications. These important trials conducted by Jihan and Ginsburg have contributed to our current knowledge yet. Many gaps remain in our understanding of the appropriate management of pneumonia and deserve greater attention. Triple Inhale therapy at to glucocorticoid doses in moderate to severe COPD by Klaus. Raba from Looming Clinic Grocery Store F- Germany. Triple fix dose regimens of an inhaled glucocorticoid along acting musk rennick antagonised laba and the long acting Beta two agonists Laba for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. COPD have been studied at single dose levels of inhaled Glucocorticoid, but studies at two dose levels are lacking in this phase. Three trial, eight, thousand, five hundred nine patients with COPD, were randomly assigned to triple inhaled therapy with either. Either a one, hundred sixty microgram or three hundred twenty microgram dose.

pneumonia Amoxicillin AMOXICILLIN Amoxicillin Group Aga Khan University Karachi Pa Kip Neha Pakistan Placebo Group COPD World Health Organization glucocorticoid Laba Looming Clinic Grocery Store Jihan fever Queensland University of Techn Relapse Chang Ginsburg
Kirsten Alexander and Tara Mitchell

Published...Or Not

11:46 min | 1 year ago

Kirsten Alexander and Tara Mitchell

"You remember a stray? In the nineteen seventies. There was Martorell against the Vietnam War. Gough Whitlam became Prime Minister. There was free unions. Eucation and Helen Reddy was singing. I am woman our author. Kirsten Alexander was only a young girl at the time. But I do welcome you back to publish to not. I'm so glad to be here. Thank you second book. Fantastic being older than you at this time. I also remember Queensland being a bit of a backwater job. Joke Peterson disallowed gatherings. There was censorship and real stories about police corruption. And this is why. I'm going to get cursed and to start off by reading a bit from page. Two hundred and seventy seven. The book of the back of the book were starting at the ending. This part is spoken by Abbey. Who's one of the two narrators abby? And her brother. Charlie tell the story and riptides and Abbey's at Queensland University on campus and she says the students want change. They're hungry for it in other parts of Australia. People struggling to keep up with change. Feel like the hurtling into the future without helmets but out premier has dug his heels in and is resisting every attempt by the federal government to civilize. Queensland Peterson makes it clear. He loads students feminist darkies homos and communists he laughs at the media while sales estate over seas developers every bit of beach front and any land that can be mined and looks away as heritage listed buildings bulldozed in the dead of night. It doesn't seem to matter that he's barely able to string a sentence together. He rules with iron fisted resolve. Ooh This is a little bit like now. You mentioned abby husband. Mark is one of your characters. What's his job marks a TV journalist. And he's he's very political in nature and at that time. I think it mattered. I wouldn't say more than ever or certainly not more than now but it was very important. Queensland have an alternative voice There was an alternative voice in the radio. That was footer. No actually for troubles. Ed didn't exist at. This point. Came later but it was very important for the media to offer an alternative to what was being told to the people by the government. Yes so marks. A bit of a celebrity seen on the news of filing reports. He's also the husband and father but has the mate. Jim Tell us a bit about the dinner party. The party was when Abby and her husband go to Jim and his wife's place for dinner and I again. I'm I'm not sure that things that happened in the past. Don't don't just keep happening forever so this is probably something that could have happened last week. But Jim admires mark because mock santelli mocks famous. And he's got an audience and the women have to just play not groupies but they just have to sit and listen while the minute mile. One another and it's it it gets Abbey's Gart because she. She loves her husband. She admires his work but she knows that. There are a lot of people out there doing important things in hospitals and schools and making roads and cleaning up our garbage and they don't get this kind of education and of course you know Jim. Thanks his wife by giving her pet on the bottom for making a Nice Pavlova Louisville's leader attitude to women going back to union to finish her law degree. What does the Father Think about this? Well I think we can get accustomed to read from page one hundred one as the father said it was enough your mother nothing to scoff at. Its dignified work to take care of you. Home husband and raise a family and this he goes on so the father talking to his daughter says well. Why do you want to be a lawyer? Then what are you trying to prove? Martin's a good salary. You'll make life harder by being at university now. You have kids to look after who are doing that. I suppose you expect him to as well as his job. So you can go off and do what you want. Which by the way he flicks his hand angrily in my direction. Plenty of lawyers in the world without you. You don't need to show off now. Her father has also very distinct views of what son Charley is doing. What is he doing? I'm Charlie leaving his best live. He finished Uni and then he mocked around bit and took off to Bali where he serves and he Works in a restaurant. There aren't very many around that time a he and a couple of nights. I've been to cafe and Khuda near the beach pen. Just hasn't a good time. Sorry you know his his comeback and he knows he has to talk with his father but he feels that he's really grown away. Well let's let's get his point of view from page fifty six. Oh God I hit my reading drawing people mental Okay so Challenge wondering about if he went and had a beer with his dad. Would that be like what would we talk about how incredible it is to surf the endless breaker Illawarra to mind altering after mushrooms would he fades as chickens? We've reached the age where he wants my approval more than I want his. Which makes me feel kind of bad for him and makes him boring company? Every says he's worried about me being directionless but I reckon when I talk about my life in Bali his out of his depth maybe even jealous makes me tired to think about it so he has no this this mutual disrespect. I think between this the Connection Between Wartime Charlie surfing and abby very comfortable in knowing her skills in water currents the title is riptide. What's retired? I think a part of growing up in Queensland Brisbane is not on. The coast is a familiarity with water. We have to learn to swim very young. I grew up in Brisbane. I'm not sure if that was the same down here but we had to learn to swim very young. We spent a lot of time at the beach and going to various off the coast. Islands stride broken bribery. And so we all know about rips which are dangerous because it's the water pushing and pulling at the same time and you lose control of of where you WANNA go. So water is very important in Queensland Life I think and the idea of different forces pulling your round seemed to make sense to me as well as the memory of the father is a teacher and he teaches them about physics and Abby remembers learning about every action has having a reaction and Charlie talks about Karma so how these two lean. I'm I'm not enough of a philosopher to explain the difference between Action and reaction and and Action IN CONSEQUENCE. I guess calmer and the laws of motion but I do feel that. The idea of motion having consequence is yeah so on Australia. Day Nineteen seventy four. Ed Behead to cancel the neighbors neighborhood gathering. What can I be doing stand? There's there's a flood so they need to go rescue the neighbor. Louis Abbey's best friend and Louis envious of Abbey ability to be supermom or is she. You have happy thinking about the flood from page twenty eight right. This is This is after the flood is gone and flood slave a lot of Damage in their wake. The flood wasn't part of my plan. Not Part of any once. These few days will derail us for months. I know now that I should have recognized the flood as a warning accordion. Everything I thought I could control was uncontrollable life. Insistent persistent was about to take on new shapes Shimmery and unpredictable as petrol on a wave with giving you back story about all of this but the book actually starts on Friday the sixth of December Eddie has picked up Charlie from Brisbane where he's flown in from Bali and they drive into the file this farm. It's number of hours away and now Costa Alexandra's going to read the first paragraph of her book. Riptides Charlie is speaking. I wake when shots she reaches across man grabs the Steering Wheel. A cow honed. Braise white beams flare at us then pitched to the right for an instant? A rump of blue metal shines into the headlights. I elbow my sister out of the way and take the wheel leaning back hard so don't Slam my head into it. Abby flattens her hands against the dashboard as I break and strain to control our sideways skid. She screams my name. We sling to one side of the narrow dirt road and the other cast links the opposite way like wrong ends of a magnet made to meet we swelled to an angled stop pointing into scrappy land. So what happened This isn't giving away. Don't WANNA rate 'cause this all happens in the first paragraph right into it they. They've caused an accident as I say because there are two people in the car but obviously there was only one driver and they were both asleep. Both the driver and the passenger were sleep in. The car forced another driver off the road. Who was pregnant and she does her. There are police involved and Sergeant Roberts certainly wants to solve the mystery because they is a mystery. What's the mystery of the car accident? AGAIN. I I worry about giving away too much. But the the mystery is who was the woman and she what. She didn't just die in the car. She was outside the car she she was when the police found her she was lying on the ground in a way that makes no sense to them. She couldn't possibly have fallen that way and her window was down and there was a storm afterwards so none of it makes a lot of sense to them and they figure out fairly quickly that someone took her out of the car and Leho very carefully on the ground so there is the mystery and pick up the father bring back to Brisbane but he becomes the suspect lots of tension in the house and I wonder how the book will hold this because we know about this everything that's happened in the first paragraph and sort of you know. Mark is job as a journalist. He picks up this tension and then he's called away. Why Christmas Day? Why why not cold away. So he's moved out of the out of the household so we have a release of a little bit of tension for a little while. What happened seventy four Christmas Day? Oh I'm I'm Which which were we hitting. Sorry just cyclone Tracy sorry. Okay Yeah just to yes. There is a cyclone up north and our so he off to that and these. Epi feels leave with the self and her dilemma. It will make my life worst and possibly destroy the lives of everyone around me if I tell the truth. Better to hold it in and manage the pain now. This is Kirsten Alexander's great rotting that she can move the plot and still carry the tension oil very

Abby Riptides Charlie Louis Abbey Queensland Brisbane Bali Mark Kirsten Alexander JIM Australia Ed Behead Queensland Peterson Queensland University Joke Peterson Gough Whitlam Prime Minister Queensland Brisbane Helen Reddy
Sailors encounter floating pumice 'raft' drifting across the Pacific Ocean

Environment: NPR

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Sailors encounter floating pumice 'raft' drifting across the Pacific Ocean

"Now to what is being called a raft of rocks floating in the pacific ocean. It's about sixty square miles of pumice. This is a lightweight volcanic rock that forms when lavas is rapidly cooled that is roughly the size of manhattan and experts believe it's likely the product of an underwater volcano near tonga scientists actually think this big big raft of rock may have picked up some travelers along the way they say it's likely marine life has hitched a ride on the floating pumice which could be good news is is if it reaches australia this geologist scott brian with the queensland university of technology charity so they use thomas's pickoff corals roles now the reef dwelling organisms and refilling organisms and transport them and really large numbers to raise australia's great barrier reef isn't ecosystem often that has been hit hard by climate change. We've had some really significant cold bleaching events but probably sock lonzo thing quite devastating stories on the gripe batteries but if this raft of rock some the size of marbles others the size of basketballs if this team was see life and if it reaches australia's coast in several months it could bring an injection of life for australia's most cherished national natural wonder so this is a mechanism that sort of helping that opportunity for the race you to rebuild and restore the scientists are urging caution saying not to get too excited researcher terry hughes the director of the arc center of excellence for coral reefs studies went on twitter twitter and noted that saving coral reefs depends on action on climate change and that there is no silver bullet.

Australia Pacific Ocean Twitter Manhattan Queensland University Of Techn Tonga Scott Brian Geologist Terry Hughes Thomas Researcher Director Sixty Square Miles
"queensland university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of them on Hulu. Smith says recently, he went back to finish watching one of the films and this happened. Oh, shoot. It's the first month is not available anymore. It seems to be that much more limited run of some of the content that I like as of March I who lost the rights to several bond films. The world has certainly changed since the days when the only option for consumers was to purchase a bundle of channels from a local cable satellite or telco company. More than seventy percent of American households. Still have some kind of pay TV according to emarketer, but close to sixty percent now have at least one streaming service. People who want to see a new program have no choice, but to subscribe Hulas original the Handmaid's tale coincided with a spike in new subscribers game of thrones appears to have given HBO streaming service would boost but the cost can add up Smith his wife. And their two children have accounts with Netflix, and Hulu they also pay for Amazon prime cable and broadband at a cost of nearly three hundred and forty dollars a month. So far, I'm able to absorb the cost. But I still would like to find one service that offers the station she likes so it's just sort of finding that right mix. It offers everything we're looking for Mr Smith that service may not becoming anytime soon. Some people have this notion in this misbelief that hey one day someone's gonna come along like apple and they're just going to aggregate everything into one platform. Dan, Raeburn is a principal analyst at frost and Sullivan who follows digital media. There will be more streaming services launching later this year, including one from Disney with all its entertainment might did hits for Marvel's Star Wars and Pixar and AT and T which owns Time Warner and the rights to Harry Potter these major corporations like Disney, they want to have the direct to consumer relationship with the consumer. They don't want to go through a third. Party. They don't want to go through another platform. Amanda, lots of professor at Queensland University of technology in Australia thinks it's a golden age in one household. You may decide that you need these services in the next household. They may be entirely different. Lot says customers are experimenting too many subscribe to a service to watch one particular show and canceled the subscription when it's over. Sometimes they can just by a show, I'll a cart some experts don't think this hodgepodge of services is going to last. Mark's sister is a venture capitalist who's been investing and online video for over a decade. He thinks we're in one of those moments of explosive growth like the early internet days when a lot of companies are fighting it out for dominance over the next few years. Sister believes many services will spend a lot on content to customers and after they realized that they're not winning the race. You'll see a lot of those people exit and consolidated around the winters, some people might actually welcome consolidation. Alexa. Conway is a seventy year old retiree on a fixed income who lives in the Pacific northwest. She has Netflix Amazon prime and Hulu she cancelled her cable subscription to save money and put up an antenna to get local TV stations. She's a fan of the Denver Broncos on cable CBS, she got all their games. She says now she would have to subscribe to CBS is streaming service all access to watch them all she spoke over Skype, and it really really offended me. I just thought you know, there's enough to do if I want to sit in front of the TV and binge that I don't need to pay yet. Another service, the kind of anger Conway's feeling maybe having an unexpected impact for the first time in many years. There's growth in online piracy of film, and TV some experts believe it may be because fans are getting sick of paying for yet. Another streaming service, Laura's.

Hulu Mr Smith Conway Netflix Amazon Disney HBO apple Hulas Alexa Denver Broncos Time Warner Pacific northwest Laura Queensland University of techn CBS Amanda Skype Harry Potter
Researchers call for the word 'cyclist' to be BANNED

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Researchers call for the word 'cyclist' to be BANNED

"The word police are added again calls being made to ban the word cyclist and many wondering if it's another example of political correctness or just plain commonsense USA radio's John Clemens with the story. Researchers at Queensland University of technology working with the university of Melbourne. Australia conducted a survey finding some respondents add deliberately operated their vehicle closer to a bike rider. Seventeen percent said the user vehicle to block a cyclist nine percent use their car to cut off a cyclist. Researchers said the word cyclists has become associated with negativity with actual aggression. So they're suggesting instead of cyclists we say people who ride bikes,

Queensland University Of Techn John Clemens University Of Melbourne USA Australia Seventeen Percent Nine Percent
"queensland university" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Right now. Everybody wants a better job. Everybody wants to make more money. But unfortunately, not everybody can say stupid stuff on the radio and make a lot of money for say, they should aspire to say stupid stuff on the radio there you right? Here's my last one since this is my only show this week. Then you're out next week. Yeah. I know what you're saying. Visit the Uber facts website again. Well today is your lucky day. I have four fast game three are actual Lubar fat. Yeah. One I just made. Okay. See if you can identify the fake fact, Greg you can play Jay you can play. Greg broke your long losing streak last time. Correct. And boy it felt good. Okay. And so everybody think Mace was the only guy who lost last time. All right. So here we go fact number one sixty percent of people can't go ten minutes without telling at least one lie. According to a study published in the journal of psychology sixty percent sixty percent of people can't go ten minutes without telling a lie. All right fact, number two being in a relationship is better for your overall health and well being than being single, according to researchers from UCSB and the university of Maryland so better to be interrelationship than to be single. Fact number four roughly four in ten men have experienced inexplicable sadness after sex. According to researchers from the Queensland University of technology and fact, number four in honor of Dan Zan pillow. The honor. There you go sea otters tend to have a favorite rock, which they store and carry with them in a pouch usually under their left arm. So I'll give them to you. Again fact one sixty percent of people can't go ten minutes without telling a lie. Thank number two being in a relationship is better for your overall health than being single fact number three roughly four in ten have experienced inexplicable sadness after sex and fact, number four siato tend to have a favorite rock, which they store and carry with them. Greg Bergman, which one is the fake fact, I'm down to two it's either I think it's either the sixty percent, I think it's either a different number or the relationship is better. And it's the exact opposite. I'm going to go with of those two you gotta pick one. I'm going to go opposite. I'm gonna say the relationship is you're actually better off single than in a relationship. Okay. For your for your overall health. Okay. Jay, what do you think I'm gonna go with the one? What's at sixty percent that peace and can't go that tell them a lot. Got numbers way different and probably less time. All right. I'm more. I think they lie. A lot more Are are. you are cynical? All right. I am going to go. Even though I don't believe it's. I disagree with the fact that this is fake, but I think the single versus in a relationship is the lion this group. Okay. You guys were all smart to stay away from the sea otter thing that was one hundred percent true. Although though, he has a favourite rock that he stores under his left office waving right now, he's waving his lucky rock at us. All right. You are also smart to stay away from the inexplicable sadness after sex, which I found ridiculous. I've never sat after sex and. I'm just relieved that. Yeah. Roughly four in ten men have experienced inexplicable sadness where they find in..

Greg Bergman Jay journal of psychology Mace Queensland University of techn UCSB Dan Zan university of Maryland sixty percent ten minutes one sixty percent one hundred percent
"queensland university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"To your emotional bonds and boosts your mood. It's not always the case. Some people have what's called post coil dysphoric and its negative emotions which could include sadness, irritability and anxiety. And usually it's it's been tending to or researchers have tended to focus on women because women seem to have more of this. But a recent study suggests that it can occur among men just as often as well psychologist at Queensland University of technology in Australia surveyed more than twelve hundred men and discovered that forty one percent had experienced post, quite at least once and twenty percent had experienced in the previous month. So, you know, the post sex news at the variability of both male as well as female sexuality there. So be aware of that. And then if you have an over. Active bladder, mostly women are are flooded with this more you might not need that drug. That is promoted that I've seen on TV commercials for in this problem. And here's why there are many factors, of course, coffee or caffeine diuretic effective of drugs, anxiety or stress or UTI's infection of your urinary tract. But it might also be just you. This is interesting information. This was from C university of Alabama school of medicine, and they found out just training your bladder muscles. You need to train them just like any other muscle. And a lot of times if you haven't been diagnosed with an overactive bladder. It's just the habits of you know, some people's p every urinate every hour or every few hours, and what they say as you can teach your body to do this, and when you feel the urge to urinate, set and squeezer pelvic floor, the Kigali exercises five times, and that'll delay your trip for about five minutes, and he just keep doing. That week after week, and then pretty soon you can go for a few hours without having to go to the bathroom. Okay. Finally, let's go to the funny bone pharmacy. And then we'll be joined by Steve freely. Talking about Hawaiian herbal medicine. Okay. Time for some daily dishonesty. The little lies. We tell ourselves each day cake is mostly air. Yeah. Along with all the galleries can is a food group. Let's see what else pizza is a vegetable. I won't eat the whole thing. All right. I worked out. So this doesn't count another little lie. I will only watch one episode of my favorite show.

C university of Alabama school Kigali Queensland University of techn caffeine Steve Australia forty one percent twenty percent five minutes
"queensland university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Having sex for obvious reasons and also in to your emotional bonds and boosts your mood. It's not always the case. Some people have what's called post quite dysphoric and its negative emotions which could include sadness and irritability and anxiety. And usually it's. You know, it's been tending to researchers have tended to focus on women because women seem to have more of this. But a recent study suggests that it can occur among men just as often as well psychologist at Queensland University of technology in Australia surveyed more than twelve hundred men and discovered that forty one percent had experienced post-coital destroy at least once and twenty percent had experienced in the previous month. So, you know, the post sex blues at. Variability of both male as well as female sexuality there. So be aware of that. And then if you have an overactive bladder, mostly women are flooded with more you might not need that drug. That is promoted that I've seen on TV commercials for this problem. And here's why there are many factors, of course, coffee or caffeine diuretic effect of drugs anxiety of stress or UT is infection of your your attract. But it might also be just you. This is interesting information. This was from let's see university of Alabama school of medicine, and they found out just training your bladder muscles. You need to train him just like any other muscle. And a lot of times if you haven't been diagnosed with an overactive bladder. It's just the the habits of you know, some people's p every urinate every hour or every few hours, and what they say as you can teach your body to do this, and when you feel the urge to urinate, set and squeeze your pelvic floor, the Kigali exercises five times, and that'll delay your trip for about five minutes and heap during that week after week, and then pretty soon you can go for a few hours without having to go to the bathroom. Okay. Finally, let's go to the funny bone pharmacy. And then we'll be joined by Steve freely. Talking about Hawaiian herbal medicine. Okay. Time for some daily dishonesty the beautiful little lies. We tell ourselves each day cake is mostly air along with all the galleries baking is a food group. Let's see what else pizza is a vegetable. I won't eat the whole thing. Right. I worked out. So this doesn't count another little lie. I will only watch one episode of my favorite show tonight. There was that one season doing a little too much binge-watching, are you? I can hold my liquor in a bottle, maybe, but you know, before you drink it. The most is are a good source of vitamin c. Yeah. Sure. Champagne is a good source of alcohol and finally my favorite daily dishonesty lie. I'm not addicted to my phone. That's the biggest lie of all. All right. That's it for the funny bone pharmacy. When we come back. We'll have new information on herbal medicine and using.

Steve university of Alabama school o Kigali Queensland University of techn Champagne caffeine Australia forty one percent twenty percent five minutes
"queensland university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on The Science Show

"This is the Sean show on our N A next amass crisis. One. Well, we see it every week that we another survey showing our maths or science standards in schools are declining this week it came from the media center for educational research. And the headline was high school students losing maths motivation, and then many students particularly girls are switching off in maths in the middle years of schooling and into high school. So what's the answer? I wouldn't say a maths teacher now attached to the Queensland University of technology, the vice chancellor's stem. Cam is a pinnacle event where one hundred sixty of the states brought a students come in and they board at some level. And they spend the week working on real world projects with our research centres here at key. So students might health assessments on real patients over at the health clinics or design a skull and ear implant, which is super cool. They. Develop a computer game to play in the new eastbound Torino or they design the highways of the sky for how are we going to get to work in the next twenty years? There's a real world project where students design a siphoning system for the glacier likes in baton, which are potentially flooding communities as the climate changes. They also designed rockets and launched them on the cube, which is really cool. The cube is else that of the projection screens take up sixty four screens, and we have cube experiences that students can play with an engage with physically at school groups come in and do those as well. How are these young people selected they apply? So we have around three hundred students apply full the hundred sixty positions eighty of them taken by regional and rural students. So we fly them to Brisbane board at some of all. And the programs fully funded. So there's no financial requirements and students can be from anywhere.

Cam Queensland University of techn Sean Brisbane chancellor twenty years
"queensland university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on The Science Show

"The side show on Aaron and now have you ever heard a bat sing? So what's going on who better to ask than Beckman, professor at the Queensland University of technology student Parsons before I call you bet man that make you cross you aren't have been the first of all new Stewart. You don't mind. No, I don't mind at all. But I used to play golf a lot. And so my children used to buy me Gulf things. And then they realize as they got older that I was at bat biologist and forever, then on I've been getting Batman paraphenalia. They as I've gotten used to it. It's fine which Bech do study. My personal passion is really any echo locating bad. Do they get this signals Bank? They send out a signal, and they get return signal except very very quick it is it's the speed of sound three hundred and forty three meters per second. So they'll send the sound out. It'll either go out through their nose or the mouth, and then it'll bounce off an object. If there's an object there and return to their ears. They can actually measure the time difference between sending and receiving it. And that just gives them the distance, and then get a kind of picture of what this around ings alike. Paps? They do they get what we call an acoustic image. But I think using the analogy of vision constrains us in the way, we think about how the animal uses it because we try and create what we consider to be an image. And. And drew analogies toward the animal is actually myself seeing in its environment. And I think it's different for the animal. But it's probably the closest thing that we can come up with. But they can work out the distance to an object. They can work out its movement from left to right. It's position in vertical space, and they're not very good at working at the relative acceleration of themselves through changes, what we call Doppler shift in the returning echoes as well, so they get a very very good idea of what's around them..

Stewart ings Queensland University of techn Aaron Beckman Bech golf Parsons professor forty three meters per second
"queensland university" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

The Tom Leykis Show

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

"Sec sack. Tom leykis internet's most listened to call in show. I know one three thousand Tom this is the Tom leykis show from the new normal news room. It's news for guys on Gary. Dino, new study finds that having sex makes almost half of men feel sad. I you know, these studies keep happenings going on in. This new study reveals that forty percent of men feel sad tearful and irritable after banging your edible. I could understand if there's something going on in your life, but you just had sex. What team are you got to a tearful team from Queensland University of technology. It's cute tech. They surveyed twelve hundred eight men from Australia the US UK Russia New Zealand in Germany about their feelings after sex. And that's what they came up with recorder percent are pissed the code post-coital, this fauria. I mean, I haven't heard about chicks, you know, have an issue, and that means more sense than anything else. No. Scientists are finding out that the having sex twice a night may increase chances of pregnancy. They used to think it took like twenty four forty eight hours free to reload. They're actually saying it only takes a couple of hours and on that second time around because the danger zone. The boys really mean at that time. Yeah. That's the dangerous on right there. Yeah. So don't go to go doing that as much as you'd like to bang twice in a night. And you're in your unless you wanna kid. South Florida man who cross dressed as a woman and taped himself having sex with at least eighty unsuspecting straight dudes. And then. Releasing the tapes on the internet. They even know there'd be Dave. Soudini under the Susan Leon thirty three three twenty six pled guilty on two counts of illegal interception of oral communications. All this other crap ball blows down this person like totally con these guys. And they thought they were banging a woman, and they weren't. And then the these these encounters were recorded on top of it. So they. Man. I mean, this is not like a Louis from Hollywood. He knows that. He's with a guy. Correct. This these guys either just didn't care. We know somebody like that to that figured it out and didn't care continued with the act even when he figured out the person was a transvestite. Yeah. So I mean, some people are like that too. Yeah. But some people like daddy Bonner, dude. And then you start swinging. Now, you never know you find something you words expecting but these guys completely. Yeah. They missed the whole thing. A hundred percent ended up on a ended up on the internet. Dan, Dannatt, right? Such a celebration of good tax. Yup. Charleston teacher use grades to pressure students having sex with her going to a new lawsuit. Just a badge that your teacher offers you better grades. All you have to do is do things to you. Wow. All right. Our gross twenty seven Jennifer. Jeez. Over there on Johns island. She was arrested in December of two thousand seventeen in charge of the coun- sexual battery with a student sixteen or seventeen years of age. Here's what happened. So after they go through the process, they realize what was going on the thirties figured out that she was trading grades for sex acts, and that is something else. She taught pre calc which I could have totally an algebra. No problem with even greater. Finally shook nights going to jail for twenty eight years. But that's because he worked out a plea not. And he's still innocent. My just about to launch this trial. Looked like it was gonna be a good one too. Yeah. He is going to get time served because you understand that. We just said this yesterday, he has been involved in the longest trial in recorded history for crying out loud. It's taking forever to get to this point. It's keeps getting delayed dragged out delay dried out while. He's getting time served for three and a half years. So I have to say that she's going to be eighty years old, but he gets out and I'm going to send that.

Tom leykis Queensland University of techn Dino Jennifer Gary daddy Bonner Susan Leon Johns island Dave Louis Charleston Hollywood Germany Australia Dan US UK New Zealand Dannatt Russia
"queensland university" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Now fashioned but this was i guess to prove where the spiderman could exist i don't know but they spent real money on concluding that which i found remarkable there was another study from a joint study team of psychologists from plymouth university and queensland university in strata have determined that often many hours of playing tetris the game can be addicting distract us from doing other stuff now again i know quite sure how they managed to finish the study but apparently if you play tetris it might cause you to forget to of things and the other one that really that really amazed me was study of tens of thousands of japanese men and women and they concluded that healthy diet will help you live longer i mean it's remarkable so having read these and just set hey quantity shaking had each one of them felt that it was a good week to be short scientific research studies it sounds like scientists are just trying to see what sticks all right i really i am actually going to take the other side of this trade grant if i'm because i one of actually my issues with scientific studies that they always kind of prove the surprising they proved that you know three glasses of wine every day is healthy for you or or sleeping in a bed is no better than than sleeping on the ground and there's there's kind of bias toward novelty and so these studies that prove that actually eating healthy diet is good for you or is that when you play a lot of tetris you began to become a little addicted to it you know it maybe it's good to have the out there because then it doesn't open the door for people to to get their own data and find something that actually just happened at one time but you only time we're gonna publish it a see what you come into from from the angle but realistically if a son to didn't actually do a research study and said to you know eating healthy helps you live longer would you see the results of the survey.

plymouth university queensland university
"queensland university" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on KKAT

"Sd i to say because it triggers the music dortha yoho yeah yeah the old shut down no eight is with that that's awesome to another cognitive biased friday on the armstrong in getty shows reading this the other day has really intrigued by a jacket no is a big thing for you you wanna be clear headed you want to be a thinker you want to be a philosopher i would like to be a public intellectual earned but i'm not smart enough inland holds me back then you know i'm a private dullard well if that's the path it's opening to you pretty funny isn't that the story of most of our lives i wanted to be a blank but i'm not blank enough yeah wayne that's why you know the one transgender lad who who who was a feller and his big and strong and wants to like beat up on girls in some sort of contact sport listen there's a lot of stuff i wanted to do that i can't do and i was disappointed but i moved on not everybody gets to do everything those of us who live in the real world recognize epa jack wants to be a public intellectual and and as such you need to eliminate your cognitive abaya sees for instance queensland university that's a while strive now found that blonde women earn on average seven percent higher salaries than redheads and brunettes no good reason for that unless you're running some sort of blondheaded model place in the brunettes just mellman they're not pull on their way why would like to know what's behind that that's pretty interesting duke study is it the kind of person that because most of these people that are or probably not naturally buon is it the kind of person that colors their hair blonde do they have different traits that makes them better employees or is it the perception of the uh the employer who decide what you make well pretty people just make more money but listen lewis duke university and and we can take grass on any of these if you want there there are thirteen of them these are examples before we get into the thirteen but anyway a duke study found that people with mature or faces those with bigger chan's narrower facial features smaller eyes on theory has never never heard the term mature face they experience more career success.

armstrong wayne feller epa queensland university shut down duke university seven percent
"queensland university" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Yet deary do we really want to start our conversation about belief and then the three percent of quote unquote scientists that don't accept climate change are not climate scientists usually like if you only look at people who study earth an earth climate the numbers even higher it's the three percent tend to be people like engineers mathematicians theoretical physicist those kinds of fields have a higher proportion of climate change deniers than other fields of science the reasons why that bias might exist are interesting and sociological and probably a topic of discussion for another time but gathered 97 percent is even more founded in in reality and the way scientists really think than even the 97 percent connotes and like how do you by the group this big regan 97 percent to agree on anything and then i have to continue with zero hendry article obama because this is referring to jennifer mirror houses article and then the these the next paragraph begins with another fallacy it's a fallacy of authority it says jennifer marohasy a scientists with a rather long list of impressive credentials with a hyperlink so i clicked that i fully coast like a what are these impressive credentials she was a senior research fellow at the institute of public affairs australia's hartland institute ipa she used to be a professor at central queensland university but then was terminated because her work quote in her own words was not well integrated into emerging research clusters i don't know what that means i think it means you're science which and we fired you or it means you word telling everyone else in the department the climate change wasn't a thing they didn't want their department associated with that which you.

climate change physicist obama senior research fellow australia central queensland university hendry institute of public affairs hartland institute 97 percent three percent
"queensland university" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Killers are going to come for us i rise home down i know someone who can help you do but we gotta get out of here back this baby on up all right all how listen to that mendy will what's that sound garrett in dc yet why is that it it looks like a tiny yellow submarine actually kinda looks like ours that guy rise is hot bought or as i like to call it that said dr fish would you were going forward ladies and gentlemen and thank you for joining us here on the great barrier reef with his worldclass bout between the starfish layer in the rural killer now mark what can you tell me about these two competitors well see the coral killer has been around bursts at all millions of years now and during that time as i'm marill really been able to hone its view okay that's enough tv well no time for tv right now by the way what is this dr fish slayer hotspots thing said the plant by pods meaning crown of thorns dr finish is his underwater rome developed by robotic researchers at the queensland university of technology in australia and its whole mission is to hunt down the sinister dark bench how back so cool so it's like a little submarine lic just whims around the reef identifying crownofthorns starfish with those cameras on the front of his and every time it sees a new crown of thorns starfish it's knack the picture and inflict fat picture in its blue robot brain to help it identifier better pick out future starfish when it comes across them so once it identifies one of these starfish what happens next well take a look.

mendy garrett dc dr fish australia queensland university of techn
"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Weekend started today pricewaterhouse coopers is saying that many consumers plan to complete uh they're shopping list online and amazon kicking off a soft launch of its australia website as it continues to push into asia and the sparsely populated continent with some local web retailers up in writing it's a bit of a different challenge developing in some markets in the ancient timezone guy mortimer snc professor of queensland university of technology says it's going to be a slow oh burning kinda thing this time we want expect to say the venture into the city market wait don't believe in tula made to light two thousand eighteen and certainly not into brisbane for several years after that amazon rolled out in singapore earlier this year and has also been spending heavily on expanding in india and we've got some morale to talk about for the embattled commodities trader noble group we are told that noble is now asking its main agree on a unified response to an opening proposal to restructure about three and a half billion us in debt noble is said to have held talks last week in london creditors there would include soft gem ing oxidative and davidson kempner china is making another attempt to keep shanghai edge of economic reform after at last try in 2013 didn't go so well and adviser to the proposal tells us china's state council will soon unveil plans for a free trade report at the world's biggest shipping hub it would feature ease capital controls no customs duties.

pricewaterhouse coopers asia professor brisbane amazon india davidson kempner china australia queensland university of techn singapore commodities trader london shanghai free trade
"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Stores or online over the long weekend but pricewaterhouse coopers is saying that many consumers planned to complete their shopping lists online well amazon is continuing its push into asia with the kickoff kind of a soft launch of its australian website as a sparsely populated continent with some local web retailers up and running it's a bit of a different challenge than developing in some markets in the asian timezone guy mortimer is associate professor at queensland university of technology he says it's going to be a slow byrne kind of thing this time while expect to say the main until the sydney market wait i believe in tula made to light two thousand eighteen and certainly not into brisbane for several years after that now we're earlier this year amazon rolled out in singapore and two companies also been spending heavily on expanding in india we'll new developments at the hong kong commodities trader noble grew that actually is listed in trades in singapore we're told that noble is asking main creditors to agree on a unified response to this week's opening proposal to restructure three and a half billion dollars of debt noble is said to have held talks this week in london with creditors including so cetacean are all ing ox if and davidson kempner it looks as though china's making another attempt to keep shanghai at the cutting edge of economic reform the last try in 2003 or 13 that didn't go so well and adviser to the proposal tells us that china's state council will soon unveil plans for a free trade ports at the world's biggest shipping hub it.

china free trade london noble singapore sydney byrne queensland university of techn shanghai pricewaterhouse coopers commodities trader india brisbane associate professor mortimer asia amazon billion dollars
"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To complete their shopping list online over announced daily amazon kicking off a soft launch of its australian website as it continues to push into asia as a sparsely populated continent with some local web retailers up and running already it's a bit of a different challenge for amazon than developing in some markets in the asian timezone guy mortimer at associate professor at queensland university of technology says it's going to be a slow kind of burn this time why expect to say the main threat to the single market i believe until made satellite two thousand eighteen and certainly not into brisbane full civil years after that yeah amazon ruled out in singapore earlier this year and has also been spending heavily on expanding in india and we've got some more developments for the embattled hong kong commodities trader noble group were told noble is asking its main creditors to agree on a unified response to a proposal on restructuring about three and a half billion dollars in debt noble is said to have held talks this week in london with creditors including salk jen i ng zip and davidson kempner kansas making a search china china is making another attempt to give each i'm going to keep my chin off the ground here china's making another attempt to keep shanghai at the cutting edge of economic reform after its last try and 2013 didn't go so well and adviser to the proposal tells us that china's state council will stu soon unveil plans for free trade poured at the world's biggest shipping hub it would feature eased capital controls no customs duties end minimum clearance procedures.

amazon asia associate professor india noble group kansas china china shanghai free trade queensland university of techn brisbane singapore commodities trader noble london billion dollars
"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And j crew inch all right thank me as fat pumpkin pie please dag well at amazon certainly in focus for these retailers but in australia even more so it's kicked off a soft line cubits australian website as a sparsely populated continent with local bled retailers and burning it's a bit of a different challenge than developing in some markets in the asian timezone guy mortimer associate professor at queensland university of technology says it's going to be a slow burn kinda thing this time override consumers with another platform the shelters but i don't think it's going to stabilize rates all illustrator as we now with amazon rolled out in singapore earlier this year and has also been spending heavily on expanding in india seven minutes past the hour here on daybreak asia time for an update on global news we have president trump thanking us servicemen and women this thanksgiving day but he also had an unusual warning that tops global news let's go to the bloomberg newsroom here in new york denise pellegrini has the headlines her hey thank you tug that's right president trump marking the thanksgiving holiday in florida today by addressing us troops overseas here's what he had to say hello everybody happy thanksgiving the a very very special people for me and everybody in this country now bloomberg's market talibans traveling with the president and she says president trump also addressed the coast guard today and he had a warning about us military sales to other countries that was part of his message to them it will bear when he was talking about the f thirty five and a great us military quit men where he also that we could really never dow even our ally the beth military equipment because you never knew what an ally would turn audio data that you think the right way to go to hold about 10 percent back i work with the cried all right bloomberg's michael tell of reporting there in the president is expected to spend the thanksgiving evening at mara lago japan's government is said to be getting ready to file.

coast guard mara lago japan new york thanksgiving singapore queensland university of techn mortimer australia bloomberg military equipment amazon trump president us florida denise pellegrini asia india associate professor seven minutes 10 percent
"queensland university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"queensland university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"So and i feel like there's things about animals i don't need to know if it causes the animal harm for me to have that knowledge so when i saw this turtle researchers turned to sex toys to determine male and female of species i didn't think the peruvian thing i didn't think like whose vibrating a turtle shell and does the turtle really want you to do that because turtles don't speak english and they can't say don't do that it's too much pressure and do turtles have a t spot okay if girls have a gspot what do turtles have all right a queensland university students as a vibrator can determine the sex of a turtle with one hundred percent accuracy for some species now there are so many jokes that i could make about a vibrator on a turtle but i'm just i'm just going to because here's the thing all right i'm gonna i'm not gonna make a joke because it's kind of adult so i'm going to paint you a picture and then you can write the joke in your head so a few years ago my brother and i were in a parking lot of a home depot in san francisco and you and i both know what a lot of people call home depot so we are at one in the middle of san francisco on a saturday the parking lot was impossible to navigate and my brother looked at me and he said they have us box in like the turtles hm yeah so so yeah think about where a turtle keeps his wenas like how would you now all right so james cook university phd student donald mcknight set of successful the method could be used in australia as a lesson of invasive way to distinguish between male and female most.

san francisco donald mcknight australia one hundred percent