5 Burst results for "Queen Mary University Of London"

"queen mary university london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"queen mary university london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The sport that's all coming up here on Tuesday. Yes, Let's start here in the UK and the front pages of today's newspapers. I'll just read you some of the headlines this morning from page off. The Daily Telegraph. Stay at home to be scrapped as prime minister unveils route to normality forceps to freedom that is on the front page of the London metro newspaper. The Guardian. Has a similar headline, and The Times Prime minister sets out for tests for the end off lockdown. So that is what he's going to be announcing later today is a heavily trailed speech charting a road map out of lockdown here in the U. K. And ahead of that. Let's think about the different ways it could be done their strengths and their weaknesses. Joining me is their Deepti Could Sonny AH, clinical epidemiologist at the William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University. London. Well, sorry, London. Welcome to news day from what you're reading so far. What do you make off what Prime Minister Boris Johnson's going to say later today about coming out of lockdown. Um, sort of me a lot of the rhetoric about doing this cautiously, which has been sort of stated by you know, our CMO and sage doesn't seem to be reflected in what we're seeing in terms of what's happening. I mean, it does appear, for example, that schools are fully going to open on the eve of March on so far, there doesn't seem to be sustainable Plan for school opening with any additional mitigate three measures. Scientific advisers have warned that this would almost immediately to a surgeon cases and exponential rise is resuming. Um And you know the idea that we can get back to normality soon, Just because about 20% of the population has been vaccinated isn't really grounded in evidence. And I'm quite surprised to see that we seem to be sort of doomed to making the same mistakes again and again. This is exactly the same mistake we made when easing up the last two lakh tones, and it led us into well straight into other lockdowns with he was devastation to society and economy and not to mention the more than 100,000 deaths that we've already had. What is it? Is he not listening to that in your opinion? S so I think the strategies one of short termism there seems to be this idea that we need to balance the economic growth with, you know, controlling covert, and what they never seem to have understood is that those two things are inextricably linked unless you get on top of Corbett. You know, any strategy that you use in terms of early opening will again lead to long term restrictions, which will have hugely devastating impact on the economy. So if you want to protect the economy, society health care on education, the answer to all that is getting on top of covert and to get on top of coverage. You just need to wait a little bit longer before easing those restrictions, because if you ease restrictions early what you do a squander All the games that you've had in the last months, which you know, people have made huge sacrifices to bring us to the point. We are now on to squander that with early the opening would be completely negligent. So for for example, on schools, they say This is phase one from the eighth of March. All schools expected open without door after school. Sports and activities allowed. Recreation in public space, such as parks would be allowed as well between two people meaning they could now sit down for coffee, a drink or a picnic on schools. There, you think Just stage it because we know in Scotland and Wales, for example, and in Northern Ireland. They're having a staged re opening rather than everything opening on the same day with that be a better approach in your opinion. Think staging is important, but it's not sufficient. So I think we need staging, and we need mitigation measures and schools that have not been there before. We've been here in November international lockdown when schools were open, and it's very clear that cases was still rising in areas where the new variant was dominant. And now we have a new wedding that's dominant across the UK. There's absolutely no reason to think that we can open schools in the same way as they were open before. Without seeing those surges in cases. Okay, So what did the Medicaid tree measures will? What needs to changing in your view? So I think we need to get in line with you. No evidence and aerosol transmission CDC recommendations. So that means use of maths and primaries on secondaries, as is being carried out in many European countries and in Southeast Asia, we need much more gentle ventilation than just opening up windows. We need air filtration purification devices. Carbon dioxide monitors. We need a captain bubble sizes. The department for Education currently has no cap and many schools have bubbles up to 300 peoples. We need smaller class sizes. We have one of the largest class sizes in Europe on this requires much more investment into schools on teaching stuff. We need larger spaces use of empty spaces so Children can distance where they have to, and we can have these sort of smaller class sizes in different parts of the school. And so if this the announcement is made, and it's been heavily lead in the way that we think it is going to be made, is it your opinion that we will end up back where we started, even though vaccinations are going well in the U. K. Yes, Absolutely. So we need to remember that vaccinations protect people who have been vaccinated. And right now we have about 20% of the population vaccinated with a single doors If the virus is allowed to spread now that would still lead to many more cases, Many more hospitalizations. The majority of people I see are actually under 70 on sadly many more deaths. On. But it would also allow for tile field for virus adaptation to continue particularly the varying radiance of concern that we're seeing that are, thankfully, not dominant in the UK right now that we think potentially might refuse. Reduce vaccine if efficacy It's very important that we actually control transmission alongside vaccine rollout. Listen, it's good to talk to you as ever. Thank you for your time. Here on you say BBC World Service. Deepti could Sonny, a clinical epidemiologist at the William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London..

Scotland Europe Northern Ireland Southeast Asia Tuesday November William Harvey Research Instit Wales UK Corbett BBC World Service Queen Mary University two people London today Prime Minister Queen Mary University of Londo more than 100,000 deaths U. K. eve of March
"queen mary university london" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"queen mary university london" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Martin Archer is a planetary physicist from Queen Mary university London who's been looking into a forty five year old theory about the earth's largest drum what we found is some of those ripples, which will head towards the northern seven polls. We'll get reflected back and you'll end up getting a pattern called standing waves. It's very much like how you get patents on the surface of a drum which gives them than notes. Suffice. What we found about the magnetosphere in this particular study a standing wave is a wave that looks like it standing still like ATar string. Or in this case drum the way that we drew this picture together was by using five different satellites from Nasr's famous mission that happened to be in the right place at the right time and essentially allowed us to see the thing the smack Nita sphere. See them boundary move in response and hear the sounds within magnetic environment that will caused by it. So it was piecing together. Those ob- survey. Nations allowed us to finally make this discovery. But since particles from the sun are always hitting the earth. How do you isolate one single solar slam? It's a complicated problem being able to show direct causality from one thing to another often because you've got lots of things happening at the same time all at once lots of different prices that can lead to something quite complicated. So that's why we picked a very specific sort of impulse. It was a very strong jet of plasma hitting into our magnetosphere with nothing really very much either side of it happening. So that means we could be very clear about the it was definitely this not something else going on that was that was causing the effects that we saw understanding this. It isn't just pie in the skies of the consequences of this a things that we still need to do a bit more work into. But we certainly know these standing waves do penetrate with into magnetism quite deeply and our source of ultra low frequency ways. So when these streams from the sun, hit, the my needles fear, they 'cause all the charge particles there to wiggle which creates these waves in the Magna's fear itself. And these help create Oltra low frequency waves, which may have profound effects on our technology. They can excel electrons in the radiation belts up to energies that can damage satellites, for instance, and their ideas as well that these ways might affect the Aurora, and they can actually hit the top of the atmosphere. So there's lots of different ways in which could have consequences, mainly on our technology. But as I say because we've only just discovered these in the odds of Asians. Now, we've got a long road ahead of us to defer the research into really understanding, the actual implications. So watch this space that was Martin Archer and the work has just been published in nature communications now back down here on earth and into the ocean. Facts small particles of plastic micro-plastics Nanno plastics being formed when larger bits of plastic rubbish are breaking apart the moment, we don't know what the consequences of this going to be but one outcome that scientists have now documented is sticky polymers. Produced by microorganisms can glue these small plastic particles back together. So they formed bigger agglomerations that other species mistake for food Marianna compa spoke to Tony Gutierrez who's been studying the offense app. Heavy at what university in Edinburgh..

Martin Archer Queen Mary university London physicist Nasr Marianna compa Edinburgh Tony Gutierrez forty five year
"queen mary university london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"queen mary university london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Behrman of Queen Mary university London and professor Faye darker of Imperial College loan than to create a video installation time tries all things earlier Monaco stone ho headed down to the gallery. The institute of physics to speak to grace and learn a bit more. But first, here's a short excerpt of the new work. You'll history accumulates more past events. So you're different now than you were half an hour ago because more has happened. We experienced time passing. And it's probably the most basic aspect of our perception, this temporarity of our experience speed of light is not really about something moving. His almost the opposite. It's about how the causal structure space changes from future and past. My mother said Pani when I was seven I nine times only happy when I was drawing. So as always going to be an artist my father was an artist. I was always drawing was always going to be an artist, but physics and maths for my two other favorite subjects at school. And the great divide happens. It happens to everybody. And I think that that's sort of shame to a certain extent. I think it took me a long time to come back to my interest in physics and that came about from making films times intrinsic filmmaking. So the more I worked in film and photography and those mediums which incorporate time the more I wanted to understand time better. That's what led me back to his first to ask them about the nature time to understand it. I think I'm kind of interested in the elementary. I'm interested in the kind of for me. It's how do I begin to talk about really anything without understanding the medium in which I am working? So even if that's time and space the time space in language. So I'm all the time going back to the elementary if you will on to try and invest. Gate before it of go forward. I wanted to actually talk about the timing of the piece itself is thirty minutes long. There's poses in there, which I can't imagine accidental. And I just wonder whether you aware of making the viewer think about time passing itself as the film progresses. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, what interests me about film is that the way it maps the kind of past never recorded event onto the presence of Ewing. And that kind of mapping of one time to another time that really interests me by film. That's why like film, I think about film is kind of sculpting in time which Tarkovsky described it as and I do think phone is it's like carving here carving as a kind of space time continuum for people to view. I mean, it was serendipitous that it was half an hour long, particularly because Fe actually at the end of her piece says you're different now than you were half an hour ago because Moore's happened, but that was actually just stroke of luck. I asked the editor the what how long has it. I didn't know it was twenty five minutes or thirty six minutes. And it was thirty minutes. Physics itself. It can be a little bit abstract. What's a really simple idea that can make the everyday listener rethink their sense of time a little bit since time is like a river. Sometimes it's Berlet and slow sometimes it's narrow and fast rivulets can break off from from it and reconnect by which allows for concepts of time travel. I think I was like that one here at the institute of physics the gallery at the institute of physics, which is probably two words that people would not throw together immediately. When thinking of physics, tell us about the space ruin for a second while I think the institutes were interested in bringing other disciplines to come into dialogue with the feel of physics. So there were moving to this new building and they deliberately kept this huge space to be a gallery for different events and shows and performances in different things take place. So I think it was to do public engagement. I think the public are very interested in ideas of physics, and it was to kind of allow for that. And the work that you've got in the gallery. Space time tries all things took us through that title. What you alluding to with that work, and we'll title comes from a proverb, which says time, try the trough. And it was a problem that I found written on a stone plaque Quemoy university..

institute of physics Faye darker Imperial College Behrman Queen Mary university London Quemoy university Pani professor Ewing Tarkovsky Moore editor thirty minutes twenty five minutes thirty six minutes
"queen mary university london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"queen mary university london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the company's pricing policy and scientists have developed a new method to grow mineralized materials which could regenerate heart issues such as dental enamel and bone dental enamel cannot naturally repair itself once lost meeting half the world's population with tooth decay and pain researchers at queen mary university london created a protein mix the minerals from the saliva and encourage them to crystallize forming substance similar to enamel escaped to the netherlands now where fishermen are planning an unusual former protest against the government's plans to build further wind turbines in the north sea boats canal and bags of fish bbc's anna hogan has more an armada of fishing vessels will be talking just behind amsterdam central station the fishermen will then march to one of the nearest city centre canals and dump bags of fish which considered too small to be sold under eu rules and does them in red dye this is designed as a metaphor to graphically illustrates their claims that the dutch government is killing their livelihood with wind turbines eight new wind farms have been granted planning permission and the fishermen say that by twenty twenty five twenty five percent of the netherlands fishing waters will be occupied by these imposing structures which they say damage fish stocks the dutch government's increased demand for wind power is partly being driven by an effort to try to compensate for the loss of gas after it was recently forced to reduce drilling around the dutch city of honing in because it was causing people's homes to crumble the fishermen are also frustrated with the eu and it's landing obligation which means they have to count undersized fish part of their quotas even though they can't sell them an even if the ministers aren't watching today dumping bagfuls of bloody looking fish into a canal in front of hundreds of tourists just before lunchtime is bone to call some stir anna hogan the football world cup gets underway in russia in less than two weeks fans are getting ready to cheer on their nation and where it's colors to in fact there was so much excitement about nigeria's world cup kit but it sold out almost as soon as it was put on sale on friday these nigerian fans were queuing outside a sportswear store in central london.

the netherlands anna hogan dutch government eu russia nigeria london queen mary university london amsterdam football twenty twenty five twenty five two weeks
"queen mary university london" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"queen mary university london" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Greatest health threat of our time aides was a terrible killer but scientists found ever more clever ways of dealing with it and now with the right medication it's under control so it may seem strange that researchers at two leading london universities are arguing the gpus should be giving more hiv tests so they're patient chris griffey's is professor of primary care at the blizzard in through the queen mary's university london good morning to you good morning it it seems a bit paradoxical watched the benefit of doing extra gpus given they're pretty busy any way doing this extra screening well to be clear the it wasn't a jeep pays that would during the testing we trained and supported in a large ran the voice trial the healthcare assistance in practice nurses to actually offer patients registering in general practices an hiv test and people found that highly acceptable we got a big uptake of sir of testing said the benefit we found in the trial that we did was that we found that gp praxis sir increase the number of people diagnosed with hiv we found a a fourfold increase in the rights of diagnosis but more the not just stop for a second a fourfold increase yes yes the jay peace dog deeply praxis diagnosed serb a relatively small number of new cases of hiv but this boosted the rate of diagnosis in in the praxis that took part in a trial and all of those people then have to be given presumably the right medication at all and all the rest of it so costs are going to go up which is fine if lives are being saved but i wasn't aware people were aren't what what where the theme incidence of hiv is increasing rather than falling well it is an immense in some areas the incidences in its falling the un aid serve releaser reports serb in june and showed that in eastern europe for example the ah the rate of new cases has gone up sixty percent in the last in the last year so the uk is is is good proving but sir hov it certainly know under under control right and your argument is that if they are screened and if they get their medication quickly enough then it's going to stop it turning into something much more troublesome yes i want obviously a first summons infected with hiv but.

professor europe uk chris griffey queen mary's university hiv un sixty percent