36 Burst results for "Queensland"

Fresh update on "queensland" discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

00:38 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "queensland" discussed on All In The Mind

"Amy Enter Australian knit boy with the giants. Hi, it's only in the mind on Aren I'm. In Malcolm. In this time of restrictions and uncertainty that has come about because of the covid nineteen pandemic many of us are not feeling mentally well and resilient as we'd like to. It's not surprising that feelings of anxiety or depression can compromise our sense of wellbeing. Today we explore some of the changes that we can make in our daily lives to help prevent the development of more significant problems. First psychologist Dr Addy wooten explains how she sees the current state of mental health in Ustralia. We're seeing a lot of emotional and mental health responses to the current environment and the uncertainty that we going through and I think that's in the context of an already a high prevalence of mental health problems even before these pandemic came upon US people they're experiencing a whole range of mental health challenges from you know, high levels of stress, older whites, really complex mental health problems and saying a lot of discussion about the bird and that that is pricing on Alto, health services and the need for improved systems and I suppose that's why the focus on the role. Commissioning. Victoria and the Productivity Commission will hopefully explore how better support Australians mental health. Eddie Wootton says that we need to think differently about the language we use around mental health and how define it. I'm not sure if you're familiar with the World Health, organization definition of mental health but it's a really interesting one because it's completely different to what many of us would think when we think mental health and I talk about a state of well-being where every individual realizes he's all on potential can cope with the challenges of life can what productively and fruitfully and he's able to feel like they're making a contribution to their community. So it's quite a broad definition of mental health. And I think when we take that approach that it's leaving to optimum, we actually sat to think about mental health in a different way and I think it would potentially give us more agency in thinking. Well, what can we be doing to look after our mental health and window I need to access care or support if I have a challenge just like I do my physical hill. So. Perhaps the focus needs to be more on the line between having. Certain struggles and problems with the way you feel and your will bang and wins it Tepa marine to becoming a more serious problem. Exactly, and that's not to minimise the need for services or support for mental illness. But I think only thinking about that end of the spectrum Maine's that we forget about all of those other practices and skills that we can cultivate that can actually build really good mental health. Really good. Well, Bang. So how much difference can be made to someone who's beginning to struggle with? Anxiety or depression by getting early and helping them to help themselves. There's a lot that can be done. I think particularly with anxiety, there's a strong relationship between our inking patents and out in cognitive functioning and the experience of anxiety. Miss. Some research that suggests about forty percent of our mental wellbeing experience is made up of the factors is that we actually have some control over. Some of these genetic facial, some of these environmental and the world that we leaving the socioeconomic conditions that we leave in. But there is a big part of it that we actually do have control over and particularly if we get early, if we can take people skills that help them manage their thought processes or self regulates that they fight or flight responses in activating all the time, then we can give them skills that hopefully they can put into practice regularly and we're juice that impact of anxiety at wootton psychologist and CEO of the. Smiling mind I am Emmy Palmetto I play for the giants Netball Team and I'm twenty three, amy, I believe the Naples season has been delight because of the covert pandemic. So what challenges has the Covid nineteen pandemic presented for you? Personally yes. So this season has been a crazy one way started prices in November lost. We originally spiced to stop playing in May, and then it got pushed all the way back 'til about three months ago. So we have been playing for two months. We had to move everything up to Queensland. We've been playing in a hub in Queensland and we've been playing a condense as in. So we've been paint two games a week. So it's been very crazy. Amy Coming to says that circumstances created by the covid nineteen pandemic have certainly impacted her mental health. I've always not struggled with mental health issues, but it's always been there as part of my life you know I was I contracted is part of the giants net. Tame Lost Yeah I am had been training partner for the cheese before that and needed Bain a big dream of mine to make this team I'd put everything on. The line I dropped to subject at Uni had decided I'd go to bed at nine thirty every single night I'd done everything I possibly could didn't drink a tried to fight his own efforts on Netflix to make this team and when I made this team out. So ecstatic but I realized that I couldn't keep up that sort of commitment to spoil on needed to find some balance in my life and I really did feel quite. Obsessed in controlled by the idea of making this team, I made the same which was awesome. You know it'd been a lifelong dream. So I. Got There and I was like a half to play will have to prove to the girls that I deserve to be in this team and I started really having. With things I would struggle braiding on because I was so concerned about playing well and. Playing well of my teammates and my family that had old put so much on the line for me to make this team and I really was struggling I thought I maybe had asthma and I went to these kids AC Jays and I. It was coming back like you'll find you'll find your fine and eventually the doctor said, well, you need to go and see a sports psychologist and he was awesome for me. He really opened my mind to the whole side of. Mental Health and Sport and he told me that it's not asthma. Having hot issues, you just have anxiety and it was performance anxiety. So it was based around my sport, but you know it was anxiety or the same and my brother and sister had both had anxiety us in the late up to it and I found it really hard to understand. You know why why they couldn't get out of bed in the morning of why they felt seek like I was like this is. In your head this is mental illness is not is not your body like I found that really hard to understand. Now going through the breathing stuff that felt so physical that it really really opened my eyes to how debilitating mental illness can really bay. So what help did you get from the sports psychologist sh psychologists was awesome for me because he was also a clinical psychologist so he sort of had his. Fingers vice pots, he knew about the whole range of different types of mental illness and he was so good for me. He got me onto smiling mind which is something I use very often he gave me all these techniques breathing for being present in the moment and aware of my surroundings he made me right affirmations the full my games in every training session, I would rate affirmations to myself before I. Went into train and he was just a bit of a sounding board for me. I could go and talk to him and I just honestly I was so blown away by how much it helped my performance how much I was able to stay in the moment and feel like I.

Giants Amy Coming Anxiety Queensland Asthma Malcolm Eddie Wootton Dr Addy Wooten United States Productivity Commission Tepa Netball Victoria Ustralia Maine CEO Netflix Emmy Palmetto UNI
On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

Science Friction

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

"Hi. An tesha Mitchell welcome to science fiction. You are about to mate to people who have really felt the fault lines of covid nineteen in their families. But in the way you might imagine. A mother, he told me I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted a son. That's when my father said Australian scientists have now found out that sunlight is quite effective in preventing nineteen fiction confronting two pieces of medical misinformation. When it comes to medical misinformation, that term is actually really knew what we're used to as snake oil quackery, the waves of misinformation misleading content conspiracy content. It's really everywhere in a way that's really shocking. ABC's technology reporter investigative journalist Ariel Bogle joins us. Now she's been tracking the spread of health information since this pandemic began some of its mono-, some of it easy flat out dangerous and aerial imagine the spink kind of like wrestling with the arms of an octopus. It's really out there. I've seen dodgy posts and videos about carbon nineteen everywhere, and when we put a call out on ABC News website for examples. We received hundreds of tips and that's we're investigating here in click sick this a three part series on where health misinformation comes from, and it's impacting our lives. We're going to start with a single social media post then aerial and the team going digging and found what's out. There is really confusing papal testing their relationships including this woman. We'll call her lucy she lives a life on the move. Yeah Gypsy had. For more than two years Lucy's been travelling around Australia with a small dog picks the angel in a Pink Caravan. I couldn't afford to rent a house at any of the places places near where my children live, which ones album winds up in Byron Bay. So then I was like our will all to stick to being in the caravan and and that way I can float between my children but early in the pandemic in Queensland and interstate travel bans kept her apart from the son and daughter. So when restrictions as FA- caravan parks in Victoria I really wanted to just come and see my son that was that was migraine lot and I just bugged out acquaintance. When she arrived in Melbourne, she heads straight for his sons share house. There's been a dramatic escalation in the efforts to control a spiking corona virus cases in. Victoria in Melbourne. Getting grim as the number of covid nineteen cases, Russula, large parts of Melbourne now in danger of being put into lockdown. So I, only really got to see my son. A COUPLE OF TIMES BECAUSE? I want it to be careful because I didn't know you know how well they were self-isolating and protecting themselves. Busey was more worried than most about being infected with the coronavirus as you're going to hear Ya when Melbourne look like it was heading for a second wave of covid nineteen she bio just before the city went into second lockdown she was staying in a caravan park in country Victoria when she got some bad news on he got really sick really really sick about a week after I left Melbourne a son was on the fine couldn't get out of bed aching alive. You know coughing and I was really nervous I was like honey I really think you should get tested. It wasn't clear what it was, but his son saying it's probably not covid earned. It's probably just a bad flu and I was like, yeah. But for my sake, just to reassure your Mama I'd really appreciate it. If you go get tested because if you get tested and it's negative than I, know at least I'm okay and then he said something that really took her by surprise his words on the phone were I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted. Lucy was really worried about him, but she was also especially worried for Oregon Health I've got to autoimmune diseases and the worst being rheumatoid arthritis, which affects all the joints causes stiffness and sometimes I can't walk. So Lucy takes powerful medication, which also suppresses her immune system's ability to protect itself from infections. My immune system does not function well. Well doesn't really function at all. But I do tend to pick out coughs and colds and sniffles sore throats if I just around people. I live as a total recluse on my iron but that's what I have to do to to stay healthy. And this means contain is a big threat to. Lucy. So at this point, lucy son was feeling really sick and they was a risk he might have covid nineteen though it seems he wasn't eager to take testify doubt. It's important to say that Lucy son didn't want to be part of the story. Sorry. These impressions only. But this was a time when Victorian health authorities wanted everyone even with modest symptoms to get tested to help contain the pandemic Lucy didn't know what to do so I said well. What makes you think that it's crap and he said, well, I've been reading on the government website and it says the tests that they give you. Is just the test corona viruses in general, not specific to. Sarah's To the one that causes covid nineteen then her sunset Lucy a screen shot of a website he'd seen on facebook and it was from CDC Dot Gov Had the link at the top and pretty said what he'd said. But it had like highlights across the words and a big Red Maka pen round

Lucy Melbourne Victoria Abc News Mitchell Pink Caravan Byron Bay FLU ABC Australia Ariel Bogle Migraine Reporter Facebook CDC Queensland
Surfer Killed by Shark at Beach Protected by Net

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 2 weeks ago

Surfer Killed by Shark at Beach Protected by Net

"There has been a deadly shark attack on Australia's Gold Coast, which is popular with surfers and tourists. A man in his fifties was surfing when he was mauled by a shark. This is at a beach protected by shark netting. A man was brought to shore by fellow surfers. Lifeguards pronounced him dead at the scene. The death is on Ly, the second fatal shark attack off one of Queensland's 85 beaches. The last was back in

Australia Queensland
The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:50 min | Last month

The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

"Self proclaimed alcohol self esteem anxiety reduction expert, and a clinical hypnotherapist, and today we are to no one's surprise talking about alcohol. Specifically, we are getting into the emotional issues that can come up when alcohol is used as a coping mechanism. Hello Twenty twenty, the different personality traits that come with drinking including the perfectionist, the people pleaser and the inner critic. Finally, we're discussing why the all or nothing. Mentality that comes with dieting also applies to both food and alcohol why it's so detrimental, and then why cutting out alcohol completely will not really solve all of the issues of the casual drinker and then Georgia is giving us some practical tips on what you can do to both get out of the all or nothing mentality when it comes to drinking, and then what you can also say to people if you're more of the people pleaser mentality. I WanNa know more about how you became a self-proclaimed like alcohol self esteem and anxiety reduction expert and a clinical hypnotherapist. show. Well I I'm fifty four now. But. Many years ago when my late twenties I had. One could set with breakdown. Berlow. self-esteem. Overweight. Pretty miserable attracting the wrong guy and I was very aware that I didn't like myself so. I, Ran, away. To a health bomb went to the travel agent and I said the travel agent I want to go on holiday on my online. I WanNa, know who I am. She can look to a bit of a widows and I said. I need to go somewhere where there's no cocktails with is no crazy kind of food that will make me feel more crazy. So the worst place, one place in Australia. In Queensland and I flew on a plane up there and I lived in this in the middle of a rainforest a two weeks where we went into. Therapy basically and I've never done anything like this before. So but what was really interesting about being in this environment? was there people who really beautiful enslaved some rich had beautiful families and I could walk out why they were there because. Everything. That got you know slim bodies money. And it turned out that we all have. Different lives but the same thing was that we over crap about ourselves bicycling. So I left that not knowing the answers but understanding that I wanted to find them. And I came across a book. Add Up to share this particular. I'm theory with with with you at this book. Really literally an Cliche. But it changed my life. My mother is a therapist and I open this book and wanted to know malls. So I went to California and I studied this incredible psychology theory. And then my grandmother's British. So our went on to London and I trained to be clinical hypnotherapist and that kind of. happened organically because I met a friend I was in those days you call that a secretary working. In. An office and I met this woman hugh had been hypnotized to help her give birth. The pain control, but that's interesting. and. So I just. Something about it kind really productive. My my is so I applied for college in in Europe One of the biggest college. And I trained to make the Clinton therapist. And so I decided that was going to. It was like falling in love. It's a really weird description but. I realized that it was something had to do just. But along the way when I was training I was working with friends on wasn't charging anybody and were getting really good results but I was combining it waived my psychology training. And then the college in Botany back to become a lecturer for them. So used to teach in the universities hypnosis for many years and. I. Just as I soul. Students blow some I was hypnotized myself and getting some great results and unrealized one of my problems was. Because, I didn't like myself. I thought was because it was a bad person of considerable people thought. It was. A permanent stress in my life

Twenty Twenty Georgia Australia Europe Hugh Queensland Botany Secretary California London Lecturer
"queensland" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

05:57 min | Last month

"queensland" Discussed on Coronacast

"So there is virus, it tends not to get spread. But there will always be the risk of of a blowout. So we might talk about it Victoria just a little bit because we got a question from ally. You've said that a few times that Victoria isn't being transparent and when all is been watching the presses everyday, they're saying that they do feel like there's a lot of transparency there. So what are you referring to when you say that is digging darn and being completely open for example, by the hospital spread and we tend to find about find out that late we tend to find out. How we don't really know how it's being transmitted. We'd been misled I think about how has been transmitted because the minister at one point said only ten or fifteen percent of being caught in hospitals clearly, not the case moisture product being caught in hospitals. Possibly, not from patients maybe in the tea room and other places where they could be passing it on. But we haven't sorted that out. What we don't know is not where of knowing is whether patients have caught it from healthcare workers one hope that hasn't happened, but we haven't heard that statistic either and and why we should know about this is really the two areas that seem to be the problem. Yes. There still some problem with food storage facilities, and so on and outbreaks stemming from them, and those are always at risk. But largely, we have aged care residents have healthcare workers and both age care and in hospitals, and if you subtract them from the total, there aren't many cases left in Victoria from community spread. So we towards doing really well but if the up they've got be up front about their hospital problem. So that, we can all share in that and that means we don't. You know when we go in as a patient, we're just careful or there's no are we know that there's no patient spread? Healthcare worker to healthcare worker because people are arriving late at hospital with serious conditions which need major interventions and they need to be sure that the hospitals are safe and I think it creates doubt if they're not being entirely open perhaps were political reasons. So I think those are the reasons why should they just got to be straight and and tell us what the statistics are and how they're dealing with 'cause they really get on top of the hospital situation on top of aged care. The pretty close to solving the problem in Victoria. Really, and we've got a question from sue about people who are immune compromised. So we were talking the other day about potential vaccines and whether it's safe for people who are immuno-compromised to receive a vaccine that's based on a live virus, and we just want sues just wedding clarification on whether the vaccines being developed classes live vaccines. The Oxford vaccine is a live vaccine. Chimpanzee virus it's been used extensively or many years in trials of malaria facts and children boiler mayors and others are tested vaccine technology. I'm not aware of what the evidence is in Immuno compromised. People have sadly been used in environments where there is lots of HIV AIDS in Africa for example. The University of Queensland Var, vaccine is not alive virus. It's a it's a traditional vaccine in some ways, which we're you've got an agile stimulates the immune system to which they attach a bit of synthesized DNA recombinant DNA, made in vats and sorts the part of the DNA of the spike protein, and then that stimulates an immune response directly. So it doesn't require a virus and the vaccine produced by MODERNA and some other companies. Around the world it's not a virus either..

Victoria University of Queensland Var MODERNA malaria Immuno AIDS Africa
"queensland" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

05:25 min | Last month

"queensland" Discussed on Coronacast

", we've been talking a lot about Victoria on this podcast and with good reason because that's where the majority of Australia's new cases coming. . But there's also a spread happening in New South Wales and Queensland and some of the questions that we're getting are about basically with a these states have learned some lessons and are making some changes to their approach based on what's happening in Victoria will your queenslander? ? Why don't you tell us what's happening up there? ? Yes. . So it is interesting the health authorities here. . have been quite open about the fact that they're nervous. . They're worried to see some community transmission happening here. . It's linked to a juvenile detention center and we know that I'm prison outbreaks problematic because you've got people in close quarters but they are definitely making some changes to the sorts of restrictions I brought in based on what's happened in Victoria. . So nothing's really changed in terms of businesses, , but the number of people that you can have visiting a household or like private gatherings outside Your House that's been what's restricted and that's based on the Victorian experience that some of those clusters happened early on, , we're really linked to lodge family networks rather than sort of transmissions happening at businesses. . And offices although the ones one outbreak in a lawyer's office North West Melbourne from memory. . That's right. . So it's this is domestic kits at families is family weightings, , family events, , funerals, and , so on. . People are hugging close together. . And P. . The opportunity for Aerosol spread early on and on that one of the other things that's being mentioned much earlier in this Queensland outbreak than happened in Victoria is they're advising people to wear masks. . Now, , if you're in a public place in a crowded place there advising that you wear bosc and that's not something that we heard until quite a long time into the Victorian outbreak note that Triton thankfully there deviating from the national advice on this. . has been a bit reserved. . It's just an extra layer of protection even if there's not much virus around, , you just don't aware it is what about where you are normally in New South Wales Wales, , they seem to be getting the unknowns down to a low number, , which is the which is the statistic that worries everybody Wine Victoria when interstate for lockdown is that they just far too many people where they didn't know where they're getting virus form. . Is running along in reasonable shape. . The problem is they're still virus around, , and whilst we report day by day on the numbers and the number of unknown sources, , this can change. . On a day-to-day basis, , he really got to look at the running average and what's happening in terms of the train, , but the train these. . Small numbers and increasingly knowing where the virus is coming from. . Obviously, , we would all prefer to have zero spread whatsoever but New South Wales seems to have maintained a low level that has been more or less consistent. . Is that maybe? ? A different way of living with the virus long term. . I'm not sure that that's what they're. . Amy's. . They've said in the past that they're not aiming for zero spread. . But. . There's enough anxiety around even at low levels that you can't quite relax. . But if the couldn't get it done two zero spread and I assume that are trying incredibly hard to do so. . And you probably could live with this but you living with a situation where they probably going to mandate masks robin just ask people to wear masks. . And and have quite strict social distancing. . So that's there's no chance of virus being spread around. So . there is virus, , it tends not to get spread. . But there will always be the risk of of a blowout. . So we might talk about it Victoria just a little bit because we got a question from ally. . You've said that a few times that Victoria isn't being transparent and when all is been watching the presses everyday, , they're saying that they do feel like there's a lot of transparency there. . So what are you referring to when you say that is digging darn and being completely open for example, , by the hospital spread and we tend to find about find out that late we tend to find out. . How we don't really know how it's being transmitted. . We'd been misled I think about how has been transmitted because the minister at one point said only ten or fifteen percent of being caught in hospitals clearly, , not the case moisture product being caught in hospitals. . Possibly, , not <hes> from patients maybe in the tea room and other places where they could be passing it on. . But we haven't sorted that out. . What we don't know is not where of knowing is whether patients have caught it from healthcare workers one hope that hasn't happened, , but we haven't heard that statistic either and and why we should know about this is really the two areas that seem to be the problem. . Yes. . There still some problem with food storage facilities, , and so on and outbreaks stemming from them, , and those are always at risk. . But largely, , we have aged care residents have healthcare workers and both age care and in hospitals, , and if you subtract them from the total, , there aren't many cases left in Victoria from community spread. . So we towards doing really well but if the up they've got be up front about their hospital problem. . So that, , we can all share in that and that means we don't. . You know when we go in as a patient, , we're just careful or there's no are we know that there's no patient spread? ? Healthcare worker to healthcare worker because people are arriving late at hospital with serious conditions which need major interventions and they need to be sure that the hospitals are safe and I think it creates doubt if they're not being entirely open perhaps were political reasons. So . I think those are the reasons why should they just got to be straight and and tell us what the statistics are and how they're dealing with 'cause they really get on top of the hospital situation on top of aged care. . The pretty close to solving the problem in Victoria. . Really, ,

Victoria Queensland New South Wales Wales New South Wales Norman Swan South Wales Australia Triton Amy
Coronavirus: Have NSW and Queensland learnt their lessons from Victoria?

Coronacast

05:25 min | Last month

Coronavirus: Have NSW and Queensland learnt their lessons from Victoria?

"We've been talking a lot about Victoria on this podcast and with good reason because that's where the majority of Australia's new cases coming. But there's also a spread happening in New South Wales and Queensland and some of the questions that we're getting are about basically with a these states have learned some lessons and are making some changes to their approach based on what's happening in Victoria will your queenslander? Why don't you tell us what's happening up there? Yes. So it is interesting the health authorities here. have been quite open about the fact that they're nervous. They're worried to see some community transmission happening here. It's linked to a juvenile detention center and we know that I'm prison outbreaks problematic because you've got people in close quarters but they are definitely making some changes to the sorts of restrictions I brought in based on what's happened in Victoria. So nothing's really changed in terms of businesses, but the number of people that you can have visiting a household or like private gatherings outside Your House that's been what's restricted and that's based on the Victorian experience that some of those clusters happened early on, we're really linked to lodge family networks rather than sort of transmissions happening at businesses. And offices although the ones one outbreak in a lawyer's office North West Melbourne from memory. That's right. So it's this is domestic kits at families is family weightings, family events, funerals, and so on. People are hugging close together. And P. The opportunity for Aerosol spread early on and on that one of the other things that's being mentioned much earlier in this Queensland outbreak than happened in Victoria is they're advising people to wear masks. Now, if you're in a public place in a crowded place there advising that you wear bosc and that's not something that we heard until quite a long time into the Victorian outbreak note that Triton thankfully there deviating from the national advice on this. has been a bit reserved. It's just an extra layer of protection even if there's not much virus around, you just don't aware it is what about where you are normally in New South Wales Wales, they seem to be getting the unknowns down to a low number, which is the which is the statistic that worries everybody Wine Victoria when interstate for lockdown is that they just far too many people where they didn't know where they're getting virus form. Is running along in reasonable shape. The problem is they're still virus around, and whilst we report day by day on the numbers and the number of unknown sources, this can change. On a day-to-day basis, he really got to look at the running average and what's happening in terms of the train, but the train these. Small numbers and increasingly knowing where the virus is coming from. Obviously, we would all prefer to have zero spread whatsoever but New South Wales seems to have maintained a low level that has been more or less consistent. Is that maybe? A different way of living with the virus long term. I'm not sure that that's what they're. Amy's. They've said in the past that they're not aiming for zero spread. But. There's enough anxiety around even at low levels that you can't quite relax. But if the couldn't get it done two zero spread and I assume that are trying incredibly hard to do so. And you probably could live with this but you living with a situation where they probably going to mandate masks robin just ask people to wear masks. And and have quite strict social distancing. So that's there's no chance of virus being spread around. So there is virus, it tends not to get spread. But there will always be the risk of of a blowout. So we might talk about it Victoria just a little bit because we got a question from ally. You've said that a few times that Victoria isn't being transparent and when all is been watching the presses everyday, they're saying that they do feel like there's a lot of transparency there. So what are you referring to when you say that is digging darn and being completely open for example, by the hospital spread and we tend to find about find out that late we tend to find out. How we don't really know how it's being transmitted. We'd been misled I think about how has been transmitted because the minister at one point said only ten or fifteen percent of being caught in hospitals clearly, not the case moisture product being caught in hospitals. Possibly, not from patients maybe in the tea room and other places where they could be passing it on. But we haven't sorted that out. What we don't know is not where of knowing is whether patients have caught it from healthcare workers one hope that hasn't happened, but we haven't heard that statistic either and and why we should know about this is really the two areas that seem to be the problem. Yes. There still some problem with food storage facilities, and so on and outbreaks stemming from them, and those are always at risk. But largely, we have aged care residents have healthcare workers and both age care and in hospitals, and if you subtract them from the total, there aren't many cases left in Victoria from community spread. So we towards doing really well but if the up they've got be up front about their hospital problem. So that, we can all share in that and that means we don't. You know when we go in as a patient, we're just careful or there's no are we know that there's no patient spread? Healthcare worker to healthcare worker because people are arriving late at hospital with serious conditions which need major interventions and they need to be sure that the hospitals are safe and I think it creates doubt if they're not being entirely open perhaps were political reasons. So I think those are the reasons why should they just got to be straight and and tell us what the statistics are and how they're dealing with 'cause they really get on top of the hospital situation on top of aged care. The pretty close to solving the problem in Victoria. Really,

Victoria Queensland New South Wales New South Wales Wales South Wales Australia Triton AMY
Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:53 min | Last month

Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

"Hello Joe. It's Jose Calico and Anna Forest Tia on all CA silent USA. And just by what you see what's going on in the mainland in the US I. And we're I a Saif. He only island in a Beautiful Anna's house thirty acres in lush forest with owls and eagles, and deason vouchers. Would really enjoying actually the lockdown. After five or six years of non stop touring thirty five CDs and countries a year. With had the chance to settle down and? We do have still very, very busy with our online channel and running out business each day we do a nice lengthy yoga practice. I'm a vegan chefs are cooking more than ever. Where actually very, very healthy. And so much has changed joke. Since we last spoke the world has gone absolutely crazy. And the US is one of those places where just off the mainland here. And not too far from here there's riots and shooting and racial tensions. All sorts of crazy crazy stuff going on a lot of it is a countdown to the election. Coming up here in the US I. There's a lot of manipulation lots of lies. Very hard to trust many people right now. So. Much. Going on. But We a happy to announce that old during this lockdown. We've had the opportunity to finally record all online yoga music ceremony shamanism philosophy Joe Prayers, go out to Victoria and all Ustralia Week here how harsh the lockdown is over there and I just lucky that we were able to do the lockdown thirty Acre forest. However, we seem to allow best wishes to Victoria and Australia, and we pray that our freedoms come back again. Go, and Jose. Thank you so much for speaking with us today all the way over in New Zealand the beautiful. Put Her. Could. We stop heads of your connections to first nations culture. Would you like to share how you live and work within indigenous communities and Foams what you share today? Absolutely. Well. I have been director all descendants aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Dance Company for twenty. Five years. People can see that descendants dot com you. We've traveled to the four corners of the planet we have done the world's biggest events over forty countries were visited. And this is where I got my background. In, aboriginal culture and my aboriginal Mahba spiritual mother Imelda Willis came from the dingy. Kanju clans Al-Faw North Queensland. She is now deceased. And we still descendants still together. And this just gave us the idea I had already. Doing first nations work in forest job. But I took it a couple of steps further by doing. Exchange all over the world while wearing Australia, we do Australian aboriginal stuff while we're in the US CY cultural exchange with the Americans. All first nations people in Mexico in Canada. Everywhere we go. We liked to do cultural exchange because first nations have spirituality was is beautiful and untouched by white middle class sort of new age is symptoms. So, with the aboriginal culture, it's the world's all this culture. It goes well over fifty thousand years and it was well before yoga and a lot of people site what has first nation. Philosophy principles and culture got to do with Yoga. And it actually has a lot to do with Yoga when we look at Yoga in the broader perspective as a place learning and healing.

United States Jose Calico Imelda Willis Australia Victoria Anna JOE Torres Strait Island Dance Com New Zealand Usa. North Queensland Director Mexico Canada
Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

Between The Lines

08:26 min | Last month

Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

"Battle of free speech on Australian University campuses. Allying piece was interviewed by the Media Department at the University of new. South. Wales about the human rights implications of Hong. Kong's new national security role as. Director at Human Rights Watch and an adjunct law lecturer at the university. She expressed concern about the laws and called on the United Nations Secretary General to appoint a special envoy in Hong Kong. Well, it's hardly a very controversial stuff in democracy lock Australia Russia. Will sell you think. We'll after the article, win online the pro. Chinese Communist Party students at the university they demanded the article be removed. You see caused a fence it was hurtful to the communist government in China. The university caved in and pulled the article. Only. After an outcry in the press was the article riposted. So. How did we get to the point when one of Australia's leading universities agrees to political censorship in favor of another nation state? Elaine. Joins me now aligned welcome to between the lines. Great to have you on the program. Thanks Tom. Now, the article is back on the University of New South Wales website but with caveats that the views expressed do not represent the views of the university you happy with this outcome. Well I'm glad that they put it back up. But I am pretty disappointed at the university's response I mean I think you know the views expressed in that article of us about the human rights situation in Hong Kong and I think that shouldn't be something that should be controversial and I was a bit surprised actually that the university was so quick to distance themselves from those views and I think you know I presumed that the ferocity of the campaign by the Pro Chinese Communist Party. Students really took them by surprise. But I think now the question really is how is Going to respond to this and I, think the students you know really are looking to see what is going to be the public response and what next is the university going to do to address these shoes mind you. This is not the only incident of academic freedom being compromised. Can you tell us about some of the other cases? Yeah, Human Rights Watch has actually been documenting Chinese document lit threats to academic freedom since two thousand fifteen not just in Australia about universities all around the world we've looked cases in the US the UK Canada France and right here, and what we've seen is that there is A universities are in a tight bind because the become quite dependent on foreign students. Many of those students coming from China those students have a very different world view, many of them and when they come here. Obviously you know coming here should come with a guarantee of academic freedom and what these should be quite basic things for an Australian university education. But in reality if those students try and for instance, join protests on campus about Hong Kong or Fin Jiang they are often then reported to the Chinese consulates So they are very afraid of doing anything like that they just. Try and keep the hits down and you know you only have to look at the controversy that's happened on Q. Withdrew Pavlou and how he has been treated to see that you know we you know it's not a very impressive response from the universities to to say, Scott Free speech and academic freedom only sorts of sensitive topics like shin-jang like Hong Kong, and like human rights in China. Now you mentioned drew heavily, he was expelled from the University of Queensland in part. For, organizing, what was it very noisy pro Hong Kong protests is that right? Well, he's been suspended. So I, think you know the industry who six months suspension six month suspension so He has been you know he's had been a pretty provocative campaigner. Some of these methods may have been a bit unorthodox, but at the end of the day, look at what happened to him on on that campus I. Mean there were fistfights erupting you cue between the different student groups you had in our pro CCP's students you know supporting the Communist Party trying to tear down. The messages from? Hong, Kong democracy supporters and the only person who's actually suffered any retaliation or reprisals is is drew himself, and so we wanna see universities really safeguard academic freedom and free speech and I think that means also acting against those who are intimidating or harassing all those on campus and making the campus a safe space to express all sorts of different views. Now in your case, a lot of the outrage amongst the Chinese students was expressed and organized I understand on Chinese soil media platforms way chat. which are now apparently watched by Beijing and to what extent you concerned about those platforms like we had and I think the other one is is a waiver we Yes that's right. Yeah I mean. These were the platforms where they organize. Look if students want to express different view an opposing you that's fine I think. I'm concerned is the extent to which this campaign became one of intimidating and harassing other students who expressed different views and as I understand it were threats made that they would report people to the Chinese consulate. For expressing excuse so I think the universities actually really need to monitor. Their social media channels and not just use them as a means of advertising for you know potential new students come to the university but also make sure that those channels are being you know being up being watched not to to censor free speech. But as I said, you know where that free speech is crossing the line. I also think they just need to be clear to the students. You know what what that means that it means. Going to a means being exposed to two different views and a free to discuss and debate those issues, but you're not free to shut down. The views of others. Of course, a line universities in Australia and this is cried sacred I've become increasingly dependent on. Overseas students for their budgets. Some have more diversified student bodies but others locked. University of new, South, Wales away opposite talking about University of New South Wales because of your special case this week they heavily concentrated on the Chinese market now since covert. US W has been one of the hardest hit by travel restrictions at recently made nearly I think five hundred staff redundant. Do you think this budget anxiety affected their handling of the issue align peace and? Yes I've been I think this reliance on the revenue from foreign students is something that you know all universities are facing now and so it it is putting them in a difficult position but I think that's why actually universities need to have a unified front. I think they really need to look at their existing. Codes of conduct they don't actually deal with these issues of foreign students might come from very different oil you, and so you know what I've suggested to you, and it's still view and to many other universities in Australia is to adopt a twelve point code of conduct specifically on these issues and they need to be alive to these issues. They need to incorporate it more into the orientation when you foreign students coming to campus so that they really understand what academic freedom means with our and they need to sort of monitor and. Safeguard, for you know acts of intimidation or harassment because I'm not so worried about myself but I'm more worried about other students on campus who will see how the situation has developed and then they might be too scared to speak out on. Hong Kong will fit in the classroom or other academics who might think twice about taking a meteorological on Hong Kong because they'll be worried about the potential backlash. So you know I think universities really need to take a stand on this and you know it needs to be done. You know jointly. By by all USTRALIAN universities.

Hong Kong Australia University Of New South Wales Human Rights Watch University Of New Chinese Communist Party Australian University Chinese Consulate China Hong Pro Chinese Communist Party University Of Queensland Wales United Nations Communist Government Media Department Director
Coronavirus: Queensland to close border to New South Wales

BTV Simulcast

00:25 sec | Last month

Coronavirus: Queensland to close border to New South Wales

"Of Victoria has reported a record 725 new cases of the coronavirus on 15 deaths. Most of those when Melvin, which is in love down and most of the victims. We're at age K h care homes. Rising concern about the disease, is prompting Queensland to close his borders with New South Wales on the Capitol territory from early Saturday morning. It's already closed to Victorians. A

Melvin South Wales Victoria Queensland
Teenage surfer killed by shark off Australian coast

The Armor Men's Health Hour

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Teenage surfer killed by shark off Australian coast

"Fatal shark attack in a week in Australia and at least the fifth so far this year. Ah, 15 year old boy mauled by a shark Saturday while surfing at Willie Beach near Grafton. Some 300 70 miles north of Sydney. This speech, Gore saw the aftermath. I talked to one of the surface on DH. Basically, he said, that he was in the water and really be great White shark came up and took a But the boy pronounced dead at the scene, Australian officials saying On average, three people die from shark attacks each year. A 20 year old scuba diver, was killed the previous week by a shark off the coast of Queensland state. All

Willie Beach Grafton Gore Sydney Queensland Australia
Australia shark attack: Man killed spearfishing near Fraser Island

KYW 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 3 months ago

Australia shark attack: Man killed spearfishing near Fraser Island

"Year old scuba diver has died after being attacked by a shark off the coast of Australia's Queensland state. A man was attacked Saturday afternoon. You're Fraser Island of the Queen's own ambulance service, said paramedics who arrived by helicopter provided emergency treatment. But the man who had been bitten around his legs could not be saved and died at the scene. He's actually the fourth person to die in a shark attack down in Australia in 2020.

Australia Fraser Island Queensland
Scuba diver killed in Australia shark attack

KYW 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Scuba diver killed in Australia shark attack

"A 20 year old scuba diver, has died after being attacked by a shark off the coast of Australia's Queensland state. A man was attacked Saturday afternoon near Fraser Island, the Queensland ambulance services Paramedics tried to save him found that he'd been bitten around the legs but could not save him. He died scene. He is the fourth person to die in a shark attack in Australia this year.

Australia Queensland Fraser Island
Resonate Recordings launches a podcast host

podnews

02:53 min | 3 months ago

Resonate Recordings launches a podcast host

"We start with an exclusive resonate recordings has launched its own hosting platform resonate being the editing mixing and mastering platforms. Hosting Service Means Simpler workflows. The company says with analytics, a podcast, micro sites and to imbedded players. Costing is proving to be recession proof. According to the CEO of. Fatima's add who's writing for pod news today. Looking at how podcasts fared during the pandemic, a why she believes that podcasting is resilient and offers great opportunities to come twenty five percent of Latinos in the US a monthly podcast listeners according to the Latino podcast listener report from Edison Research Tinos also spend more time listening to audio Katina USA. NPR REX have announced a new partnership. The Latino USA podcast will join pr ex from October the first. NPR has announced this late for the second half of two thousand and twenty, including three new shows and a change for invisibility. Fair. APP has had an update the popular podcast APP now includes Apple Watch support a relax and sleep collection of shows and full support for ipad cast box is now correctly sending a user agent with its RSS feed scraper. After we reported bargain, the user agent is in our show notes and our newsletter today reporting user agents that pass, RSS Feeds. Helped to gain more accurate analytics. Motorcycles launched an updated version of their podcast tools, director, including articles and resources. The pivot podcast is hosting a series of virtual events called schooled in August. The shows will include live interviews and the opportunity for you to ask questions in real time nominees third annual audio theatre central Seneca awards have been announced. The winners will be announced on July. The twenty fourth and audio description has come to Australian public service television, allowing people with visual impairments to join TV programs and movies like this from frozen reindeer jams the. Place and penstock like a proud puppy. One him with his stick. Then goes to sneeze. He grabs his nose with both hands. His head shoots frozen coming this winter and our focus on those when those audio described shows be great as podcasts. Polk News Pablo. Torre will be the new host of the ESPN daily podcast from Aug launched today. Missing all murdered looks at Katie O'Shea who vanished in a small country town in Queensland in Australia in two thousand five adult lily wants to know the answer to that one question and the Vesey's view has former British Minister Vesey's looking at tech disruption. His guest is unlisted. Benedict Evans

Fatima NPR Torre Director Edison Research Tinos Vesey Katie O'shea CEO Benedict Evans Apple United States Espn Queensland Australia
The Future of Podcasting with Podnews Editor James Cridland

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:54 min | 3 months ago

The Future of Podcasting with Podnews Editor James Cridland

"Today's guest all the way from Brisbane. Australia is James. Cridland the editor of the leading source of podcast. News Hug News Dot Knit. Without the twentieth easily radio and online business in two thousand five James help loans, the first daily podcast from UK, radio station and the world's first regius station streaming. APP, he offers a truly international view is a bridge leading Austrailia witnessed companies across the world including North America. He's also a keynote speaker and consultant, and wrote his first podcast RSS, fading January two thousand five, and also launched the first live radio streaming at from eyeball finds in Cya. Importantly, he's worked in the audio industry since nineteen eighty nine. Welcome, James, thank you so much for having me what we only spoke last week. Your against on the podcast festival, a joint production with podcasting buddies mean to doll and safety. That was a law show with you. Questions thrown in a producer might. this week prerecord so will move a bit slow pice if that's okay, Hanna absolutely fine I'm glad you said that. Look I feel like running exchange program. You're a Briton stride. Yet I'm in London. What's it like in strider? The moment I hear a lot of the lockdown restrictions eliciting. Yes, Oh, they're beginning to lift him in. We can't so. I'm in Queensland can't go anywhere in Queensland. We're not allowed to leave. Leave our great state, although I state frankly is big enough, so that's all okay, but yeah things are beginning to beginning to relax I'm not quite sure what the latest figures were, but certainly we we've had one case one coronavirus case in the last A. Week or so here in Queensland so you know we're doing. We're doing pretty well rather better than you guys think, and you'll side pod news dot net which I encourage one to sign up for the daily newsletter. Have you seen increasing traffic is forecasting immuno thriving during this pandemic I mean pain and increase in the amount of people getting it, which is nice and the amount of people. Using it, but I mean obviously. There's been an increase in podcasting as well so actually in May. We saw a new record for the amount of podcasts launch, ninety, six, thousand, five hundred. So you know you can clearly see and yes, some of that is going to be Ju to coronavirus, and the fact that you can launch a podcast of your home and you might. You might be a bit bored or whatever but I think also part of that is just because podcasting is actually growing and quite a lot of those. We're going to launch anyway so you know a tremendous amount of growth there and suddenly podcast hosts of I'm talking to that saying that as as significant increase in the amount of you know in the Mount of people signing up and the amount of support Kohl's that having an everything else which is old boats, said good I. Think so why we're going. Here are the podcasting Stat Guru. but What what number of these podcasts will quote a sort of survive? I mean lots of starting up because people bedrooms when I go back to work and things you think there'll be some on jeopardy, or what sort of half life of a podcast series. Yeah, I think that's going to be interesting, isn't it? I mean quite a lot of podcasts. Don't last particularly long it. It has to be said. And you know that may be bydesign. May Be because people you know, realize that actually producing great audio is quite difficult. And you know and so therefore they can't necessarily work too hard on that I mean if you have a look at the amount of the amounts of active podcasts there while there are one point one million podcasts in apple podcasts, and about half of those are active, so that means that they've published one episode in the Pasta Ninety days so about how for the market about half of them are inactive, and that's I think actually pretty good in terms of you know they longevity of podcasting the that you know? Know half a million still being currently made. You know that said that's quite thing i. think often asked is podcasting the new blogging and you've been around probably as long as I have gone Do you think they blend It's it's not simple to do a great audio show, but you can actually say something happened and get your news thoughts out there, but is podcasting blogging I. Don't think so I mean I. Ingenuity. It's interesting. I, was talking to US talking to Turkish television last night, and you know and they were saying. Is podcasting growing and I think one of the interesting things around focusing. He's been going for fifteen years but it's been nice, slow and steady growth every single year every single year. It's been getting bigger. But what podcasting hasn't Betas is it hasn't been. A My space or a Bibo or vine? Hasn't you know a dramatically? Increased and then all of a sudden. Disappears again.

Australia Queensland Brisbane James Editor United States North America Briton London Consultant UK Producer JU Hanna Mount Of Apple Kohl
NZ has eliminated COVID. Is Australia on track to do it too?

Coronacast

03:55 min | 3 months ago

NZ has eliminated COVID. Is Australia on track to do it too?

"So let's quickly start with New Zealand today. They've listed coronavirus restrictions after reporting active cases in the country. How confident can we be about it? Being a radical added there just to be clear what they're talking about. No community transition from its seventeen days. They say a reproductive cycle of the viruses fourteen days. So if you've read the virus, you would not expect to see any more. More within fourteen days, so it's really good news. We predicted on Corona Casta while ago that if we went for radicalization that sort of thing, you could expect to actually to lift restrictions quite considerably, because there's almost no chance of actually catching the virus. If you're sure, there's none left in the country and smaller states in Australia we're almost at that point so straight is lifting some restrictions Western Australia Queensland. Tasmania role in pretty good shape in terms of having almost eliminated the virus from those States New South Wales Victoria still a little. Little bit of communities spread, and you can't lift those restrictions such as you have in New Zealand in the two biggest states at the moment, and then you've got the issue necessarily of literal relaxing borders between states, and that's what they're reluctant to do. As long as some community transmission in Victoria and you south Wales, but we might get rid of that within a few weeks, in which case you might be in the startling situation where the whole nation can lift restrictions quite dramatically. Yeah I mean what's at a timeframe? Would we be looking? Looking for that, and how can we be sure that we continuing to have no virus in Australia you've got to wait so nor community transmission for at least fourteen days, but ideally maybe even a month so that you've gone food to reproductive cycles of the virus new. Zealand's waited for just a little bit over one reproductive cycle to say that they're pretty confident, but you've got to keep on testing and you've got to keep on testing people who any symptoms and you can't let down. Your guard doesn't deal with the situation overseas travel. and. People came in from overseas and relaxing those restrictions as soon as you do that then. Bets are off well like you say. We have seen a bit of community transmission in some states in Australia recently and so we're getting questions from people who attended the black lives, matter and indigenous deaths in custody rallies over the weekend Jessica asking for those who did attend the protests. When is a good time to get tested? Because we've talked before about the virus it of having an incubation period wins. Wins the most effective time to get tested, and there's a question for male along the same lines where hair. She said she had me saying that. If you get tested too early on infection, it's more likely you'll get a false negative. Well, listen to mail yet. We've been covering that and and on the health report. The recommendation from governments is absolutely right. You get tested at any time if any symptom. So any symptom it, oh, you're feeling lousy. You unexplained, even diarrhea. You've got call code loss of specially loss of taste or loss of smell. Then you need to be tested. It doesn't matter how many days will come pass since the protests. If you're a symptomatic and what to get tested then is, it's not clear exactly what you should do, but if you go on, that study quoted. Day One. It's not day one after the protests. We're already at day to day one. The test isn't very accurate because you don't have very much. If you've been infected dates, essentially becomes more and more accurate the more days after you've been infected. You're looking at the data. You'd probably say three or four days after the protests, you could get tested. That would be a day or two before symptoms would appear. Then that starts to be worth doing. And if you've still got no symptoms then day eight eight days after the protests, you'd have a second test. If, the first test was negative, and that's probably going in the evidence, the the most reliable regime still miss people. But if you WANNA get tested dramatic. It's a good thing to

New Zealand Australia Victoria Jessica Corona Casta Western Australia Queensland Diarrhea South Wales Tasmania
Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

Between The Lines

12:41 min | 4 months ago

Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

"Former Prime Minister Kevin right on the geopolitical consequences of the pandemic. He predicts the coming post covered. Anneke plus Iraq believe it or not. It's future looks brought today than it has an any point in the past Dick. I'd stay with us for my chat with Linda Robinson from the Rand Corporation. She'll tell us while we should not give up on Baghdad's fragile. Democracy Corona virus continues to take a toll on the health of nations around the world. One thing has become clear the winners and losers not who we might have expected a year ago. The virus is taking an uneven and unpredictable. Course through the world defying. I usual assumptions about power and resilience. Some small poor countries being left relatively unscathed all powerful prosperous nations. I've been ravaged. So what does this mean for global order and for the strategic robbery between China and the United States? Will everything change or is the virus? Mealy accelerating trends that were already in place. Former prime minister of Australia. Kevin Rudd is the President of the Society Policy Institute in New York. He's written an essay in the most recent issue of Foreign Affairs magazine in New York. It's called the coming postcode Enki and he joins me now. From Queensland's Sunshine Coast Kevin Rudd. Welcome back to between the lawns. Good to be with you on between the lines. Now you'll recent essays titled The coming Postcode Anneke Y Anneke. You're good real turns color of international relations you would know that realists assume that. Anneke is in fact the natural state All the International Society of states rent was Headley Bull who wrote about this crowd along time ago and Australian realist and Australian realist. Ten within the real documents that order actually represents the exception rather than the rule So why do I argue this I argue it because the current order as we've done since forty five is underpinned by and large by US geopolitical pound Gio economic power secondly That's become challenge at least by China Thirdly the Cova crisis has turbo charge The hit on American real and perceived power. But there's a full factor as well. Which is the impact which the Cova crisis has on China's Powell not least the damage to its economy the flow through effect to its ability to spend on the amounts of money on its military and on the belt and road initiative example but more importantly international perceptions of China in the developed in the developing world. So where do we end up? We end up not with The same old order as in the past but a slow and steady drift towards more anoc order. We're both China and the US damaged and the institutions of global governance with the UN. The will bank the National Monetary Fund the G. Twenty etc become increasingly the terrain for geopolitical battle. Between these two wounded POWs a K. Sunday the country's the victory he but some analysts say that China's heavy handed approach eccentric lockdowns violence. That's been a political win for Xi Jinping in Matt strengthened the Central Authority of the communist regime. How would you respond to them? Well let's look at That argument within China itself. There's been a huge hit on the accompany And as a result of that China will have its worst gross numbers twenty twenty the Ted in over half a century since the end of the Cultural Revolution almost That is huge. It undermines She Jinping's China Drain which was One pillar of which was for China to quadruple. Its G. D. DP by twenty twenty measured against two thousand levels this single year of itself. Economic non-performance blows a hole amidships in that and then secondly on top of that. Tom You've got the problem which arises in terms of internal political debates within China so and I think some growing levels of resistance to Xi Jinping's on leadership and finally as I mentioned before The blowback around the world in terms of the economic damage To economize both developed and developing causing a big question mark to a rise in terms whether China has in fact being the risk to the world's best friend because of the outbreak of this virus. So these factors I think. Qualify the overall argument you hear from some the China's authoritarian model in managing the crisis domestically translates into a geopolitical win the China internationally. I don't think that necessarily holes walk conversations. Do you think heaven. I going on right now in Beijing over China's place in the world I mean is the division division over this so-called Wolf Warrior this is the and diplomacy we often hear about a division between that Wolf Warrior. Diplomacy versus say China's desire to promote soft power. Chinese politics in some respects is not dissimilar to elements of politics. We and other countries. That is you find nationalist. Ten internationalists you find a local ists globalists' you find audio logs versus as it were reformers and pregnant at this and so the as political system while it's Control by Xi Jinping's leadership still has all these tensions and personalities within it so the debates now I think are of a twofold. How do we allow this to happen? In the first place what failed in terms of the processes insistence China put in place after the Saas Crisis of two thousand and three to prevent a pandemic or epidemic as it was then from happening again. The second debate is how the Hillary you get the economy back together again given the China a economy with forty percent of Gdp comes from the traded six or the economy and International. Trade is being blend. Bits by this crosses and the other debate again between nationalists internationalised is the one. You've just touched on the Tom. Which is China's wolf worried diplomats out there launching attacks against any critique of China's performance On the one hand defend the party's legitimacy and on the other hand older more seasoned diplomat saying this isn't actually contributing much to the improvement of China's global image those discussions and debates underway. At the moment we're talking about this wolf warrior diplomacy. What do you make of China's recent boycotts threats of boycotts of Australian Exports Bali? Beef what what's going on well as I've said in other recent interviews since those public statements by the China's ambassador Australia it's unacceptable in my view for any ambassador accredited to any country to receive public threats against the host country In City five years of more dealing with the Australian China relationship I don't recall previous Chinese ambassadors of having done that not by any Australian diplomat ever having done that irrespective of the crisis of the day with was ten on all the things that I went through when I was in office etc so I think as a matter of shall we say diplomatic practice. What occurred then was regrettable as as being some of the hotline commentary. Which emanated from the Chinese nationalist media? the bottom line is however the Chinese nationalists have seen The effectiveness All the some of these sorts of measures when applaud various countries in the past sorts of economic leverage which China replied to no way out to no way through the Nobel Prize Committee Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to a famous Chinese dissident And I've also seen how those Economic Leverage points of work with various of the Europeans. So this is not alien to the Chinese playbook my argument about China's Australia's management of The relationship in prison is that if the Australian government's of the view and a view I in general support that there needs to be an independent international inquiry as to the origins the virus transmission of the virus notifications to the WHO and threw them to the world community etc. Then again to put that Ford isn't as trade in government and then do some work on it. I get a few other governments to come along with you an advance that through the multilateral machinery which rather than just blow it out as a thought bubble That's the way which you do. Real things in the international community rather than I. Fear sometimes pitching a diplomatic initiative primarily for domestic political leverage into straighter. What complicates matters? Further is president trump's theory that the virus was leaked from a lab in Wuhan and raises the question. Why would China agree to enquiry without losing this between the lines on? Abc Radio National. The familiar voice. You're hearing is former prominence to Kevin. Rudd is now president of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York. We've been talking about his article in the current issue of Foreign Affairs magazine. Kevin we'll talking about China and how it's paid a price as a result of this current ivars. Let's turn to the United States. How badly damaged is the use in your judgement? I mean we'll recover reasonably quickly With a change of administration in November or does the damage go deep. Perhaps too deep for recovery has been deep damage politically. The the. The House is a divided house within the United States. Those of us who have followed. Us politics of the many years have rarely seen it This divisive and that actually is a real factor in terms of constructing a post presidential election national consensus on how America engages the World. And the future. American politics has become so binary including on America's own future will view on the economic damage. It's huge. This is the biggest hit on newest economy at least since nineteen forty-six and the recovery from the war and probably since the depression the end of the depression and thirty three So this takes a while to recover But the American economy know a history of resilience. Look what happened after the global financial crisis? But well I was going to make the point to is enormous capacity for change and renewal. I mean you think about its recovery from the civil war that oppression in Vietnam. You being a bit too pessimistic. Kevin. Well I live in the United States and I actually listened to the debate on back in Australia now and when my American interlocutors Republican and Democrat Friends of mine over twenty years who A positive let's call it. The Foreign Policy National Security Policy Machinery signed that it's become increasingly hard to forge consensus these days across the aisle on America's behavior in the world That is a real issue. Then it's not just my external analysis it's part of the internal analysis within the US itself. Do I think the United States can come through the domestic political Malays and the Economic Destruction? Which has occurred? Yes I do. Because it's remarkably resilient country But I think a precondition is that We see a Democrat. Win this November it's not that. I am a A cheerleader for Joe Biden. Personally I barely know the man Bought he's lucky to put together a mainstream Competent Foreign Policy and National Security Policy Tame as opposed to Frankly the chaotic nature of the trump administration on most foreign and national security policy questions. And that I think is necessary for America to rebuild. Its alliances abroad rebuild. Its credibility in the eyes of the risks of the will and to overcome what has been an extraordinary period where America rather than taking the lead in the global recovery From the virus both in public health systems and economic terms as simply being missing in action and in fact the unable to contain it's the damage domestically

China United States Kevin Rudd Anneke Xi Jinping Australia Anneke Y Anneke President Trump Prime Minister Foreign Affairs Magazine America Baghdad New York Linda Robinson Rand Corporation Dick Joe Biden Iraq Nobel Prize Robbery
Deadly Discussions

Deadly Discussions

07:36 min | 4 months ago

Deadly Discussions

"John Weapon Daily discussions before I get started like to acknowledge the truce land on his on. Whose land where recode. Which is the bone people because my name is not on or injury like it usually recorded the year. It's unbundling. So he in Victoria and by Tribes Apart of the cooling nations. So John Welcome to daily discussions the live version of it. Hey going today. Yeah great thanks. Yeah thanks thanks. Have a pleasure to be Walsum. Awesome and before we started doing a share away from and What you position at the moment yes. Sure so I'm almost from bitter a country which is sort of at central west Queensland Basically at in there in the middle in Iway significant sought for people so add sort of special spring show. Why at that? Why yet really? I still don't know where that is a bit here. It's about eight hours north west of Brisbane. Yeah Wow so wrought out and you said the cultural significance. How high are we talking? These ranges in a huge this this tearing Ryan said there that sort of some a couple of hundred meters above sea level in yes. I ended up work at their that. Dates back to more than ten days and Yeah this is a lot of historic History of the divers for us yet I still like finding I know some Victorian so digressing before we get into it but so interesting Some ABS Dan. Hey Lodge mountains. I won't even say which ones but there's a lot of artwork that is still being discovered across the ranges Nfl Aboriginal is only that sort of a case there as well. Yeah there's a lot of second thoughts Cousins Arranger at the National Park Yet she goes on sighing loss. Wake that I found another another cultural sought yet just pitcher. Esca the mold New Way to go in and had explosive in a new way to go in terms of that. It's risky. I'm yet that that last last week. Still sought still being developed in an explode today. Yes incredible now. I've got three strains on hassle. I can always look at what other stuff. You've been doing a lot easier on. Usually just tolkien. I'd take notes but having the technology makes it a so much more convenient Your previous work with Avi A. I meant you went at Futures Forum which I think was a program that e sort of took laid on him put together Juwan explain what a futures form is and then. How does that work with Indigenous people because a lot of these terms and days a very foreign because we practiced these elements in different aspects of different ways but now with aligning so it makes sense in a in a Western context share. What a futures forum that works yes. Other futures will become that was born out of a of an agenda really engage with the future generation In terms of business economic sense and side what we've done is we raised Former colleague in MSL developed this concept. That really looked at. What does the future look like for indigenous people in this country in the next fifty years? What does that look like in relation to business? And let's get together deadly bunch of of a feature entrepreneurs and business people too early unpack. What that what that looks locking site that just got together. There are more country that we got and Yet we we tries back into into a pasta history and work towards a future vision statement as to what business. Lock in fifty. Is Tom here? There's some powerful stuff and was great to meet you there and have the caliber of yourself in the other people in the room. I think it was a fairly painful experience that we will go by. Yeah I think for me. It was a low the Tom I am. I'm coming onto thirty now. And so being a young entrepreneur and saying other young entrepreneurs full of indigenous latest. Probably like pretty intimidated. I was like Oh man these all these ideas a deadly like I should have thought of that But then I like you guys. Sharing and the facilitated tristen was sharing that A lot of people like early in the states have these expos in forums where I would pretty much plan how cities and how things would be divided in built and then from there that people have got the knowledge in the nine how where to position themselves to to get work where to position themselves to united. Start a business or bill equity and ask first nations people. We never really sold the reason to build up and build high things. We were living off the land sustainably living with each other trading with each other trading with Malays in Indonesia that went through China and dumb CEOS a concept that we sort of bring best both worlds really. I applaud you for that. And now you'll see you. Yes we'll get back to that. Let's rock back to dot. Cue the sound. That does time. What but let's take it back to growing up which you grow up you grow up. In country or country or countries all grew up in up McCulloch Soda Knowles In central Queensland depending on what body look at in jail grow up there in all of my family are in Rockhampton I basically Doesn't as denies dies was that my grandfather was a stockman escape. The mission law in skype in many ways living under the in that sort of thing and went from station to station appropriate. Property doing yeah. The stockman taught work fencing wholesale Some incredible stories of driving in Horses AND SHAPE AND WHATNOT INSIDE. Visually move from station station. He was born on country At at a major country and then ended up in a place called home Which is just enough canton and yum. Yeah as it was day of the policy was United Australia. Policy came in failure can equal pay came in and style of the. The property was working on Couldn't afford to pay the white that the business side I got booted at in the closest town was canton and yeah. The mobile is still there so I grew up. Just north of the. What's gone back and forth Rockhampton big family as as we are on my grandfather possibly one hundred six years old on on bitter country and had three hundred more than three hundred grandchildren gripe drain grandchildren and great grandchildren. And yet my grandfather's up to up to two hundred PSI The McCain down on having token I so yeah

Futures Forum John Weapon Hey Lodge Victoria Brisbane Cousins Arranger Walsum Iway Rockhampton Ryan Mccain TOM United Australia National Park Queensland Avi A. Indonesia Juwan Skype DOT
The astrophysicist and immunologist who've dropped everything for COVID19 - Science Interrupted Part 2

Science Friction

09:22 min | 5 months ago

The astrophysicist and immunologist who've dropped everything for COVID19 - Science Interrupted Part 2

"So most of what I did was a combination of data software and statistics. This is astrophysicist. Dr Sam Hinton from the University of Queensland in January Hey submitted his PhD so I worked on Supernova cosmology and that's essentially taking exploding stars somewhere in the universe and using that to figure out how far away they and once you figure out how far away something is and how bright it is you can try and map out the history of the universe. Obviously things that are further away are further back in time because it takes time to get to us so the idea was if we can map out the last fourteen billion years of the universe ended expansion that hopefully we can try and characterize the nature of dark energy and dark Meta. That's my main eight right and obviously that's a problem. That's all about modeling and Statistics. So I created Asian hierarchical models and other sorts of models try and encapsulate all the nitty gritty details. That happened in the universe. In some statistically robust way so just a little way project just a tiny one that managed to consume years of my life. And whether that's because I just wasn't smart enough or whether it turns out that the Hamid actually really is complicated. Well I have opinions on both if only I was smarter. And if only the universe was simpler okay so taking on the entire history of the entire universe right there. So how is this? Astrophysicist and software engineer now suddenly found himself working on another big but totally different problem. The cove nineteen pandemic today on the show too young scientists who have had to rapidly retrofit and translate talents in an unprecedented moment in history. Sam Foreign doesn't shy away from a challenge. If he's name sounds familiar to you. That means you might be a fan of this stamp. Tonight's GonNa play out that I wanted to crunch the numbers for this other man to do it. There's computer I don't know if he's going to go hunt. I didn't even know. Cross was going to play his idol. New Sam was a popular contestant in the twenty eighth season of survivor Australia but bravado aside what use is an astrophysicist in fighting a global pandemic after all as far as we know now corona virus has made it into space yet and that's a relief as poor people on the International Space Station. There's no ICU. Up there what essentially happened was once I started getting serious. Everyone just put out feeling the same. We need help looking at a whole bunch of these tasks and this happened at Uku. Enriches where I work and through the grapevine. People said. We're looking for someone with all these skills and then Sam supervisor happens to be the acclaimed dark energy astrophysicist and TV presenter Professor Tamra Davis She's also passionate about astrophysics people using their research knowledge and skills in non astrophysics domains. So Tamra put Sam's name Ford The first thing was surely there are people that are better suited than me and salmon just accepted a job offer in the US at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. That's a big deal. But when Sam was told more he went back to Tamra and said. Are you all right if I just take months off from my actual normal astrophysics project to work on? This and her response was absolutely fine. Don't worry about it. We'll figure something out. Get on the project and do what you can. It was there was no chance that I was telling this down. It was a way to make a real contribution and astrophysics You know we don't make significant contributions every day to society we may every now and then invent something like the digital camera and was like yes. This is amazing but covet is a right here right now. One hundred percent immediate problem so there was absolutely no hesitation jumping into it so just like that. In a matter of moments Sam's life has suddenly turned upside down. Oh yeah if I thought I had long hours before. There's nothing like the current hours that we have to deal with. Sam is now the lead daughter analyst on a really crucial international project rolling out in real time in intensive care units across the world during this pandemic. And if you've seen the footage coming out of those units you'll know that this is a hellish frontier and what we need damage. Dice seeing young patients patients people of all age ranges. Who are just incredibly sick. And you can even hear now as. I'm walking through patient rooms in the hallway. It just your oxygen the sound of the pulse ox this ventilator later. Dan has joined. What's called ECO car? The global project headed up by trail-blazing intensive care specialist professor John Fraser from Prince. Charles Hospital in Brisbane AIKMAN COD is a mighty Akron Rod. It stands for Extra Corp. membrane oxygenation for twenty nine thousand nine novel Corona Virus Acute Respiratory Disease a card so when your heart and lungs can't do the job of oxygenating your blood and it. Komo machine allows that to happen outside. If you body. We want to know essentially. How can we best help as many people as possible? So we have very finite resources with this outbreak. We don't have an infinite amount of nurses doctors and ventilation equipment that we can just put everyone on so we need to know. Hey if if patient x comes through the door and they look like this but is the best sort of ventilation can give them if we just give them a mosque. Are they going to be fine or is this a patient that needs something more severe because a nurse can generally do around ten c-pap mosques so the very easy ventilation but if they have to actually mechanically ventilate someone help out the longest mechanically and it's essentially one nurse per patient and we don't have that many nurses when we have so many patients coming in so we really want to be able to say when someone walks in the door that they're probably going to need this outcome will be x? Y. Depend however retreat them. So when someone comes in we take the age we take their weight and then we need to know what other things do have do. They have high blood pressure Do they have diabetes? Are they smoke I? What is the condition of their lungs? There's so many things so many different data points that you can gather in the medical world ten thousand different questions that you could ask but what we have in our data time series so for two weeks after people. Get to the ICU. How are they red blood cells evolving? How of their platelet counts doing what we want to do is compare their outcomes and Dan data with other people other healthy people or people that have different afflictions so that we can say this is the thing that's unique about Karina buyers. This is one of the predict is here. That's different from anything else. And it's very hard to get that sort of time. Series data doctors and nurses are working around the clock to keep people alive. They're exhausted so around the world. Medical students are stepping up and being recruited to help collect the data every day. You need to be updating the data. And that's why we need for example medical students to come in because it is such a large burden if anyone is trying to also treat patients on top of that. We have around five hundred different variables from the different patients. And about a hundred of those we have information hopefully essentially every day that they're in ICU. So that we can see how they evolve over time. I can't say too much mall because whilst I have a huge list of variables in front of me things like pro calcitonin. I don't know how they used in a medical context all that I can do generate the reports and then worked with the clinicians in real time to say. What do you want to see? What would you expect to see? And how can I best present these models and this information to you so that you can draw conclusions from it? The urgency of the situation means. This is being taken very seriously. Clinicians are working in the dark right now with this new virus so they'll benefit from a Biegel clearer picture of what's happening for patients around the world. Oh Yeah it's absolutely unbelievable. I've never been involved in a project this lodge and especially in the current predicament. All the usual blockades and the bureaucratic slowdowns that you encounter have just been removed. So we have fifty countries now from Estonia to Kuwait to the United States is coming online the UK Italy Spain strategies coming online now two tons of countries and then each country also has all the hospitals in it. So we've got around two hundred fifty hospitals and that number grows every day.

Dr Sam Hinton ICU Professor Tamra Davis Sam Foreign DAN University Of Queensland United States Hamid UKU Software Engineer Cross Biegel Extra Corp. Diabetes Brisbane
"queensland" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

05:13 min | 5 months ago

"queensland" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Also in very good condition and if you're traveling in Queensland which has some construction going on at Linden Boulevard but we look good off the bill passed Linden and up into the queue Gardens interchange alternate side parking continues to be suspended the media rules continue to apply I'm Karen Stewart your next report is less than ten minutes on ten ten wins the corona virus death toll in the city may be about to topple Levin thousand because the city department of health is about to add thousands of people to the Leicester were never actually tested for the virus before they died Carol Deoria has more on that from city hall this morning the New York City health department says it's likely that more than thirty seven hundred people probably died of covert nineteen but they were never tested officially there are more than seventy nine hundred people who were tested and definitely died of it so when you combine those two numbers that pushes New York city's death toll from the virus more than eleven thousand four bleaker picture now regarding testing their diplomacy says he's now waiting for the federal government the city is buying lots of test kits aria diagnostics Carmel Indiana is now going to be producing test kits for New York City we will be purchasing them starting Monday April twentieth this coming Monday will be purchasing fifty thousand full test kits per week now moving forward before we know it this summer will be here in the near post is reporting that the city may keep the city beaches close this summer so the social distancing rules could be in effect right through August there could be full or partial closure of the city beaches Carol Deoria ten ten wins at city hall New Jersey is reporting its highest single day coronavirus death toll three hundred sixty five bringing the total in the states more than twenty eight hundred and governor Murphy says social distancing orders are likely to continue into the summer I personally think in the warmer weather we could begin to find our footing assuming again that we've got the healthcare infrastructure especially broad scale testing that we're gonna need to give us that confidence I think this is you know a June or July much better reality if we keep doing our part especially stay at home right now but even with all that in mind at least one state lawmaker thinks new Jersey's parks and forests could be reopened now John Montone with more live live from New Jersey this morning John well at least sunshine and fresh air are good for us for our immune systems are a milk motional well being especially now says state assemblymen Jay Webber or or at work they can't go to church they can't see their friends there's no ball games on TV they need something to they need to get out and get exercise the Republican lawmaker has started an online petition to reverse governor Murphy's order which close the state's half million acres of parks and forests Webber tells ten ten wins the governor over reacted to reports of overcrowding at a few parks are state park police in park personnel should enforce reasonable restrictions if we have to limit attendance at the park's that's one thing if we have to ban out of state people from coming to our parks for short time Weber is also encouraging Jersey Shore towns to re open closed beaches so people don't have to walk and run on sidewalks and in the streets including the assembly his wife and seven children John Montone ten ten wins live in New Jersey president trump is still talking about re opening parts of the country next month but after saying on Monday the decision is ultimately has he said yesterday leave it to the governor's we have one country but we have lots of different pieces to a puzzle we have beautiful pieces beautiful stage with capable governors they know when it's time to open and we don't want to put pressure on anybody I'm not gonna put any pressure on any governor to open but the administration will still provide states with guidelines on re opening of the president said he does plan to speak to all the governors on a conference call he also announced yesterday he's cutting off U. S. funding to the World Health Organization at least temporarily this is an evaluation period but in the meantime we're putting a hold on all funds going to world health we will be able to take that money and channel it to the areas that mostly that and that's another way of doing it but we have not been treated properly the president says there will be a sixty to ninety day investigation into why what he calls the China centric W. H. O. cause so much death by severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of the virus in China the U. S. is the WHO's largest contributor kicking in four hundred to five hundred million dollars a year China contributes about forty million Democrats in Congress disapproves senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont saying withholding funds for WHL in the midst of the worst pandemic in a century makes as much sense as cutting off ammunition to an ally as the enemy closes and senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey recently said US funding of the WHO's.

Queensland
Australia is doing well, but where are we heading next?

Coronacast

10:12 min | 5 months ago

Australia is doing well, but where are we heading next?

"We thought we'd start today by taking a bit of a look about where Australia currently stands. It seemed to be a lot of ideas on control measures popping up. But we don't really seem to have a clear direction on where we're heading pam. Scott Morrison still says when many weeks away from restrictions being lifted the state government seeing less willing to open things up soon. What's the broad thinking? Well the broad thinking is that with say forty or fifty new cases a day which is where we're going so that's an increase of forty or fifty forty fifteen new cases every day. They stay infectious for a week or two maybe even three so that becomes an infectious pool of people that so every fifty exit from that pool but it slowly accumulates and that pool can become a very large number very quickly and there was a day. Nobody knows exactly the day in the end of November beginning of December when there was only one person in the whole wide world with what we came to be known as covered nine hundred only one person bat to an animal to a human being. And that's only four and half months ago and is now nearly two million people infected over well over one hundred thousand people have died four and a half months from one single person. So if you've got forty people fifty people every day and you lift restrictions and you don't quite know what those where you live restrictions and don't have a plan for it it becomes really quite tense to nor too because we could we could slip out of control incredibly quickly with doubling times every two or three days and that would be not good and it's called a second wave so in international terms we. We're no becoming one of the poster child's we talked about Taiwan South Korea Hong Kong. And as we said yesterday the hope would be. But you've got to be deliberate about it that you get down to new cases and some of the states in Australia are getting down to almost that level where there is just tiny tiny numbers. Scientists showed a Western Australia. They're almost at that point now where they're getting new measurable community spread and Western Australia. They're measuring everybody in theory. They're testing everybody. Who's got a call a cord? So here's here's the thinking I I suspect which is they're scared to lift it off because they know there's GonNa be very hard to button people back down and countries that have had to do that. Find it very difficult. You let people out so there's gotta be a plan and schools daycare might be the first things that you open up and we can talk about that in a minute based on research then you might open up workplaces. There's enormous pressure just to open up now as there is in the United States. And when there's still a fair bit of virus around you just don't want to do that and the states are at the front lines you think about federation like ours is that the the Commonwealth sets policy. They received money through taxation in distributed. The KOMO's doesn't run anything. It's the states that run stuff run. Education system healthcare system. They're the ones running the stuff and so the states are the front line and the states tend to be more aggressive and assertive than the Commonwealth. Because they are at the frontline the interesting thing. When you look overseas is that the metric that you'll see when you watch the news or the newspapers is the number of deaths each day. Have you noticed that? Teagan people and say well you know a good day today? The the the number of deaths in Italy has fallen off in New York City. And so on which is good news. So the the reason they're doing that and not quoting death rates a lot of our conversations early on in Corona Caswell. What's the mortality rate? Is it three point? Six percent three point four percent one percent less than one percent. In many ways the proof of puddings in the number of deaths that you get it kind of is a reflection of the of the amount of corona virus in the community two weeks ago. And when you start to see the desk falling away it means that two weeks ago something was happening because people were in lockdown. That's usually the reason getting better at testing while the death star to disappear. But as you've seen in a couple of places you see deaths flicking up again. It's very very fragile. And that's why politicians advised by their medical advisers. Just being very very careful but let's say we got it under control industry. Let's say we eliminated or almost eliminated it. Here if the rest of the world still in the throes of a pandemic what would normal even look like here. Normal could be everything a lot of things except for overseas travel. I can't see a point in anywhere anywhere anytime soon where you're going to allow travel you. You're going to lift the borders and allow planes to fly in from Dubai. London India an American because they will just get the epidemic back. So I think we have to accept as a nation that the borders are closed for quite some time. What sometime is it depends on where vaccine emerges over there are treatment emerges and so on. There are a couple of game changers around. So let's assume there's nobody coming in from overseas then the question is do you allow free movement between states. Well I think if every state is at zero then you would probably start allowing people to move between states so you can corn holiday to Queensland or whatever it is so but everybody's got to be Zero of New South Wales has got a lot of cases. People are not going to want people from New South Wales to be moving around the country similarly for Victoria. So then you try to get your local economy back on its feet and so you allow schools and big care to come back which releases parents to start going back to work and then you might allow people to go back to work in non essential occupations and then after a month or six weeks you might allow restaurants to open with social distancing and then sit and watch with massive testing very expensive testing tens of thousands of people the person positive or nobody positive. And if you manage to keep the lid on it then you just slowly let things go back. But I think we'll still be social distancing for some time to come but we'll be able to get out more whether there'll be football matches before two thousand people with theaters will reopen with a two thousand people. I think those are things for the future and not immediately but we can start going back to work and getting some of the basics of the economy going one should down to one two three single digit numbers or zero. Well one of the things we do in credit cost is answer questions from audience and someone asking about death rights and why the death rites differ between countries and between economies and between East and West. What do we know what we know is that you see twenty two thousand deaths in the United States? When was the last time I looked ten thousand deaths in the UK? I think it's almost pointless to talk about death. Rates Something Business. Who want the restrictions lifted? Now say all well you know if it's under one percent this is not something to worry about is starting to seasonal flu. Well try telling that to one of the twenty. Two thousand families have lost somebody in the United States. It's almost academic high mortality rates for for this and and as we've said before the actual case fatality rate depends on. How many people you know in the community who actually have the virus in the United States. They haven't a clue in it's they don't really have a clue so it's really hard to know what the actual rate is and we talked about the diamond princess one of the cruise ships giving a rate of one percent and vein depends on how the mortality rate is going to be higher in countries. Where they don't of intensive care units where you can't go to hospital and get oxygen. It's going to be higher when people are malnourished in poor poor environments and then the numbers Luke large because the numbers infected incredibly large. So it's almost pointless. We know that it's probably ten times more on average maybe thirty times but somewhere in that range more than seasonal flu and large numbers of people are dying and the potential is for our hospital system to be overwhelmed as indeed. It has been in New York and parts of Italy a lot of jurisdictions in Australia looking at school from high in term two but nominee this new research at showing just how effective school closures Aaron Can Charlie spread there. This was a group that published in the Lancet. And they've taken available information from the SARS one epidemic as well as what we know from recent school closures in Hong Kong China and elsewhere and try to come to an answer and where they landed was wonders. Not sure at the moment what the contribution is. Kids are not big spreaders but they do catch the disease. They don't get fever. A lot of the time which means new teen temperature at school is not necessarily going to work so two to four percent contribution to total deaths from SARS in other words the contribution of the children have to spreading it to other people maybe ten percent contribution to the pandemic but again and then you've got the social costs of Closing schools and I think that where they landed with an editorial is that if you reopen schools. It's going to make a bit of a difference. Not huge to the pandemic but schools need to be really careful about hygiene and social. Distancing are going to reopen so in summary most models that they've got if all schools were open preschools and so on they would contribute maybe two to four percent increase in the number of deaths from covered nineteen because they've spread it to their grandparents and other places and maybe about ten percents of the total spread of the virus. So that's the story. And maybe if you then put it in social distancing schools lots of hygiene you could minimize that risk even further.

United States Australia Commonwealth Sars Western Australia Scott Morrison Italy Taiwan South Korea Hong Kong New York City Corona Caswell Dubai Komo New South Wales UK Fever Queensland
Man dies after being bitten by shark near Great Barrier Reef

Steve and Ted

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Man dies after being bitten by shark near Great Barrier Reef

"S. shark fatally mauled a young Australian wildlife worker on the Great Barrier Reef queens and officials say the twenty three year old victim worked for the Queensland's parks and Wildlife Service police say the man was in the water returning to a vessel chartered by the service when he was attacked yesterday near northwest island suffered extensive injuries to his leg and arm and died at a hospital

Great Barrier Reef Queensland Northwest Island Wildlife Service
"queensland" Discussed on Dear Dyslexic Podcast

Dear Dyslexic Podcast

14:19 min | 8 months ago

"queensland" Discussed on Dear Dyslexic Podcast

"Out and you know i was using that one i'll wanna crime screen and when i talk pop an assignment odd have so many words underline that it would it would take almost as long to go through and check it as it would toward written it and and i remember sometimes i'd have to get my my flatmates to look at it with me because i couldn't even guess close enough to have a word should be spelled for the computer workout what word it was australia aside and then to pay potato and have a look in the dictionary that always baffled fool me because i think if i can't spell it i don't think addiction is going to help me i don't know the start of the word yeah well you know i mean with that but i i was very unfortunately i had some good friends who you know very understanding and and i were you know very happy to help and it became a little bit of a running enjoyed you know i'd be sitting there with the computer it'd be going ahead of you spell how do you spell hattie spun eventually that that turn the tele fano sit around and go why don't we just got through it truth and why don't we just cut through it it's going to be going to be quicker unless annoying if you just because only one god what a great group of frame yeah yeah laws aw and so did you having your diagnosis did that make you feel better about yourself in the challenges you've had how did you react twenty ted time to process i said well i guess from my point of view you know i was very fortunate to arrive in hong kong and i played basketball quite a serious level alive there for southern china and so i didn't feel bad about myself at all i just so you know i'm just not and so you know academic kind of person so from that regard it was i what he did was allowed me to understand what had gone on and so you know by simply sort of you know cutting a hole in a piece of pipe tracking it down sentence by sentence i could i could suddenly we start absorbing knowledge and i could actually remember it and and i didn't jumble the words around because before that basically arita a sentence and i'm picking words out random that our ladder the paragraph to kind of just make sense in my head and i'm just talking gobbledygook nobody goes you know it just wasn't making any sense at all and so you know before that when i was reading stuff sometimes i'd be reading it you know four five six six seven times to try and understand what the hell the pie was talking about so yeah for me uh what it did was was help in terms of my ability to be able to get through the course now i'm certainly no great shakes as an academic you know but but i got through and and i i wouldn't have got through i think without the help of computers my friends and the ability to BI but a simple cut a hole in the piece of pipe and didn't track it down a package that is really simple atip tipped probably some of alice's might wanna try i might suggest that to my brother because he doesn't read a lot but hey says a wins old move on the page i wonder what my well for me for me it's not you know i wouldn't even necessarily say that i move but i literally if i look at paragraph that goes to the five or six sentences is in it i really struggle to follow it line by line word by would i end up picking words at a three or four lines belie couple of lines above you know one might be before the word one might be after the word and my brain will just sort of try to make sense of good old sizes quite often what i you know if i'm reading something what i i will actually make sense but it's just completely not relevant because it's not what's in front of me i'll just pick all these different words at oh yeah oh yeah well i don't read much hey even today you know i i'll have a computer talk to me a lot more than i actually read the words myself it's however we can taken the information i think that it's listening rating so can you walk us through your working career because it's being very diverse basketball shadow minister in parliament so what is well i'm anne i thought right back at the beginning you know i've i've done everything from sort of you know wash wash cows sell jeans i work in advertising agencies and that's when i was in london i worked for video production i worked for publisher publish probably if i use the publishers the example the work i used to do for them was actually an early version of XL i think visit calcutta hewlett packard computer and it was all just numbers and data on spreadsheets with big declines tracking everything across everything's neat little box and all the boxes lined up i've got to help me track it across and and i could do the maths of it right so i'd be able to see if i might mistake pretty quickly because i'd look at it and go that number the magazines and so you know different times i had different jobs where i could overcome it i got into trouble a number both times for not having things spell correctly when i've had to label things and you know in the ad agency i remember posting off some stuff you know part of my job in the was was in a packing room and and you know i've got the address completely wrong and something really important hasn't arrived where it's supposed to be told him and i'm in favor of trouble for or it but but you know then so whilst i was at university i got into hospitality where i were doing security and by work and obviously there's very little writing involved in that and a lot of talking and meeting people and making sure you're keeping people happy but it's not a great deal of of written and so i found working in hospitality by style was at university and then even after university i found that industry suited me a lot because i was dealing with people i had to be able to talk and you know when you use a till so you don't have to read what is on all the buttons and way you're pushing you just have to know where they are on the on the tail and so i'd cod allocated that how cod and you know you know you could easily workout which buttons away without getting yourself confused because of the colors and the position so even today you know i find i find using a cable a lot easier than handwriting because i don't get the wrong later as often just because i'm simply on my way is on the cable so it's hard to get a big day mixed up because they're on their own different places on the keyboard whereas if i'm riding you know sometimes i'll i'll finish writing and it's only when i look back at it i'm telling you idiot what have you done you've got the wrong you've put the wrong letter there yeah so then how did you end up in government because you have to read a lot in yeah well well interestingly you know you know that that would be that would be the the thing that most people would think and to a certain extent that that is that is true but what i would say is you know off the reason i went into politics is out of frustration with the government running a small business listen i kept taxing me and regulating me and giving me these piper to fill out and eventually i just got sick of it and so while someone's going to go and tell them that you know this doesn't help papal run businesses so so that's what led me to government and a lot of that work is listening to people a lot of that work is is actioning and and trying to get solutions for people and as a local member you know your job is often often to help people nagai shy the bureaucracy and one part of your job is constituency a struggling in dealing with the the she a bureaucracy of government and trying to provide them help and so for me i find that easy because i can listen to what they're saying often i can empathize because i've been that go up against the bureaucracy not being able to follow her understand the rules and you know a lot of my working nights situation we'll be done by signing people just get on the phone and guys and they'll say can you email it to me and i'm like no i will do a TV and of you and let everybody know what i think if you don't fix it and and so so that sort of it has been i we've with the legislation i've got a pair of very good headphones and i'm a microphone there actually gaming hit finds with a microphone so you know i can dig tight and i do that a little bit you know computers getting better and better at listening and being i would prepare pair written what for that i also use a translation company where you know you put it you recorded on your fine send it off and coupla lighter and arrives back spelled correctly and punctuated and light out and then i can talk it through with stuff in the office to just make sure that there's not anything silly on in that translation license so the process and in terms of the rating a lot of knowledge acquisition for me is by having meetings and talking mm two people and also you know where i can use audio books online and you know oh my i then get to a situation where i do have a program that will you know just your apple stuff we'll just read it to you it's a little bit robotic but if i'm reading it often get supply at the same time so that you know the computer saying and and on following it helps me keep on track and then lastly is just quite literally i'll get the ruler out which sits right buddy edge my my desk you know all a lie down on the paper you know in in terms of delivering a speech in parliament when it's technical that's when i feel the my stress i we'll have a situation where i'll i'll either use a piece of paper and track down to pay jaw aw or i'll spread my fingers across on the line and also guy lawn at a time and you know we use a particular type feis in particular point size and particularly eh spicing and if i find myself getting lost i literally every single page i have prepared he's a completely new utopic side that if i get lost i literally you know either putting a piece of paper to my left and my right now i haven't covered it properly because i've just lost my way on a piece of pipe backout lighter and have another cracker why so many strategies in place it's amazing technical nickel skills that just blew me away i still can't get dragon spatial even dictating into my phone promptly say it's amazing yeah and they're all different things but when i deliver a speech handsaw to brilliant because they pick everything up and they can spell them punctuate and they i do everything so my my written speeches have never looked good as when hands out of taunted up for me but but i i often will do just a mind mind matt i have i have a software program but i do a lot of it just by hand and i just do a mind map sort of oh you know k. phrases in a bubble so i've got a ten minute speech on no my topic i'll have my sort of central topic in the middle and i'll run ten bubbles off it h with just maybe two or three words inside the bubble which is the prompt and that is them at all us to to speak from from and no yeah you know you'd like them the mind map and i bought a program to try and make it look a bit more professional because the poor people at parliament they have you got any notes speech and i sent him this pace of scribbling MS look at what has he done you know the literally the the the mind map for me where i just i just have a three wood central theme and then i nine o'clock right in front of you and you know i know that i've got to talk for one minute on each of these topics and now that's as the stressful ones for me when it's technical and and you're talking about you know clauses to a bill and you you've got to be very precise yukon you can't get these clauses wrong you know you can't you can't cite forty five oh i've instead of fifty four you know and that's you know you'll you'll say mina highlighted non-aligned outside a couple of times just the show that i get it right and so i find that the mice stressful talking off the cuff i find much more comfortable so when you're doing the ones with the numbers is at times as well because i've been going to parliament quite a bit now being watching people do this speech is so when the time does his wealthy that would be a lot of pressure i struggle doing public speaking normally.

"queensland" Discussed on Dear Dyslexic Podcast

Dear Dyslexic Podcast

13:37 min | 8 months ago

"queensland" Discussed on Dear Dyslexic Podcast

"I'm seri- excited about this interview today because for me it shows such courage resilience and greet trevor watts is the queensland show minister for police border patrol and corrections trevor announced in parliament that something more needed to be done to raise awareness and support for the many dyslexic australians his speech really moved me for the first time in australia adults with dyslexia from all walks of life a standing up and having the voices uses hood welcome to the show trevor it's great to be here firmness tripper we met you in time during national dyslexic awareness month way you talk to us about your dyslexia which she hadn't really spoken about in public very often what was lack let growing up you yeah i i grew up in england just east of london and in school school was you know i i had a lot of fun at go with us because i was fairly naughty you know the thing that sticks in my mind is the sort of you know ten spellings awake and the why what tomorrow's goal is whoever got the loudest in the class and those sort of thirty items in the class you you've got the privilege of going to the board and writing letters of how it should have been spelled as everybody else code them out for you which was very helpful except for you know you'd write a letter you know be as a d. or an evacuation or you know eventually you just didn't want to go out so often pretty much every week i was bottom of the class so so you know so i i i learnt to misbehave prior to the spelling tests so that was obviously you know i reflect back back on that now as a young child and that was a fairly obvious symptom that for whatever reason you know under-resourced lack of awareness as you know sort of forty forty how many years ago that he's you know no i slip through the cracks so i'm sort of traded education as apply applies to catch up with my mates where i could have some fun and you know i guess i never really imagined that i was stupid but i did try to avoid certain certain amounts of work particularly you know everything that was written and reading based i would avoid so whenever we were doing practical tasks otherwise really enthusiastic gastric because i wanted to do those and so did that was it the same kind of experience when you went through in secondary school what did you find the secondary school was a bit different the school i went to was streamed from one to fifteen so i distinctly remember the first time it really dawned on me was way rose strained for maths and we're all sitting in the in the assembly hole and they're calling nine times out to go to the class and i started at the top and side of cooled you know talk sort of thirty five or whatever it was out to guys that have set one for math says it was cold all disley wasn't listening inside anyway they've gone through the oh school and everybody's been cold out to their classes and i'm still sitting there and i've gone up and i said oh you know when you listening listening you know you're you're supposed to be gone to mrs brooms class which was a set one mass class and i sort of sit down i think that must be hygiene agenda another boy quote i want to my school i said no i think that must be another boy latin must be a mistake and they sort of insisted it wasn't and i win along and that was the first time i guess where i realized that potentially i'm not stupid i just have a on acquiring knowledge differently and so i i got into that mess class and and i found it really difficult because a lot of my work was not nate at all and mrs brown niger using pain and red lines and mock it all out and everything else and are used to get older the answers correct but i'd be my to do the work again and again and again until it was not smudged and it was night and tardy and it was to her liking say mrs brown really affected you easiest later you can still remember a name i remember it very clearly and and to be honest she she probably told me some really good quality bicyc- mass because i would be one of the first finish then i'd have to do it three times compared to everybody else i but a time we go through it i knew it and then it was the simon outside physics i did well i love metalwork i love pea you know avoided english like the apply but as we went on in in the tide i do co. JCS's and and so at at i five fifteen saudi couldn't be attain here you tight what i levels in JCS's and i i i had entered into a lot of JCS's that my teachers didn't seem force i meant i had to pay for them and because the the teachers said you chance of passage not horse we're not gonna do it so i ended in oriented in for these external exams at my mom's requests i and if you pass you then have to go and get a piece of pipe on by your teachers and you get refunded the money that you spent on the external exam and the one that i was really interesting directly to which was english language and and english literature and unmined which teacher was miss lucy who for whatever reason never dog knows me as dyslexic but she knew there was an issue and shields i knew i wasn't stupid so she for english literature we did the merchant of venice and i learned the merchant of venice by going to the ply about about four times and she got me out of the public library set of four old vinyl albums and i just listened to it i run over and over either and when i when i finished i passed the eleven JCS's levels which was more than most because i'd into the whole bunch of stuff off myself including language and english literature by the lowest grade you can get and still consider hospital the pass apostle was signed that's fine you know yeah one of the greatest things was was going and seeing her because she was happy for me but then i remember going from her to go and see my physics stage joe who even though i've done very willing physically he wouldn't enemy into the exam used on work and anyway long story short he had to sign off on on me i how did that make you feel that the teachers didn't want you to seek those example that family have to pay money for you to sit them because because i didn't believe you would pass like did that knock yourself confident so did it give you that determination to prove them wrong you know i was an angry child so it was grim in determination for me and in my family didn't pie i was working part time selling james at that point on the market and i paid knows the time into i was determined so you know middle work and technical drawing woodwork you know these are all the subjects that are taken as moy moi selections through high school 'cause obviously are tried to avoid anything record me to read or write a lot but i couldn't get out of singlish in english literature so day with the two most challenging whereas everything else i was doing was locked physics chemistry maths meta were technical drawing so you know that was all subjects where there was limited amount of rating to be done and limited amount of writing to be done it's amazing and especially sean that the chemistry physics max because that's still a lot of a lot of people struggle with math so it was good that you had that area that you felt strongly to gain carrying g e yeah well i mean it it was weird because i used to go as i said my school was strained so i was set one for mass for chemistry set lonzo ball aji remedial for english and before we got to our options i was reminded the bunch about subjects that world language based and so i had a a really diverse group of friends in big school from what would affectionately be known as the buffon's to affects what would be known as the troublemakers oh oh i scout backwards and forwards in a di between you know those classes so school you know i had i had a lot of fun at school but i look back now and think how much easier it would have been and how much of the english subject i could have learned if i'd been able to acquire the knowledge differently instead of having to read it oh sidewalk if if you said to me what's in them what's the prow nam dan what's the what's the what's and i i was not turned on to listen to that in class at all ever so even even today i would still struggle to sit down and give you a description of those things i think i only really learnt that when i did my speech pathology kohl's and we have to look at set a who sentence and then you had to ride which would made it a full sentence otherwise i would have been the same so how old were you then when you were diagnosed with dyslexia it was at after school yeah so so i left school young and i i worked in london for a couple of years and then i was on the whitest say my dad who was living in perth breath and i i stopped in hong kong i played basketball i've been there for a while and i had a job on the side for video production company and so i did that sort of four and a half years and what i learned from march on as friends was that education was really important and it was so highly valued by them and their families where a whole family was sacrificing everything for one of my friends to be able to go to hong kong university the city and that was the first time it really occurred to me that you know this is something that must be really important if if if you know like his brother his mum he's sister-in-law his dad working to pay for him to go to university then i need to understand a little bit more about this university thing i'm you know i'm guys on the world was thought he different and not as many people as a percentage went to university but that was what might be interested in the world of academia was much as friends and i was in hong kong or saudi you know this is sort of nineteen eighty seven around there and lots of people were up in show trying to recruit including key you you take so i sort of thought well starting citizen let's find out about this cute tell you so i applied from iva and was was accepted by them not coming through a normal practice all i had done some pop time study the in hong kong to get to a point where i could sit an exam with those guys and i i kind down to australia in i d- knowing and i sort of turned up on came postseason they told me i had to do this thing called and eloquence course before i could start university university and i was on yeah okay that's fun and i turned up and i didn't know what another course was but turns out what it was an english language intensive course for the c. students and so all right and the guy's looking at me strangely going so you'll first languages guages english right yep and he's like so what are you here for i'm not hold on is this is the place piper told me i gotta do three months of this before i can stop me university calls and that was when i said oh well that's interesting and he some questions and then he he got me to do some tests and we spike a little bit and that was when he turned around and said why didn't you just tell us should dyslexic you know and i'm not really know exactly what he's so you know there's no google at this point to look up these things when someone this is something you don't know about and and and so that was really the first time and a nice guy may some opportunity to do a bit of research myself through the university library as well as some pretty simple techniques and and at night time computers you know we take it all so so much for granted now but the program would st-.

"queensland" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"But if an essence of an in Queensland in you might have something that's closer to your home. But is there a favorite spot in Queensland that if there was a tourist coming from the United States or Europe that you would just recommend that's really special to you? In wise, it special. Hybrid scott. That's pretty actually my favorites. Was the jump up? I'm it's a bit of a disgra. We would west of. So Jim rough like you went through bit Moga country the top row and on a huge expansive on congratulated bull net and country. Law Mitchell grass grading it was absently make really had to just stop on top of the hill. And have a look at an camera. Just didn't give it Justice. They don't enough rhymes like the grass when they app for that thirty footy. I'd forty miles before hit one peci scrub and attend SAF. But Dan theory arrive the Cup of creeks in it and its in newest than win that would account at why. So as a huge expansive brass name, very few trees edits heavy has and I could wait had we had trace kitschy. And and you got in a very accessible spot is river the. It's just magic just it's patent Pasol of country. It's just beautiful in the territory, new of Victoria, and Queensland is is the is the nicest place of India. Okay. That was perfect perfect. Final question. And this is more for my own sake. Is why did you feel so comfortable calling me that bloody yank? I always had trouble with mines. I always connect someone to something. We've gotta go who is one of the senior public servants in. The secretary for like by some community budget committee, and he's a fairly fit. Looking Jackie does a bit of likely whatever liquid and the first meeting went to jail back, and you had gulled long be strucks insinuating that apply on allies funny penguins. What's the nine needle is macaroni penguin? And that's how I Christian that the macaroni penguin so new he was well, if you see the old gang say hi for me, and I will be in touch. But thank you so much, Peter like, I just good, Dave, yank blooded, bloody yank buddying. Take care. Okay. D- after's that is wrapped. I miss all this wonderful expressions. You almost need a translation book to understand. Some the words are saying I love listening to Peter Douglas, even when he's insulting me. It's such great stuff. Okay. So getting various sectors impacted by climate change to work together is not easy, and the interim model should serve as a case study on how to engage with rural audiences. He their experiences and learn from them just in detail note this episode has been many months in the making so in that time Andras dill. My first guest has moved on from interim Queensland, but his interview was obviously relevant to what's happening now, some final housekeeping don't forget.

Queensland Peter Douglas Europe Andras dill United States Jim rough secretary Dan Victoria Jackie India Dave
"queensland" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Sound business and environmental principles research thoughts is combined with out of the box beginning and yet it has a commitment to the economy the economy as well as the very much the environment, different wise. We'll could you describe some the environmental problems that you had to deal with even on a daily basis. You know, there's invasive species there's drought. What were the sort of the main ones that kept you busy? Well, I think one of the biggest subjects has as he could go when you're fat is when a will. Two point controlled by the winter once upon a time, wait just Hampton and pride. So the lack had a big Pat of it, which two point I guess lobbies depends if they've been lack of kiss he does on the other hand, I think we have they can much beta at managing historically managing absences with the approach to ensure that the Alan practices have adapted to comment China their ability as the wine varieties Aland, the why we are very conscious napping forever. Coast to feral animals out of the land out. Try to get from sorta things that just at the mind doing a series of terrific classified sing in western Queensland while those two on the dog too. So that can rub shape again. And also one of the things on stock was at the last few years is the vision of play Kaisha trays. I had a lot to with trying to as many as cool for the property. They just boom in good times as would seasons, and they continue to scrap take land than the cross as griped by our great Emory traduced actually grinding source which. Fool store in the it was about the Dane twenty trees something about of course, because I have supply protein have within system as well. As that guy this pardon? It's loving juicy. Unfortunately can become invasive. Scrubber will you've mentioned climate change on just curious. And I imagine that loan pub in Madeira is that something that you would talk about with other cattle ranchers, would you talk about climate change? Or would it just would you be focusing more on just the drought? You've always been dealing with drought. But do sense that more of the landowners are actually talking about climate change in the need to data it or or is it talked about like that? Well, I can get away from the fact that they are the pats at set eight this out of the will has become hot and. Strain. Now, we also believe I'm chill among people believe that the comet is changing all Tom and has been forever, which I guess it is so because of the change a ticket late eighteen up and that length of time now that we do have a very hot summer you guys along. Now what I'm trying to say as opposed to get a once upon a time. I think he is ado believe that people are addressing that Baisha won't to. None of us won't take that I think mice people in the up our pub at that. As well as lots of issues, particularly drought win, foes one-fourth. The they are meeting to the fact that the climate is trying will there's this whole notion of changing things are getting hotter. That this in some way is new and you hear about a lot of local governments and state governments really starting to focus on app tation how we're gonna dapper climate change. And is that sort of outreach or is the state or local governments working with landowners in in Queensland on these issues in you know, and I I guess they have to be sensitive to a lot of times, the landowners are listen, we're on the land. We know what's best. Is there a relatively good relationship? Let's a the desert channels. Do they come out in they talk about adept in are they telling you actually do anything different than you've ever done. The are is it new or is it doing the old things differently? I think that ladder. They stack up went in the environmental is very very focused on the guy. Statewide and financially. It's going that way. Because I Anna I say plan to too late. And I'm sure it's right. They Kara list..

pats Queensland Hampton Emory Aland Madeira Alan Anna China Tom Baisha
"queensland" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Assets in Sistan services that are important within the within sky Panetta and environmental management that dies three perspectives. Trae voices role respected battles. I contributing to the baseball cups. What if you could give me example that so the state of Queensland has their own expectations that they hope the interim bodies are reaching with adaptation plans. But are there some image? Just maybe just one example of just on the ground example of adaptation planning, I don't know if it's an indigenous population, or maybe tourism example, but here is some adaptation happening on the coast or something like that. Do you do have something that you could kind of explain probably the the clearest example is in tar strike way. The wep there has been. Really, very impressive. And we're seeing adaptation Iran this in in that particular plan, there are three outcomes which are clearly climate and at comes around increased of arise and extreme weather events. They're all size six resilience building. Abc comes CHAI, Iran, stronger communities around resources, helping actual systems around enterprise. Him in Wilbanks half. And so what you say they is at a Tyson around building conversation, but also addressing program with building some sales in some low-lying orlands because the tar stride ones, there's some sand cays and hall, but they're all sides cycled model, which are all in the math of of the river just in era between your Guinean in strata. So you start to say some unequivocal hide infrastructure to deal with state of arise in that particular case, it's primarily stone cycle Fairweather flooding. So it's flooding during that they are time periods of the year. So there's that so, but what you also say in stri is that we have really variable climate. So when you got the western areas that climate variability covers up the long the slow China Jing plummet reiging towards a warmer pundits. I've appear to decades. So what? Dealing with their passion processes, which provide greater resilience. But also the benefits of it on the really north winds in south west is plus defensing. So it's driven by ad.

Iran Sistan Panetta Wilbanks Queensland stri Abc
"queensland" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"To report because you know, kind of legalizing legalizing marijuana, they have t- reports on how how this is the share price of all these companies which is in a cannabis in lifted marijuana, Stokes, the company that coke is reported to be having talks with went up of fourteen percent. Another company went up six percent, green organic Dutchman. Apparently that's the company as well up six percent. So I think one, what the shows I mean, we don't know if this is gonna come to anything. We didn't know whether code is going to go ahead with this, but we know that they recently bought Costa coffee, a UK coffee company for four billion pounds. Almost it shows a that coke is trying to shift out of its traditional fizzy drinks market into into other markets and be that seems likely if cannabis's Neagh laws in in more places like seeing many states in the United States, we've seen Canada, for instance, what's what's going to happen is, is that going to be a big company is going to go into this. Market there will see previously was was a bit sort of molecule, and then this does suggest. And I think this is why why the interest in this the the that will be what's likely to happen because it could become a very big business because of course they were used to build those rumors about cocaine, various kind of drug based back in individual Victorian when it was originally, I think marketed as a sort of a tonic for your health. You know, this would be. I mean, the people look at kind of video or something that's to do with, you know, easing of physical pain and chronic pain. So that's what the the, the CBD the gnome so psychoactive positive of cannabis is is supposed to do. Let's go to Australia now and strawberries is a stroke as you probably don't wanna be each. Yes, this is yes, this is not so appetizing and it's a bizarre. Another bizarre story. This I think actually about sort of social behavior and how how, how people respond to new stories and things. So the headline in the guardian here I'm played for strawberry sabotage warning spreads to all six Australian states. Now. Now, this seems to be bizarre situation in Australia. When needles have been found in strawberries and with this is what the Queensland strawberry regrows association said. It started as a single active, what they're calling commercial terrorism and saying MRs, brutal multi-million dollar industry to its knees. So now in New Zealand who said that taking Australian strawberries off the shelves, consumers found needles in their strawberries, and there have been reports of people, you know biting into a strawberry and finding a sewing needle inside what they don't know is how this has happened in more than one place. You wouldn't think a strange. One thing. The seems to have happened all around Australia, but what they don't know what police in the government don't know is all people just hearing reports of needles in strawberries, and then starting to do the same thing which is just it was c- vocals, my mind that someone would hear a story like that and then think that that was something. That you might do. And there are reports in some of the fears. A copycat incidents increased yesterday after a sixty. Two year old woman was putting a needle into a banana in central Queensland is just is, is a really, really strange. I mean, you know, there is a slight suppose you start to worry. Is there a danger in reporting stories like this? Because I'm sure Monaco listeners a foam will sensible will not go and do silly things like this, but you just think how strange is it? The people would hear a story like that and then want to start coping. And the advice is a close chop before before you Trump. I thought that was a very good Australian phrase from the from the health officer telling people to cuss up. You'll strawberries I and make sure there's nothing g in them very quick canal at, is this a personality colts or what's going? Oh, I am a sucker for a political evener. I know that makes me incredibly keep that we all. So the Elysee macro has decided to have his own amongst other things. Michael. You can now.

cannabis Australia coke Queensland strawberry regrows marijuana Costa coffee Stokes United States cocaine UK Queensland Canada Monaco New Zealand Michael officer six percent four billion pounds fourteen percent million dollar
"queensland" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's crazy. I mean who would ever thought that we would finally get the answer is such a pressing question. I mean, how many years have you sat there new wonder to yourself which did come first the chicken or the news out this past week was all over the internet that a team of physicists from the university of Queensland Queensland, Dave actually shown quite sure this happened that the chicken and the egg can both come first they say that the answer lies in quantum physics caused in effect the indefinite casual order. That's what it's called the story. Did you? Well, I read the headline. Sure, sometimes that's enough. But what they're saying. He was that it was a mutation from two different species similar to chickens that happened in the league. And so they haven't at the same time the chicken mutation and the eg happened the exact same time. Wow. You know, what I'm impressed that you actually read the whole thing. That is amazing. Thank you. Dr babinski mad. Good work scientists. Now, you have to get to work on how much wood could a would Chuck Chuck if a woodchuck could Chuck wood how much would would that be? And you see, ladies and gentlemen, just an example of all the fun that we have here week after week as we talk about living the best digital lifestyle ever. It's the nation's largest weekend radio show. Now broadcast on over four hundred top stations from coast to coast, and you can catch us around the globe on armed forces radio. What that means is one hundred and seventy seven different countries. My favorite part every ship. At sea gets the Kim Komando show, truly your source for everything digital. And of course, I'm your beloved digital goddess Kim commando here with you once again. We all learn something. So far, you're on this Kim Komando show. The phone lines are open..

Kim Komando Chuck Chuck university of Queensland Queen Dave Dr babinski
"queensland" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Alexa, play twelve hundred w I on iheartradio. No, it's crazy. I mean who would ever thought that would finally get the answer is such a pressing question. I mean, how many years have you sat there wonder to yourself which did come first the chicken or the news out this past week? It was all over the internet that a team of physicists from the university of Queensland Queensland, Dave actually shown. The chicken and the egg can both come first they say that the answer lies in quantum physics cause and effect the indefinite casual order. That's what it's called. You read the story. Did you? Well, I read the headline. Sure, sometimes that's enough. But what they're saying. He was that it was a mutation from two different species similar to chickens that happened in the age. And so they haven't the same time the chicken mutation and the edge happened the exact same time. Wow. You know, what I'm impressed that you actually read the whole thing. That is amazing. Thank you. Dr babinski mad. Good work scientists. Now, you have to get to work on how much wood could a would Chuck Chuck if a woodchuck could Chuck wood how much would that be? And you see, ladies and gentlemen, just an example of all the fun that we have here week after week as we talk about living the best digital lifestyle ever. It's the nation's largest weekend radio show. Now broadcast on over four hundred top stations from coast to coast, and you can catch us around the globe on armed forces radio. That means is one hundred and seventy seven different countries. My favorite part every ship. At sea gets the Kim Komando show, truly your source for everything digital. And of course, I'm your beloved digital goddess Kim commando here with you once again. Ooh. We all learn something so far here on this came commando show. The phone lines are open..

Kim Komando Chuck Chuck Dave university of Queensland Queen Alexa Dr babinski twelve hundred w
"queensland" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Now, it's his crazy. I mean who would ever thought that we would finally get the answer is such a pressing question. I mean, how many years have you sat there and you've wonder to yourself which did come first the chicken or the news out this past week? It was all over the internet that a team of physicists from the university of Queensland Queensland, Dave actually shown. Has having chicken and the egg can both come first they say that the answer lies in quantum physics cause and effect the indefinite casual order. That's what it's called. You didn't read the story. Did you? Well, I read the headline. Sure, sometimes that's enough. But what they're saying is that it was a mutation from two different species similar to chickens that happened in the AIG. And so they haven't the same time the chicken mutation and the egg happened the exact same time. Wow. You know, what I'm impressed that you actually read the whole thing always. That is amazing. Thank you, Dr babinski. Matt good work scientists. Now, you have to get to work on how much wood could would Chuck Chuck if a woodchuck could Chuck wood how much would would that be? And you see, ladies and gentlemen, just an example of all the fun that we have here week after week as we talk about living the best digital lifestyle ever. If the nation's largest weekend radio show now broadcasts on over four hundred top stations from coast to coast, and you can catch us around the globe on armed forces radio. That means is one hundred and seventy seven different countries. My favorite part every ship. It sea gets the Kim Komando show truly your source for everything digital. And of course, I'm your beloved digital goddess Kim commando here with you once again. Well, we all learn something so far here on this Kim commando show. The phone lines are open..

Kim Komando Chuck Chuck university of Queensland Queen Dr babinski AIG Dave Matt
"queensland" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"Help with her mental problems at no point. Did I leaned warehouse have any chance whatsoever. Catherine night had three chances within the span of about two months. Okay. She was obviously a very ill person and she could have turned her life around had she taken an iota of responsibility for herself and her obviously dangerous behavior, but she never even tried and a lot of people suffered for it. Well, does she have fun with it or the knives talking door? We know friends with the axe. Was it a good time? She enjoying her life. I think she lived in a, I believe she. I lived the life of high stress broken apart by moments of drunken fun. Like they did have one thing said, eventually we'll find out that. I mean, David went back to her after all this like he again, and he kept going back and there was one time that they all remember the one real happy memory. They have of her was David through her surprise, twenty first birthday party, and she was off the alike. I prince ace, oh, now wins. Have I done this from befall and she was like, they were like, he was just kissing himself, but this was after she sent him to the emergency room by cracking his skull open. Sure it has this so that this dork back to words a bunch of people walking on shells are on this one person, which is how a narcissist this this person keeps control over everyone basically holding them hostage. Yeah, I'm really surprised. He had the courage to throw her a surprise party doesn't seem like someone I would like to see shocked or like unaware of what's about to happen. The, she could've just killed everyone and then maybe you then that would have been the best birthday of her life? Yes. So after Kath was released, the second time she decided it was time to make the whole town pay for her misfortune. So see Catherine thought that she didn't really have to worry about Dave Kelly leaving. And that's what precipitated this entire thing was Dave Kelly leaving her the reason why she thought that was because Dave Celts truck had broken down, oh, he's like, well, if he goes anywhere, he's just going to go somewhere in Aberdeen, but his truck I fix he went to Queensland net is because it was fixed by Hoppy. Oh, the towns. One legged McCann. We'll tell you just locally all got to all be the town's won't leg. It one handed McKittrick. Very good old it because owners eight, I just wish that somebody anybody would let me quit being a Mickey, I guess that's so they call him Hoppy because he has one. They're funny. Yes, they, they've got the, the Australians are quite humorous folk. Oh, right. And thing is, is that okay? Hoppy, it fixed the truck. Okay. But the town had produced the girl that David had run away with. So they were on the hook for everything. I see all the towns fault. The David had left, so it was the town that was going to pay. Katherine have been staying at her parents house since her last stint at the hospital. So she left early one morning with her infant daughter in tow, and went back to her place together. Some things after gathering up a check, a knife with a big, curved blade, a pair of scissors and some bandages, Catherine went down the street to the house of a teenager she worked with at the slaughterhouse named Margaret MacBeth. Margaret's mother opened the door cast holder. My baby is sick, and I need a right to the doctor. So the mother gathered up all her kids got in the car and drove down the so what a pain in the ass. I mean, honestly, it's so nice that they help, but it's just like, because you can imagine her shown up with a bundle that I can't imagine. Does it look like it's not filled with knives the baby on a half, spin up baby sick. Go, go host spittle. Yeah, and she's just like, I Pim one payment. To knife e one ninety two to a town name. Van, they found her on the corner of her house dressed in her standard, purple top in jeans combo..

David Hoppy Catherine Dave Kelly Katherine Margaret MacBeth Kath Aberdeen Dave Celts McCann Van Queensland Mickey two months
"queensland" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on The Science Show

"A work actually so we've collected information on the genome of tens of thousands of individuals recorded lots of traits that we want to approve it's not just growth that we're interested in we're interested in things like the coupe kala the towel proportions that we can breed preowneds which have more mate let's say that are resistant to important diseases that we have so this is where equa culture needs to invest where the twenty years old is an industry you mentioned disease twice of course and we're worried about the white spot which exists down for the south in queensland has it reached here in the north watched about is really serious for australia and we need to take it seriously because i've assays it really is the big disease that has wiped out billions of dollars of production and particularly when it first hits attends his kill nine point nine percent of all farmed prawns fortunately at the moment i we have got what spot now in stryer at sames it's awesome to dan in south queensland and we really need to wear tied to tape it away from north queensland we must've farming actually occurs what is it actually a fungus djerma what it's a virus signs a flu virus it circulates in prawns and particularly when pronouns will eight h uva that can be transmitted very easily how did they get in that frozen stuff that comes in from thailand and elsewhere that is one hypotheses that out there is that it has coming for imported product which hasn't been cooked what sports very prevalent throughout asia and latin america stri was one of the last countries that was what spot free until i hit last year so we don't know where it came from but it's pretty likely on imported product now i think he was saying that some people find that the prunes are so cheap the ones that are imported for humans that cheaper infecting the bait that they could get an so they buy the stuff that comes in frozen.

white spot queensland stryer south queensland thailand asia australia nine percent twenty years
"queensland" Discussed on Podcasts – Working Cows Podcast

Podcasts – Working Cows Podcast

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on Podcasts – Working Cows Podcast

"Some veteran generation shape in cattle producer from south west queensland and have been the same long time out there in that dynamical ranch as we call them properties stations that properties been run bummer family eldest brother my parents went to devoting school in twitter in southeast queensland and enough to that after working around for could have been money went to union foyer exxon's degree at gotten university of queensland after which full enough of the auctions in that way to go what to do to could've gone into the banking sector marketing at avila decided oh still young enough is enough to go and were appropriate up in no quays land what attracted me to that property was that i didn't understand what they did if not grown up with property in just on this exxon's degree the what did didn't quote understand that italy strange things up the dessau dessau designed to got there and that's what i'm getting to just to see was requirement and so i ask finish is up with that property sydney nyc appropriateness simlisafe's to what grownup that hundred from town under columbus sydney malls from town which is similar to what to grow up with this well and then the similarity stopped on grand cattle but that's out of that why i approach business in the price county was was very different to the what i'd grown up with the us pretty taints varying steijn tainted he'll talking troch rising in that system we had on that property we had one hundred ninety and we ran from three and a half to seven thousand cattle just depending on the season the land skype up they said australia as with with the sites is a huge variation in landscapes to graffiti environmental conditions timing of seasons xetra this executive signed.

producer southeast queensland exxon avila dessau dessau us executive university of queensland italy sydney australia
"queensland" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on Risky Business

"Touched for the last 10 years or stop that seem like a a language that is esoteric will or whatever like the the regression that needs to happen before that vulnerability can be remediate it it's not necessarily because the company's batted security it's because it's a really complex issue that's buried really deepen their code these are in that sort of circumstance it's perfectly in my mind acceptable for them to figure out how to put a bandaid on the front of it while the getting dump yeah like words like a cascading failure come to mind riot like eight south fixing fixing about deep deep in the code you know it's like the butterfly flapping it's weaned at wings in new york leading to a hurricane in sorry leading to ice cyclone in queensland especially if it's kobo right yes i healy you start talking about stuff like that in this gets really complicated relief off so by people time helped him reduce the risk helped them do it properly yet that tomase is a pretty cool option so let me ask you casey i would last year i want you to compare because we we are trying to make the case here the bug danny's and now a mainstream pot of the of the information security product mix i k we're trying to make this case that it's an established mature disciplined that's not going anywhere and we'll just sort of be refined and not maybe there'll be no pivots it's an establish thing so i want you to tell me if you can wear bug crowd is today verses where it was a year ago i mean what can you tell me in terms of growth whether that's numbers of customers or revenue or whether that's types of businesses or types of programmes what can you tell me that supports this idea that thug down he's a now mature offering yes.

new york queensland danny kobo casey 10 years
"queensland" Discussed on The Good Life: Andrew Leigh in Conversation

The Good Life: Andrew Leigh in Conversation

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"queensland" Discussed on The Good Life: Andrew Leigh in Conversation

"We played a tournament queensland i think we will go in bus kedo's didn't think anything office applied terribly in the grand final couldn't lift my legs couldn't up off the ground either something really wrong somehow will likely go flat go back to canberra woke up the next morning and i couldn't merge and i was just a her member distinctly being invade could move moms couldn't move my legs completely freaking out panicking but but just had to lay there for a few hours was no one around um eventually auspices be somewhere and i think someone came in kind of got into the house family and i still was unable to move a conical rushed to hospital and the data hollow tests i thought it was viral meningitis because my temperature was through the roof my joints rule swollen my whole body had come completely swollen um and i'd actually probably took a few days to really work out what was but essentially my immune system it just become completely overrun i have roster of a fever um which was kind of during one of the the severe um breakouts in queensland when that have happened and essentially and found that i just had a whole lot of viral by still mrs mic said glandular fever turned into cranks teague the ross reveal us automatic the virus a whole range of viruses which essentially my immune system it just collapse my digestion an adjusted digestive tract and system was was completely inflamed and pretty ruin to that point and i think the thing that was a very key moment for me one all those kinda completely learn in that moment bought on their thinking of copy seek of could hit peak peaks i can i was trying to mouth that to the to the doctor and the doctor outta be ridiculous you never play sport again and walked out and that was that his cut of that moment of what what are you either and i really am very clearly remember thinking well if i can't play sport but that's the whole all go to the olympics is the whole purpose of con of 25 years of my life.

canberra viral meningitis immune system queensland glandular fever ross olympics the house fever mrs mic 25 years