35 Burst results for "QNA"

Body-Image Healing and Body Grief with Brianna Campos

Food Psych

05:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Body-Image Healing and Body Grief with Brianna Campos

"Premiere. I'm your host, Christie Harrison and today I'm talking with Brianna campus a fat positive health at every size therapist and body image coach and a lovely human to kick off this eighth year of the podcast we talked about how to improve body image and fight internalized weight stigma, her concept of body grief how body image is connected to what's going on in the world around you and so much more. I can't wait to share a conversation with you in just a moment but first it's time for ask food psych our listener QNA segment. This week I have an amazing answer for you from a fabulous co host and friend of the pod Sofala trip. Shinsegi Sofala shared her story in episode one ninety one. So if you haven't heard that interview already, I highly recommend checking it out. She's a bad ass writer teacher and Social Justice Attorney with a book coming out next year and I just love her and before I plays of all his answer, I'll just give our standard disclaimer that these answers and this podcast in general are for informational and educational purposes only aren't to substitute for individual medical or mental health advice and don't constitute a provider patient relationship. This, question is from a listener named Amy who writes, Hi, I'm a forty two year old married mother of five kids when I was younger, I struggled with an eating disorder and while I have mostly recovered still struggle at times intuitive eating was literally life changing for me and has helped so much in my recovery. However, I'm confused about how to implement some of the strategies with a large family I know that for my own recovery A. Big Part of rejecting diet culture was making certain trigger food's always available. So those foods did not bring feelings of restriction and then subsequent disordered eating behavior. However, I'm noticing that within my own family when we do have special food such as those found during holidays or parties in the house, the entire family seems to have the scarcity mindset and consume those foods at a higher rate simply because they're thinking better, eat it now before it's gone. which is totally true with so many people in our household special foods do not last long at all I really want to help my children avoid disordered eating, but it is simply not practical nor within our budget to keep those more desirable food's always available our family is well fed and there's always plenty to eat in the house. But when special occasions arise, we have special foods I feel like the better eat it now before it's gone. Slash. Scarcity mindset starts to kick in what do you suggest? How can I help my family avoid scarcity mindset with special foods when just by virtue of budgetary limits and the number of people living in our house, those special foods are more scarce. Thank you. So would love to hear your thoughts on that questions of a while. I love this question I relate to it and the listener who wrote it so much I too am a mom. I only have one kid not five. So we're on different both in that way but. I too am a mom and have a background as the listener says the eating disorder in her case. I always say disordered eating in mine because I never had a diagnosis even though the whole concept of how these things diagnosed can be problematic since I never had one I just had a disordered eating background and a part of my recovery that was incredibly important like a listener our rights is. A making the quote unquote I'm forbidden foods available and trying to make them just a normal low key part of how food flows through my life. So that I. Don't set myself up for the kind of restriction. Cycle, and also because I, I really enjoy food and so part of you know my recovery was just wasn't is about making these foods that I love and sort of limited just available so that I can enjoy them rate just for the sake of the pleasure Sell released a question on so many levels and first and foremost. I think I approach it as a mom and as a former kid. Dieter. We don't know when this person started their eating disorder they're dieting but I started when I was very, very young and so as a mom as now a five-year-old's. One of my main goals really in life as a mom is to raise a child who trust her appetite. Could trust her behavior around food and who can eat without a lot of drama and a lot of sort of negative emotional stuff happening at the same time. So I think that's a goal that this mom shares I think that's kind of underlying the question is. How do I help my family? Have a relationship with food that is pleasurable and? Not marked by a ton of drama, you know given her back nick event is the reality of of their budget and. You Know How put food on the table.

Shinsegi Sofala Christie Harrison Brianna AMY Sell Dieter
Praying for your Clients

The Plant Path

05:46 min | Last month

Praying for your Clients

"Hey there everybody say Jay here founder of school have luminary herbalism and in this week's. I got a really a really great question from a student that I thought would be really great to share with the greater evolutionary herbalism community and And the question this week was about a kind of integrating more of a spiritual approach to your work with clients specifically in regards to praying with an for your clients and you know this isn't something that I really talk that much about. But I when I think about him I go. This is actually a really critically important part of my own personal work that I do with clients but I think there's a way to approach doing this with people in a way that is authentic in a way that is. Doesn't make people feel uncomfortable in a way that really is honoring and uplifting and encouraging and supportive for the person that you're working with and and I know that this is something that maybe a lot of you would really be interested in incorporating into your work with clients, maybe not just handing out herbs and just keeping it that way. But you know maybe wanting to incorporate a little bit more of that spiritual side into your work with people and I really feel that simply praying for people is a really great way to do that and so that was the question that I answered this week in. Our student QNA session and I just I just thought that maybe it would something that a lot of other people were interested in. It's not something I talk about that. Much. So I, thought it would serve you well. So so I hope you enjoy this discussion here on integrating prayer into your work as an herbalist I am super grateful for this comprehensive and straightforward guidance on intake, which can be so daunting. Otherwise I would love to hear about the prayer that you say with clients in the beginning I have been feeling called to do the same, but it would really be helpful to have a sample. Yeah Great Question Donna. Yes. So this has been any. Aspect of my work with people over the years. I. You know I think it's really about following your sense of the person. You know especially when you're just starting to work with someone, one of the things that I think is one of the most important aspects of starting a new. Client relationship is building and developing trust. Right, you want your client to trust you. You want them to feel comfortable with you you want them to. Up like you and enjoy your presidents and because if they don't like you, they don't trust you if they don't feel like comfortable with you. They aren't going to open up as deeply as they would otherwise. So one of the it's kind of one of the. I guess maybe one of the invisible things that were working towards as practitioners is. Is Developing that trust with the client and that's done a number of ways. Through, ideally getting results helping them. Just. Being kind and friendly and compassionate with them. Really listening to them. Really listening to them. And, and just following what their needs are. Now, one way that that trust can be really negatively affected is by making them feel uncomfortable and if you are you know if someone comes to you for very first session, they don't know you. They don't really know your work they don't really maybe they don't know much about herbs or herbalism. Maybe they're coming to you with their own particular belief system or religion or way of seeing the world, and if you just shake their hand and jumped right into. You know maybe praying in your own unique way of praying that could very well, really make someone feel uncomfortable. It could might really turn them off maybe it's. Maybe. It's not in accordance with their spiritual or religious beliefs, and that is just it's going to immediately kind of kill the vibe. So I actually don't do that anymore because I learned from experience the hard way. Unless you know unless you already know the person and you know that there's A congruency there I think it's really good to kind of wait on that a little bit and I think to me I think it's really good to go through the intake process. So you really know what's going on for that person, right? It's hard to say a prayer for someone if you don't know what to pray about right if you don't know what their struggle is if you don't know what their life is like and to me, that's what the whole process of doing the intake and the conversation and the the interview. Is All about right is that you're having a conversation Co creative exploration with this person about their life,

JAY Founder Donna
Herbal Antibiotics and Gut Flora

The Plant Path

06:00 min | 2 months ago

Herbal Antibiotics and Gut Flora

"Hey everybody say John Popham. Here founded the school of Evolutionary herbalism, and it's QNA day today and. This week's question that I wanted to share with you all is. Is a very interesting question that comes up from time to time in regards to weather and herb can actually work like an antibiotic and possible benefits and possible risks. and terms of using herbs to treat pathogenic infections, and I think this is pretty relevant topic these days as we are in the midst of the whole Covid, nineteen situation and I'm seeing more and more people reaching out. To plants as ways of strengthening your immune system and wanting to look at antiviral antibacterial herbs, and how to protect themselves and their family. But as most of US know. Standard, antibiotics can have pretty detrimental effects on the body specifically in regards to the Gut Flora so in this week's Cuna. We're GONNA be talking about antiseptic antimicrobial plants, and they're kind of weighing their benefits and risks, and also kind of a what I think is a really excellent discussion in terms of the difference between how an herbal medicine works in the human organism in contrast to how a lot of pharmaceutical medications, specifically antibiotics work in the human organism. So I hope you enjoy the question answer for this week I question number one here is. Coming to us from Sharing Lemay and Materia Medica monthly. And Sharon his asking since Lemay kills off micro-organisms, is there a danger? It will destroy our gut flora the same way an antibiotic would especially if we drink it as a tea. Does using the tincture, keep it in the respiratory system, so it never gets down into the gut in any meaningful strength, so when used for a cold slash flu situation, the Gut Flora are not impacted, although since also affects the urinary tract. It seems its powers. Go throughout the body, so I'm just wondering if we are nuking. Gut Flora with Lemay mation great question Sharon. This is actually. This question brings up some really interesting dynamics. I think in the way that we think about how an herbal medicine works in contrast to how drugs work right. So this is a question that I actually quite a bit not just around lamasion, but around other herbs to especially see this one a lot with a lot of the. In containing plants. High drastic candidate insists golden seal. Mahoney Aquaphor Liam. Grape a cop, this or gold thread. Really any plant that you look it up in your book and you see. Anti Microbial. Antibacterial Oh. Is this going to adversely affect the Gut Flora? Generally speaking, I think the best answer to that question is for the most no. Obviously I don't really know if there's been a whole lot of scientific research where they measured someone's Gut, Flora. And then they took you know some of these whole plants. Or tinctures teas of these plants, and then measured it again and found that they were adversely affected. I'm not sure if that exists but from a clinical perspective. Through utilizing these remedies, we don't really see any of the. After effects that are pretty common. From as Sharon said, nuking the Gut Flora with an antibiotic right, which be off. Fatigue or post antibiotic use. Digestive imbalances. It's really common these days for. People to have digestive symptoms, digestive issues, and when we really do some digging in to the case and figure out we'll. When did it start a lot of times? You can trace it back to a time when that person was put on around of antibiotics, so it's really common. I've used a lot of verbs that are typically considered anti microbial antibacterial herbs and haven't seen anything that would indicate that it's adversely affecting the gut flora, and especially in the case with limitation. This is not something that I've seen. One study that was done. On a burberry isolate right so this would be isolated. An isolated alkaloid right Bergreen the. Famous alkaloid that we find in Goldenseal and Oregon grape grapefruit that has been demonstrated to have very strong antibacterial property. burberry isolate was administered to people in doses. I would say higher than you're going to probably be able to get from taking capsules or drinking, tea, or taking a tincture and. There was no. Signs of any type of Gut Flora imbalance, and that was actually a study that was done where they measured the Gut Flora, and after a period of time of administering pure burberry alkaloids, they did not see adversely affecting the gut flora

Gut Flora Sharon His Lemay School Of Evolutionary Herbali John Popham Mahoney Aquaphor Liam Materia Medica Lamasion Oregon
Cory Schlesinger On Isometric Training

Just Fly Performance Podcast

05:30 min | 2 months ago

Cory Schlesinger On Isometric Training

"Welcome to another episode of the show. I know you've probably if you've been following this show, you've probably caught a couple of McEwen as that I've put on and decided, it's time to not just do them myself. Because I enjoy answering questions, but in addition to have to kind of check and make sure I'm not double or triple covering old question. I just thought it'd be more fun to get more minds involved in this segment of the show and I always enjoy whether it be an episode with three people or four, generally speaking the more the more people in the conversation. It's always a good thing and. And also I just love talking to Corey. So I wanted to get him involved on the the QNA. Here just a quick back onto for those you guys who aren't too familiar with corey his work. He is the head, strength and conditioning coach for the Phoenix Suns. He's spent the last or the previous three years as the head of basketball athletic performance for Stanford University. He was involved at a couple a D. One schools before that he's also trained pro athletes Olympians, and it's just overall as a coach in his overall a coach who? Is incredibly creative, but also is incredibly practical and athletes centered in the way that he views train. The training of the athlete core is a guy who not only has a great mind for the strength element things, but also played basketball in the college level and is continually. Looking at a wider more zoomed out view of what what training athletes means in context of becoming a better player. So for the show we took you guys as questions on social media, a lot of them were directed towards US specifically core issues on athlete autonomy in his training system, but also some great questions on isometrics foot training. Combining strength with sports, skill, training and more This was a really fun show and I will say definitely the questions are probably a little bit more geared towards cores neck of the woods, which is awesome. I mean honestly I I would just as well consider this a second interview with Corey just as much as a Q. A.. It's just fun to answer these questions alongside him so for episode to eleven. Let's get onto this QNA with myself and Corey slesinger. I. We got a special QNA today. I was sick of just doing myself and some super excited. Have Corey here so welcome to the Q. and Corey. Hey glad to be able. All right well, so let's get rolling. Thanks Irwin. Who who pop questions I? Think we just ask for my instagram this time instead some different mediums. Usually, that's where most of them come from anyway, so ause kick it off. Acceleration Randy Petersen thanks for the question he asked about the utility of ground-based strength, tumbling, crawling ruling, wrestling with pro athletes, and so maybe this could be framed to like a college versus pro, or as he worked through the levels What do you think about that one corey in in different populations. You know it's it's interesting because everyone, no matter what if you're professionalize your amateur? They all fit on a spectrum of their own developments, so like taking a. Broad like. Tumbling good for professional athletes, yes, if they're lacking certain things and the same of amateurs. Yes, if they're lacking certain things, but we gotta look at it more so in my opinion is you gotta? Just do it needs Alice. And where that athlete is currently, you know it's not this cutoff point where all of a sudden they're professionals. They don't need to do XYZ or there. Is there an amateur, so they have to do x Y and Z. You have beautifully gifted genetic athletes who don't eat a lot of art work to be hundred percent hottest, and so then you skip a lot of those steps, or you have more strategies in place to keep them. Them playing or keep them doing the things that make them awesome on the court or on the field, and then you have some that are like well. They're grinders are the ones that constantly need that training stimulus or that controlled stimulus to help them develop or stay more robust than those athletes in the woods yet? Maybe they do any more quote, unquote, ground-based work, or they need more skill acquisition, not from a skill perspective on the court, but just from a human perspective, and that's where for me. It's everybody across the board on your child won't do your DNS in stages, or you're an elite level athlete, who seven foot tall and do a backflip duck. All of them need some form or fashion of. Tools that will allow them to get in and out of scenarios via falling which everyone in some point we'll go through or you know being ground-based and being able to stay able is and being able to express that or not only express forces, but also be able to hush this to be able to sustain them to be able to of our accepts them into. Be Able to redirect them, and that's where I think there's a question that was presented earlier. The France Bosh you. How does this influence? I guess some of these things. Just self organizing and that's what I think. Tumbling willing comes into the equation as Yom. You're just giving them exposures them. How to self organize in areas that might not be. Normative values are a plane basketball on a hardwood surface which requires as a ton of stiffness. How about we actually teach them how to fall and get more compliance so they can keep receiving

Corey Slesinger Basketball QNA Mcewen Phoenix Suns Instagram Randy Petersen D. One Stanford University United States Irwin France Alice
According to Me

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

04:23 min | 3 months ago

According to Me

"Last week's live QNA on thrown about my June. Essay and subsequent podcast episode, covering the many faces of racism didn't spark any arguments finger, pointing or I rolling from anyone, but rather a unanimous desire to not only better understand how we can go beyond educating ourselves about systemic racism, privilege and ways to move past it, but the tools we can use to more productively discussed this issue with our family. Members Co workers and friends to clarify once again. Privilege as when you think something isn't a problem, just because it doesn't affect you, personally one woman will call her. Susan offered the following example of privilege for us to consider when she. She was looking for a commercial space to lease, so she can open nail salon. She rented a suite on the second floor of a walkup building with no elevator, because of her able bodied privilege. It didn't even occur to her that this would be a problem. Until someone made an appointment, but couldn't get to her salon because it wasn't wheelchair accessible. Susan doesn't have to be disabled in to be an ally now in an ongoing effort to make all buildings and commercial spaces accessible. Being made aware of her privilege didn't make her defensive. It made her a better person I think we can all benefit from taking inventory of our. Our privilege whatever it may be an if something positive can be gleaned from recent events. Is that a number of readers who attended the live discussion expressed how they've always considered themselves nice and kind, but have only now come to realize they've been living with white privilege without realizing it. Black listeners said they don't have the time patients or bandwith to educate everyone which is perfectly understandable. Racism isn't their problem to fix its hours. Many people have been unknowingly living in a bubble, and as not hunt says we are here to awaken from our vision separateness. One of the most productive question someone asked was what is the best way to? To have these conversations with family members who don't see the problem or cannot look within to see that they are part of the problem. Well unsolicited advice can only be perceived as an attack, and therefore responded to with defensiveness. Calling someone out on being racist is very tricky for two reasons one, they might feel justified in their bigotry, in which case you're doing nothing, but stating the obvious for them or two they will deny it and respond aggressively so the only way I have found to peacefully broach. The subject is to lead by example that is to say, never point the finger at someone else, but rather share a personal. Personal story about your own racism. Make one up if you have to. And how you have awakened to a new truth, after years of believing something else share a personal story about prejudices that hold and how your mind has changed, make it about you not them, and they will get defensive offensive or shut you out owning up to our own shortcomings comes across as an invitation for the person with whom we are having a discussion to do the same, and once someone is open and vulnerable. It's easier to talk to them than when we try to force feed them because when we push our beliefs on. Someone were literally pushing them. Them away this open. The discussion to have any of US had emotionally charged conversations with family bat was not very effective, not getting emotionally charged and staying in the present moment with no attachment to the outcome of a conversation is something of a learned art form, and that's exactly what we are here to do to learn, not just keep repeating the same behavior and expecting different results the online. QNA then took an unexpected political turn, which would normally skip over as this isn't the time or place for that so gently shut it down in a way. The person who brought it up actually appreciated. This person was upset about A. A certain politician because he is as she said, divisive, mean a not a good role model. My only suggestion was that she had the words according to me at the end of all of her statements and accusations. It is our EGOS, the turn our opinions into facts so much so that then we look at people with differing opinions as our enemies, but if we had the words according to me at the end of our statements than we keep our egos at bay

Susan United States
"qna" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

06:01 min | 5 months ago

"qna" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"Good evening everybody. And welcome once again to the Society of Western China in Alabama Luca here in Perth Western Australia. And we're coming up to do the second part of the basic ceremony for this year. Two Thousand Twenty and of course as you of you that we this morning he will know that we had here very empty hole but nonetheless. I think that for those that saw this morning ceremony will agree that it was very very moving and very emotional of ceremony so it was. I think very very successful and we hope that the softens live broadcast. We'll we'll do the sign for you. I'd like to just introduce venerable has opinion Ed Young Acipenser. Who joined us for this afternoon's events and along with Edward Brown who you saw this morning? Of course will be in amount having Adama discussion Both of them will be able to answer any questions that you have wrought inside. You're very welcome now to rotting questions. And they will any of those questions you might have During the period between three o'clock and four o'clock here in west the strident standard tone. Three to four thirty so we can be quite a bit of time to allow you to to ask questions and from four thirty to five thirty. We're going to do a circum ambulation and we're very lucky. In fact to have a lot of the team is have put it a lot of time setting up cameras and so on so that we can sort of follow this event as As the group in fact there will be. There'll be people that'll circa maybe like the softener is the four pillars of Buddhism. If you're like we'll have an representing the sanger. The Mile Sanger monks Hesse Penarol be representing the the nuns the order of nuns sanger and the main The four third pillar of lightning. And then the fourth pair of Li- women will be all represented here this afternoon in the in the circulation so that's between four thirty five o'clock between five and five thirty. We'll we're going to be reading out and and welcoming new Buddhists and indeed the number of gone. This morning I reporters that we had seventy seven people that had applied to nine that I wished to be come. Full Buddhists if you live coming out of this Buddhists but I think that numbers climbed and I'm not really quite sure where we are to now but it's sort of well I well and truly eighty four people or something like that so we'll see how many people there are that want to be named by the time we get to five o'clock this afternoon so without further ado. I'm hand Nantwich and Brown for this afternoon's proceedings who lead the Dhamma discussion for today said. Thank you Dennis. Long-serving president and vice president preferring so many roles for Society for so many years is wonderful to see you here and also Again could welcome to an. Who's come from Thomas? Our for today as well give it some sort of equity notice seeing amongst all the time two miles to see the females as well forty nine B Kunis which is wonderful to see so for today. We're inviting questions This is the very earliest part of Buddhism whether put aside it's not just listening to the Dharma listening to People give the teachings but it's also have the opportunity to ask questions and any questions if it's something which makes sense. We'll that you know but we try our very best to answer the question as honestly straightforwardly as we can. Now you are questions online. It would be held for if you have a preference. This question is has or this question is for at John Brown or this question is for both of you because that makes it easier for us No which one. The question is aimed for so. Are there any questions yet online? I think it takes a while. The Internet is very slow to transmit the formation online then to read the question and then to us among so the nuns is quite difficult so in there I will start off how can ask a question of. I has soprano. We haven't seen you for about. How are you? And how all the the big Kuni Saddam Asala piece still in one piece but is that piece thin always very fat because happy busy because on preparing for on the raining season. Some of the work in you do like pay thing we have to pay people the raining season Cam. But they're happy because we only in the morning and afternoon they'll go back to mandate so there's a bit of balance the headwork they feel cut through failing that they're doing something in enough surveys and that actually actually they're arousal happiness in bed when they go back to the seat after.

Mile Sanger monks Hesse Penaro Society of Western China sanger Ed Young Acipenser Edward Brown Saddam Asala Australia Adama Alabama Luca John Brown Kunis Li Perth Nantwich president Brown vice president Thomas Society
Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

The Big Story

07:06 min | 5 months ago

Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

"To Parliament Hill to get a sense of how the aid packages for Canadians have evolved. Since they were first announced. What's available now? What might or might not become available in the future and of course to see if our MP's have figured out the mute button yet. I though I will mute Claire so that she can give you everything. You need to be up to date today. Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr Teresa. Tam says the spread of Cova. Nineteen is slowing in Canada. But the number of deaths is on the rise and she says that's because of outbreaks at long term care homes more than three quarters of the deaths are linked to those facilities. She also talked about testing capacity two weeks ago. She said she believes the country could do sixty thousand tests a day but lately Canada's been averaging twenty eight thousand tests a day she says provinces can help by extending the criteria for who can get tested British Columbia's laid out some plans for easing restrictions around Kovic nineteen starting next weekend. The province is allowing group gatherings of more than six people as long as no one is showing any symptoms of the virus. Also this month. Some businesses in BC will be allowed to reopen including hair salons retail stores museums libraries and some restaurants Dr Bonnie Henry the Provinces Health Officer says BC has put the brakes on the outbreak. But they're not through it yet and Antero Premier Doug Ford says the provinces moving with cautious optimism in the reopening of garden centres nurseries and hardware stores. Ontario's still not technically in its first phase of restarting the economy which was outlined a few weeks ago and the emergency orders have been extended until may nineteenth as of Wednesday evening sixty three thousand four hundred and ninety six cases of Cova Nineteen in Canada with four thousand three hundred and fifty seven deaths and I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Cormac McSweeney is the Parliament Hill reporter for city news for Rogers Radio and every once in a while for us and he's working from home and so am I so Forgive the toddler noises. But how are YOU DOING CORMAC? I'm doing all right surviving like everyone else's in isolation well and we're not the only ones doing this now so my first question is just tell me how virtual parliament for the first time ever is going. Well it's been interesting. I mean as you know there have been some troubles some growing pains as MP's and the House of Commons tries to switch to this Basically a really large zoom meeting and they're actually using a version of the zoom platform to host all of this So there have been a lot of troubles as people. Try to figure it out. There were connectivity issues where people were losing their connection and that's unfortunately just a fact of life with a lot of Mp's living in rural areas of the country and not having the same Same sort of connection as you would have. Let's say in Toronto or Ottawa? A lot of 'em. Ps You know figuring out the mute button figuring out the translation button as well because every time somebody doesn't hit the right button it seems to have to pause proceedings to try and deal with it but overall. I think it's been working out all right Aside from the technical hiccups that they've had I it seems to be rolling along smoothly in terms of having MP's MP's question The Prime Minister and different cabinet ministers and I will note as well that this is not technically a sitting of the House of Commons. It's technically a sitting of this special Cova Nineteen Committee that involves every MP and the reason why point that out is because there's there's a difference of procedure so we don't have the normal question period where Thirty SECONDS OF FOUR QUESTION. Thirty seconds for an answer instead because it's a committee. Mp's get about five minutes to question. Whatever minister or the Prime Minister And they can ask as many questions within that time period and the rule of thumb. Is You answer? Just as long as the question has gone on for and so it really does allow for a lot more of a substantial debate and a substantial questioning of the cabinet. Because if you WANNA get a lot of information out of a cabinet minister keep your question short and just squeeze as as many as you can with a five minute period. So what is the tone of those questions and this sitting been lake because to an observer it does seem Less like the. We're all in this together tone That we had six weeks ago. You know when all the aid packages were coming together. Yeah you hit it right there You know at the start of all of this. It seemed like there was going to be no criticism for the Trudeau government right away because this was an unprecedented time and unprecedented measures had to be taken but slowly over the last number of weeks. We've seen The Conservative Party. Start this off where they started questioning the programs being put forward by the government and in a very public fashion. I would say that for the virtual sitting themselves. The tone is actually quite different than what we've seen from the news conference as being held by the individual parties the tone on these Virtual sittings in and these. Qna's that are happening is actually quite different. From the grandstanding and showmanship you normally expect out of question period. In fact everyone's a little bit more toned down and there's I it's much more substantial questioning There's a lot more information coming out. And I think that's a great thing It really shows that without the theatrics that we normally get in question period There can be a good conversation to be had between opposing sides in the House of Commons. But outside of the virtual sittings exactly as we were discussing You know there's been more criticism for the Trudeau. Government people are exposing the gaps in some of the programs that have been announced. And we're really seeing the ideological differences for how we should be dealing with this pandemic at this time and the Conservatives have started raising more and more of opposition to the conservatives add to the true liberals rather as every week has gone on. So it'll be interesting to see where we go from here because up until may twenty fifth were working on a system of Just having one weekly in person a in the House of Commons and then to virtual sittings But the Conservatives for awhile now have been pushing for as many as four in-person sittings each week And so as we approach may twenty fifth Towards the end of this month there'll be more conversations between the opposition parties and the government about how we proceed from here because there's still a lot to do and You know June is when normally parliament would break towards the end of June For the summer break but With this pandemic ongoing and with it being such a fluid situation. I imagine we might see some more unprecedented changes to the procedures of parliament as we move forward and continue to deal with with this pandemic.

MP Cova Canada House Of Commons Prime Minister Trudeau Parliament Hill Cormac Mcsweeney Claire Doug Ford BC Provinces Health Officer Chief Public Health Officer TAM Rogers Radio Dr Teresa
My Panic Attack

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

07:24 min | 5 months ago

My Panic Attack

"Originally intended to record this episode back in March but that's when the corona virus hit the US in full force. So I put it on the back burner to host live. Qna's instead highlights. From which are uploaded as podcast episodes but once our front doors open again. The sudden stimuli of crowded stores and roadways might overwhelm us which brings me to this unlikely story. I want to share with you about a panic attack. That had earlier this year it turns out. There's a good explanation for why it occurred but it was quite unnerving when it was actually happening. What got me through? It is what can get us through. What's happening right? Now after? Six years of accumulating airline mileage points from flights and credit card charges. I finally had enough points to cover an absolutely free round trip. Flight and five week backpacking trip around the Philippines earlier this year and setting up a tenth on the beach or as I like to call it. A five billion star hotel made the trip in nature lovers paradise but quite a few shots. Vaccinations for things like typhoid and malaria were either necessary or strongly advised prior to boarding the flight. I am fortunate enough to not be on any medication. generally avoid even taking aspirin unless. I'm in severe pain but considering all the time I was about to spend sleeping outdoors in a third world country. I took the malaria pills for two weeks prior to departure as well as during the trip and for three weeks. Afterwards I didn't bother reading the possible side effects because not taking the pills wasn't an option but it didn't take long to notice that the pills made me sleepy for example so I just took them at night. I later discovered. They also cause vivid dreams and a slight fever which was no big deal. The whole point of the trip was to maximize time on quiet deserted islands for some peace and tranquility and to avoid major loud cities like Manila as much as possible. Since as far back as I can remember. I've been hyper sensitive to certain types of noise. The high pitch of CRT monitors beeping alarms the sound of someone snoring chewing the auditory assault of emergency sirens screaming children wind chimes and even certain. Birdsong would all drive me crazy. If it wasn't for two things one I can usually meditate and breathe deeply through the noise until it stops and I can return to the bliss of silence and to almost always have earplugs on me just in case. The sound is louder than my meditation consumer. Whether this miss a phony ah is a symptom of being somewhere on the spectrum or something else. Altogether avoiding noise isn't an option especially when dealing with major airports and public transportation. I can usually gear myself up prior to leaving the house in preparation for what's to come and wear noise cancelling headphones which more often than not keep my anxiety at bay anyway. The trip involved wonderfully warm ocean breeze on white sand beaches beautiful hikes and surprisingly freezing temperatures did not expect to experience in the Philippines but enjoyed immensely nonetheless on us. Sunrise hike to one of the highest peaks in the country clear blue skies and great food. Add into the mix one bad case of getting seasick on a boat between islands two cases of food poisoning which I actually think was from drinking the water. Not NECESSARILY FROM ANYTHING. I eight and you've got the complete experience which was still great in the grand scheme of things but at one point returning to the big loud and busy city of Manila after a couple of weeks of reading books in a Hammock on a quiet deserted beach. Hit Me really hard. The noise of construction traffic blaring. Tv's and radios car horns and the fast pace of everything and everyone around me shot my anxiety through the roof and sent me into the worst panic attack of ever had. I'm not going to play it down for you. I completely lost it. I truly believed it was the end of timber as we know him. That Buddhist boot camp would come to an end and that I would have to check myself into a mental hospital upon returning to the states. If I don't kill myself I that's how bad it was. Suicide was more inviting than another minute of noise from which I couldn't escape even with earplugs or noise cancelling headphones I truly wanted to die. It was my lowest point and I didn't even recognize myself. I mean this is me. We're talking about the guy who feels anger threatening to surface and starts contemplating what other feeling I'd rather choose but in this case this down to Earth Guy you've grown to know over. The years was no more. What got me through this sudden spiral of mental instability. As I was rocking back and forth was repeating to myself. This is temporary. This is temporary. This is temporary within an hour. I fell asleep probably from exhaustion. It's incredible how much energy the body uses to feel something anything so strongly. When I woke up the next day I was no longer on edge but still seriously questioning my mental health. Was this my own psychotic breakdown. His this what everyone was saying. Britney Spears went through in two thousand seven. It felt like years of meditation. Mindfulness and all the practice of had to remain calm in the midst of chaos. Meant nothing so I decided to do some research and discovered that severe panic attacks are actually a common side effect from the Malaria vaccine. I was taking and it all made sense on the one hand. I was relieved that it was merely a chemical reaction to the pills but has felt so real in the moment of panic. I couldn't access all those other parts of my brain that would have otherwise kicked in with logic and reasoning to talk me off the ledge but whether real or chemically induced the mantra. This is temporary. Helped me through it? All temporary can mean a minute or two an hour a week month year or lifetime. No matter how you look at anything. Everything is in constant flux. I guess what pleasantly surprised me. The most is how quickly I was willing to accept my mental breakdown. Prior to falling asleep I contacted a friend to recommend a therapist could see immediately upon returning to the states. I asked another friend whether the mental institutions depicted in movies resembled the real ones. He sees in his medical practice and then all reminded me of the near drowning incident that I described in my memoir and how I'm merely observed what was happening rather than reacting to it. I guess I wanted to share this story with you because perhaps all of the years of mindfulness practice didn't go out the window in the moment of panic and the gap between impulse response. I didn't react to what was happening. I reminded myself how temporary it all was. Mindfulness Meditation can really help us. Not In the moment of meditation but at some point down the road when we need it most a got me through the four hours of being seasick on the worst boat ride. You can imagine it. Got Me through the panic attack and it got me through the whirlwind of change to which I returned when I got back home for starters I found out that I had to move out from where I've been living for the past two and a half years but rather than react or dubbed the unexpected experience terrible or unfortunate. I found a new place to live. That is everything of ever dreamed of. And then this corona virus exploded and I can't think of anywhere on the world where I'd rather be quarantined right now

Manila Philippines Malaria United States QNA Fever Aspirin Typhoid Britney Spears Assault Birdsong
Isabella Gomez's Experience When 'One Day at a Time' Got Canceled

Latina to Latina

05:39 min | 5 months ago

Isabella Gomez's Experience When 'One Day at a Time' Got Canceled

"One day at a time deals with some really heavy topics that deals with immigration deals with consent deals with sexual orientation. How has being on the show impacted you? I am exponentially better person because of the show. I I think I grew up very annot where and very ignorant of the world you. I like switched cultures when I was ten. I was completely new to this country and then I lived in Florida so I was just unaware of a lot of stuff. I didn't even know that I was unaware. I didn't realize there were more to learn and then move to la which is super liberal and super hippy. Dippy and super whatever and I get on a show like one day at a time where we're talking about these things that I know nothing about and it's just made me so much more aware it's made me so much more empathetic. It's made me realize that I am not the center of the universe. Which for a long time growing up as an only child and especially as an immigrant where it like. You only have your core family you think. Oh everything's kind of about me and how I'm transitioning through this and then I realized that that couldn't be further from the truth and is just it's Tommy so much about artistry in humanity and how much talking about these things actually means to people. 'cause I also grew up. There's all the talk of a presentation but I am white passing and Columbia. Everything was dubbed into Spanish. And so I grew up thinking that Hannah Montana and wizards to waverly place. Where about people like me because those girls looked like me and they were speaking Spanish and so it's just made me so much more aware. We interviewed a Gloria Feltler. Wrong Kellet out for one of our way back in the day Love her such a powerhouse. What have you learned from working with her? That anything is possible and that anything is possible on. You can still be nice. She is a powerhouse and she is taking over Hollywood and she is so nice and she can I curse and she gives a shit man like she gives a shit about everything that she does and everybody that's involved in her projects. And I think that is so powerful and meaningful especially in. I feel like our culture is so much about productivity. And and how much can you do? And how much can you like? Churn out and do whatever it takes to be that way like. I feel like you're in a few years ago. There was such an emphasis of like you can sleep when you're dead in like Hustle Hustle and you don't have to be nice if you just have to get it done and Gloria as the penny me of you can rest in have a balanced life and of course she still struggles with that but you can have a balanced life and be nice end still rise to the top. I think that is such a good lesson to learn this early on one day at a time originally on netflix loyal following dedicated following very vocal on social media and never more vocal than when. Netflix canceled the show. Where were you when you find out that they weren't going to pick it up for another season? I was in Vancouver and Mike and Gloria called me on the back and it's both of them and they don't. They're not screaming so I can tell something's wrong and Gloria says. Hey they're not picking our little show up and I felt like I get teary eyed. Just thinking about it. I felt my soul like unhinged like I just immediately started sobbing. It was really really rough and then I remember getting to the hotel room and calling my parents and crying in such a manner that they were like who died. Don't like what's happening. And it was like Monty family died and they were like you've been in this industry for fifteen years. You know this happens get it together and then when it got picked up again. I had been texting Mike and Gloria for a couple of days because I could feel it in the air that something was shifting and I remember Mike had told me will know by tomorrow and then I got on a flight to Spain so all of the time things were different and I had been on this flight for freaking like twelve hours whatever long and I got off on immigration and my parents had come with name and I opened my texts and I it was something like at Glory on Mike and Gloria said. Gomez you there and Gloria said Mike Gomez. They're glorious Ed. It's done we're doing the show or something like that and I didn't know how to handle myself I. I'm in an immigration. And he didn't I one of the trouble of my parents at the same time so I just like squealed to myself. I text my boyfriend at the time. It was like frigging like one. Am here to am here. And like I woke him up and he's like what's happening here okay and I was like shop. We got the show back and he was like. Oh my God and then I got to go the next day to a convention and I had a QNA schedule or a panel so there was what felt like millions of people in this frigging audience. And I got to tell them and we all got to just scream and cry together and it was just the most surreal. Couldn't make it up. Should be in a movie kind of moment. I've ever

Gloria Feltler Mike Gomez Hannah Montana Netflix Florida Tommy LA Columbia Hollywood Spain Vancouver
"qna" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

Future Thinkers Podcast

02:46 min | 6 months ago

"qna" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

"The way the group can haul that is is is probably evolutionary old. An embedded in human system Yeah I like to look at these phases of group or community practice as asynchronous transformation of the individual. So it's a synchronous transformation. But every but it's coursing through everybody right so If you if you bleed out the time you could conceivably experience as a simultaneous transformation but it seems to I have a synchronous kind of a rhythm to it and I think that's very helpful for people because if you say you know it's a transformational circle But it has this a synchronous rhythm than people will still feel inside the circle and notice that there's different spotlights of transformation little insights happening here and there that don't necessarily land with everyone but if everyone was participating than that's off like when have shined so I think that's a claim that this were can make the brand new future thinkers members portal is now alive develop your sovereignty and self with our in depth courses get access to our weekly since making calls joined the QNA's with past podcast guests and much more become a future thinkers member today at future thinkers at org slash members. I've never really heard anyone talk specifically about the role of shadow work in group format. It seems to be and I mean the experience that we have with it is. It does seem to be quite heavily individualistic. But there's something to circling that seems to especially as people are watching something arise in each other and in themselves. It seems to point that they're a shadow material but as far as the practice of doing shadow work is that does that have a place in group group dynamic so I'm just gonNA answer by Talking about how Perhaps address shadow work. You know one of the problems with some of these practices is they. They become Like the whole notion of shadow work is already loaded. You know so then at an so what I talk about is I like to look at So.

QNA
Biohacking India: Sleep, Jet Lag, Hidden Environmental Killers, Air Pollution, Antiviral Tips, Eating For Longevity & Much More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

03:40 min | 6 months ago

Biohacking India: Sleep, Jet Lag, Hidden Environmental Killers, Air Pollution, Antiviral Tips, Eating For Longevity & Much More!

"In today's episode. I want to instead focus on what I got up to during my recent trip to India where fortunately I came back safely and managed to get back into the US before any of the travel was quarantined. And I was able to take part in some fantastic. Qna's and panels over there and the one that you're going to hear today is one of the better ones so we spent over two hours not only replying to really educated and informed questions from the audience about biohacking sleep fitness beauty symmetry jetlag etc. But then we also did a panel and the two gentlemen who you will hear along with me on this panel are Jag Chima and Kris. Gethin two guys who actually toward India with and we did a panel in both Delhi. Which you're about to hear and then also panel in Mubarak and was recovered. A bunch of extra information and I'll also be releasing that episode for you soon But jag himself is an entrepreneur. He's investor. He's a big health and fitness personality. Who has done a lot in the health and fitness space particularly in Asia? Although he's based out of London and then Kris Gethin who you'll also here on this podcast. A new friend new acquaintance of mine former bodybuilder and editor of bodybuilding DOT com. Who was one of the best natural pro bodybuilders in existence and now he does a lot of personal training with Bollywood celebrities and billionaire businessmen and a lot of athletes. He has a whole chain of gyms as well over in India and so between Me and these two guys. We covered a ton of stuff. Everything that you're about to hear is going to be over at Ben. Greenfield finished dot com slash Delhi. Qa that's in case. You don't know how to spell that famous city in India de L. H. I. Qa so if you go to bed angry dot com slash Delhi Qa. You'll be able to get the robust show notes for everything that we discuss in today's show all right so in addition to that I have a very very cool announcement. We just launched at kion one of the most well researched proven supplements in existence for enhancing the health of your brain staving off muscle decline increasing testosterone boosting performance boosting power boosting muscle mass increasing heart health the list of benefits from this particular product. That we just launched. Its it's staggering. I've been using it for twenty years since my bodybuilding days and have been waiting for the perfect purist version of it to finally be available and it is now available and we've managed to get our hands on it and packages for you at kion so the supplement in case you haven't guessed it is creating but we have gone way beyond creating we've taken a special form of creatine monohydrate in a form called CRAP. Heure which has stringent manufacturing standards and very precise analytical control and use that to create the most efficacious creating. You're ever going to get your hands on. There's no loading necessary. There's no cycling necessary. You just launch right into this. You start taking five grams per day and it is amazing. It's the gold standard for creating. And if you combine this with Arcane economy knows especially if you're going after this from a performance and a recovery standpoint totally gangbusters total game changer. I don't think I can throw any other descriptive terms out there without a exhausting my

India Mubarak Kris Gethin Delhi QNA Jag Chima United States Asia Testosterone Editor London Greenfield
Designing Your Website for Google's Perfect World

Accelerate Your Business Growth

09:36 min | 7 months ago

Designing Your Website for Google's Perfect World

"Thanks so much for joining me today. Jeff thank you for having me. Diane appreciate it's Great Speaker. Well it's great to have you here. This is We're GONNA be talking about stuff that I think. Confused with an awful lot of sales people marketing people and small business owners so hopefully so this conversation we can shed some light on a couple of things and I would like to start with having you explain. What is Google perfect world? Yeah While just to start I think It is it does feel like a lot of business owners to allow entrepreneurs like Seo. Is this black box. That sorta impossible to predict. And you know you're at their mercy. We're really trying to Trying to shed light on what they're doing and a lot of that is thinking about you know we spent so much time and money on what the the U. I. U. X.'S. For Human beings are in that's predominantly what we do is marketers But I actually argued that we should focus a lot on the. Ui you ex Google. So you know there's perfect perfect world for users and then there's perfect world for a search fought and they're actually they're somewhat similar but they are a little bit different and so yeah. We focus on Particularly that sort of what schools perfect world so Google's perfect world is Things that have preached for years stuff like really fast page speed for example. I don't know how many times they're gonNA have to shout from the mountaintops how much they care about. Page veep or people start listening but paid speed is so important. It's not just important for the user. It's actually very important for them because of a site slow they can only crawl so much on any given site in an day and they'll move on and they'll miss valuable information that they care about so page speed is sort of that classic example Mobile friendliness is also falls into their perfect world A language called Structure Data Markup which is the preferred. They're sort of preferred language with speak to a website that falls into their perfect world flat. Html so instead of these complicated dynamic front end languages like Java scrip- that make it very hard for them to crawl understand. They like sites like wikipedia. Wikipedia always the one that sorta point out. Is there perfect website flat? Html loads really fast obviously has a ton of user generated content but it's easy for them to understand their perfect situation. They've kind of realized that that isn't really happening. Is Getting more and more complex compounded by the fact that the web is growing at an exponential rate and so Yeah they struggled to understand websites now and And that's sort of what I focused is. What the U. I u exits Google and giving that to our customers but Just making people aware of the fact that Google cares about things that users on that are different than users. That is so interesting so I so it sounds to me. I guess I want a little bit of clarification symphony like there are so many other things out there that Google that we are making it difficult for Google to help us Be Found and seen by implementing some of these things that Google really doesn't like. Is that fair? Yeah if you think of the sort of long laundry list of things that a marketer will want on a website that Google will not want. The classic example is like a chat box set. Chat boxes are almost entirely. You know those chat boxes that show up in the lower right hand corner asking if you need any help for whatever. They almost always powered by third parties. So they're javascript. They don't provide any value to google interns and understanding the page and they usually slow the page down by anywhere from twenty five to seventy five percent making it that much harder for them to understand south and usually marketers still put on this cap. The sort of technical. Seo captain they're thinking about making decisions around the website which you might implement a chat box that increases your conversion rate by one percent but it kills your Seo by thirty percent making it. Useless so yeah. There's a lot of things that we do as marketers that Google can't stand and it's sort of our My goal is to make the Internet simpler place for them to be able to crawl understand websites. There's a example bomb the customer of ours. Sap huge customer data page on SAP DOT COM. That had over a hundred Java scrip- tags on just one page which is tracking pixels and Personalization all you think about all the business demands for the marketing department on a on a page like that and I'm almost makes it impossible for people to figure out what that page is about. So yeah we don't think is much. I'm a marketer. Come from overstock. It's my background of then. Everything from branding to you know conversion optimization everything but people don't think much about Google's experience on a site which really ends up being drives the majority of the visits They don't think about them as I say that they're the most important visitor that comes to your website and the day because they how many humans come and and basically experiences a lot rougher than the human experience. Wow that is crazy a okay. Yeah sort of a mind warp. You have to sort of figure about a lot different way and I think the reason that it happens is that you know marketers. Usually have certain skill set in that skill set is really good at branding messaging and managing budgets and you know picking the highest. Roi Channels when you come to Seo. What I've found any way is that. Seo is actually really technical problems. There's a bunch of other things you need to do. But if Google can't understand your site you know you're good luck doing whatever you're doing content or whatever so it's really kind of a technical problem and that's really a totally different skill set than your normal marketer house so to put on your CTO. Capitals A CMO is difficult. So that's why I think they're often doesn't get done and it gets ignored right. Okay okay so is there a An easy to understand way to look at technical. Seo As opposed to marketing the Honestly I can't say that it's all that easy on the easiest way is to think about it I think structured data is sort of the fastest way to get good at technical SEO structure. Dana is It's a language that structured across websites so their structure data for products. That shows you know the brand and the price reviews instructor data for Human Beings. They're structured data for almost anything. That can you know an event movie almost anything that can be visible on page score. There's this language where you can communicate to Google directly through their language and it's it's getting more complicated but to get going on. It is not all that hard and so you know when Google comes to a site. May you know for years and years? Reliant on crawling. Html on our no if you looked at a lot of HTML Diane but it is not very easy to understand. This is a shortcut to help them understand so not only does it. Help Goule understand. Every single page much more clearly than they did before but it also they use it in lots of meaningful ways within their search results. So you know how now when you search for recipe in that recipe just shows up or almost any query. There's these enhancements to QNA box. Just shows you the sports score. They'll show you the movie times. All of that is being powered by this language. Structured data and so That's sort of I think from technical. Seo Perspective for marketers to start thinking about structure data's away the optimize their seo versus just writing content running continent running content. You layer good structure date on top of of a website and Google just goes nuts. They crowd so fast and they just they understand all of a sudden what you're trying to do

Google Diane Jeff Wikipedia SAP Dana Instructor Goule CTO
Coronavirus Hot Zone: The View from the U.S. Epicenter

Science Talk

04:36 min | 7 months ago

Coronavirus Hot Zone: The View from the U.S. Epicenter

"Wayt GIBBS was a member of the board of editors and a senior writer at Scientific American from Nineteen Ninety. Three to two thousand six. He's contributing editor. And he's in a unique position to bring us reporting an insights about the current corona virus pandemic. While at scientific American Gibbs wrote numerous articles that gave him experience highly relevant to the current situation in one thousand nine hundred nine he wrote a piece titled Trailing Virus to research that article. He traveled into the hot zone of the highly lethal Nipah virus outbreak in Malaysia. Like Corona virus that one also spread from bats to people he co wrote the two thousand five article preparing for a pandemic the plan to fight a new flu which has obvious relevance for our current situation. That article is currently available free on our website. He interviewed Bill Gates for two thousand sixteen. Qna called Bill Gates views. Good data as key to global health. That piece is also up on the website and Gibbs wrote the two thousand sixteen article. What ails the human race about a project called the global burden of disease which began a new chapter in academia logical modelling that work originated at the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics in Seattle where it continues to this day. And we're gibbs plans to go for reporting for future podcast which brings us to the second factor that makes Gibbs's situation unique in addition to being assigns writer of great expertise in the area of Gibbs lives in Kirkland Washington the epicenter of the US Corona virus outbreak. So what we envision for. This series of podcasts is a combination of traditional science reporting and first person accounts from Gibbs about the situation in Kirkland and the surrounding area where the virus has so far hit the hardest in the US we plan on posting at least one podcast a week for the foreseeable future as the corona virus situation plays out and now. Here's what Gibbs. There's some weeks when history seems to unfold before our eyes. This past week has been one of those in the United States. And here in Kirkland Washington where I live. We have a front row seat to the fast growing. Coruna virus epidemic. My neighborhood is ground zero the hot zone on February twenty ninth we learned that Cova Nineteen had claimed its first fatality in the US here in this city of about ninety thousand on the shores of Lake Washington just across the bridge from Seattle. Is I read about the man in his fifties who had died at Evergreen Health Hospital but it seemed a distant and abstract threat suddenly felt immediate and berry real. I am a man in his fifties. I walked across my living room and looked out the window at evergreen health just on the hill less than a mile away. I thought okay here. We go we. In Kirkland and King County will be the guinea pigs testing how the public health systems in America cope with a crisis that scientists warned us would inevitably come that we could have planned for but that his founders unready our experts in elected officials and employers are scrambling to keep up with the torrent of new scientific information about cove in nineteen and the virus that causes it which goes by. The name SARS Kobe to here in Washington state. They seem to be doing their best to act on that information as they make tough decisions about what to shutdown what to keep open and what to tell the public in this episode Alexandra one particularly difficult question that officials face when to close schools. I'll talk with the local eighth grader. Who's online petition? To close schools in our district has attracted more than thirty thousand signatures will hear. King County's Public Health Officer explained why urged schools to remain open for now as long as they don't have any confirmed cases of the disease and we'll hear from experts at Johns Hopkins University and from Anthony Voucher. The Director of the National Institute of ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES. About the mystery of why so few children have become seriously ill with cove in nineteen. But I I need to explain what the past week was like. Ear in Kirkland Cove in nineteen role do our city like a psychological sue. Nami sweeping aside other topics of conversation. Actually a a wildfire is probably a better metaphor infections. Have jumped quickly and unpredictably from one spot to another with responders racing behind to catch up like the wildfire smoke that now darkened skies across the Pacific northwest each summer. This epidemic has cast a pall on daily life on the other side of the hill from my house. About a half mile.

Wayt Gibbs Kirkland Washington Nineteen Ninety United States Kirkland Cove University Of Washington Insti King County Seattle Writer Contributing Editor Bill Gates Kirkland Evergreen Health Hospital Lake Washington QNA Pacific FLU Malaysia
Dream Interpretation Answers

Energy Healing

09:17 min | 7 months ago

Dream Interpretation Answers

"Welcome back to energy healing with me. Heidi Lane today is kind of a part two episode back on episode thirty seven. I did the meaning of dreams where he talked about. Dreams and figuring out what your dreams mean and I received quite a few questions in relation to this episode so I thought I would follow it up with kind of a QNA episode so to preface episode. I'd like to say that and dream interpretation very open to interpretation so how I interpret. Something may be completely different than how someone else would interpret it. And that's okay totally fine. Another important thing to note is that we're in Pisces. Season Right now and this is a time where we have more vivid dreams so this is a great time to connect more with your dreams and keep a Dream Journal. Because you'll likely find that there are a lot of messages coming through during this time. Okay let's jump in with these questions. The first one is. What do you think about trauma in dreams? Could it be that it was experienced in this life or past life and is trying to come through or could someone really experienced trauma while in a dream state? I WANNA break this question into two parts and I talk about experiencing past lives in a dream so when we dream about a past life experience it typically takes place in a different time periods so it doesn't look like present time you also probably look different than how you look presently because we don't look like this in every lifetime right and you probably even talk an act differently than you do. In this present lifetime dreams about past life experiences also tend to play like movies so when we normally dream it can be pretty choppy and jump around a bit but when we're dreaming about a past life experience it's not that way it plays out in one go so the other part of this question dreaming about trauma or experiencing trauma in a dream. I'm feeling like with this dream that you're having about experiencing trauma is your subconscious trying to tell you that there is healing that needs to be done. There could be some sort of emotional trauma that happened in the past or some other kind of trauma or really. Maybe it's not something that you would think of as trauma but it's still something that you need to heal from it something in the past that hasn't been processed and healed so this is gonna take some self reflection. Maybe you find that. You didn't experienced trauma in your life but if you do and you find that it is overwhelming to heal this on your own. I encourage you to reach out to a licensed mental health. Professional there are some great ones out there and many who specialize in healing trauma so something to think about. Not Saying that pertains to you necessarily. That's to anyone okay. Moving on I have a question for you on dreaming about the same person. Every few months I have an old classmate and went to school with from kindergarten to Twelfth Grade. Who was my very first boyfriend and fourth grade but as we grew older we didn't hang in the same group. Borstal nice to each other and after we graduated we saw each other and we would talk for a few moments. He died two years ago from a tragic drug overdose. He has seemed to come to me about three to four times every time he comes he just says hi smiles and I hug him. This is in her dreams around Thanksgiving last year. He told me to tell someone he loved very much. Hello for him. I recently had another dream where we were in our old school gym. And I saw two versions of him older bad-looking and younger fresh and healthy. I told him I liked this version of you. Best hugged him and he smiled. Is this really him or am I just having a hard time coping? It is weird because I was not super close with him. Okay so there is a lot of different components to this. I will start off with that. Yes it could be his spirit coming through to connect with you especially if you do have medium ship capabilities and he has since about you now. If we're going to assume that yes this was his spirit coming to connect with you through your dreams. There are a couple of things to think about one is to set boundaries especially if the spirit is giving you information to share with their loved ones or family you shouldn't share information from a spirit with someone who is living. You need to ask I because the person who is living may not be in a space to hear what you have to say or they may not want to hear it so you need to respect their boundaries as well the other part to this is that you can set boundaries with the spirit that is visiting new if it gets to a point where you don't want them visiting anymore or you want to put some limits to them visiting you. You can certainly do that. And that's not being selfish. That a setting a healthy boundary. Now let's look at if it's not a spirit coming through to talk with you so there are a few things to think about. One is to think about the impact that they had on you. The other is that they may represent who you were at the time that you knew them so it sounds like you guys knew each other best between kindergarten fourth grade maybe think about was there something going on few during that time period that is now coming up for you again or something that you need to take a look at another is that he could be a manifestation of your shadow self representing the traits of yourself. That you're repressing. Were there. Aspects of this person that you did not like and are those aspects present within yourself thinking about this part of your question where you said that you liked the younger fresh healthy looking version of him rather than the older bad-looking version of him and this is making me. Think of that shadow south. Perhaps the older bad-looking version of him that you did not like is that shadow self piece so these are just a lot of things to think about so sitting with and trying to feel what resonates most with. You is likely the answer for you. Okay so dreaming about being chased by a gunman I would say it would depend on the context of the dream like what you're feeling in the dream when this is going on. I am going to assume that you felt scared being chased by a gunman so I would that the gun represents either anger or fear and either. There's something in your waking life that you're angry about in your running away from because you don't want to face it or there's something that you're afraid of in your waking life that you're avoiding because you don't want to face it this also kind of plays into the next question which is dreams about running from harm or being chased by someone and dreaming about being held hostage so being held hostage makes me think that you feel powerless near waking life combined with these dreams of being chased by gunmen. I'm feeling that this thing that you're either angry about or Freida is making you feel powerless. Because when we have a gun pointed at us we feel rather powerless where we're being held hostage. We feel powerless. We feel like there's nothing we can do about it or it's outside of our control. So there's something in your waking life that your subconscious is trying to get through to you that you are feeling powerless about most likely because it feels like it's outside of your control which is making you feel scared and probably spiking some anxiety as well when you're running away from something in your dream it's also your subconscious telling you that it's time to stop running and to confronted

Dream Journal Heidi Lane Drug Overdose Freida
Marketing and Branding in a Voice-First World

Inside VOICE

12:11 min | 7 months ago

Marketing and Branding in a Voice-First World

"Have with me today. A Sanjiv n John of what Stone Technologies Welcome. Gentlemen on Yes so you guys did a talk earlier today about marketing and branding and a voice I world. Can you talk a little bit about what you guys were explaining in that workshop? So in fact. I'm going to give the JOHNSONS. He was the one that was on the panel. I love it right so There were a number discussed The one of which of course was Discover ability that's top of mind in for most brands agencies marketers is how to. How do you get to the skill of the action in the first place? How do you make people aware of Discover ability on this platform system is still an area. That's very much influx in very much development I know I know that there are teams in Amazon and Google and in Bixby. That are working heavily in that space. Now that said there been some creative solutions around Addressing that that we're discussing the panel including Social Media Marketing to in social media pushes doing time events. For example the rain agency didn't interesting release with The Nike Sneaker Shoe drop that tied in with the halftime show of an NBA game. So you you had a very present call to action and you know the television was informing the home users to use their Alexa. I'm you can't get much more direct than that. Yeah I mean when you're talking about discover ability because that is something that people struggle with. It's just like any other marketing. You have to push it out. How would you suggest people do that on? Social Media Brealey when you're when you're doing on social media for example part of that is just letting somebody know you can now talk to? This brand. Alexa opened my brand right. Or Hey Google talk to my brand. But moreover you can target S- Certain user groups on on facebook you can look for hashtags on twitter You can do more targeted marketing or two people that are interested in more information about the Surface area that your skill touches on and I'll I'll use the term voice application to be a little bit more broad because you know every rightfully so every business us every brand would wants to have as much reaches as possible so they they wanted to be on every platform as possible so I think targeted Campaigns that focus on. Let's say for example. I'll just pull out one case in point. Let's say you have An Agency for balloon rides right then you would be targeting. People that have been searching for a balloon rides in a given area. Maybe you would. You would target like travelocity As a as a marketing platform. So you want to think about you. Know the keywords the demographic that would be likely to use your skill likely to be looking for your skill that makes sense. I mean how important is it for you to also teach these people how to use the scale how to interact with that? You're not only marketing. That hey we have a skill but how do you kind of Tell Them? What is the best way to use it right so he wanted to be as intuitive as possible. So you don't have to teach in the first place so keep the interaction Light quick and direct and deliver value quickly like for example One of the peace process of our platform involves coupon delivery. So Oh so you would engage the user with a set of very quick. Yes no pre qualifying questions to ascertain whether they are interested in the coupon you're offering and whether they're the right target audience but you don't want to Overdo it with a litany of QNA's you want to keep it down to like two or three questions than okay yes It sounds like you're interested in this. Please provide your phone number. And we'll send you a discount code and of course you want to make that Discounts worth it to that person to give up their phone number because of course. That's another piece of personal data so Of course you have your privacy statements. That's you're not going to be solid to third party But with the particular brand at that that's Phone is a phone numbers. Offered up to that particular brand can still use it to do additional reminders. We always in the space. We tend to think voice. I and often forget that it's not necessarily has to be boys exclusive so you can capture that initial data and then keep the conversation going on another platform so you you've got the phone number you then have SMS capabilities. Yeah I like that. You're saying it's not just voice I. It's voice exclusive. Because a lot of people do think I should just doing voice. It's really about integrating with every single thing you're right you want to meet the customer where they want to be met and so if they're coming to you with a on the voice platform certainly. That's where you meet them and you can use the voice platform for doing it with the voices good at like we found. It's good capturing numbers is spoken numbers. It's not very good at capturing spoken letters so even spelling an email address like the letters z could be mistaken for being often is My last name for example spelled I W Z is pronounced. Iwata's what do you think the likelihood of my spoken last name? We'll get transcribed correctly by the smart speaker. Can I don't care which far speaker you're now? The two of you both worked at Microsoft right. How did the tune of you knew? And why did you decide to create this company together so we met in two thousand one when I moved to Philly and we worked at Microsoft consulting services? We've known each other. I nearly twenty years and then we had I think as we went from being co workers to where we actually spent seven years making short films together and then I was between jobs and then John had this idea about doing something with Alexa and I had this sudden thing of going. You know I could go look for a job or you know when I turned seventy. I don't WanNa be sitting on my deathbed going. What if I tried and tried? And and we're we're we're at here. We are and John. John came along for the ride of Your Role. So when you decided to work together is one of you. More technical wants where the vision where the marketing. How do you guys work together? So John John is the so. He's in charge of the architecture. The platform where where we take in this. I'm the Shiny Talker guy you know and so I work. I work on that. We also have. We also have Patty Curry. She's helping us with marketing and strategic initiatives. We have a GUY UP IN BOSTON. Vic South Who's helping us with business? So I love it a little bit so you guys knew each other for a long time. He started this company. But you've been doing film work as well. What do you do? Where did that come into play? Does that have anything to do with the voice? If you're doing as well to well we a lot of the filmmaking. We did was actually around horror comedy and stuff like because we we always found whenever we tried to write a series script. Just started goofing off and so in comedy lights and that kind of Trent but honestly where I think the filmmaking came in with audio is one of the things John and as we started to we we were self taught and I taught myself how to do sound. John taught himself how to be a director photography and as we started getting into the in into working with film you know part of part of making a film is understanding how to tell a story and having a beginning middle and an end and when you think of conversation conversational design. It's the same thing you need to have a beginning a middle and an end and also as you're working with the film one of the biggest components it's actually more I believe it's about sixty to seventy percent of a film is the audio and so when you're making an audio application. There's a lot of crossover audio engineering of how do you? How do you get a person to feel like? They're part of this experience. How do you communicate is it? Are you know when you make your choices? Are you using the voice of the assistant? Are you choosing to use a human just using way files? What kind of you know? Maybe you're mixing some different audio in the background. So there's there's quite a bit of crossover when you really get down to it. Yeah there is an one of the things I love about this voice text base is. It's pulling in so many creatives my background's in dance originally and I do writing. People are writers. They're filmmakers. Why do you think that there is such a big pull of the creative space into this piece of technology more than others? I think everyone wants to live star Trek. Because let's get real. This is what we're starting to see. This is this is star trek this her being able to turn around to the computer and say turn the lights on. Turn the lights off. Phasers on stun right John. Yeah I actually used if this then that to set up an experience on On our speaker so that if I say you know red alert it blinks might Philips Hue Lights Red and and the Star Trek klaxons begin sounding. I mean yeah I agree. It's an interesting. I never thought about it that way. But that makes a Lotta Sense. So what advice do you have four brands? That are considering voice technology. Invoice Skills Abou- where they should start especially when it comes to their marketing component. Let's say they have a skill. They're utilizing capacity. What should they be doing as a brand I? I think starting simple certainly start with a very simple interaction that goes back to earlier statement delivered value quickly to the consumer. Don't involve THEM INTO A LONG-TERM CONVERSATION. Attention spans are fairly short so And used that learning to then build on and augment the skilled use that to determine what customers are looking for where they engage in where they not engaging where they dropping off you know. And it's an iterative process so it's not a one and done deployment. It's an ongoing Is going process? And to build on that We had the experience from releasing a skill that was like a treasurer on adventure story That is like an audio drama. Meets treat hundred venture self guide to story and we had some engagement with it was designed for children. It was written up in in Pc magazine as one of the top one hundred skills for kids But once the skill is finished there's no incentive to return once the person's face the game. There's no new content for them to explore so something to consider and strongly so is. How do you incentivize the person to return to the skill to become a monthly active user? So it comes back to refreshing your content and making sure that contents is. What the user certainly whether you sorta looking for make fresh make it new and put that content creation into the hands of the brand managers because certainly they're going to be the ones that other customers

John John Alexa Social Media Marketing NBA Johnsons Microsoft Travelocity Facebook Pc Magazine Google Bixby Amazon Boston Iwata Treasurer Patty Curry
Justin Bieber calls sex life with wife Hailey 'pretty crazy'

Celeb News Ride Home

01:45 min | 8 months ago

Justin Bieber calls sex life with wife Hailey 'pretty crazy'

"Justin Bieber has an album out today but more importantly he has sex with his wife hilly bieber and he wants us to know about it okay. During a concert last night justin did like QNA thing with his fans and apparently one fan asked he. Just how do you like to spend the time when you're not working and Justin said quote when I'm with my wife we like to you guys can guess what we do? He gets pretty crazy. That's pretty much all we do and quote. Wow so he has sex with his wife. This is quite the turn of events the cut wrote about this saying quote. This is not the first we've heard about this man's wild marital sex life. There was the time. He bragged in a series of instagram videos. That Haley always says that he has good hands. She confirmed then. There was the time last month that his album playback party that he told his attendees after weeping throughout the entire night the he was leaving his own event to go get pretty freaky with his wife. Also one of his new songs is explicitly about how Yummy he finds her end quote so yeah Justin's a wife Guy He definitely has sex. He definitely does sex with his wife so sure you know. That's you know that's pretty cool to most people. That probably doesn't sound like a big deal. Married couples have sex all the time. But I do think it's a big deal because Justin manages to have sex while also having one of the ugliest mustaches of all time and to me. That's an accomplishment. I mean to get laid while having an ugly mustache on your face. That's something that I think. Deserves some kind of plaque or

Justin Bieber Haley GUY Instagram
Choosing Photo Travel Gear

Photography Radio

08:52 min | 8 months ago

Choosing Photo Travel Gear

"Hey everybody I'm Karen Hutton. And welcome to the Wu. Today I introduce a new feature on the Wu. QNA as those of you who listen in regularly know by now. I have a lot of things to talk about. Get off my chest. And that's all fine and Dandy but I'm open to questions to so recently. I opened winded up bananas. Some folks what they like to hear about our fabulous end intrepid first up. Is Jim Zuffelato. Who Asks this question? We I just got back from a fabulous trip in Paris and surrounding areas. We went to New York for a few days. And improvisation I pondered long and hard hard about what equipment to bring. How many camera bodies what lenses? What am expecting in the way of photo ops with your travel schedule? I'd like to know how you you plan for work and for just family vacations. So that's Jim's question and thank you for that by the way because that's always a big question and sometimes sends me around the band. I got to admit but I can share some approaches that I've developed to that question that made my gear selection debtor easier ear to carry my mind calmer and my muse happier first of all right off the bat. You GotTa get good with the fact that you're not going to have the perfect lens for every situation and then let it go. I think what drives everybody off. The deep end me included is when we imagine that we have to cover all the possibilities. BILITY's 'cause you know Famo- kills so let it go we'd hopper be creative with what you bring start with. What your heart most desires tires to create from this experience? Do you like to shoot architecture. Mostly Street and people portraits landscapes cityscapes wide-angle fantastical goodness you. You know just kind of make a little list. You know like have to get this stuff. These would be nice. May I can live without these because making the decision about all that narrows the field. Then then I go straight to this one. How much time are you going to be on your feet? Ten hours. A day combing streets Peres hiking in the Alps. GotTa Sherpa Purpose. I mean really. Just imagine yourself in whatever. Your scenario is an include any neck shoulder back problems you might be dealing with because those are huge and they. They don't get better the longer you're on your feet. I've discovered and decide how much you WANNA SCHLEP keep coming back to the fact that gear does not get lighter as the day wears on. Trust me now hone it in a little bit more decide which lenses can do double duty just to give you an example on a recent trip to Italy for one of my photo retreats retreats. My personal goal was to create a visual book of my experience. We were starting in Venice. And then heading to the DOLEMITE's I mean these are two very you. Different areas very different subject matters shooting distances. All of it. I mean for a minute I went out of my mind. What how I honed in was I decided I wanted to make images that it ranged from this particular kind of perspective driven intimate shot that I love to do and then of course I love my grand mountain landscapes gapes but I wanted to make really really strong statements with every shot so I shoot Fuji Film The eighteen to one thirty five and the fifty five to two hundred which is an older lens? But it's a great telephoto Lens in its lighter. They did most of the work now. The eighteen to thirty five did a decent job bob of isolating my intimate subjects. I mean would I have liked more specialized lines for that sure and again if I had a team of attendance to carry my gear which which I just don't have and then I use the fifty five to two hundred only in the mountains really and I was happy to have it Yes would have loved to have my one hundred four hundred but again team Sherpa was nowhere to be found so head to adjust a bit to my gear instead of just having all my gear had sort of adjust asked my vision but that limitation worked great for the strong compositions. I was looking for that. Forced me to make really strong decisions and stick with them. MM commit to them and I was really happy with the results. Now I will admit that as an afterthought and unable to battle my fear of missing out foam oh I did break down and throw my ten twenty four into the bag and I literally never used it. Now if your focus is more on street photography portrait's and things like that. Maybe a couple of Primes is more your style. That's legit you decide. You just have to choose and then commit to the decision and don't look back. Whatever you do set your mind to work with the limitation you set for yourself and make good creative exercise and just know you're GonNa love what you get by leaning into it now second camera? Yup I do on my trip to Italy. I took two X T. Three's you do it with two different ones a bigger one. And then you have a little pocket camera that just slips into your pocket. Your second camera could even be your phone but it's always good to have some kind of backup and the fun thing is they'll all help you see in different ways days. which is what will give your visual story even more awesome perspective so that's my little spiel about cameras and lenses it is and for what it's worth a manuchehr the peripherals that I also consider when selecting gear for a trip? You may have this all figured out Jim but other people listening you know might be Kinda wondering so so the things I think about to our filters holders rings I use Lacroix which is a company out of Spain I love the quality of their glass their holders holders are really really light and super easy. They don't break. I just never have trouble with him. Think about your camera strap so everybody uses a camera strap but you're gonNA be walking long periods of time popping your camera off the strap or whipping up to your face a little bit different when you're traveling so so really think this went through and figure out how you move and what's GonNa be ergonomically sound for you. I use a meg. Poll which works with my really really right stuff L. plates I use Tripod at night in cities and for long exposures end for big shots in the mountains. So you know that plate is pretty much always on my camera so the meg pull works best for me but whatever works for you. A lot of people use peak design black rapid. Whatever as long as it works for you now camera bags? Those are always always a challenge for me. The quick thing I'll say is I usually have one that is for the airline travel so I keep my camera gear all in one bag and don't have things things spread around lately. I've been using the peak design forty five l.. It's padded and I can fit so much in it and it fits in the overhead and then I pack a smaller one for every day what that smaller one is will depend on whether to be in a city or hiking. I also have it. This pretty beat up crumpled five million dollar home bag and I use the beat up one sometimes because you know a woman travelling around the city with camera gear by myself a lot of the time the either or is attended DNA ten because it's smaller looks looks a little nicer. If that's what I want it just has a different configuration. So again comes down to how I'm going to use it. And how conspicuous I WANNA look. Then if I'm in the mountains and hiking a lot actually use a super lightweight twenty leader hiking backpack ways practically nothing and then I use padded lens covers and mix them in with the extra clothing layers water. And you know other stuff you need when you hike in the temperatures are going to change or what have you. It just works so much better because camera backpacks tend to be a little bit heavy. And this little lightweight twenty L. hiking thing just smashes down to nothing weighs nothing is super easy to bring then then remember whether Protection Lens Cloths Extra Batteries chargers power converter adapters power strips. USB Hub power brick for your phone phone either external hard drives for backup or a pile of SD cards. If you don't WanNA use hard drives bring your laptop or Ipad or whatever computing device you like to use news and then whatever other goodies make your life. Smooth streamlined in prepped. For the best time ever. Because that's the key having the best time ever I. Also this is a sidebar. Not Everybody thinks about it but I also advised TRIPP insurance. Make sure it offers the kind of coverage that works for you. Do I always make sure if I'm hiking in the DOLEMITE's little more rugged. I make sure I've got kind of insurance where a helicopter can come pick me up and take me out. I don't need that if five minutes city so you know. Consider what you're doing and what kind of coverage you need and get insurance for your gear to some companies can do it all some specialized. You may have to cross pollinate a little bit so do your research ahead of

Jim Zuffelato Dolemite WU Karen Hutton Italy Venice Alps Paris Sherpa New York Bility Peres Famo BOB Spain
Author Seth Berkman on 'A Team of Their Own: How an International Sisterhood Made Olympic History'

$6.99 Per Pound

07:26 min | 8 months ago

Author Seth Berkman on 'A Team of Their Own: How an International Sisterhood Made Olympic History'

"We have another amazing righteous yet. His name is Seth Berkman. He is journalist by second journalists. We've had on the show but I'm a little bit of a twist. He has been the contributor at the New York Times nine since plenty of twelve he's also been published Yorker. ESPN other national outlets and this focus is actually on sports with an emphasis in perception the Asian athletes and we are catching him at this next exciting phase of his career. He is an author now. He published a book called a team of their own. How in the International Sisterhood Olympic history about the Korean women's hockey team in the two thousand Eighteen Olympics? That sounds like yes. Yes yes so. Thank you again for coming through. I guess we'll just go right into both. I mean so for for those the for those of YOU OUGHTA be watching. I don't know when and how this is how to book. Looks like a desk. The author right there on you know what I mean. Eight represent and Korea Korea. You know saying team of own available in all major bookstores available. Now so let's talk about this go. Who on the surface kind of book about sports and like players and identity? But you also talk about how this book really explores gender under an immigration in communication and that how do basically three identities of South Koreans like North Americans who you have a Korean heritage DOPP DIS as you call them imports and also towards a few weeks. Before the Olympic stars they find out they have to play with North Korean Ain't players so basically pulled from the diaspora and just kind of the hockey team. Right is that what happened. Essentially it's like a peeping pop pop of hockey players. They just kind of Joe hit. Go ahead you thank God. Damn tell us about your book in the very concise Nice way just for our listeners who are encountering it for the first time short and so it makes me think I once heard a long time ago. When you're writing a book someone told me that you should be able to explain it? One sentence I haven't been able to do that only because there's so many layers but to give you kind of just a simple breakdown to me. What the essence of this book is eventually? It's a search for identity a search for belonging that I think anybody can really relate to and what really sticks out to me. Is this give and take take that developed over time. So you had like you mentioned players from Korean-americans Korean-canadians North Koreans and South Koreans all forced on this one one team together over time though you saw this give and take develop between the sides for example. The Korean American Crean Canadian players like you said that imports they they never attached much their identity. They never felt Korean growing up. It was just language. Some of them grew up in rural North Carolina. So there were yeah no real strong connections or cultural aspects. They're going to Korea. Living in South Korea among young women obviously obviously changed that started develops stronger feelings towards Korea than on the other hand when you have the South Korean nationals. These half the team were teenagers. Fourteen fifteen eighteen sixteen year old girls on their growing up in Korea. And they're at that age where they're questioning everything they're having these thoughts emotions for example. Some players battled all depression but they never spoke about that openly just because in Korea it so taboo. Depression is still very new. Run around and there were even some players who had questions about sexuality their owns actuality. They just couldn't talk to their friends at school. Their people they knew increase about this but when the imports it's came over it became like an open book. You know they basically had these. QNA sessions where anything they wanted to ask about emotions or sexuality the imports. I would tell them. Oh it's okay that you can have these feelings. And so like I said you had this give and take between the exchange and I think that's what the book starts to really bring out is just how the sense of belonging grew from these two from opposite ends of the world basically coming together and forming this team. This little family that they did and going back to what Jackie said about. This is like a situation. You had a really crazy breakdown of how this team got recruited rooted because you know career finds out. Yeah we got the bid for the Winter Olympics. Oh we don't have a hockey program. So can you tell us then. Refresh the people who haven't read the book of how they went about recruiting in how unconventional it was so two thousand eleven. South Korea gets the bid to host the Winter Olympics in two thousand eighteen. So they celebrate immediately but then it dawns on them. Oh Shit we have to create a hockey team. Olympics hockey is a centerpiece sport of the Winter Games. No one in South Korea. They'll really plays hockey at all. So what they did. Was Korea Ice Hockey Association of a man who works in the public relations relations department. Basically he went on Google and googled women's Hockey College Women's hockey teams in the. US and Canada pulled up the rosters and looked at but names that sounded Korean or if they had pictures took note of players. Look Korean when I interview early on even said the first few players he found. Were actually Chinese. These there was like a Yang and a Wu and he never heard back from them but he is a cree. How can anyone who looked? Possibly Korean sounded like later Korean rename reasons. How like an excel sheet of a name? Exactly eventually he stumbled on a few that responded to them but at first when they were contacted they thought they were being spammed. Damned pranked emails. Broken English Green Symbols Ronan was like something at dot com got even like an official government in my email account and so the first person that kind of bit you know took the bait was She actually had an uncle lived in South Korea and so he when in an e content to Kia loughry ice hockey association. Verify you for sure Kia C.. Kriss oil great pat branding confine your and they reach out to him and he was like. Yeah we're interested in bringing your daughter over here to represent South Korean the Olympics and that's how these korean-canadian free in America players kind of latched onto the team. Yeah well it's interesting that they think bank just like you looking Korean is what makes you Korean route. You know if they're looking at Asian faces. I'm sure some of them were adopted so they don't have green last name name so they were making like these assumptions. That's like really interesting of how that was something that was important to them that they were just Korean. But even if on the inside they may have never encountered the right and then but I think maybe for this government official who had to put this together his or her door process was probably early like you know as an easier way for me to possibly convince them yeah to kind of like take citizenship or you know like maybe they are or dual citizens so it was kind of an easier

South Korea Hockey Olympics Korea Korea Korea Ice Hockey Association South Korean New York Times Seth Berkman Espn International Sisterhood Olymp North Carolina Depression Official Google JOE Jackie United States America Yang
Goop's Elise Loehnen on the benefits (and challenges) of a 'polarizing' brand

Digiday Podcast

08:11 min | 8 months ago

Goop's Elise Loehnen on the benefits (and challenges) of a 'polarizing' brand

"At least welcome to the PODCASTS. Thanks for having me so you've been a coup for six years. I'm sure you run into people at parties and they're like goop. Oh my God. I've heard of it and they go into some sort of you know viral sensation and stuff like this but what what do you explain to them that that group is about what makes gook unique so it started out as a as a simple newsletter once a week out of Gwinnett kitchen in London in two thousand and eight just her experiences in the world she felt like she had access to incredible thinkers. Doctors healers and just experiences in general. We're all not what it was born out of the stuff that she was interested in and then by proxy the stuff that her friends were interested in and we haven't we've obviously grown significantly in the last past eleven years but it's essentially still kind of the same. We do content and food travel wellness. which is what? We're probably most known for beauty fashion but it comes from that place of open-mindedness and curiosity and asking questions so it was never a media the We don't report stories in a typical way where we go out and then craft things into a story we just ask people. We published straightforward. QNA's QNA's people can just get the information and decide for themselves. Yeah so talk about the challenge or you know there's there's there's always like opportunity and challenge on both sides of Having a personality at the center. Yeah I'm going to Paltrow is is a big personality One hundred percent probably recognition among The type of audience you're looking to attract But at the same time there it it comes with a challenge because this started as a personal rating and now it's not going to threaten all these articles. Yeah so obviously you as you can imagine their benefits and drawbacks the benefits being that we get at a tremendous amount of interest and attention for almost everything that we do And it brings you know she really is able to bring the spotlight and mainstream things that have existed for a long time. It might not yet. I'm part of popular culture and And I think as a as sort of an icon herself or an example of what it means to live like this it gives people sort of an immediate opportunity to understand some ways what the brand is about And then the drawbacks of course are that she is a public look person and people like to project things onto her and all their and that's part of our culture and that's that's fine project she's just polarizing for so many people That word comes up a lot. Yeah and you know as I think a lot of women are who are unapologetic about what they believe and who who they are in the world like. She's never asked for permission she's never said. Hey is it okay with everyone. If I'm no longer an actress and I become a business person and someone in media And then she's not she doesn't bow down like she's unwilling to sort of stop in the face of criticism and I think for a lot of women should come to represent what it means to continue to stand up for yourself and not be cowed and to like live and not discomfort. Is it any different being the the the chief content officer of a brand built around a personality than just to be of a brand not built around and personality. Yeah you know. I grew up at Lucky magazine. And it's funny because when lucky started it was also kind of polarizing people love to make fun of it and then it was the most accessible launch in the history of continent asked and the secret secret of lucky was that can France created a magazine that she herself wanted that her friends wanted and then sort of again it had that ripple all pool fact within media and at no point. Lucky that I am. I still here this sometimes when I go to media conferences and no point was there this sort of uttering of the audience. She is a woman named Gloria. Who Lives in Peoria and has two point three children and like this is what we're going to create for her? It came from inside like like it was Don in a way that wasn't Sort of prepackaged with this phantom person in mind it was done like sort of from the heart art as cheesy as that sounds and so because it starts with Gwyneth it's similarly like there are real people that are making the content and there are people who were specifically making it for when you're like if someone I don't know how the pitch process is but like does it go through like a test where you're like this isn't GP Is it any different like that. Then just like a brand. Because when you're figuring out what makes sense for brand there is some sort of primers around. I just wonder if it's different because like It's sort of has her endorsement right now. And I think that that's that's a really really good and interesting question and because one of the things that we do that obviously we get a lot of attention for as we write about practices that people find power and so like we're berry known in the culture for talking about Jada Aches and it was never that stuff that we do never prescriptive never like everyone needs to drop everything and go get a J. D. it was you know. Qna Hey with someone who found a lot of power in that practice and so like. I've never used one not the idea that you could It's that's not the idea of being prescriptive and sort of this is what we do therefore you need to do it to instead. We're sort of examining all of these things and saying some people find a lot of power in this practice and we're not gonNA shame these women or pass judgement on them you might might be resonant for you or something more Western might be more resonant for you so talk about the audience because you mentioned how goop can be polarizing. And that's that's obvious And I think a lot of people fixate on it and I think it. It doesn't really matter necessarily be as like a lot of the people that find it. Quote Unquote polarizing or controversial. Or something like this is probably not for them So who is it at four. You know I think I think it's seventy percent of our readers. Are Women. Actually a lot of men read the content male sex. There's a male section and a lot of the You know food travel a lot of the wellness non gendered and it's not supposed to be gendered but it is a primarily female audience And they typically are Affluent although there's a range to not as well I know people think it's only for wealthy women which is in Tracy Tracy Anderson. That's what we talked earlier about. The Tracy Anderson which is a high end studio. I guess if you charge it up money. It's not a gym. It's a studio but yeah so it's it's typically women. I think women have been largely ignored. That was another when I was at Conde I remember being twenty three twenty four and then editor there and realizing realizing that somehow I was target demo like how is it possible that I'm the target demo when I don't have any money and yet the sort of age out I'm out of the I'm forty I'm Outta the target demo and I have obviously have kids but I have more money than I had twenty years ago. That's for sure and yet so I think for a lot of women it's like. Oh suddenly not only sort of creeping towards the invisibility that seems apparently they say come with paramount PAS menopause deposit I'm not I'm a relevant to marketers and so I think that we And then when you compound on that the way that women are often ignored by their are doctors And sort of what's happening as we surge against the Patriarchy at all sort of starts to make sense so it's like a woman who I think has really come into her power. Who wants to be her own authority in her life? He wants to make those decisions unilaterally whether it's about travel or food and just wants the information who doesn't want to be told what to think but just wants information.

Tracy Tracy Anderson Lucky Magazine Chief Content Officer France Gwinnett Peoria Paltrow Gloria Editor London DON
Jon Kasbe on Filming Between Two Sides of the Law in 'When Lambs Become Lions'

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

10:24 min | 9 months ago

Jon Kasbe on Filming Between Two Sides of the Law in 'When Lambs Become Lions'

"Just going to have you introduce yourself. Tell me Your name name and a little bit about who you are. Yeah my name. Is John Kospi on the director of limbs become lands and I've been working on documentary films from a Pretty Young Age. My parents were Christian missionaries this group in this environment or the first you know thirteen to fourteen years of my life was kind of traveling around the world You know send a lot of time in Kenya. Serbia India Australia doing that that type of religious work and then have shifted quite a bit and now work in documentary but there is quite a few in her loves between them pretending to lifestyle so in a lot of ways. I feel like I was raised in this environment. That made translating the documentary. Filmmaking make a lot of sense super fascinating tell me I mean I I wonder if you can just give us a very brief overview of of what you're about yeah when landlines it is about two on either side of the ivory trade so one is ivory dealer in the other Wildlife Ranger in. They are cousins. So that was a that that was a small detail but some had huge implications and it was when we realized about eight months into the process The relationship between the two men and it was the moment when I realize that this is not a short film in that this could actually be something longer an interesting. It really speaks the complexity of the of the situation on the ground it. It certainly doesn't end. The film is this is amazing but before we dive into some of the more the more detailed questions I have for you about The project I feel like we should upfront front talk about what opportunities listeners might have to to see the film. Yeah for sure. So it's her nearing New York City this weekend at village. Oh Gee cinema and I'll be doing. QNA's as well and then it'll be continuing in New York for weekend. It's also playing in Los Angeles right now at the theater. And then we're expanding to a bunch of other the city's over the coming weeks and then in twenty twenty it'll be available on the ODI. Excellent so is is there like a website where folks can Sort of check to see if it's is coming to a theater in their area yes. The website is one lambs dot com. And we're also on all the social media's those the best the best way to stay updated so tell only your entry point into. This story was good question. So I'd done other shore films in Kenya before this Three of them and it was through those projects that I had relationships with people that you know relationship of Kenyans on the ground. who were telling me that there had been so many filmmakers and journalists? That have come Kenyan done stories around poaching but they hadn't seen anything that actually looked at it from the perspective of the poachers that they kind of like that. Was this missing. Piece that goes in. oversaturated retreated space x was every dealer. They're like just come meet him. You know you'll like him first hour of sitting down with him. He kind of found a way to flip all my preconceived notions around the issue on on their head and I was blown away. I mean I kinda went into the situation with him thinking I think what a lot of people think about when they think about it which is coaching is bad and the people that do it are are making bad choices. Explained to me early on is that there is an actual separation between these two sides. They see themselves. There's one community that is kind of forced into one side or the other but in reality. They're all still friends. They grew up together. And there's a lot of crossover between the two sides and when he started explaining anatomy it started to click in that like this is way more complex than the way I think we sometimes funnel these these stories through through media into these very good versus evil Hollywood ed narratives and you know he was saying things to be. were out there. Killing elephants opened. My father was killed when I was a child. He was shot in the head. Ten Times in there were no repercussions they were just swept under the rug and yeah he was very direct to. He was very honest he was like making contact. I kinda thought he would be a little bit secretive or shady and and opaque but he wasn't at all I found myself like laughing with my found myself being charmed by this guy and that was not what I expected to happen and I kind of left the interaction thinking about him a lot and wanting to spend one more time with him and wanting to see more of the choices he made into understand his logic behind them is. This character is The the first the person that we meet and this introduction to his community and he's kind of walking around and I mean you know right from the beginning that he's opposed to be a bad guy but he's so compelling. Yeah Yeah we really. I mean we really like we fell for him. This project was made possible because of the relationship that we formed and it was about seven eight months just living with them spending time together without really shooting and it was like those that time of building a foundation of friendship where it was like. We lived together with eat together. We I would like to ask each other questions. He got to know me as well as I got to know him. He started to understand my motivations wanting to be there and why I thought this film had valued why people need to see what was actually going on And that kind of became what made the whole thing possible. Because I think without that especially when you're filming people doing illegal things and insensitive situations and really. Taking huge risks is to be a part of a project. There needs to be the foundation for to for to work. Yeah that's an. I mean it's really it's it's really interesting to hear you say that because I mean watching this film And you know as I mentioned like I have experience working as a filmmaker in communities that are experiencing you you know S- somewhat you know a comparable sort of situation where there is this sort of economic push for community members to get involved in an illegal wildlife trade right. So you know I I I have this understanding of Like the difficulty associated with getting that sort of insider perspective And Gaining Trust. And so I mean there were numerous moments watching your film where I was just blown away away by the level of access you had And how clearly comfortable your characters were with your presence. There you spent eight months. It's with This character ex before even started shooting. You said Yeah. Yeah and I don't mean eight months like living with him the whole time a lot of that. I was there with them but it would. Also I'd come back to come back home and take a week off here and there and wrath like that but but yeah I mean we talked a lot. We talked a lot over that first year and very little of it involved a camera. And you know Ed one thing that I think people have you know people watch the film. They sometimes have that reaction of like how in the world did you get a camera to these situations and what happened was like there's nothing in the film. The takes place that I didn't already experienced them without a camera. Right and lag going on hunts with him without a camera watching a son and his wife get into fights without a camera seeing them interact with their kids. had seeing those those really difficult tender moments without a camera made it normal for me to be there and so when I was there with a camera. It wasn't like this was new new. It wasn't new content. Wasn't the new experience. It was something I had already been. Part of. So they're much were And it got piece of me but made with me filming. Sure sure and so what was the time period you know. How long were you actually? shooting you know the time window that we see play out in the film I was I I would go for three to six months at a time. And then you know take a little bit of a break here and there and dump footage back in New York And that went on for about three and a half years and then we did about a era of editing and during that year of editing I would go back every now and then for like pickups or when something new was unfolding Gotcha but he it it was sporadic in ways but also like it didn't do anything else. I wasn't working with anything else when I did this. In a Lotta ways the film started become an excuse to be there. You know I really became close not just with the characters in the film but also the community around them And enjoyed being there can really enjoyed living there with them until the film became away to continue doing that And Yeah but it was important. I mean it was. It was the foundation. Like I don't think it I don't think we would have gotten the types of moments we did. If that wasn't underneath at all I. I wonder if you worry. Sorry I mean this. This is a conversation that I think. When you're following a a character like this character acts in in your film right who you you feel for him? You know you start to understand that you know this is somebody who's maybe doing things that we think are bad but that we don't necessarily see him as a bad person person right but you still see him doing these bad things these things that like. Well you know I mean regardless of like what you know Sort of society of you know. I don't know this sort of attitude that society has towards people that are doing this type of thing thing that are that are poaching elephants. I guess my question is what what was it like to be there with this group of poachers like seeking to kill elephants. It was really hard. I mean I went on ten. Hunt's total the first three hundred went on with them they didn't let me bring a camera and so I'm like you know watching them plan. I'm just watching them. Go through and do the devastating act and you have a camera in a Lotta ways kind of separate you from the reality of what's going on. You have a heightened sense of purpose in being there in documenting it and saving it for the people to see when that stripped. You're just a part of it and it was often either take time off to take time and step away because as I was was having a hard time relating to them understanding him Having a hard time loving them at certain points them after Sunday's hunts but eventually I eventually by the end of it was having a deeper understanding as to why they were doing this. I got to see the consequences. What happened when they didn't succeed in for them? It was like there weren't beating their kids and so directly they're waking coming up and going to sleep every day thinking about how many kids would not as your first thought in the morning. You don't really have time to get to thinking about ethics. Does this privilege in having the opportunity to think about ethics and what is right and wrong and and And getting to that that dimension so I don't know if I answered your question but if it had been flawed I mean there were times where I was fascinated by what they're doing and wanted to understand it more. There were times rose disgusted by what they're doing and I just wanted to be away from. I needed space but I think at the core like there was a real friendship that we really cared about each other. We still do a nice spent more time with them than I did with anyone else. You know during mid twenties There forever lawyer

Kenya New York And Gaining Trust New York City John Kospi Director Los Angeles QNA Serbia ED Australia India Hunt
"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

07:43 min | 11 months ago

"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Well. There's not to invest in Peter. But thank you for clearing up the that question force to make sure we don't forget to do it. I better let you out of your misery about the single so people have actually with the finals. This RHIANNA in little down. I'm also right. It is a cat yes so they sleep twice as much as humans. Do in the case of the council is about five times as much as I seem to. Yes the young referred to as a kindle when there's a group of them and the collector term for a AH group of them is a cloud and there are ten million pussycats in the UK just the UK has a watery number of cats into kids. Want to so the focus. If you'll excuse the pun on this question which came into a forum at naked scientists dot com slash forum. It's from us it scientists when you do cataract procedure and you replace a forked Lens. From a person's I normally that lens can have shaped changed subtly by the muscles inside the eye which achieves a degree of tweaking of the focus thus when one puts in a replacement Lens to do with the cataract that Kant changes focus. Can it no. But there's other ways are how do I I still see clearly then the cataract effects the lens of the eye which sits just behind you pupil and the Lens itself is is you can imagine a little bit like a grape. It's got a skin gin called capsule and then it's full of of the sort of the pope of the grape if you like which are lens fibers and the Lens is a kind of an unusual usual thing in that it grows throughout life. You're continually producing new lens fibers at the edge of the Lens and shoving the older fibers into the center. Now the lenses transparent because of the regular arrangement of those fibers and we want it to be transparent soda can let the light through to the back of the eye but as time goes on and you increase they number lens fibers in their pushes them. Altogether changes the regularity. And that can lead to clouding of the Lens which is cataract so yeah very common operation Russian to remove that cataract we peel away the little capsule at the front an essentially remove all of the contents of the lens with a little sort of surgical hoover. The type thing. Then you will put in an implant a replacement plastic cleanse to replace the power of the now the Lens in well in anybody nobody under forty or so is able to change shape a little bit because this capsule on the outside of it is elastic. Your ability to do that does decline with time. That's why we all need reading glasses by a certain age and that again is because the lens is becoming much stiffer because it's not able to change shape as the so many fibers in that lens so by the time most people have got cataract then not able to change the shape of Lens anymore when the Lens is removed. There's a little plastic implant that is inserted kind of like a ship in a bottle into the remaining capsule of the Lens in the majority of cases that is a fixed focus lens so it will be designed on the basis of measurements if the eye to give you a particular focal point so either to be focused for distance then you need to put reading glasses on afterwards or possibly to set you for reading and then you have have to put distance glasses on one of each. You can have a long run on a short one you can. You can get around that you can go one vision like that. You can do that with contact lenses. As well and give one the distance and one is reading laser laser correction can do that swell for close work and one for longer you can do that does cover both bases. It does mess about with the you been on television a little bit so it might happy a depth perception a bit. But the other thing that you can do with intraocular lenses the implants that get put in as you can have multi focal Lens's not only nhs but you can have multi focal lenses and they were by diffraction so that the single piece of plastic produces two simultaneous focal quickpoint. One for distance and one for raiding is does that get like going through it in different positions. According to where you're looking you have. Do you have to learn like you do with bifocals. Vocals you have to almost learn to use them and now it's not quite like that way you've got sort of an area of the lenses distance in an area is reading you have little circles. Engraved moved on the Lens so that the light that falls in between the circles might be focused one distance. Say to give you distance vision but the light that passes through the Aniela ridges on the Lens. We'll give you a different focal point focused for reading. So you get this simaltaneous two things in focus at once but it can give you slightly less crisp vision. Ginette can affect your ability to detect low contrast. So it's not because it's trying to do a number of things at once is not perfect doing all of them. So how is the fine focusing in a lens. That can't change shape achieved then. Is that purely by just moving pupil wider smaller in order to achieve a pinhole effects. You can get that fine focusing and compensate that way as you get older and to some extent yes the the. The older pupil is a little bit smaller. So you do get more of a depth of focus focused. Because I if you've got a smaller aperture you get a wider depth of focus. But the short answer is that you will get your distance correction and then you will need a separate correction for reading. You can't have both at the same time so there'll be a sweet spot at which are vision works best and then either side of. That's a compromise. I decided that yet. But that's what special. Thank you very much for clearing that Lens Question. I guess thanks very much right Richard. We've got this question. Which James would like you to help him out with please in space nice tourism actually feasible and sustainable? Is it just for the super rich or could it ever be a possibility for mortals. Excuse for the super rich okay. So currently tickets on Of a collective will set you back two hundred fifty thousand dollars It's a bit like what Peter was talking about. It's in early stages it's going to get cheaper. It's never going to be that cheap but it might open the door to hypersonic travel aval from continent to continent so you know trip from London to Sydney say in just a just a few hours it might it might kick start that sort of that sort of Economy There are a few rivals out there but all of them are Kinda Ramat. Two hundred thousand dollar Ma. I can't see ever coming down a huge amount but that said I think there was one an important reason why it's good that the rich and powerful can do this because there's a lot of evidence that if you see the from space you get this idea of the earth without without Borders you can certainly see the whole environment and actually if we start sending presidents and the CEO's of companies out there they might. It's helped to change the world about two or three months ago. We sent a helium balloon to the edge of space. We got to thirty three kilometers and we played people screams listeners to the naked. It's on his. We played the screams in space but we also put to qualify mobile phones in the box and took beautiful shots. We were joking saying the people in Beijing at perhaps watch the footage footage before we go to sit. I'm sure that's not true but some we put these mobile phones in the box. Music the most gorgeous footage of the from thirty three kilometers up in the blackness of space compared head to this amazing iridescent blue and it really doesn't like a mobile and honestly I've watched that footage identity. How many times in his orange spines exactly where you're coming? It's what the astronauts talk about this thin blue line nine separating us from the void and it is just extraordinary. I think the more people can see that and experience for real it will make a substantial difference. So if if Mr Branson's finds out the space boffins podcast and says Richard. Would you like to go into space. What would you say I think I would have to say but yes so I would love to go but if to preserve my marriage.

"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:56 min | 11 months ago

"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"No wants to make profound one and made it. We're going dynasty remember. You have pretty horrible question. Okay Lithium you can make molecules of daily just take to maxims and joined them together and that a commonly occurring die nitrogen the same into you just take a former triple cavale. Bond Diadem was Mandalay. Of's periodic table in the early days. They used to think it was one element but we now realized realized that in fact it's the combination of two rare earth metals which is president and neodymium and we can separate them apart so Damien no longer exists in the modern periodic table. So afraid it's new that done okay. So round three here we go now. This is pretty hard. I'm we're going to see what you make this. Okay these are riddles. And you got to solve. This is called solve this. Listen very carefully. You can take notes Richard and as you might need to okay. But I'm going to strict about the time because we don't have to launch this. You are on a forested island. It is five hundred meters north to south and three kilometers east just to west. It is surrounded by high cliffs and ocean. A wind blows constantly across the island from west to east to constant constant speed on Monday at noon. The entire western edge of the island forest catches fire fanned by the wind. The the flames of moving at one hundred meters an hour across the island. If you're trapped by the fire you're going to die. You can't jump off the island with you is a rucksack which is GonNa Penknife the compass a calculator and a Bible in there for good measure. How do you survive until rescue arrives on Wednesday? Great I really I can't. I was on university challenge once and I cannot process this information quick. You gave me a couple of days come back to you I can. We can jump in the sea or something that we can't. We can't to do that. Okay if you're contemplating that I'm going to come to the other team and I'm GonNa give you your one to think about too because you can have some extra time thing then. Thirteen to impeach. A woman has a bucket of water in her hands. She turns it upside down but the bucket stays full. There's no lid on the bucket and the water is in liquid form. She's not relying on Centrifugal Force. How does this happen? That's your question version. I don't believe it. Upside tanishing space sold it yet. Richard Kessler has your Kansas reckoner I think we've got to use the if we head for the eastern most side of the island the wind the the flames will catch up with us So I'm wondering what will happen. And if we go to the northernmost or the southern most point of the island will we escaped the flames. If they're just zooming across the middle of the island to the other side but I suspect it. I'm afraid that you're not gonNA have that. Here's the answer. Okay you take a piece of wood from the fire. That's currently burning you heison hasten across to the other side of the island and come one hundred yards inland enlighten other fire. You then retreat into the forest while it burns towards. It's the edge of the island and Burns out that Peter Forest. Meanwhile the fire has arrived yet. You then go into the burned-out bit because you've created a break and you sit in there quite safe to eat your Apple Regional Bible until so rescue comes on some afraid. I'd like to thinking but that wasn't the right answer. Br.

"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

06:29 min | 11 months ago

"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Still to come how much energy is the Internet costing us what might be the environmental consequences of that before at the? Here's the next part of our guests. Who Game Clue one was that this animal sounds like this and clue too? Who is these animals? Sleep a lot about twice as much as US humans and they live between ten and fifteen years on average. Anyone any the wiser here yet. And if you're not in the studio any ideas. HP Sophie through and you Oh okay so fi reconciled while you ponder further. So if can you enlighten us. nearly PR forms wondering about glowworms and says how declare worms glow and health going for. Okay Soglo M's a really interesting interesting. They're actually a beetle and we got them in the UK and it's the female that does the glowing so she doesn't typically transform. She doesn't transform typical typical way into an adult. Says she looks like lava but a heavily armored sort of Try a bite type creature about two and a half centimeters long and she produces the glow below. The male looks like typical beetle and his attracted to her. So he'll fly through the night and and be drawn in by her glow now she produces a chemical called Lucifer on which is fantastic. Then reaction with oxygen this producers with glow so what we call bioluminescence biologically produced as light now. glowworms don't actually feed as an adult so they metamorphose into the adult form and they don't have mouth parts. They do not need to eat at at this point all they need to do is find a mate and mate with one another so she's kind of stuck she's relying on reserves that she's built up as lava she's is left about two years as a lover actually eating to make sure she's got enough reserves to produce this chemical reaction once mated that that's all she needed so she will I use has spam fertilize her eggs and she will stop claiming. She doesn't need to anymore. She will hopefully find mate if not she might run out of energy and she might have to stop glowing but the mound back on the subject of eggs they really like female that a glaring strongly. 'cause they're big. They contain lots of eggs. So he you can't get lots and lots of offspring sign if they if they can afford to glow very brightly their welfare. Lots of energy probably a healthy female. Isn't it more likely to have healthier offspring indeed and also. I'm generally a bit larger. So her what they call the London. Which is the section of optimum that glows will be bigger on a bigger female and bigger female bigger body? I like that. Thank you very much so far so there you go shedding some light on. How clean wounds were Richard from glowing glowworms to rockets that go screeching through the sky? Can you answer this one force from Amalia. What is the maximum speed for a rocket that is for human to experience? Okay that's the wrong question Christian. Come on what's wrong question the second. We're actually traveling life ost right now so I had to write these down because I work some of these out as well so they might. That'd be wholly accurate so the earth rotates at six hundred miles an hour so we're currently on the earth going six hundred miles an hour because we're on the earth we're also going six hundred miles an hour. The the earth speeding around the sun as seventy thousand miles per hour so we are also speeding around the sun at seventy thousand miles the sun speeding through the galaxy at at four hundred and fifty thousand miles which means we're also spending at four hundred fifty thousand miles an hour so actually we can go very very fast. The the Qu- question is acceleration kind of human stand. So that's when you come in to g forces and the idea of the amount times gravitate so you can withstand so typically a rocket as the Soyuz rocket which is what astronauts used to get to the International Space Station doesn't that she accelerate that much. It's about three or four G. that maximum going up to the space station coming back. It's pretty more unpleasant. It's kind of near five G. but not for very long period of time. So that's fine. We know from experiments done in the nineteen fifties by colonel. John Stop a military doctor. He did experiments on himself as all good doctors should do. He attached himself to a rocket powered sled and spelling this track and then braked patiently to see what g forces for pilots. What g-forces pilots could endure the most? He went up to bursting blood vessels in his is in the process but actually suffering no serious injury other than that was twenty. Cj did he decelerate with his head towards the direction of travel or away. Because this makes a difference because it makes us with blood goes away from your brain and you get blackout account or towards your brain and you get socal read out his. He was on a chair on a sled. I guess the etc going through his chest through his body the same astronauts. The reason they lie down on couches the forces are going through your body rather than straight down through your head which is you want to avoid the US you get this idea. Blackouts astronauts also wear to to avoid that and pilots. Do I mean they have far greater g forces pressure suits and they pushed the blood towards the head. So you don't black out you don't be unconscious when you're flying a jet fighter so returning to the question which was what's the best of rocket go in terms of Speed actually that doesn't matter. It's the acceleration that matters and the acceleration is. What is the g you're GONNA feel? And so what would be a comfortable G for a human to feel when I'm taking off on an aeroplane wall sort of g forces. Nothing nothing really. So that's what I want basically craft. I mean it's interesting because actually the best spacecraft for comfort was absolutely the space shuttle not too bad on the way up and coming down. It's sort of circled it. Luton Luton Luton to lose energy as it came down to Earth and as it did that it was quite a gradual deceleration whereas the Soyuz again G. forces going up. Uh not see bad. Coming back is pretty horrendous. I've heard it described as like going over Niagara Falls in a barrel but a barrel. That's on fire. What a wonderful wonderful picture? Thanks very much Richard. The naked scientists podcast is produced in association with Spitfire Cost Effective Voice Internet and engineering engineering services the UK.

"qna" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Thank you to pain strip it to America's pastime should be shaming racists. Yeah let's get that going Thomas Smith is my favorite attorney Andrews oh second meet to oddly enough Travis Napoleon thank you Sir Chemo Valley Experts Australian red meat and craft beer trump stumped Rudy Moody Bar Tarde let me totally clear I like being totally clear Milo need song passed the bar and his brother got married well congratulations Susan a property lawyer slipped on a banana next patron continues and keep at it keep trying join your labor union together we bargained we beg Patriot names about friendly atheists are so meta the time traveller who prevented justice garland's pun filled Nice Arthur to sheds Jackson COSMO blues is not my legal name but Karaoke legend is my legal title James Call the civil war will be live tweeted update Dory and put a hole in my roof FNL sorry Jonathan Steele is a great dad fund anonymous sample luck can we have an episode about rugby law please maybe couldn't build the house of trigonometry no one would go side Ooh that is such a great debt math joke I love it I don't want just any wasp nostrils I want these wasps nostrils I have no idea what that's supposed to be kind of wasp nostrils is kind of a funny phrase closing concessions the Great and unmatched wisdom of.

Sir Chemo Valley Experts Travis Napoleon America FNL Thomas Smith Jonathan Steele Rudy Moody Milo Dory trump Andrews garland attorney Susan rugby Arthur
"qna" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"He really mean to crime though like maybe if we let him know crime for like a week and then crimes then it's fine by the way that they can append comments can say okay this came to my desk. I'm forwarding it to you because the law says I have to but but but does not say that the acting deny and there is no director of national intelligence goes of course there isn't I like fifteen major cabinet level positions are vacant right now and are filled with people that have never been confirmed by Congress by the Senate so that's for this the director of National Intelligence was I'm blanking on name is an Indiana senator Senator Blevins I'm pretty sure it was Dan coats right and a long-standing establishment guy pretty hawkish it would be no fan of the show but again not a howler monkey not a crazy person somebody you know respected coats resigned like a monk before and then so the acting deny was literally on the job for like a week and I don't know I said this on the episode this is getting to the right like we've never had one of these about the president so I didn't know which which I think you pointed out was Kinda nonsense and it is but but I I do kind understand when you're the deputy guy and it's like your first day in the chair all of a sudden it's like oh by the way like the most monumentous decision and I don't know if acting McGuire really intended to commit a crime and cover stuff up here if you want to pick why isn't this guy arrested like Corey Lewandowski that'd be a real good one to pick right like that guy should be arrested to show and I'm one hundred percent serious right like to show up and testify before Congress and basically like kick your feet up and eat an apple in the testimony that was below and beneath the call of duty you take arresting how they're helping guys look their best if you haven't yet it is time to see what they're all about here's the problem sixty six percent of men start to lose their hair by age thirty five once you've noticed thinning hair it can be too late so is that hairline slowly starting to move backwards ball spot yet the best way to prevent hair loss is you something about it while you still have some it's time to get a handle on this precious locks I ask you do you WanNa bald spot to pop up or your hairline seed or do you want to do something about it first and here's the thing guys turn to weird solutions or do nothing when they can turn to medicine and science we're fans of medicine in science here on the show for him Dot Com.

Dan coats senator Senator Blevins National Intelligence director Congress Corey Lewandowski Indiana McGuire apple president Senate one hundred percent sixty six percent
"qna" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

14:59 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"It all right anyone have a question for Andrew here we go somebody here no you're pointing mm-hmm oh Duh I forget every time yeah what's your question obligatory question one from truce go this is Andrew had asked on twitter to share his gene Scalia story Oh so meetings are you someone else's question Theresa I want L. Theresa Chris I'm just kidding okay what is what is the question for Gene Kelly yet gene Scalia so Eugene Scalia son of the late fully departed former Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia works for I think he's still there but but when I encountered I'm he worked for a big firm Covington style firm called Gibson Dunne and Crutcher in downtown Washington DC and Gibson Dunne represented the defendant in one of the few plaintiffs cases that I did while I was at a big firm and this was I've told a little bit of the story before this is one of the worst in fact pieces that I've ever had a case this was a guy who was an accountant for a multinational billion dollar accounting firm right and they transferred him to the Philippines over his objections and and he was kidnapped off the street in the Philippines which is currently happens to Thursday seriously apparently that that happens a lot and then so that's real bad and then and then the the firm decided that they were going to intervene in the hostage negotiations right the kidnappers were like center uh letter to to my client's family and said Hey we want you to pay one hundred thousand dollars which was a lot but he was like yeah right you know the the the his his wife was like yeah we'll we'll pay that tomorrow I will borrow money will do it and the firm was like we got perfect we got trade wind hostage negotiators here so we're not gonNA know don't pay exactly from diehard right Hans Yobe Yeah it really is yeah this was the guy that name not Elliott but it was anyway so it might be that anyone no we did we should bring one diehard special host every show right now Brian write that down for me anyway so the firm went in and low ball was like well we'll pay you twenty thousand and so in response what the kidnappers did was this was described in the complaint has cut off a portion of his ear so I want you to think about what you would think about for that and I watched the video that they sent they again movie like right sent the box with half of his ear and this videotaped his family and the video we'll go to thirty thousand the video came on and and he is bound and he has a gag shoved in his mouth and he's screaming right and it and it says muffled herb and then the kidnapper comes over with Kit Black handled kitchen she I write goes in the middle halfway in the middle of this year and as I'm sorry I should have done I don't really need this is really this really as the they cut through all of a sudden like I had to throw off the headphones because the screaming went uh yeah it was it was definitely don't if I'm ever kidnapped can you just repair that money don't take kid napping advice from anyway and and so our entire case was basically like that we're going to play that up to a jury and the jurors are who suing somebody suing the so my client I write sued the accounting arm that interfered in the kidnapping this they should have they should have and the accounting firm hired Gibson Dunne and crutcher and they tied us up for four years with all sorts of bullshit procedural like the first thing was well this should obviously it come under Worker's compensation right which was like yeah well which was will pay for one a medical visit they were going to pay like two hundred and thirteen caller or docking as vacation days while he was and so the ultimately like I dealt with the Gibson don lawyers who are first rate Covington style like top of their Class Ivy League university and it was a pleasure to kick their ass at every stage when we had the appeal before the DC circuit on the workers COMP all of a sudden gene Scalia added his name to the top of the pleadings he was a partner Gibson Dunne at the time and took over the oral argument and his oral argument was essentially like well. You know your honor I'm Gene Scalia like my my dad's on the Supreme Court and my dad said I should in this case you'll do that Iran I mean I'm not kidding it was one hundred percent like or sent in to try and convince the panel well like you don't want my daddy to overrule you and uh three Oh in the DC circuit right so James Scalia talentless hack nepotism and so of course he's been nominated by Donald trump to the feather Wow let's murderer question anybody let's go era just jump into recording when you guys start your show or do you guys do show between each other and what's that like no we pretty much just jump in I mean we we usually chat I usually complain about something and Andrew learn listened to sympathetically because I've some some broke or some audio piece we're not working I'm mad and then he's like okay I'm really sorry about that anyway let's go and then we got that's pretty much we do we do fill out the whiteboard and so what I'll do is put on the White Board you know this is the story for the second Segment as Thomas alluded to in in recent weeks like the B segment will be like it's Yo mountain and then I'll have like eleven number Adams on the list but but but yeah now we jump in that way except for Friday show the one that aired today yeah we recorded on Wednesday where we're Thomas Message me like twelve minutes beforehand and he was like no I gave you well yeah you're sorry right twelve I thought I'd give you warning I realized that I had the wrong date in my calendar and we're recording that day I thought reporting the next day my fault you're right sorry and he's like and how the PG shut up power for million people about this and I was like can you lie or something me some law for it yeah sometimes I think I need to move to like across all around the world once and then also more in a time zone so I'm like thirty four hours ahead of you because the problem is the west coast I mean we all know we're all here and some of you probably live around here as big dodgers fans and stuff like we like it's hard because he's up all ready I'm sure you're you're up earlier than I am because you're a lawyer and you still do lots of stuff and that's three hours ahead of us so I wake up in the whole world of news already happen so I usually I'm just trying to play catch up and then we record like the coast man is west coast killing me but yeah all right next question how let's go over Uh Vara game players of the game sorry for feeling that by the way so it's still love you there is a lot offline movie or just general deep dive topic is are there any movies are topics that you vehemently disagree on covering and if so why you like him and I disagree with each other in covering or oh well injury kept wanting to do really amazing comedy movies for a lot of movies and I was like I yeah make jokes about a perfect movie I'll just be like yeah that's funny cool they are great And so that was that was several arguments early on and then I think Andrew Maybe realized all right on that one maybe a little bit I don't recall ever taking that side you want to do my cousin vinny it's too he's been against doing my cousin vinny precisely that reason I'm getting sick we have this for Pena you turn over the there's one that I feel like we could talk about I'm probably not thinking of what you're talking about so there is and really this is just I think we both want to do this but there's no tasteful way to do it there is an unbelievably awful socially disgusting movie from Nine Hundred Eighty six called soul man I don't know if you've ever yeah and it is c Thomas Howell at the height of Thomas in Blau no that is guys to everybody knows who see Thomas Thomas Sowell he was he was associated with the Brat Pack. Yeah sorry it's C Thomas Howell in black face playing a white guy in black face who gets in Harvard on affirmative action so it is yeah it's so it's got to Harvard thing it's got horrible law it's got it's gotta be uh-huh terribly regressive social message affirmative action doesn't work that way you assholes right and like I really really want to rip this movie a new one and you think probably like yeah it would be super uncomfortable to do this say one thing unfortunately we have one person here who knew me back when I was a conservative an asshole now asshole I'm just not conservative but Yeah I wish somebody in college and in high school when I thought I was all against limited action because it was unfair to white people I wish I wanNa just take me and done the thing in movies like you slap the woman was like trying to talk and then she realizes like thirty and I shouldn't talk you're right or whatever they done that to me and been like hey dummy more white people get into Harvard based on their parents then all of the affirmative action slots that are ever available fucking idiot done that and be like I didn't know that because white people don't know that because we are ignorant about these things oftentimes that is absolutely true the number of just legacy admissions far outnumbers the total number of black people at Harvard total number forget like they're all affirmative action which they're not that's a fact and I didn't know that because I was ignorant and just thought of it now because some stupid black-faced movie that we're not going to get so if anybody has a time machine please go do the thing I just said with the slapping in circa two thousand three or whatever for all right next question straight here we'll get to the sides next throw the catching up do these all need to be practical questions because it seems to be the theme the more impractical the better I have no other show I'm just curious with the whole whistle blower thing that I feel like you like three years ago but you know the whistleblower rounded up to an edgy right excuse me if I forget all the names of people I see and then that went to someone else right who had to hand over papers to Congress and took key waited more than seven days or whatever the thing the time limit was why can't like a police Sir just arrest him for breaking the law like like why you know like we can find no reason to arrest like black people forever why why can't this guy get arrested I totally appreciate the speed of that one and you're gonNA answer it but I also think it goes to the theme we've talked about which is I mean thrown in jail if a politician commits a crime we're like well but did the accurate description of how the system works it's not an inaccurate description of how the system works in this case however and I think I said this on the episode of the show when the so so what happened under the under the International Whistleblower Protection Act is The the whistle blower filed his complaint it goes to the Inspector General the International Community Inspector General who was the person who looked at it and I said Holy Shit and does the investigation and that person has a separate time not looking at the statutes I don't want to get the numbers doc but that person has a set period of time I believe is fourteen days to make a determination as to whether that complaint is serious and credible he did so at that point the statute then uses the words must and shall says he the I G shall turn the complaint over to the director for National Intelligence and then the director of national intelligence must forward complaint to the House of Congress to whom it is directed hase close if it is as case closed as as the law can be and it says.

Gene Scalia Andrew Supreme Court Thomas Howell Harvard Iran one hundred thousand dollars one hundred percent thirty four hours billion dollar twelve minutes fourteen days three hours three years four years seven days
"qna" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"But then it just really leave feeling really great. And the main actresses the two people that say the sisters they're coming. They're also the co writer and Hannah, the main actress, she's the director of the film, and and you know, I saw her and her film when I went to Cleveland and just hearing her talk and Acuna that she did there. I just thought like this is going to make work great panel after the film because I think a lot of people are going to have similar questions, and, you know, ask her because it's very rare where when you can ask. Ask a director about an actress experience to but because she's the director, and she's been main actress, and because this was her first feature length film, but she made in acted in a she can answer a lot of questions and give you a lot of insight on this reason for the choice, or that reason for this, you know, seem setup because she she has done it all the other big event that we're doing our clothing nights are closing is I I mentioned the film autonomy. And it's actually not really at night if at two pm, but after the film and the QNA with the director and the producer. We're going to have our closing that Cardi at and city, which is the first autonomous vehicle test track proving grounds in the world and the university of Michigan along with partnered with other companies to build this facility. It's close off to the public. It's mainly use for companies. And for the university to pass the vehicle that they've been working on. And it's very rarely open to the public. I was able to go to MCI when they first opened because I mentioned my husband's in the field. So we went to the special events..

director QNA MCI writer Acuna Cleveland Cardi university of Michigan Hannah producer
"qna" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"But I'm saying, but it was interesting because then everyone else sort of copied not the ball gag. But like everyone else went that direction. So we'll see if it was sorry. So everyone went that direction. And I think it was not the worst direction to go on for journalists. But I do think that now everybody's kind of like everyone suddenly is making. It's like making avocado toast, like everyone's making avocado toast and not everybody makes great avocado toast. I think it's hard honestly to make a bad avocado the genius about. But the one thing I do want sound I can tell that we're supposed to Toews. Right. Let me just say one thing before moved to QNA, which is something that was really interesting to me to see when I was at the post was that you could write the same story as news, news analysis and opinion. Yeah. It was just like you were just saying that there's some people think this is a shitty deal. Right. Like critics say Comcast deal is terrible. And then there's like. The kind of kind of bland but still like dues analysis colon. Comcast deal has problems. And then like, then there's like a pin? Like, Comcast sucks. Right. Like, and you could write the same thing. They're places like who you quoted and what what order it went in. That was always really interesting to me. And I always thought that in the traditional way, we did it we made it too hard for the new side to tell the truth and too easy for the opinion side to lie. But now, I think we also sometimes epipens gotten so easy and thick out there that we don't do enough of the stuff that was behind a lot of that news. It was like good process. Even if there wasn't always good product. And I think we don't want. I don't want the old even-handed news product. But I do want to bring more of that process into. It's really good point. Sponsored by fund rise. The future of.

Comcast Toews QNA
"qna" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on Recode Decode

"But I'm saying, but it was interesting 'cause then everyone else sort of copied not the ball gag. But like everyone else went that direction. It was sorry. So everyone went that direction. And I think it was not the worst direction to go in for journalists. But I do think that now everybody's kind of like everyone suddenly is making it's like making abakada toast, like everyone's making avocado toast and not everybody makes great avocado toast. I think it's hard honestly to make a bad avocado. That's like the genius of that. But the one thing I do want sound I can tell that we're supposed to. Toast. Right. Let me just say one less thing before moved to QNA, which is something that was really interesting to me to see when I was at the post was that you could write the same story as news, news analysis and opinion. Yeah. It was just like you were just saying that there's some people think this is a shitty deal. Critics say Comcast deal is terrible. And then there's like the kind of like kind of bland, but still like dues analysis colon. Comcast deal has problems. And then like, then there's like a pin? Like, Comcast sucks. Right. Like, and you could write the same thing. They're places like who you quoted and what what order it went in. That was always really interesting to me. And I always thought that in the traditionally, we did it we made it too hard for the new side to tell the truth too, easy, for the opinion side to lie. But now, I think like we also sometimes epipens gone so easy and thick out there that we don't do enough of the stuff that was behind a lot of that news. There was like good process. Even if there wasn't always good product. And I think like we don't want. I don't. The old even handed news product. But I do want to bring more of that process into it really point. We're gonna take another break. Now, we'll be back after.

Comcast QNA
"qna" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"qna" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"No, I've had over five hundred people on my show, and the people you think, oh, they're just pop stars or whatever they all have a story of getting through some major drama to be with a are. That's why I love talking with people because they always surprise you. They're there for a reason it's because they've paid the cost. These are all really really good points. In fact, I'm dealing with something a couple of things a little little bit of resistance of this week is we put together a live event that we've got coming up this weekend. And initially, I was a little frustrated. Of course, nobody wants to face the resistance. But I started thinking about a little bit more. And I thought to myself, you know, this is a good thing. This is going to make this event better. It's gonna make us more prepared. It's going to enhance future events and to your point about suckers. It's going to keep those people out. I know for example, when I have a conversation with guys like you and these other guys that the both of us have been able to get on the show and have conversations with just by default of their success. I know that they are people who are willing to push past this resistance, and frankly, a higher caliber and quality of person because they aren't deterred by some challenges and some hurdles that come up because they're willing to break through them. Yeah. It builds character. And honestly, you can see it on your face, and you can see in your posture. And if you've ever been in a room with somebody who has faced through resistance and gone through it, you just know it it's actually deepen their souls, and it's very commun- effect. And that's why you know, when you're around a really solid kind of alpha male figure that has been. Been there done that it feels good to be around that because you know, it's someone who has a strong character and even back to the olden days that can get you through a tough situation as a leader or even as a team member, it's really important to do that. And also, I'll say one more thing something I teach my students all the time in the academy is when you're feeling resistance and frustration. You're actually building intellectual property, and that's a great way to look at what's happening. So for you live events. Don't get me started. I mean, I just had two hundred people come to a movie premiere, and it was insane. It was insane. So when all that's happening. You're actually building I p because now, you know, how to run into vent now, you know, how to coordinate things how to deal with things all of that stuff. How to even remain combine your own emotions when all things going crazy and had a look like a boss player when you jump up on the stage. Like, you do this every day. That's all intellectual property. You're building the next time. It's easier easier easier we had our fourth premier this weekend. And I was actually able to enjoy it and have fun. It's always good to remind yourself that. That's what's happening, and we have. To do difficult things every single day. That's how we progress as humans, and so just get used to it. Yeah. I mean, I like the concept that you talked quite a bit about which is earning it that you don't get to just have what you want. You have to go out there and earn it. And so for your ability this past premier to be able to sit down and enjoy that premier that was earned that wasn't just something that was handed to or given to you is earned through trial and hardship and adversity in the fire that you had to deal with and the previous events that you did. Yeah. And I always say true professional makes it look easy for me. That's kind of advanced game. That's kind of black belt level stuff for even what you and I do or an any profession is just make it look easy. I think that's when it's really gangster. And so if you were to come to that premier it probably looks like we do these every weekend. Everything's role in smooth everyone smiling, we're on stage. The movie comes off. It's flawless the QNA's there. And it's like that means that you've really done the work..

QNA
"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"qna" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"See is that nothing has happened as fast nothing that we've really seen happens as fast as what we are currently observing that rate of change that makes the anthropogenic the manmade effective climate change different. Not Joe which has always happened and will continue to always happen with our signal on top of it. Thank you for that joins Laura. Let's move over to you. So fi has been in touch on Facebook. And once you can help out with this when cheering them. Monthly cycle. Women. Most fertile well most women average twenty eight day cycle. Some ladies have slightly short cycles and some have slightly younger cycles and most ladies of late about halfway through that cycles around about day fourteen so from facility spec, did we would usually recommend regular sexual intercourse from around about day ten because sperm lasts five to seven days an egg baloney last of one to two days maximum, so ladies mainly fertile from probably about day fourteen of their cycle round about day. Twenty one of their cycle is all to do with of elation occurring day fourteen. But what about if a person doesn't have a regular cycle because what the data you've given us a seems persons knows where they are in that cycle. So what happens then so for us? We might recommend that you have some scans can see what's happening to see whether the follicle production is going on within your cycle. Patients can try using Luton ising home sticks. Sixes surge kits. As they're called. You can buy over the counter pay on a stick. And it tells you whether your of your lighting or not ladies, then aren't detecting that they may need some help with something like Plum Athene reproduction of follicle stimulating hormone that usually occurs naturally. But isn't in those languages the chemical process of of Asian, and then obviously we would link gain with scanning. So that we can see that there is a follicle production as well. So what roughly what fraction of people do have a regular cycle. What fraction have irregular cycles sip, ruby one in six ladies have irregular cycles. That's quite a high high proportion Milli. I mean, we keep focusing again here on female factor. But actually forty percent of problems are male factor problems. Forty cent female twenty percent, sometimes it between the unknown. And all say is a mixture of two quite often appears that patients drawn together if both have an info having infertility issue. Well. James, you're gonna say, yeah. I was going to you're talking about of kits. You can buy buy over the counter. Do you put any stock in smartphone apps sort of suggest your facility in the cycle? There's lots out there now which help you track cycle. They would recommend the track your temperature because there's a slight temperature rise when you feel late there is now bit like fit bits and things like that. They're now out there for facility as well. It's a it's a big of up and coming burgeoning market within that side of things as well. And help. They find that useful. Or do you think it just helps Buddha focus their mind they plan in place. And so they tend to stick to it, which means more light successful. And for some patients. It's really helpful. It gives them through focus for others. It just absolutely adds to the stress of the situation, and we would recommend that they go and seek help from a specialist go and see the GP speak to tilting us in those those lots of things out there to help. And actually the apps are useful. But I think sometimes for patients who are really struggling. It's not the best thing really adds to their stress. Some people use these apps because they don't wanna get pregnant is a risky strategy. Then I would say it's a very risky. Thank you very much on.

"qna" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"qna" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The highlight was undeniable who's a long chat in qna with the psychologist dan economy timing is not only the elder statesmen behavioral science that he's rv on say so we were just overwhelmed with joy and gratitude when he said yeah i will come close out the session commons moderator was max pays herman himself a most distinguished scholar he teaches business administration at harvard and he's written many landmark pieces on decisionmaking ethics and negotiation by way i heard his ourselves however de beers hong kong and i thought i love making me know peterman began with a brief overview of commons research most of it done with his late collaborator amos toureski the two of them were the subject of michael lewis his book the undoing project which lewis discuss on this program in an episode called the men who started a thinking revolution it is incredible to me how many different spheres of human existence these guys work has touched and inflows now max space herman again i realize that most the he was room no remember the 1970s at least loved healy play there was a highway after your 74 eager were apologised became acutely aware of your work and behind for paying too much attention and then eventually louis rough announced starts but throughout the last millennium this was headed more of an academic in this millennium we seen this robust movement into new world war all by groups that the wizards like the members here by the video and say he's how you summits fleeing the shift from academic to intense rural world interests so behavior economics as as it currently exists thinks the deploraball that's right behavioral economic started in a bar an economy in an amos toureski we're having drinks with eric wanner future president of the russell sage foundation and eric said that he wanted to bring psychology and economics closer together and he wanted our advice to how he.

qna herman harvard peterman world war president russell sage foundation de beers hong amos toureski michael lewis healy louis rough eric wanner
"qna" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"qna" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The highlight was undeniable who's a long chat in qna with the psychologist then economy the timing is not only the elder statesman behavioral science but he's also are beyond say so we out more just overwhelmed with joy and gratitude when he said yeah i would common close out the session commons moderator was max breeze herman himself a most distinguished scholar he teaches business administration at harvard and he's written many landmark pieces on decisionmaking ethics and negotiation by way of nervous as dang nervous come and i love making meeting of peterman began with a brief overview of commons research most of it done with his leak collaborator amos toureski the two of them were the subject of michael lewis his book the undoing project which lewis discussed on this program in an episode called the men who started a thinking revolution it is incredible to me how many different spheres of human existence these guys work has touched and influence now max space men again i realize that most that he was room no renamo the 1970s at least loved healy there was a highway after your said before he were psychologists became acutely aware of your work and behind this working too much attention and then eventually the b he broadcast stars but throughout though the last millennium this is kind of more of an academic looser and this millennium we see you this robust movement into their world war all by groups the pew research likely members here vitamin d b he goes against how you sort of those fleeing the shift from academic to intense real world interest so behavior economics as as it currently exists thanks to the law that's right behaviorally conomic started in a bar the an economy in an aim is too risky we're having drinks with eric wanner future president of the russell sage foundation and eric said that he wanted to bring psychology and economics closer together and we wanted our advice as to how he.

qna harvard peterman world war president russell sage foundation amos toureski michael lewis healy vitamin d eric wanner
"qna" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"qna" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Which other and we had a great qna so he interviewed me basically in front of the audience and one of the questions that came up what from the audience was if president reagan were alive today would he tweet this is a great question john high bush joins us now hi john how are ya um did with great laura was just so terrific to have you there so thanks oh good people really good people ed do we had a blast afterward to and two during the booksigning for billionaire at the barricades we hit has like 500 people are selling line was really relief i just had if i just had a fun time i just i don't know i always a good mood what am at the reagan library 'cause a reminds me of what is possible and when right really does make might may know he he was right and we were powerful and strong and uh and we just have to remember president reagan's lessons for all of us absolutely and you're right lower the you know when they question was asked about would reagan tweet i was really interested in your answer i don't know if you wanna say you got you recap i totally agree now onstage issued right that capacity crowd of uh laura lovers as i call him and uh one of the questions were you know we talked about uh president trump and his tweets just this year speak you you know talking about today and uh um uh one of the questions was well if reagan had the technology at the time if he uh was able to tweet to do you think he would have tweeted and i just thought your answer was great now i said i think yeah he probably will allow us and it would be different from trump trump's tweets he probably wouldn't you know you wouldn't get personnel a little in these small spat swiss these minor figures there he probably wouldn't do that paid privacy really and stories.

bush laura president reagan trump president john
"qna" Discussed on The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"qna" Discussed on The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

"In other words i make this statement and then cdl bria disagree than i make another statement the you read a series of the shows about them and not the guest the guest is a prop i never had i never went on the air with an agenda i never went on the air saying boy am i gonna get this guy why not i was little learn gavin agendy nothing learn in my opinion i don't learn anything when i watched shows in which the host and his guest our of one point of view and that's the whole thing you know so whether it's bill o'reilly with at odds conservative or rachel meddle with an arch lebrun ruined i noted rachel meadow stands for this in her guest stands for that and they both agree that's now learning process to me it's not a real qna a real qna takes me understood in the heart of a person how people react to things was it like to be president and sinn that some to war mr late at night when you get a statistic suit one hundred thirty two killed today and he's sleep you're you're describing it as of an exercising curiosity visit partly an exercise in embassy in just emily the area has like pd houston off the great actor tony likes being interviewed because she gets to think about things he doesn't think about our walk around thinking about things you've just ask me put a foursome me think about them and therefore i enjoy it i liked as much as i like asking questions are being asked if they're good questions and causes me to be fought for.

lebrun president gavin bill o'reilly rachel meadow sinn tony