20 Episode results for "Pushkin industries"

Revisionist History Presents: The Pushkin Industries Holiday Variety Show

Revisionist History

37:00 min | 10 months ago

Revisionist History Presents: The Pushkin Industries Holiday Variety Show

"Hello Hello my friends Malcolm global here. I'm taking a quick break from reporting the next season of revisionist history to tell you. It's December it's cold stark huddle around the fire. And what do you have to entertain you. Just some crazy person singing jingle bells over and over again Jingle Bells Jingle Bells Jingle all the way jingle all the way who wrote that hundredth time you hear that son you realize. We don't want anyone to jingle all the way at most jingle some small portion of the way best case scenario. You don't by the way I grew up in Canada. I have been on a one horse. Open Sleigh Oh what fun. It's not. It's freezing here at Pushkin. We have such profound sympathy sympathy for all of you out there being slowly jingled to death that we've decided to step in bringing you a little December. Cheer Ladies and Gentlemen the First Annual Pushkin Holiday special today I will answer some of your burning questions about visions history. You will hear a taste of my hilarious. This conversation with Conan O'Brien for his podcast Conan. O'Brien needs a friend. And you'll hear excerpts from two new Pushkin Industries shows. I am so proud of the work. The Pushkin elves had been doing all year. And I WANNA show it off to you so shake off your boots and join me by the fire. The first new show from Pushkin Pushkin that I want to tell you about is tim. Harford's cautionary tales. Tim Writes for the Financial Times where he's known as the undercover economist. He's a genius. Musa telling stories that. Illuminate our world. And in cautionary tales. He takes stories of disasters and mistakes and asks what we can learn from them. In bringing we know stories to life we brought in a whole cast of great actors including Alan Cumming. Who you're about to hear in the role of an authority figure who's not what he seems? Here's Tim Harford. There may be times and places where it's a good idea to talk back to a military officer officer but Germany in one thousand nine hundred six isn't one of them so the young corporal doesn't the corporal. Let's let's call him. Corporal Mueller has been leading his squad of four privates down Celta Strasser in Berlin only to be challenged by captain. The the captain is about fifty a slim fellow with sunken cheeks the outline of his skull prominent above large White Moustache. Truth be told. He looks strangely down on his luck but corporate muller doesn't seem to take that in like any man in uniform. The Captain Looks Taller and broader. Thanks to his boots. Smart Grey overcoat. Prussian blue office CAP. His white gloved hand rests arrests casually on the hilt of his rapier. Are you taking those men back to the battery Turned him around and follow me. I have an urgent mission from the own highest command. The all highest. Everyone knows that means orders from the Kaiser as the small group. March towards polit- Strasser station should the charismatic captain. Sees another squad. You meant yes. Captain behind the Kaiser himself has commanded. Yes captain the captain now commands a little army and all ten soldiers ride the train across Berlin towards Capet. Charming little town. Just south east of the capital on arrival adventure continues corporate lined up for inspection lineup. Men Hurry fix bandits. It's already been an extraordinary day for Corporal Muller and his men with just getting started what they're about to do he's going to be the talk talk of newspapers around the world. You're listening to another retail Cautionary Tales stories stories about other people's mistakes and what we should learn from them lest we make the same mistakes ourselves. Sometimes these mistakes a tragic. Sometimes they're comic. This time I present a comedy at least I think it's a comedy I'm the captain of Kapernick is going to help me. He has a name by the way a name that will soon become famous. His name is Ville Helm. voight remember. We left him. He's outside the town hall of panic. Snapping out orders to Corporal Miller and his men than lined up at bayonets. A fixed. Now thought is going to begin. Captain Voids Little Army bursts into company townhall into the office visit the man. A man named Georg. Langham's you're under arrest. DECAYS has decreed that you are wanted men. He's in his mid thirties. A mild looking king fellow with ponds nee spectacles a pointed goatee and a large well groomed. Moustache he stemmed in astonishment. This is illegal. There's your warrant. My warrants is demand. I commend you. What is your role here? I am the tone pleasure so then open the safe to cash. Reserve is to be confiscated for safekeeping and visa will be examining the accounts for fraud. Aw cupcakes municipal safe contains three thousand five hundred fifty seven marks forty five Phoenix captain. VOIGHT voight is punked. Ilias about the count. Here's your receipt stamp it and keep it safe. It's nearly a quarter of a million million dollars in today's money. You Find Frau. Lack of hands and arresthe she will be interrogated alongside him three times cut. Captain Void searches the town hall office while his men keep the town officials under arrest failing to following following what he seeks he decides to wrap up the mission. The officials ought to be driven to a police station not far from where the days adventure began de eh. They'll be detained and interrogated captain. voight himself walks company railway station. He collects package from the left luggage office. insteps into a restroom scored a minute or two later he steps out again and he's almost unrecognizable having changed into shabby civilian clothes. He ambles bandy-legged across the station. Asian concourse this anonymous fellow boards the train back to Berlin with his uniform weekly folded under one arm and a back money under the other. He looks over his shoulder as he steps onto the train gazing out over the station he smiles then disappears into the carriage just like that captain of company is what what happens next well to hear the rest. You'll have to go and subscribe to cautionary tales. They're all good because Tim Harford like I said it's genius. Hi I'm Tim. Harford host of cautionary tales. First Season of my show. Show is out now. And it's been such in creating it with the Pushkin team from all of us to you. Wish you a very happy holiday season Stay with us because next. I'm finally going to answer your burning listener questions about revisionist history. Is there. Something that interferes with your happiness this or is preventing you from achieving your goals. Better help online counseling. Is there for you. Connect with your professional counselor in a safe in private online environment. It's so convenient. Get help on your own time at your own pace you can schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. Licensed professional counselors who are specialized in depression. Stress anxiety relationships oops sleeping trauma anger family conflicts. LGBT matters grief self esteem is all confidential. And if you're not happy with your counselor for any reason you can request a new one at anytime best of all. It's a truly affordable option revisionist history listeners sooners. Get Ten percent off your first month with Discount Code. Glad well so why not get started today. Go to better help dot com slash slash glad. Well simply fill out a questionnaire to help them. Assess your needs and get matched with a counselor. You'll love that's better help. NOPE DOT com slash quite. Well if you listen to revisionist history you know that we're big fans parachute world's greatest bedding and bath homosexuals company designed in Los Angeles and responsibly manufactured pictured by the world's best craftspeople. But here's the problem this podcast. I can't show you how gorgeous quilts are or their bath linens like if they're fantastic towels made from cream long staple Turkish cotton from the Jean region with textured strips hand knotted fringe. I can't show you them. I can only tell you about them. which is driving me crazy so we've decided here at revisionist history to bring you the sound a a parachute ready? That's my cat. A tabby named push it of course sitting on top of with my parachute quilt. Box Patterned in coal would it softly textured Linden Front and Chris precale back. I mean listen would push can be pouring like that if if you were lying on some second rate do they. Pushkin doesn't think so and now that's me. I take myself last night. That is the sound of utter happiness and contentment. The sound of someone sleeping on some insanely high quality parachute than in sheets. Crafted did from the finest Portuguese flax. Okay this mean Pushkin. Together that is happiness penis. My friends parachute home. Essentials so amazing you can hear the difference visit parachute home dot com slash glad dwell for free shipping and returns on parachutes premium quality very comfortable homosexuals. That's parachute home. Dot Com sloshed. Glad well for free shipping and returns Happy Holidays because it's against the rules to say. Merry Christmas I'm Michael Lewis host against the rules season. Two of against the rules will focus on why. The role of coach has expanded so far beyond sports in American in life. Everybody hates the ref these days but everybody seems to love the coach. I'll be back next spring to talk about Malcolm here again sitting by the Fire Pushkin. HQ recovering from a highly unpleasant ride. Pushkin's one horse open sleigh. What Masochist Masochist decided? It had to be an open sleigh. It's December anyway gathered around as we settle in to read your burning listener questions chins about revisionist history. Now if you listen to the first two episodes of last season revisionist history. You may continue to be curious about my score. The law school admissions test. Nope not telling you okay. Question Number One. If British Malcolm Canadian Malcolm L. Come and Jamaican Malcolm would erase. Who would win interesting question Jamaican Malcolm wins the sprints of course English Malcolm wins the longer distances. Get Him out convincing win at all. And I'm reminded of to tell Global Story Graham Gravel of course being my hi my father When we first moved to Canada from England my father and Englishman was convinced that Canadians were lazy and he decided to test this and and we lived at the end of a long row of houses on a country lane and those half a mile of houses and so he had a dinner party invited every one of our neighbors along this half mile stretch? Not because he wanted to see his neighbor that because he wanted to see a what point would people drive as opposed to walk walk so clearly the first neighbor would walk right. It's twenty yards and maybe the second neighbor would walk because it's like fifty yards away. But his point was at some point. Canadians are so lazy at some point. Someone's going to drive rather than half mile at most and he wanted to know. What was the cutoff? Shut off. But he was a mathematician. It was important for him to figure out what was the cutoff point to establish the level of laziness in his neighbors that maybe nutshell sums sums up the quiet dark genius of Grand Blobel who is greatly missed by the world. Next Question Sugar CALC asks. How much would would a would chuck chuck if it would chuck could chuck wood? You know my feeling on this is what I've been saying been consistent. Since the first time I heard that which is why is everyone putting so much pressure on the woodchuck the woodchuck just wants to hang out and occasionally chuck a little wood. And everyone's saying no no so you have to perform we have to measure you. There's like puppy. Some standardized test for would chuck performance. They went no. Let the would chuck be enough already. Unlike like high stakes would chuck performance metrics next LIA asks. Do I have a favorite episode. Yes I do well. Well it's hard. I think Elvis analysis per practice the last episode in season three. I don't think I'll ever do when that good again. I think I peaked. Hate saying if you haven't listened to it and you want to know what's going on with visions history. That's probably a good well. Don't start with that because because every other episode we'll be disappointing. Wait until the very end provision history. When I'm ninety eight years old and hang up and then listen to it? So you don't have a big letdown when you go into other ones Gabrielle asks about my mom why has joyce global not appeared on on vicious history. Very Good Point Gabrielle I have been thinking long and hard about how to remedy this because my mom in addition to her many other extraordinary traits has a lovely voice. She's the greatest voice of all time very low. Very quiet it. She's like five feet tall so you have to lean down to hear her. This is what happens when you call Every single time I've called mom for the last fifty years. This is what's happened. I call and she sees that I've called and she goes Malcolm how lovely to hear are you. And then it doesn't matter it could be. I talked to her earlier today or haven't talked to her for two weeks and then this is how she ends the conversation she goes when she's had enough she goes could all right a lot of questions about Jesuits to Glory Lori. Somebody asks about my statement that I may a Catholic Wannabe. This came from my jesuit episodes in season. Four revisions history You know funnily enough my friend Jim. Jim Nicholson is a Mennonite pastor who I actually saw yesterday We went for a long walk and Jim expressed a little bit of a concern about my statement that I was a Catholic wannabe. He thought it was a Mennonite. WanNa be so everyone's mad at me out there in the world of Pastors but he did Jimmy concede. And I'll give this to Jim your generous than that Jesuits when you hang out with them. They're so impressive. That is kind of hard not to want to be one of them. All right last question from OBI Kenobi he points out that that Matt Damon German was on Bill. Simmons Bill Simmons podcasts. I this past week and in it. He references a revision history. PODCAST calls me out by name to talk about Something that was said in the Toyota sudden acceleration podcast from season. One and OBI KENOBI wants to ask. How do you you feel when Matt Damon uses you as a reference and the answer is amazing? I mean I remember where I was when I heard that. I was in the gym in the Hollywood Equinox on the treadmill and I'm listening to Bill Simmons and there's like Matt Damon named checking me. How great is that? But I will say this. It is not the greatest call up Reuters. History call it every. I'm sitting in a restaurant and my phone rings and you know how sometimes it says unknown caller or no I D. That's like 'cause coming from some stealth place. Well there's a higher one a more a more stealth one which is like some gobbly league UC thing like Boola so I see on my phone. Oh my God what's this I answer it I go hello and a her voice says Malcolm I'm glad well and I go. Yes and the voice says Barack Obama absolutely true Brock Obama. Call me on my cell phone to say how much you liked an episode of revisions history. It does not get better than that. Ladies and Gentlemen Highpoint Herbalife. They were many many more wonderful. Mr Letters emails and Next year maybe we'll devote the entire episode to this. I don't know what all of my handlers by better say. It was lovely to hear from you and I hope I have enhanced your listing experience experience with these answers to your questions. Hey there this. Is Laurie Santos the host of the happiness lab. I had so much fun. Creating the first season of this podcast and I just wanted to thank you for being part of it for all your amazing reviews and feedback. I've really enjoyed becoming part of the Pushkin family this year. And I can't wait to see what else is in store so let me end by wishing you a happy no pun intended holidays. I look forward to seeing you in two thousand twenty. Hey this just in Richmond from broken record wanting to wish all the Pushkin listeners a happy holiday season hope you've had as much fun listening to our PODCAST is we've had ad making up. Here's a twenty twenty. Let's get it. I've a friend up in Hudson Newark Tomorrow. Adler Tamar has written some incredible books about food including an everlasting meal cooking with economy in grace. She's been a cook at the famous shape police Berkeley but more than any of that. She's just hilarious. Laureus an over the years of talking eating tomorrow. I've come to wish that everyone could meet Tamar now. You can in her new series soon. Pushkin called food. Actually it's on luminary in this part. She gets me to try Georgian wines and that's not Georgia as in you now Atlanta Georgia as in former Soviet Union Georgia with a very cool guy named Steven and now I'm looking at this and I'm not I think I might be able to. She warned us in some white. So it's sort of biracial wine to suits. It's my personal preference is the U. of wine. It's the me. Apply the colors of natural wine and if the Georgian wine and Stephen serving us aren't binary they're not red or white. I mentioned this before. These wines are all different hues and that's considered a positive ositive attribute not a flop. This is totally different from conventional wine. which like other binary systems like male female black or White House to be filtered to fit its categories categories conventional wines white wines when you press the juice from the grapes you remove the skins and you just do the fermentation with the grape juice? So you maintain the clarity. But when you allow the fermentation to happen with the skins then the Tannin's and the color earlier. The pigmentation will start to show up in the wine. And so you see kind of honest spectrum of color the length of time that the skins have been in contact with the juice of the one. And why would you not want that. Why would you bother taking the skins out because people like purity people like things that are sparkly and transparent so? I think there's just kind of like people like things that are really sanitized. And so the idea of have like these skin contact winds up until recently was really like a bit murkier. You know it was Not something that seemed as commercially viable based on our own ideas about wine and along the same lines as demanding that wind be sparkly and pure red or white is the demand that wine never change which is also the antithesis of being accepting influx queer. or at least open. UH natural wine most Georgian wine. The kind that can be any color it doesn't get stabilized to slow down the fermentation. If you want something estate exactly the same oxygen is your enemy. Bacteria like us need oxygen to survive. Well yeah I mean I guess. In the context of wine the biggest first thing the biggest impediment is oxygen. It's just like fruit right so if you cut an apple in half and you eat half in the morning and then you go to work you you come home and then. The apples oxidized so brown. That's right so the same thing is true with these basically raw wines. I'm fine with apples. Turn Brown I. Don't throw that apple out. I eat it a little brown or I save it until I have a lot of Brown. Apples stressing me out and late at night at the last possible moment meant I make applesauce I tell even this and he calls me a benevolent eater. Maybe I am but I don't actually buy that people so oh enjoy being stuck in pursuit of perfection. I think they're just told that's what they're supposed to do in wine and food but the truth is perfectionist. That's just not that fun. I think most of us would be happier feeling permitted to use brown apples and stale bread. I think embraceth imperfection might eight not be benevolent to ingredients but to ourselves cheers. Cheers cheers. Thank you welcome suggests that the best route to embracing all the changes that come. I'm from leaving. Grapes with their skins is recasting. It as a positive like stop calling it skin contact wine. You could call these this this whole grape point as opposed to a half grape wine but when you use the word which sounds sounds like. He'd want the whole grapevine right see he malcolm glide world skin contact wine whole grapevine. Sounds so much better like a whole foods whole grain whole milk who wouldn't want the whole grape tree dixit patten. That feels a lot less. That feels a lot less unusual. That feels a lot more like the kind of white wine which I rarely drink. Present may five rules but it se- seems conventional lot more conventional not conventional but more conventional than the last one did and that's a perfect assessment congratulations. You're that was me would tomorrow Adler and former Sommelier Steven Satterfield. I was the Guinea pig in tomorrow's wine tasting experiment. But let me tell you there are very few actual guinea pigs who get a GIG that good get yourself on luminary and subscribe to her show food. Actually and you'll hear just what I mean now. Don't go anywhere because I'm not not done with this cozy extravaganza in just a little while. We have a man who seems to think he has no friends. He could not be more wrong a little a special excerpt from my forthcoming interview with the Great Conan. O'Brien stay tuned. I'm tomorrows learn I'm host of the new show food. Actually that you just heard some of. I'm so happy to have a seat at the Pushkin table and I want to wish you a calm and happy holiday with this party advice straight from the Bible it is better to eat a dry crust to threaten peace than to eat a feast in a house full of fighting in in other words. Relax any meal. You're happy at will be great. Hi I'm Noah Feldman. I'm a professor at Harvard Law School and I'm the host of deep background a show about the big stories in the news and what they really mean in historical goal scientific legal and cultural context from the deep background team to you. We want to wish you the happiest of holidays but you know what I hate at the euphemism have a happy new year have merry Christmas. Happy Hanukkah have a terrific Kwanza. Whatever holiday you like go for it and enjoy? Hi Everyone. I'm Bethany McLean. The host of making a killing I loved hosting my podcast. A big. Thank you to all of the guests who have come on and chatted with me May and a big thank you to all of you. Who have lessened? I'm back. It's very nice to be in the same studio where I recorded the Audio version of my latest book talking to strangers but the audiobook isn't just my voice. I wanted that book to sound more like a podcast. For listens to hear the people I interviewed even to imagine scenes from courtrooms or labs that I wrote about so he pulled out all the stops of Pushkin Industries to produce a three dimensional. No four dimensional. audiobook that I am so very proud of talking to strangers is on audible now. I've done a lot of interviews for talking to strangers. Trust me a lot but I don't think I laugh more than when I did the podcast. CONAN O'Brien needs a friend. Here's a bit of our conversation. Which Will Air December sixteenth in which I set off on a little Hobbyhorse of mine? The in person job interview should be abolished face to face so in the face to face encounter. What am I finding out? I'm finding out whether they're taller short with the hair is darker you know. How well they dress? None of. This is a very relevance whatsoever. Right now there are Assistant. I don't work with them. They work at coffee shops. The Mommy stuff they have to be they have to reply instantly. You have to be super organized that to be nice good honest people. I'm so glad you brought up this topic because you are in the room with my assistant. Okay I hired my assistant ten years ago and I will tell you that. I met her She seemed responsible okay. Prompt courteous professional. Look and it affirms everything you've said I was completely horn swag in a word that's never used much readiness. The second you talked about hiring sin- like please don't say but I will say I will say that I we did. What information did you gather from the face to face again? You know. It's funny. I was completely duped by and it's not sewn as fault but it it was. I needed to hire an assistant. I was coming here to Los Angeles. My New York system did not want to move. She had a family so as hiring a brand new assistant I met with. I think ten assistance of candidates in one day in some office in Burbank. And the stuff that you'd think I could take away like. is she tall is she short. I even got that wrong because I was I forget what happened but I think she came into the room and sat down on his couch. And it's a very low couch with soft cushions and she sunk into it so I I've had this conversation with you. Yeah and I remembered and your hair was like all puffed out 'cause humidity or something so I thought it was because income on no but seriously so at the end of the day get ended up I ended up hiring. Her and people said well what she said. Well she's this very short woman with a big massive Bush black hair and her name. SONAL move session. I think I can't pronounce it. I am Yeah Nice and then really nice you. Nice firm Menia Irish. Yes persecuted people. I mean I know you guys have your own story but I can tell Ya. No one ever accused the Irish reduced Irish history. You guys have your own story. Yeah I tell my favorite let us have a potato for eight hundred years. Ah You you when you finished with this story. That's embarrassing persists. Yes we're saying they finished. She's not she's very tall and the visual cues wrong as well as her character. We're totally totally wrong. Go ahead ONA tell my all time. Favorite Irish story right. This is pressure to do this. Yes I was very at one point in my life into the troubles story the guests and we call them the trouble with troubles in a footnote to a truly great book on the IRA. The following story is told during the at the end of the Second World War there there was a British informer who was very very high up in the IRA and he was found out they discovered it was so they immediately spirited him away way to a cottage in you know often the countryside somewhere and they interrogated him and they rung an a confession fashioned out of him and the asked him to write out his confession. Now I should stop and say the story is based on deep affection. I have for the Irish people and for their extraordinary literary legacy. No it's some of the greatest that are trying to work course so he is asked to write his confession he says give me they say yes absolutely and so he's the capture him in. I think may be going yeah win. He is finally rescued viewed by the British in November. Still working on his. But it's a beautiful story imagined this a horrid Ira Guy Okay and you've got this trainer in your who you busted. And he's like every morning he sits down with his pen and paper and it's working on another draft and everyone's fine with it. Yeah I like writing process at some point. He must have been blocked. They were very understanding. Because even James Joyce went through a difficult period or so they're all it sounds fantastic supportive community and it goes over. Six months is just how can you not love the Irish. When you hear that star exactly how indeed? Indeed thanks again to Conan. O'Brien and team Coco for having me on their show. I hope you've all subscribed to his podcast and if you haven't put down your Eggnog and do that right away. Our cozy our is drawn to a close time to get it back around around the fire and if you look out into the night and see candles burning far off in the distance. That's all of us have pushed industries working late into the night to to bring you even more entertainment in the New Year of course season five of provisions history and a second season from Laurie Santos at the happiness lab more more. A broken record producers are also working on a fantastic series about an undercover FBI agent who somehow helped bring down a dictator not to mention the second season with Louis against the rules and a new show from the historian. Jill Lepore plus another from the novelist hurry cancer and that's just the beginning. If you want to find out Wendy shows and more coming your way sign up for our newsletter at Pushkin Dot. FM and thanks to all of you for listening none of this would have been possible without you. And don't get into a one horse open sleigh under any conditions no matter what the song says Oh what fun it is to ride in a one horse. Open SLEIGH nope friends. Don't let friends ride in one horse. Open sleighs this special. Pushkin variety hour was produced by emily rustic and Heather Fain with Julia Barton Jason Gabrielle and Carly McClary very special. Thanks to the whole Pushkin team. Happy Holidays everyone. I'm knocking Bagwell in partner. Luminary is offering a great deal for the holidays. Luminary is a premium. PODCAST APP that offers access to shows from I'm top creators. You won't find anywhere else plus the ones you already love. We're working with luminary to bring you shows like our own food actually for just three dollars and ninety nine cents a month entire year. That's fifty percent off the normal subscription price. You just have to sign up by December fourth breath luminary dot link slash food. That's luminary dot lake.

Conan O'Brien Pushkin Jamaican Malcolm Tim Harford Pushkin Pushkin Pushkin Berlin Pushkin Industries Corporal Muller Malcolm captain. voight Canada apple chuck chuck Jim Nicholson Los Angeles Laurie Santos Alan Cumming Adler Tamar
Introducing: The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Introducing: The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

"Is it possible to teach someone to be happier to take the latest science and apply our lives in a way that has real impact. I'm Dr Lori Santos as a professor at Yale. I was getting increasingly worried about the levels of depression and anxiety. I was seeing in my students so I decided to teach a new class on the science of happiness us. It's been a runaway success. It's changed not only my life but the lives of thousands of people who've taken it and my new podcast the happiness lab. I want to share all these insights with you. Through conversations with amazing people like figure skating legend Michelle Kwan dancing with the stars champion. Jr Martinez has and musician David Byrne. I'll show you simple but evidence based tips for improving your own wellbeing. You'll learn a bunch about the science of the mind but you'll also learn how how you can put that science into practice plus. You'll pretty much get an entire Ivy League class for free. Are you ready to feel better. Let me teach you how beginning September seventeenth the happiness lab brought to you by Pushkin Industries and available wherever you get your podcasts.

Dr Lori Santos Michelle Kwan Pushkin Industries Ivy League Jr Martinez Yale professor David Byrne
Solvable Presents: Axios Today

Solvable

12:37 min | 3 months ago

Solvable Presents: Axios Today

"Pushkin. Hello solvable listeners. There's a lot of news being thrown at us, and it's affecting our lives more directly than any of us can remember. axios system media company that helps you get smarter faster with concise reporting in their newsletters. Mike Allen's axios am newsletter is the first thing I read before I, get out of bed in the morning, and now axios has Daily News podcast to produce with us at Pushkin Industries. Are New. Show axios today helps you start your morning with the news that matters in just ten minutes. axios today, host Nyla Boudou and a team of award winning journalist. Bring you. The latest scoops from Washington and stories about everything from Corona virus, the state of the economy to systemic racism in the United, states. You'll also get insights into other big trends, shaping our world, including China's growing influence and the rise of artificial intelligence. You're about to hear the latest episode of axios today. I hope you'll listen tomorrow and the next day and the you'll make it a daily habit. It's like taking your seat at the smartest most fun breakfast table in the world you can find the show on apple, spotify, or wherever you get your podcast brought to you by axios Pushkin Industries now here's axios today. Today's episode is brought to you by Goldman Sachs. Morning! It's Tuesday June twenty third. Welcome to axios today I'm NYLA. Here's our promise to you will make you smarter about Your Day if you just give us ten minutes of your time every weekday morning. We're getting started today with one big thing. That's our story. You can't. Miss Right now. Every top tanner bestseller list is filled with movies TV shows and books about fighting systemic racism. Maybe you're breathing. One of these books yourself. We break breakdown why it's happening, and why this matters also president trump is using the pandemic to shut out highly skilled workers from the US. But I the sudden rapid and mass consumption of race conscious media is today's one big thing. Explaining it all is Sarah, Fisher she covers the media for axios. Surra we saw for example like demand for the TV show, dear white people went up three hundred twenty nine percent on Netflix. Justice go! This is. This is racism. Obama fixed! where else are we seeing this kind of trend? We're seeing it with other shows on Netflix for a brief period of time another show when they see us was also up a hundred and forty seven percent spike Lee's newly released film. Five bloods has gotten increased attention because it's been included in Netflix's black lives matter collection. One thing to keep in mind is that it's not just about the content. Content that's in demand, but the content that's being rejected. Notice that a lot of TV shows that highlight police brutality like lies. PD OR COPS are being canceled. Hbo Max had temporarily suspend. Gone with the wind until it figured out how it was going to re introduce it with more context. Media companies aren't just going to be held accountable for what they don't air, but also for what they choose to air. Air as well. Some of this is content that's being put in front of us whether we flip on net Netflix or Amazon or spotify, and they're suggesting this to us. How much of this is propelled by platforms that are pushing this or making it more visible, excellent question on the TV and movies front, I think platforms are largely responsible for putting this in front of consumers. If NETFLIX's didn't create that black. Black lives matter channel I. Don't know that enough people would have been able to search through its vast library of titles to find things up, spoke to this moment and same thing goes for music that's distributed on various platforms, etc, but at the same time I also think that platforms figure out what type of content to inform by what people are Ganic -ly sharing on social media and what's going viral? Of that Childish Gambino Twenty eighteen hit. This is America. There have been remixes of that going viral on Tiktok. And so that might be a signal to spotify that this is a song that we should be adding to our curated lists about the movement, because it's something, users really care about so I'd say half it is yes for making editorial decisions to push things to people, but it's also people making decisions at the ground level at the grassroots level about what is resonating with them. What speaks to this moment for them and that's pushing platforms. Platforms to pay attention as we see more people asking for it. Does that even create a space for more representation? More diversity as companies are seeing, this is more mainstream to have more, and I'll just be very specific to have more black artists to have more black. TV shows like I'm thinking of like blackish blackish coming back earlier. This fall right Yup blackish has pushed to the beginning of the fall season instead of season. SEASON BECAUSE ABC. said a show like that speaks to this moment. Yeah, I think there's a business case for it I think that one's networks and platforms recognized that consumers care about the stuff. They're gonNA feel a lot more empowered to put conversations about race about police brutality up front in their programming because they know that people are GonNa WanNa Consume Sarah. Why do you think this matters? Because I'm sure there are some people who think. Think like this is just pop culture. This is a fleeting moment who cares Americans for generations are going to rely on. The media were creating today as a way to relate to what we're going through now, and that's critical, because if it isn't for those pieces of contribution to our culture through music through books, their movies through television. There's few other ways that we're going to be able to document it for the rest of time. Sure News articles can last a few weeks maybe tops, but a good song. I mean that could last decades. Sara. Fischer covers media for accidents. We'll be back in fifteen seconds. With president, trump's new visa restrictions on highly skilled workers, but first a word from our sponsor. Nineteen is changing markets, industries and the global economy. You can hear the latest insights from Goldman Sachs experts and thought leaders at GS DOT com slash cope in nineteen or on any of your favorite podcast platforms. Welcome back to axios today. Let's catch up quick president. Trump keeps urging states to reopen jump start the economy, but yesterday he used the economic decline caused by the virus as his reason for shutting down the parts of our immigration system. Asked axios political reporter Steph Kite to explain more about how the president is using the corona virus to achieve his immigration agenda. This is actually the second time that president trump has used the coronavirus in order to do some temporary restrictions on what immigrants are allowed to come into the country, and which ones are not allowed to come in anymore, so these current restrictions are in regards to H. One B. Visa holders, so the original band, and not include be. It only applied to different kinds of immigrants who are coming. Coming on permanent visas, but this time not only trump extend the original order which impacted Green Card applicants, but he also added restrictions for immigrants who are coming on short term work visas including H. ONE BS as which are really relied on in the tech industry in the US in stuff I. wanted to ask you what the Tech Industry's response has been to what president trump plans to do. The response from many tech companies has not been great because they really do rely on these immigrants and a lot of ways, these are high-skilled immigrant visas, and so they're looking to other countries to find specific specialties in really high skilled jobs, and so companies like Google and twitter and Amazon have all come out and oppose the president's latest restrictions on their ability to get those workers into the US and working for their companies instead. Do we have any idea what impact this may have owner Connie? If these workers are not allowed to part of it well, a lot of people think it's not going to be great. Even Republican Lindsey Graham said in a twitter thread that he thinks this could have. Have a negative impact on the economy, because not only do these restrictions impact, H., one B. Visa, as they also impact other visas which include some lower level jobs that are also sometimes hard for us. Companies to fill and that the US economy really does rely on and the trump administration estimates that this could impact five hundred and twenty-five thousand jobs, and according to the trump administration. They think that means that well now. That's five hundred twenty five thousand jobs Americans can take, but in another sense, many companies might struggle to fill those jobs, and that's why this matters stuff I mean I think the bottom line is even as the trump administration is urging states to reopen. They're still using the coronavirus. Tool to continue to crack down on immigration and one thing I'm looking for is how long these kinds of restrictions are going to be renewed and kept in place. STEP IS ON AXIOS POLITICS T. axios insider is our sneak peek into the axios. One of our co founders Mike Allen is with me. Good Morning Good morning, nyla great debut. Rave reviews. Thank you, you know. I feel like there are many of us who are anxious about what's going to happen in the fall, and you've got some really interesting data about college campuses, which as it turns out, mean to being a bit of a laboratory for the pandemic or how virus might spread. This is a poll by College Reaction Tuck to eight hundred fifty four college. College students and they said what if there's no vaccine, are you still going to go back in person and two thirds of Students said yes, we are and will listen to this one. Here's the question if our parties like those that occurred before the virus on your campus this fall. Will you attend even if there is a risk of contracting the virus and Nyla? Third of students say I'm in. He may have a great day NYLA. Thank you and have a great breakfast. Why it matters, young people are more likely to take risks and will be much more exposed when they head back to college in the fall. We'll be right back after one more word from our sponsor. PULLMAN SACHS estimates and thought leaders are sharing their insights about the trends, shaping markets, industries and the global economy. You can hear the latest insights on Covid. Nineteen economic and market implications at GS DOT com slash cope and nineteen or on any of your favorite podcast platforms. Thanks for listening axios, today is brought to you by Axios, Pushkin Industries and special thanks to feel salmon for bringing axios in Pushkin together, this episode was produced by Carol Alderman. SCENARIO MARQUESS MARTINEZ CASH chillan Naomi Shaven with music from Evan. Viola, Alex Sukey is our sound engineer Sarah. Alani Goo is our executive editor and push in executive. Producers Are Lee Towel Melodic and Jacob Weisberg. You can write to us at podcast at axios dot com, and you can find me on twitter at I la Buddha. Catch, US tomorrow morning, but until then tuninter afternoon show recap. Buddhu thanks for listening stay safe and we'll see you back here tomorrow morning.

axios axios Pushkin Industries Axios president Netflix Nyla Boudou spotify Trump Goldman Sachs US trump Mike Allen GS DOT Sarah Pushkin Industries Washington China Pushkin.
Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"It started with feeling some nagging worry about this world. We find ourselves in. Deep Curtis through the clipboard. Steve Kerr has got teed up. Steve Kerr has got a jacket. A world where everyone hates the referee. Those who could kickable playful bone does account referee. Heels like someone keeps poking you in the back of the shoulder. And then saying foul foul foul. I would never say the things that I do to referees to a person in normally. I'm Michael Lewis, author of the blindside moneyball the pig short the fifth risk. This is my first podcast. It's called against the rules. This season taking you to all the poorly refereed corners of life. Look where we're sitting right now, Michael we're in a crappy parking lot across the street from one of the most important capital market building on the globe on the globe. I just have some simple basic questions through my trash people. Do it questions about what's happened to our idea? Fairness when you first float this idea. How's it greeted? Okay. So when I first float this come on. This is the early two thousands. And I'm talking about new government agency. Oh, just what everybody's looking for right? Here's what I think we still need our referees someone to make the call someone to protect us when lice unfair. But these days, it's not easy. Why would anybody want to be ref seriously? I wonder that too man. And they're not allowed to say anything. They're not allowed to explain themselves not allowed to defend themselves. So I'm going to defend them. It starts April. Second against the rules is the new show from Pushkin industries. You can subscribe now for free wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have anything you'd like to say to the referees of the world before we turn this recording off don't pick sides, unless it's my son?

Steve Kerr Michael Lewis Pushkin industries Curtis
Introducing Against the Rules Season 2

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:04 min | 5 months ago

Introducing Against the Rules Season 2

"It's Michael Lewis here. I'm back with against the rules last season. I talked about the attack on referees and the idea of fairness homerun this season is all about the rise of coaches in American life. Now what are you doing? It wasn't that long ago that we only had coaches in sports and work for your pitcher. Or I'M GONNA kick your ass got it now. Coaches are everywhere. Shut up so I'll give you positively there. People who call themselves life coaches and other people who call themselves deaf coaches saying which is therapies. Partha Tears and coaching is the path of laughter. You can hire a coach to improve your executive skills your online dating performance. And even your charisma. I am here to guide you in making sure you grow as a person but the rise of coaching is connected to unfairness. The richest best performing people in the world have the most coaching. That guy would never have gotten to Yale but this guy who got all this coaching did get into Yale. It just seems like anyone who can answer. These questions has got to be coach schools. Coaching the UBER DRIVER. Coaching just ends up making the rich richer. Yeah join me for season. Two of against the rules from Pushkin Industries. I might even get a little coaching myself. So Michael if you had some e wants to be coached on over that beep. I'm not telling at least yet against the rules back. May Fifth. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Michael Lewis Partha Tears Yale Pushkin Industries executive
Revisionist History Presents: Axios Today

Revisionist History

12:36 min | 3 months ago

Revisionist History Presents: Axios Today

"Pushkin! Hello revisionist history listeners. There is lot of news being thrown at us today, and it's affecting our lives more directly than any of us can remember, and axios is the media company that helps you get smarter faster with concise reporting in their newsletters podcasts, HBO show and now. A Daily News podcast. Axios, today helps you start your morning with the news that matters in just ten minutes. axios today host Nyla. Boudou, an team of award. Winning journalist will bring you. The latest scoops from Washington and stories on everything from Corona virus to the state of the economy to systemic racism in America. You'll also get inside into other big trends shaping your world including China's growing influence and the rise of artificial intelligence. You're about to hear today's episode of Axios today I hope you listen tomorrow and the next day. Will you get the picture? It's like taking your seat at the smartest breakfast table in the world. You can find a show on apple, spotify or wherever you get your podcast brought to you by Axios and Pushkin Industries now. Here's axios today. Today's episode is brought to you by Chevron. Morning it's Tuesday June twenty third welcome to axios today. Here's our promise to you will make you smarter about Your Day if you just give us ten minutes of your time every weekday morning. We're getting started today with one big thing. That's our store. You can't Miss Right now. Every top tanner bestseller list is filled with movies, TV shows and books about fighting systemic racism. Maybe you're one of these books yourself. We break down why it's happening. And why this matters also president trump is using the pandemic to shut out highly skilled workers from the US. But I the sudden rapid and mass consumption of race conscious media is today's one big thing. Explaining it all is Sarah Fisher. She covers media for axios. So Sarah we saw for example like demand for the TV show. Dear White people went up three hundred and twenty nine percent on Netflix justice. This is this is racism. President Obama six. where else are we seeing this kind of trend? We're seeing it with other shows on Netflix for a brief period of time another show when they see us was also up a hundred and forty seven percent spike Lee's newly released film defy bloods has gotten increased attention because it's been included in. Netflix's black lives matter collection. One thing to keep in mind is that it's not just about the content that's in demand but the. The content that's being rejected. Notice that of TV shows that highlight police brutality like lies. PD OR COPS are being canceled HBO Max had temporarily Suspend Gone With the wind until it figured out how it was going to reintroduce it with more context, media companies aren't just going to be held accountable for what they don't air, but also for what they choose to as well. Some of this is content. That's being put in front of us. We flip on Netflix or Amazon or spotify, and they're suggesting this to us. How much of this is propelled by platforms that are pushing this or making it more visible? Question, I mean on the TV and movies front I think platforms are largely responsible for putting this in front of consumers, if Netflix's didn't create that black lives matter channel I. Don't know that enough people would have been able to search through its vast library of titles to find things up, spoke to this moment and same thing goes for music that's distributed on various platforms, etc, but at the same time I also think that platforms figure out what type of content to inform by what people organically sharing on social media, and what's going viral, so an example of that childish Gambino Twenty eighteen hit. This is America. There have been remixes of that going viral on Tiktok. And, so that might be a signal to spotify that this is a song that we should be adding to our curated list about the movement, because it's something, users really care about so I'd say half is yes. Platforms making editorial decisions to push things to people, but it's also people making decisions at the ground level at the grassroots level about what is resonating with them. What speaks to this moment for them, and that's pushing platforms to pay attention as. As. We see more people asking for it. Does that even create a space for more representation? More diversity as companies are seeing, this is more mainstream to have more, and I'll just be very specific to have more black artists to have more black. TV shows like I'm thinking of like blackish blackish is coming back earlier. This fall right Yup blackish is pushed to the beginning of the fall season instead of midseason, because ABC said a show like that. That speaks to this moment. Yeah I. think There's a business case for I think that once networks and platforms recognize that consumers care about this stuff. They're going to feel a lot more empowered to put conversations about race about police brutality upfront in their programming because they know that people are GonNa. WanNa. Consume it Sarah. Why do you think this matters because i? Sure there's some people who think like this is just pop culture. This is a fleeting moment. Moment who cares? Americans for generations are going to rely on. The media were creating today as a way to relate to what we're going through now, and that's critical, because if it isn't for those pieces of contribution to our culture through music through books through movies through television, there's few other ways that we're going to be able to document it for the rest of time. You know sure news articles can a few weeks maybe tops, but a good song. I mean that would last decades. Sara Fischer covers media for accidents. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with President Trump's new visa restrictions on highly skilled workers, but first a word from our sponsor. Support for Axiom, today comes from Chevron partnering with California Bioenergy Transform, farm, waste into renewable natural gas and provide an alternative source of power for a cleaner way forward for more information, visit Chevron Dot Com. Welcome back to axios today. Let's catch up quick president. Trump keeps urging states to reopen and jump start the economy, but yesterday he used the economic decline caused by the virus as his reason for shutting down large parts of our immigration system. axios political reporter Steph Kite to explain more about how the president is using corona virus to achieve his immigration agenda. This is actually the second time that president trump has used the corona virus in order to introduce some temporary restrictions on what immigrants are allowed to come into the country, and which ones are not allowed to come in anymore, so these current restrictions are in regards to H. One B. Visa holders, so the original band did not include Asian be holders only applied to different kinds of immigrants coming on permanent visas, but this time not only to trump extend the original order which. Green Card applicants, but he also added restrictions for immigrants who are coming on short term work visas. Including HBV's says which are really relied on in the tech industry in the US in stuff I wanted to ask you what the Tech Industry's response has been to what president trump plans to do. Yeah, the response from many tech companies has not been great, because they really do rely on these immigrants and a lot of ways, these are high, skilled immigrant visas and so. So they're looking to other countries to find specific specialties in really high skilled jobs, and so companies like Google and twitter and Amazon have all come out and oppose the president's latest restrictions on their ability to get those workers into the US and working for their companies and step. Do we have any idea what impact this may have on our economy? If these workers are not allowed to be a part of it, well a lot of people, it's not going to be. Be, great, even Republican Lindsey Graham said a twitter thread that he thinks this could have a negative impact on the economy, because not only do these restrictions impact, H., one B. Visas, they also impact other visas, which includes some lower level jobs that are also sometimes hard for US companies to fill, and that the US economy really does rely on and the trump administration estimates this could impact five hundred, twenty five thousand jobs, and according to the trump administration think that means. Means that while now that's five hundred twenty five thousand jobs in Americans can take, but in another sense, many companies might struggle to fill those jobs, and that's why this matters stuff anything. The bottom line is even as the trump administration is urging states to reopen are still using the coronavirus as a tool to continue to crack down on immigration and one thing I'm looking for is how long these kinds of restrictions are going to be renewed and kept in place. Step Kite is X. uses politics. axios insider is our sneak peek into the axios newsroom. One of our co founders Mike Allen is with me good morning. Good Morning Nyla great debut rave reviews. Thank you, you know Mike. I feel like there are many of us who are anxious about what's going to happen in the fall, and you've got some really interesting data about college campuses, which as it turns out main, being a bit of a laboratory for the pandemic or how the virus might spread. Pull by college reaction talked to eight hundred fifty for. College students and they said what if there's no vaccine? Are you still going to go back in person and two thirds of students? Said yes, we are. Listen to this. Here's the question. If our parties like those that occurred before the virus on your campus this fall. Will you attend even if there is a risk of contracting the virus and Nyla third of students say I'm in. He may have a great day Nile. Thank you and have a great breakfast. Why it matters, young people are more likely to take risks and will be much more exposed when they head back to college in the fall. We'll be right back after one more word from our sponsor. Support for axios, today comes from Chevron partnering with. California bio energy to transform farm waste into renewable natural, gas. Chevron is exploring ways to reduce methane emissions from dairy farms to help address climate change and provide an alternative source of power for a cleaner way forward for more information visit Chevron Dot Com. Thanks for listening actually today is brought to you by Axios, Pushkin Industries especial thanks to feel examined for bringing axios Pushkin together. This episode was produced by Carol, Alderman Scenario. Marquess Martinez Cara Dillon Naomi Shaven with music from Evan Viola. Alex Suge Yara, our sound engineer, Sarah. Alani Goo is our executive. Editor and Pushkin are executive. Producers are lead how Milad Weisberg you can write to us at podcast at axios Dot Com and you can find me on twitter at Nyla Boo. Don't forget to catch us tomorrow morning, but until then to inter afternoon show recap. I'm NYLA Budo. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we'll see you back here tomorrow morning.

Axios axios Chevron US president Netflix President Trump Pushkin Sarah Fisher Chevron Dot Com spotify Pushkin Industries HBO axios America Nyla Boo Corona China twitter Washington
The Art of Audio Storytelling with Jacob Weisberg

Mission Daily

40:13 min | 1 year ago

The Art of Audio Storytelling with Jacob Weisberg

"Welcomes emission daily on today's episode stephanie sits down with jacob weisberg co founder and c._e._o. Of pushkin industries jacob malcolm glad well started pushkin industries twenty eighteen to pushkin notes put artists in creators. I this podcast network currently has six shows and more shows in development prior to starting push with malcolm jacob was the c._e._o. Of the slate group co oh founder of penelope an editor in chief of slate magazine. He has written for several publications including the new york times new yorker and financial times. He's author of several books folks and a lecturer at yale university where he graduated from and this episode stephanie and jacob discussed the beginnings of podcasting what makes audio storytelling different from other mediums and where the podcasting industry is headed into the future. Take a welcome to the show stephanie great to be here. Thanks rasa inviting me on. I've been looking forward to this conversation for a while so i'm happy to have you so if someone asks you what you do. How do you respond. I have a podcasting company. Of course the time was when that was an unusual answer. Now it doesn't differentiate you from half the people walking down the street in new yorker palo alto. I guess we'll ever and has a podcast. Not everyone has a podcasting company exactly not everyone has a good podcasting company oregon podcast in general. How many podcasts do you have right now. We have i think six on the air as it were. Maybe another three or four in production dan and a few more in development. I got onto this very early. I think at slate where i was for for twenty years we made. I don't think we made the first podcast but i think we made some of the first podcasts that many people listen to it came out of a partnership ridge and we had with national public radio and on a show that's no longer on the air called day to day and after doing that for a year or two andy bowers who was the producer. We'd hired to represent slate in the partnership. I said you know this new thing called podcasting and he said i'm making one of my garage with my daughter and you know i think you should try this was it was fourteen years ago so they really were some some of the very first podcast that anybody made and i've been kind of bending everybody's era about this for a long time and then you know starting a few years ago go people started to have some idea what i was talking about and actually be interested yeah now. That's the cool thing so. What was your role at slate and how is that transition into what you're right now. Yeah i'd started its slate as a writer. My background is as a journalist writing about politics. Basically you asked politics and policy <hes> but i was one of the people who founded slight michael kinsley who was my mentor in journalism was the founder but i was one of the first employees and then when he stepped down as editor. I took over resented her. I did that for several years and over time it just the whole thing just became my problem. I became in charge of the business and we'd originally started at microsoft and i was involved in getting it sold to what was then the washington post company so i i kind of ultimately did everything there but it was part of the time when i was eh when i was editor that was when we launched the original audio shows got us. That's really what got you into it. I wanna know if you still believe some advice that you gave two aspiring journalists back in the day. You gave two pieces of advice. One was the people he can work at the intersection of journalism technology. Those are the stars. Do you still. I think that's true yeah. I think it's funny i mean i think that's been probably a theme of what i've been doing. For a long time with the beginning of slate it was really doing doing journalism but figuring out how we could use new technology which was in the early days dial up connections to the internet but how we could use it to you do what we did in in different ways and try different kinds of storytelling and relate to readers in a different way and being open to those the possibilities and i very much the same feeling now about podcasting that i did in the early days around the internet which is that there probably are not that many <unk> times in anyone's career when they're going to going to get to be a part of inventing something new new media do get invented vented every so often but it's it's usually you know once or twice in a generation whether you're talking about news magazines or in journalism television news radio news i felt that way in the ninety s and i feel that way now i think every when you make a podcast of the kind and we're we're trying to make which are all creatively ambitious innovative. If you make a podcast at succeeds you've helped to define what podcasting fasting is and in ten years. I don't think that's going to be true in the same way. I think it's going to be much more fixed. Thought bad has two things have to become more standardized and more more regularized in in media overtime but that creative opportunity and then when you combine it when a moment when there's also business opportunity. That's always been very exciting to okay yeah. It seems like the opportunity. They've definitely changed over time. How do you view the next ten twenty years. I mean right now. People are looking into subscription based models for podcasting staying in everyone's trying out different business models. How do you see where we're at today. <hes> or with what you guys are doing at pushkin versus where we could be in the next decade or so will the revenue podcasting the thing is almost all advertising at the moment and i think we will be a much healthier industry if we can supplement that with other formed revenue and particularly revenue from listeners. I think we clearly have the kinds of listeners who will pay for for content content. They clearly care about the content and the way that indicates willingness to pay now whether people will pay directly or they'll pay for a bundled subscription description or whether the content will be paid through platforms you know like a spot of fire and apple that we don't really know the answer to yet <hes> <hes> but i think it's important to the health of the medium long term that we developed listener payment as part of part of their revenue picture healthy media businesses. I mean this is something i became keenly aware of in now working at slade businesses that are totally dependent on advertising and businesses is that are totally dependent on one form of revenue aren't secure and are healthy in the way healthy media businesses are that have multiple revenue streams cbs. Are you experimenting a bit with these different consumer paid models at pushkin or are you kind of trying out a bunch of different models when it comes to monetize the shows or do you not monetize ties. How's that work right now. We are interested in testing out different things. We're making several shows for luminary. Which is the first real i think net flicks six type model of a paid platform. You pay monthly fee for a bundle of thirty or forty podcasts that are available exclusively that way and we're making a few shows that are just only available to listen it luminary listeners. That's the only real opportunity to do that and kind of all wholesale model so far far as opposed to selling individual episodes individual series to listeners through a patriot or trying to get a patriot type support <hes> <hes> but we're kind of watching everything you know. Spotify is made some moves apple is looks like they may be making some moves in this direction and <hes> we're. We're kind of agnostic about how it's going to work and so i think we'd like to try everything but with a bias that we you were believers in paid content when it comes to starting push. Can you have a business partner right mountain blood while we started the company together. How long have you guys known each other for. How did you know is the right time to start your own company. What was the process between transition and deciding malcolm's guy and we're gonna do this well balcon. I have been the close friends for more than thirty years. We were original originally roommates. We shared a group house in washington d._c. <hes> i think he he's year older than i am. He had just graduated from college. I was taking your off from college <hes> but we've worked in journalism together and you know been close for a long time and <hes> i'd been involved in launching revisions history with him at our old company panoply which not our old company minded malcolm's insulate sold company panoply which came out of slate and that show had done really well but panoply because it was having some real success on the technology allergy side with a platform it developed called megaphone decided they wanted to just focus on the technology side of podcasting and that was sort of a cue for me. Okay i'd been at at slate and panoply together for twenty two years and had been thinking that maybe it was time to do something else and it was very committed to making that show with malcolm so at that point i just said to him. Hey maybe we just start our own company to keep making it and that's what we did. That's awesome. Are there any fun roommate stories remember. You're like oh. This is a good time well. I will tell you that in our living room where you might ordinarily have a dining room table or a sofa. <hes> we had a ping pong table and we would we would come balcon with working various places in those days. I was working at the new republic <hes> and we would we would come home. I'm from doing reporting or whatever we're doing just play for rochas ping pong and <hes> we're both little competitive at least at that and <hes> if you get us us inside of a ping pong table we will resume those roles. We need an at that competition to take place. Everyone alto and let's get a good competition could old-fashioned in competition going. We also had <hes> we i think we had somewhat legendary seventieth parties and of course this was this was in the in the mid eighties so it was not quite as as quite a familiar idea but even then the seventies you know the stuff you'd get in thrift shops to dress for seventies party. What's notable. That's so fun. We need to bring that back to that sounds great. Absolutely we haven't had one at pushkin yet though we are having we are having a wrap party tonight night. We just finished producing the fourth season of revisions history but five episodes of aired five more will air but but as of i think yesterday we put the final finishing touch on the final episode so it will be celebrating tonight congratulations. That sounds fine. I hope you guys do some stuff on social media so we can all follow along with you. Our mission invites must've just got lost but that sounds great so maybe to shift into your shows. It might be great to start with revisionist. There's history. What is the process like with developing a new episode for that or even developing the show altogether. Maybe if we can get some behind the scenes storytelling of like. How does that all come together together. Yeah i mean we malcolm his work with the with the same small team which is now our our core team running content at at pushkin mia lebel who has been the executive producer of that show since the beginning is the executive producer for our company says she supervises the production on all our shows julia barton whose the editor editor on that show is now our executive editor working on the scripts for for all of our different shows and then jacob smith who was junior pro who originally been malcolm's assistant is now producer on the show so we've been lucky to have the same core group <hes> make that a bit it really is malcolm's brainchild oiled and every single episode comes out of his head and i think when you listen to that show you you come to realize that couldn't come from anywhere else you know. The the most recent episode of the show is about the singer randy newman it brings together the history of segregation asian in the south around lester maddox who is the racist governor of georgia who had notoriously closed his his restaurant rather than let ah blacks eat there with this song by randy knew and a fight that <hes> involves steve bannon being invited in the the non invited to speak at last year's new yorker festival and you know you hear this and you think nobody in the world would have put those elements together in an argument a._m. And <hes> the way malcolm does and every episode really i think it's about malcolm's integration of a number of different themes that ideas ideas and and and things he's come across putting them into a conaco heron whole using this form or audio storytelling that he's really invented around the the show. That's awesome so if we shift to solvable that show i think is that a newer one that you guys have just put out that is newer. That's one of the we've all the other shows. Has it been launched. Since panoply began last fall <hes> solvable went on the air or just at the beginning of june and that is a partnership with the rockefeller foundation on dacian <hes> they came to us with the idea of developing a program around solving the world's biggest problems and doing interviews leads with people who have interesting ideas about solving different problems and <hes>. We thought that was such an appealing project. We're not doing any other shows at least so far is partnerships but we wanted to work with rockefeller on that that show has host maeve higgins but multiple interviewers <hes> including malcolm me another friend of ours named anne applebaum who's a very distinguished journalist and historian based in london london and poland <hes> who's written extensively about eastern europe and the soviet union and we all find people we wanna talk to who <hes> have ideas about how you address major major issues rate ranging from homelessness to abusive abusive algorithms on social media to food waste and our putting together a series of thirty episodes. I think we've run. Maybe about eight eight so far on a weekly basis but that's one of these projects. I mean i think projects are very much around what you learn making them and the way the audience i learns via the the host than the people who produce it and dab show is just i gotta say for me in such a learning experience on a different a different topic every week where i start enough knowing almost nothing in end up knowing something that's awesome so what is one of your favorite stories at you've heard on the show far or that. You've been inspired by yeah which one's your favorite and they're all probably your favorite but if you had to pick one joe awful because i'm one that art already because it's a mixture people be able to listen to it. I interviewed <hes> a woman named miriam jam who had just had the most amazing being story <hes> she was orphaned in west africa and abused and she was a traffic and as a as a young teenage girl living homeless essentially in paris and somehow this woman has as an adult old taught herself going to public library taught herself to read to write and to write code and is founded an organization uncalled. I am the code which has the goal of teaching a million young women and girls in the developing world to write code and they have they're. They're not at a million yet but they trained thousands of people to start businesses to become software developers and dan it is it is the most empowering thing it's the most amazing woman <hes> <hes> most amazing story that that she has and you know that's an example of the it kind of just extraordinary story and expert person that i've run across making the show and and some of these interviews i was just sort of hearing this with my mouth almost hanging open because it's so she's such an extraordinary person and so inspiring to be around. That's amazing yeah. I can't wait to dive in deeper to that show show and listen to some of the episodes that sounds really great. Honey strike the balance when you have someone who's sponsoring the show where you're working in partnership with to be able to choose the guests that you want versus versus also letting them kind of be a part of the production or creative process because you mission has a lot of sponsors. We've also kind of experienced this a bit as well of like you know making ensure. The show is still what you want but then also having a sponsor attached to it can sometimes make it a little bit tricky. How do you guys move around that. If you're able to talk about that that's interesting. It's part of what i was referring to kind of obliquely. When i was talking about the risk of having a business that's too dependent not advertising. You know if your if your listeners are you're paying for content. You have much greater ability to say no to advertising to an advertiser that you're not comfortable with or just an advertiser. That wants you to do something or say something that you'd you'd rather not now we my background is in journalism as his mouth gums uh-huh you know i think we have a strong asset around keeping a clear distinction between what's advertising and what's our editorial content so into the core issue. I think is not to blur those things. One of the nice things about podcasting is the because we have this format of the host reading eating the ad the ads are much less of an interruption and people don't mind them. They're kind of fun. Malcolm particular has really good time making ads for his show and everyone understands. I think that those are ads. They're not part of the show and that we get paid to do that but at the same time you know i think you have to always maintain attain a strong sense of integrity about advertising and make sure that it's not influencing the editorial content with rockefeller. That's a different kind of partnership. They they're not advertisers as such they give us a grad to make the show and then we're free to make the show but of course we're very interested in their ideas and their connections to people who are really in their world who are addressing solving a lot a lot of these problems so nope we maintain the the the the editorial say but we want to hear everybody's ideas when i was looking at it bit of your background i've seen i saw that you wrote a couple books. Do you have any new ones that you're working on now or what's that looking like not at the moment having launched a startup nine months ago i think taking on a book at this point point would be it would be a little masochistic. I've loved writing several books over over my career. They've all been about politics one way or the other there. My last book was a short biography of ronald reagan which is in a very good series originally started by the historian arthur schlesinger called the american presidents and series and there is a uniform short biography of every president and they're mostly written by historian summer written by by journalists like me <hes> but what's so interesting about a book like that is to try to digest a big life and a and a big story down to it's real essentials and to try to make an argument that is fresh and surprising about someone like ronald reagan whose both hard to see because of how recent he is also where the people's views are very very colored by ideology so for me that was that was a chance to go back and try to revisit a lot of what i thought at at the time and ask whether i'd understood thanks correctly my <hes> the book provided before that was <hes> about the bush family but particularly about the presidency of george george w bush and then my britain another book about little more a political theory about about government called in defense offensive government. It's my first book. I wrote <hes> when i was still still young journalist now very cool and what pulled you into politics was at your internship internship in college or was it before then. We'll catch. You excited about politics. I grew up in chicago on the north side in a very interesting political moment in a kind of the political family my parents weren't they weren't politicians <hes> but we were <hes> for. I was very involved growing up in what was known known as the sort of independent <hes> northside politics and my parents and their friends were group of people who were really for the first time challenging zhang the urban machine run by richard daley who'd who that had run chicago for for decades and that was a that that was a very exciting kind of political moment and political mute mill you to grow up in in the well by the time i was really conscious of much it was going on in the early one thousand nine hundred seventy s i would say that started a little little before that and <hes> i think that gave me an interest in politics that just persisted. I didn't study leap politics per se. I studied some political philosophy in college but i also interested in writing and in journalism and i did. I took a year off off college and worked at the new republic. I was referring to that year. I lived in washington and <hes> that kinda set me on the course of journalism about politics so that kind of brings me back to when i was talking about the two pieces of of advice that you are giving to aspiring journalist the second piece which i completely forgot until now it was done. I'm sure sure won't remember a word of it but go. What did i say so. The second piece was at the end of the day. The strength of one's writing is at the core. If someone writes well oh you want to hire them and i don't think it's a gift i think is a result of intensive practice. Just write a lot. Do you still think that is true. I mean personally at the mission. We think you're writing. Obviously podcast for anything is key and like you said in your quote. When you find a good writer we just try and scoop them up really quick. But how do you think about that now. And how would one go about developing good writing writing skills. Today i mean i think the part about practice first of all for for people who are who want to be writers th- really crucial. I'm in writing is like learning in a language or playing a musical instrument. You've gotta spend you gotta put in the time and you've got to do it. Every day. You know never no one ever got to be a concert pianist piano without practicing every day for hours and i think similarly no one ever got to be a great writer without spending some hours a day writing right and that's the practice is important both because you it helps you get over the fears and phobias associated with it. Um in a lot of people do find writing intimidating or just you know our stare at the blank page and have trouble getting started and it just becomes a habitual activity. You do every day <hes> journalism. The deadline of course is a great aid to that. You know that's the first hurdle you get over but look i think in in any field yeah i mean that would be i would i would say some version of the same thing if i weren't in journalism because i think being able to communicate clearly and effectively the and succinctly and writing is essential to almost anything anybody does so. It's it has value whatever you do. I think get hiring journalism obviously you do you do run into people in journalism who are very very skilled reporters particularly investigative get if type reporters who often are not very good writers twi investigative reporters are often paired with writers because you know they're they're they're able to find out things and ferret out information that has real value but often don't have the ability to communicate as well themselves else. That's the only real exception i can think of. That's the only time you would really you know in journalism hire someone who just didn't have superb writing skills else any training materials that you would have a new hire go through like i know at the mission we have people read the hero's journey and <hes> like robert mckee's work and all that kind of stuff. Is there any materials that you would have a new writer. Read for your company will my company. You know it's a little different. I mean we're hiring audio producers. Some of them are not. We're not hiring them fundamentally writers <hes> when i've taught journalism and sometimes when people ask me for recommendation i have always recommended george orwell's essays because i think orwell's essays are such models of lucid effective persuasive writing and there are few in particular a few of those essays like one called politics and the english language that that are just you know in twelve pages fourteen pages whatever you had to distill down the essentials of hotter right whale and walk good writing. Is you know i think i can't think of a better place to find one last question i had before maybe doing a little lightning round with you. Which is we'll give you questions and you can quickly answer on your thoughts on it but one question i i had was when you were starting pushkin. What kind of lessons or learnings did you take from slate or panoply or any of your past career experience. What are the big lessons that you learned or you. Saul from like you know leadership skills or people that you mentor it under. What did you see that you put into pushkin to make this company successful. Yeah i think malcolm and i relief thought about it the same way you know we we're entrepreneurs in our fifties not entrepreneurs in our twenties <hes> which affects exp both our appetite for risk but also what kind of business we wanna create. You know we we do not. We're not looking for a one in ten. Chance hands have enormous success. We're looking for like nine in ten chance of building a business that we're going to want to stay involved in you now quite possibly for the rest of our careers right so i think that steers you in a number of directions certainly says don't get involved with anybody. You don't wanna work with only bring in people you really want to be involved with <hes> and it's also i think it also i shaped are thinking about the financial structure. We didn't take any money from venture. Investors know knock on venture investors. Some of our best friends are rancher investors on some of our best friends but we didn't want pressure to sell the business or grow the business faster than we want. We expect to expand things who knows we may want to sell it someday but we wanna be in a position to keep control to only work on things that we really want to work on and maybe say hey we could be bigger. We could make be more profitable even but we're more comfortable at a at a certain size so i think it's really about appetite for risk about the connor control. You have and then just being very choosy about who you work with one hundred percent agree with that. That's the one thing at least in silicon valley they see when people are on message boards and looking for founder looking for you know a technical engineer. Your founder and i'm like oh gosh never wanna get into business with someone that you don't even know i mean i'm in business with my husband and i feel like i don't even know him. Well enough sometimes yeah well do. I could ask you some questions about that too but it's great. I feel like you're basically family with whoever you're in business with and what's funny is our other co. Founder ian always gets asked. What's it like being in business with a married couple and he's like no different than being in business with anyone else where basically all married anyways okay so yeah you know going into. I mean i'm involved with other friends. In this business. <hes> michael lewis we launched a podcast within the spring is one of mildest friends and there is you do take a certain risk when you work with friends because if things go badly and things can go badly you can endanger our friendship. <hes> in a way is totally normal and business but if it goes well there's a real upside which is that you get to work with your friends and <hes>. I think it's going really well for us. So far and i think malcolm and i are. Both you know really loving the chance to to work together on something when you ohio people because i know your team is a little bit smaller. Maybe similar to ours do you look for more of just the culture and personality fit as in like they could be my a friend and also be a good employee and they'll be here for the long haul or are you more like these are the skill sets we need. That's focused getting the right person door. How do you think about hiring the right team a while. I think we're we're focused on skills and particularly in in our field you know people who have the skills around audio production and have experience experience in making shows are they're really in demand right now and you've got to get the best people and it's not easy to get them. The other part part is almost the opposite of what you said. The business does it is a couple of friends who founded it but we want a diverse and very group of people and people who have the different kinds of life experiences and people we probably never would've met otherwise <hes> and in fact having a business chance to to work with people who are totally totally different from you and on in all kinds of ways so <hes> you know i think we're <hes> i kind of resist words like sort of fit and culture because i think they're just sometimes euphemism for you know hiring people who look like you or you think you're you're comfortable with. I think in hiring you you often want to get as uncomfortable comfortable as possible agree at such a great point. Is there anything that i didn't ask the man stephanie. I really wanna talk about this and you didn't ask me a question on this or i didn't get to touch on this that i miss anything before we jump into very quick lightning round no the only other thing that sort of interesting is about this moment in podcasting and you know all this listen vestment. That's pouring into it and so many people trying to make podcasts. It's an exciting time but i think it's also a time when people can sort of lose. Their air pads a little bed. I lived through you know at least one era of this and the earlier form of digital media <hes> i think you're much too young but around the nine hundred ninety ninety nine two thousand and bob all when you know you just started to see some very very irrational behavior huge amounts of money being pumped into businesses says it didn't make any sense people just kind of wanting to kind of get on the train without really bringing anything to and i don't think we're seeing that yet in podcast cows. I should say i mean. I don't think we're at the pets.com moment but that risk is out there. It's getting a little frothy. I think that you know they're already there are too. Many podcasts are more podcasts than will certainly anybody could listen to but now that doesn't mean you shouldn't be starting podcast. I think there are a lot of not very well made did not very ambitious not very thoughtful kind of projects getting underway and it's a little like you know the blog moments like everybody wants to have one and as you love the democratic aspect of that but you also think hey wait a minute. There's a lot that goes into making as well you. I hate to see too many people rushing into something without really thinking through how how to do it at a high level we see that all the time when companies these are people approach us with different podcast ideas and we try and explain to them like it takes a lot of work to start a podcast and if you're a business who wants a podcast you really have to have clear your goals and know exactly where you went ahead with it because if you just randomly start a podcast might not actually meet your k._p._i.'s that you're looking for or do anything unless you're really aligned with the show that you're developing businesses starting podcasts themselves. I mean there was a funny article. In the wall street journal a few months ago about how the most boring podcasts in the world or the these podcast started guarded by businesses you know the voice of business is not interesting per se right and i think they you know there's something for them to do in podcast or on sponsorship and in some rare cases maybe making shows but you know brands that are not gonna make podcasts that human beings wanna listen to even if the marketers loved the idea <hes> of people listening to them and gas for now we completely agree we wrote a whole article called the corporate graveyard. I don't know if we actually released. We're like oh a little bit touchy sub- it was all these corporations who try to start their own podcasts and it's just not what they're good at and i think that's why we always yes adjust like at least partner with someone who you can have an arm's length or they can maintain the story that direction the creative part of it and then you can be a little bit involved but you shouldn't try to do one internally because it's expensive time consuming coming and it'll probably be way too bias if a company trying does it on their own yes will you. You're giving them good advice all right so we have a very quick lightning around and i wanna make sure i respect your time unless you off your in a few minutes. Let's some only do three of the questions and all you do is you are basically betting on the future a true or false and then you have to say. Why are you ready to go for. I one podcasting will be as big as youtube ing yes it. I think it will be as big as you were in in dollar terms but <hes> i think i think the podcasting is has a fantastic growth trajectory on the business side but i also think it's much more permanent then you tubing or will much much longer life as a medium their podcasts being made now including. I hope some of the ones we're making that. I think people are still going to be listening to in decades from now. I don't know that i would say that about anything being made for youtube but then again i'm not an expert on it. Second one discover ability will change range and how instead of why i hope discover ability will change. I think it certainly will change because it's one of the inadequacies of podcasting <hes>. There's there's not a great way to figure out one podcast. You would like if you're not already steeped in listening into podcasts. <hes> you know people look at the apple podcasts top charges which is a very rough proxy. You know there are some different platforms arm's surface podcast in different ways but for the most part. It's still very word of mouth. You you find out if you listen to a lot of podcasts you tend to find and about new podcasts by listening to podcasts. That's there were the guests from new show or you know people you respect tell you they're listening to something. <hes> it's a very <hes> ad hoc process now that sort of nice. It's kind of handmade <hes> and you know the specs of that. You don't wanna lose but i think it's very tough for the still the majority of people who never listened to a podcast with podcast who aren't regular podcast listeners. They don't have a ready way to figure out where to start all right the third one is podcast v._r. A._r. and other platforms all collide as we've never seen before true false and why or how i don't know oh about that i don't i don't see podcasts being combined with video based formats. I think part of the great appeal about a podcasts his his hands busy mind free right that you can you can listen to them while you're driving or while you're exercising or while you're walking to work. That's not true video video depend demands your your full attention. You've got you've got to watch it and hold it. I mean i guess maybe can be on the treadmill but it doesn't <hes> it's different kind of medium and i don't see people combining those things and interesting ways but i do think is going to converge. Urge is podcasting audio books. Audio books are an area. We're interested in. We've we've just been making our first audio book and we're you. You know we're producing it using much more about podcast toolkit <hes> so i think those are two. I mean audio books. Are you know the fastest growing part of the business. That's where combination of skills make sense and are you guys writing the audio books. Are you taking a book. That's already written and turn into audio cassatt luck well. It's the it's the latter so far we <hes> malcolm. Godoi has a book coming out in the fall talking to strangers and we reproduced. We've just produced the audio book for that but he wrote that book as someone who had been making a podcast so he recorded all the interviews with a high quality polity recorder and he had an i an idea when he was writing at that there was going to be an audio version of it. That'd be distinctive so little brown. Which is his publisher assure hired us to produce the audio book for that so far. That's been our only project but it was a great <hes> it was a great one for us and we're interested in seeing what what else we can do in that area very cool all right last question creatives will be in more higher demand than technical or engineers in the next decade or two. They'll well speaking specifically to podcasting. I'm not quite sure about that. It depends what you define as technical <hes> certainly engineering as technical michael skill that's gonna be in very high demand people who know sound engineering <hes> and they're really important to our process but also producers zor somewhere in between or combine elements of both they've gotta think like creatives <hes> but they also need skills. They need to be able to edit tape and use pro tools and think about using different sonic elements to tell the story so in some ways. I would say you're back. You have that quote of mine about about the intersection of technology and journalism podcasting is very much about the intersection of creative thinking gene with a certain set of technical skills well awesome. This has been so fun. I really love talking to you about all this and excited to hear all your upcoming new podcasts. New episodes will definitely be tuning into all of that and yet overall had a really great time drank yourself and as a pleasure talking to you take your mission daily and all of our podcasts are created with love by our team at michigan dot org we own and operate network of podcasts and a brand story studio designed assigned to accelerate learning our clients include companies like salesforce. They're a customer times five twenty oh and ca- tara who worked with us because we produce results to learn more and get our case studies checkout mission dot org slash studios if you're tired of media and news that promotes fear uncertainty and doubt and if you want an antidote to all that chaos ask your at the right place subscribe here into our daily newsletter at mission dot org each morning. You'll get a newsletter that will help you. Start your morning in your day off right <music> <music> <music>.

jacob malcolm writer pushkin washington editor producer apple stephanie founder pushkin malcolm jacob chicago rockefeller partner michael kinsley pushkin industries the new york times yale university oregon
Revisionist History Presents: Axios Today

Revisionist History

12:36 min | 3 months ago

Revisionist History Presents: Axios Today

"Pushkin Hello revisionist history listeners. There is lot of news being thrown at us today, and it's affecting our lives more directly than any of us can remember and axios is the media company that helps you get smarter faster with concise reporting in their newsletters. PODCASTS HBO show and now A Daily News podcast. axios today helps you start your morning with the news that matters in just ten minutes. axios today host Nyla Boudou an team of award winning journalist will bring you the latest scoops from Washington and stories on everything from Corona virus to the state of the economy to systemic racism in America. You'll also get inside into other big trends shaping your world including China's growing influence and the rise of artificial intelligence. You're about to hear today's episode of Axios today I hope you listen tomorrow and the next day will you get the picture? It's like taking your seat at the smartest breakfast table in the world. You can find a show on apple spotify or wherever you get your podcast brought to you by Axios and Pushkin Industries now. Here's axios today today's episode is brought to you by Chevron. It's Tuesday June twenty third welcome to axios. Here's our promise to you will make you smarter about Your Day if you just give us ten minutes of your time every weekday morning. We're getting started today with one big thing that's our store. You can't Miss Right now every top tanner bestseller list is filled with movies, TV shows and books about fighting systemic racism. Maybe you're one of these books yourself we break down why it's happening and why this matters also president trump is using the pandemic to shut out highly skilled workers from the US. But I the sudden rapid and mass consumption of race conscious media is today's one big thing. Explaining it. All is Sarah Fisher she covers media for axios. So Sarah we saw for example, like demand for the TV show. Dear White people went up three hundred and twenty nine percent on. Netflix, justice. This is this is racism. Obama six, where else are we seeing this kind of trend? We're seeing it with other shows on Netflix for a brief period of time another show when they see us was also up a hundred and forty seven percent spike Lee's newly released film. Defy bloods has gotten increased attention because it's been included in Netflix's black lives matter collection. One thing to keep in mind is that it's not just about the content that's in demand, but the content that's being rejected notice that. Shows that highlight police brutality like lies PD cops are being canceled Hbo Max had temporarily Suspend Gone With the wind until it figured out how it was going to reintroduce it with more context media companies aren't just going to be held accountable for what they don't air, but also for what they choose to as well. Some of this is content that's being put in front of us. We flip on Netflix or Amazon or spotify, and they're suggesting this to us how much of this is propelled by platforms that are pushing this or making it more visible excellent question I mean on the TV and movies front I think platforms are largely responsible for putting this in front of consumers. If NETFLIX's didn't create that black lives matter channel, I don't know that enough people would have been. Able to search through its vast library of titles to find things up spoke to this moment and same thing goes for music that's distributed on various platforms, etc. But at the same time, I also think that platforms figure out what type of content to inform but what people organically sharing on social media and what's going viral. So an example of that childish Gambino twenty eighteen hit. This is America. There have been remixes of that going viral on Tiktok. And so that might be a signal to spotify that this is a song that we should be adding to our curated list about the movement because it's something users really care about. So I'd say half is yes platforms. Editorial decisions to push things to people but it's also people making decisions at the ground level at the grassroots level about what is resonating with them. What speaks to this moment for them, and that's pushing platforms to pay attention. As we see more people asking for it does that even create a space for more representation more diversity as companies are seeing this is more mainstream to have more. I'll just be very specific to have more black artists to have more black TV shows like I'm thinking of like blackish blackish is coming back earlier. This fall right Yup blackish is pushed to the beginning of the fall season instead of midseason because ABC said a show like that speaks to this moment. Yeah. I think there's a business case for I think that once networks and platforms recognize. That consumers care about this stuff, they're going to feel a lot more empowered to put conversations about race about police brutality upfront in their programming because they know that people are GonNa WanNa. Consume it Sarah. Why do you think this matters because I sure there's some people who think like this is just pop culture. This is a fleeting moment who cares Americans for generations are going to rely on. The media were creating today as a way to relate to what we're going through now, and that's critical because if it isn't for those pieces of contribution to our culture through music through books through movies through television, there's few other ways that we're going to be able to document it for the rest of time you know sure news articles can a few weeks maybe tops but a good song. I mean that would last decades. Sara Fischer covers media for accidents. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with president. Trump's new visa restrictions on highly skilled workers but I a word from our sponsor. Support. For Axiom today comes from Chevron partnering with California Bioenergy Transform Farm waste into renewable natural gas and provide an alternative source of power for a cleaner way forward for more information visit Chevron Dot Com. Welcome back to axios today. Let's catch up quick president. Trump keeps urging states to reopen and jump start the economy. But yesterday he used the economic decline caused by the virus as his reason for shutting down large parts of our immigration system. axios political reporter Steph Kite to explain more about how the president is using corona virus to achieve his immigration agenda. This is actually the second time that president trump has used the corona virus in order to introduce some temporary restrictions on what immigrants are allowed to come into the country and which ones are not allowed to come in anymore. So these current restrictions are in regards to H. One B. Visa holders. So the original band did not include Asian one B. holders only applied to different kinds of immigrants coming on permanent visas, but this time not only to trump extend the original order which. Green Card applicants but he also added restrictions for immigrants who are coming on short term work visas including HBV's says which are really relied on in the tech industry in the US in stuff I wanted to ask you what the Tech Industry's response has been to what president trump plans to do. Yeah. The response from many tech companies has not been great because they really do rely on these immigrants and a lot of ways. These are high skilled immigrant visas. And so they're looking to other countries to find specific specialties in really high skilled jobs and so companies like Google and twitter and Amazon have all come out and oppose the presidents restrictions on their ability to get those workers into the US and working for their companies and step. Do we have any idea what impact this may have on our economy if these workers are not allowed to be a part of it? Well, a lot of people it's not going to. Be Great even Republican Lindsey Graham said a twitter thread that he thinks this could have a negative impact on the economy because not only do these restrictions impact H. One B. Visas. They also impact other visas, which includes some lower level jobs that are also sometimes hard for US companies to fill and that the US economy really does rely on and the trump administration estimates. This could impact five, hundred, twenty, five, thousand jobs and according to the trump administration think that. Means that while now, that's five hundred, twenty, five, thousand jobs in Americans can take. But in another sense, many companies might struggle to fill those jobs and that's why this matters stuff anything. The bottom line is even as a trump administration is urging states to reopen are still using the coronavirus as a tool to continue to crack down on immigration, and one thing I'm looking for is how long these kinds of restrictions are going to be renewed and kept in place. Step. Kite is. Politics. axios insider is our sneak peek into the axios newsroom. One of our co founders Mike Allen is with me Good Morning Good Morning Nyla. Great debut rave reviews. Thank you. You know Mike I feel like there are many of us who are anxious about what's going to happen in the fall, and you've got some really interesting data about college campuses, which as it turns out main being a bit of a laboratory for the pandemic or how the virus might spread. Pull by college reaction talked to eight, hundred, fifty for. College students and they said, what if there's no vaccine? Are you still going to go back in person and two thirds of Students said yes, we are. Listen to this. Here's the question if our parties like those that occurred before the virus on your campus this fall will you attend even if there is a risk of contracting the virus and Nyla, third of students say I'm in. He may have a great day Nile. Thank you and have a great breakfast. Why it matters young people are more likely to take risks and will be much more exposed when they head back to college in the fall. We'll be right back after one more word from our sponsor. Support for axios today comes from Chevron partnering with California, Bio Energy to transform farm waste into renewable. Natural, Gas Chevron is exploring ways to reduce methane emissions from dairy farms to help address climate change, and provide an alternative source of power for a cleaner way forward for more information visit Chevron Dot Com. Thanks for listening actually today is brought to you by axios Pushkin Industries. Especial thanks to feel examined for bringing axios. Pushkin together. This episode was produced by Carol Alderman. Scenario marquess. Martinez Cara Dillon Naomi Shaven with music from Evan Viola Alex Suge Yara, our sound engineer Sarah Keelan. Goo- is our executive editor and Pushkin are executive producers are lead how Milad, Weisberg you can write to us at podcast at axios Dot Com and you can find me on twitter at Nyla. Boo Don't forget to catch us tomorrow morning but until then to inter afternoon show recap. I'm NYLA Budo. Thanks for listening stay safe, and we'll see you back here tomorrow morning.

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BONUS: A Happier Christmas

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

08:34 min | 9 months ago

BONUS: A Happier Christmas

"There's one holiday I adore and you can ask anyone who knows me well. It has to be Halloween. The candy the costumes. All the general creepy and I love it. Sadly I've never urban all that enthusiastic about Christmas. It's never really been my thing. I also know a lot of people who have a really tough time during the Christmas season and so I wanted to do something to change range that so even though we're busily working on a special New Year season of happiness lab one that will launch January sixth. I wanted to bring you a few super super quick tips for how you can feel a little bit happier this holiday season so without further ado. Welcome to the happiness. Labs very very short guide to having a mirror. Christmas miss with me. Dr Larry Santos in the Christmas season provides lots of opportunities for improving your wellbeing. Things like getting together with other people taking time off to celebrate and relax. All of these are practices. That science shows can make us feel happier but the holidays can also be really stressful and so here are some useful things that might help you. The first lesson involves the power of giving finding Christmas presents for everyone on your list can feel like a stressful chore. Or you're a distraction from the thing. We really want to do which is buying stuff for ourselves but research shows that this might be another spot where our minds Leah's astray Earth Mass. Liz Don a professor at the University of British Columbia has done some great research on this. You know I don't think training ourselves is a terrible idea. Like spending money on ourselves can be good. It's just that spending money on somebody else could actually be helpful. I think especially easy to overlook she asks people to spend money either on themselves On a gift for someone else people predict treating themselves will feel the best but it turns out. They're wrong subjects. Who Buy Nice things for others? report feeling happier at the end of the day. Then people who buy nice things for themselves and that affect holds even when relatively large amounts of cash involved. Liz also finds that doing nice stuff for others doesn't even need to involve money in fact she's running these same kinds of gifting studies with very young children using the kitty equivalent of cold hard cash goldfish crackers and so we gave these little kids windfall of Goldfish for themselves as well as chance to give some of those goldfish away to a puppet a monkey. He even children under the age of two seem to exhibit pleasure from giving their resources away. It's kind of just reassuring like as many problems as we have in the world right now. Oh it's like the tiny. Humans are starting out with this proclivity to derive joy from giving their stuff away like that to me. It makes me optimistic again about about the world so the big happiness lesson is that giving feels better than are allying minds realize in science shows that the price tag isn't the important part it really is the thought that counts my second. Christmas tip is about the kinds of gifts we should be giving others. It turns out that there's one kind of holiday present that can be super valuable and hugely happiness. Inducing and that is the gift gift of time psychologist Ashley. Williams from Harvard. Business School looked into this. So we ran this experiment where we gave people forty dollars in one week to spend in a way that would save them time and forty dollars in another week to spend on a material purchase for themselves and what we found is that on weeks where people made this time saving purchase. They felt oh happier less stressed but it wasn't about the objective amount of time they saved it was that these time-saving purchases getting a house cleaner ordering takeout. Help people feel like they were more in control of their time and that was what was driving the happiness benefits not the fact that people saved an hour and a half from cooking but that people all of a sudden felt felt like they had a windfall of time that they were more in control of their schedule. Our third holiday tip is to take time this Christmas season to experience gratitude. The reason send according to gratitude expert. Robert Emmons is that feeling thankful can give us the strength. We need to weather tough situations for me. I think the most important good good of gratitude is that it helps us live resilient. -Ly there's no resilience without gratitude. I mean it's just impossible. Gratitude is absolutely indispensable for. I think you know just for for growing an unshakable center a core of strength and happiness and it helps us to deal with with the slow drip of everyday stress as well as the massive trials and tribulations and also it widens our perceptual feel helps us see the big picture and the opportunities in it and of course it connects people Together Roberts work has shown that taking time for gratitude can have an important impact on your happiness whether you're trying to navigate the usual seasonal aggregations nations or even facing a more profound sense of holiday. Malays so take a second to jot down a few things. You're thankful for each night this season or steal Ella. Fantastic gratitude tip from my colleague here at Pushkin Industries The economist Tim Hartford who has a fantastic new. PODCAST called cautionary tales. Which I hope you'll check out? Tim's holiday gratitude hack is making his children. Write a thank you letter whenever the open presents not the end of the whole pile but each time an individual gift is unwrapped wrapped. I really love this idea. It lets tim and his family safer more time together by slowing down. The whole unwrapping process it forces. Tim's kids to think about what receiving each gift feels like and the act of writing. Thank you know organizing our feelings of gratitude and setting them down on paper. That's great for our happiness is to now. This might seem like a hokey family ritual but that gets to my final Christmas tip which is that if we want to be happier this holiday season then we need to embrace race dumb rituals just like this and fact research from Harvard Business School Professor Mike Norton shows that rituals have a way of making us feel a little bit more connected during during the holiday season. If you report having a ritual you're more likely to keep getting together with your family for the holidays and it's more likely to go well when you do get together. If you've ever been to a family holiday after a few years sometimes it occurs to you in your head that you have nothing in common with these people you know. They have different political local police. They have different lifestyle choices. You're kind of wondering. Why am I related to them? It seems as though rituals provide kind of framework for the fact that we're a family because we've always been eating Nana's roles for the past fifty years so I guess it's something that we all do together the other thing. The rituals do for family events. Like that is which is almost as important as they tell you what to do at each moment so again if you've ever been to a family holiday mainly it's people standing around awkwardly. I hope that arguments don't start based on something that happened in seventh grade rituals. Tell everyone exactly what they should do all time. So it's you and you go out and do that and then we'll do this in the kitchen while you do that over there and then we'll get together at four and watch the thing and then dinners over at six and then we're done and it actually allows the day to happen where everyone kind of sorts themselves in a way that's optimal and then suddenly it's all over and nobody killed anybody Yes the true meaning of Christmas. We got through it and nobody killed anybody anyways. I hope you found these short tips helpful and the happiness lab will be back on January six for four special shows exploring how you can become happier in two thousand twenty. I hope you'll join me in the new year to learn how the science of psychology can boost your wellbeing and if you can't wait sign up for our newsletter right away at happiness lab dot FM and so until we return happy holidays from happiness lab with Dr Lori Santa's Uh.

Tim Hartford Liz Don professor Dr Larry Santos Leah Robert Emmons Harvard University of British Columbia Dr Lori Santa Pushkin Industries Ashley Business School Williams Ella Roberts Harvard Business School Mike Norton
French podcast publishers work together; Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

podnews

03:46 min | 1 year ago

French podcast publishers work together; Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

"The latest from pod news dot net duo, lingo launched today. What the company claims is the first of its kind ever knew and welcome to the dueling. Go French podcast, it's a jewel podcast in French and English aims to help people understand French using compelling stories. It's presented by, and Goffin and Bhutto Boya a journalist, lawyer and podcast producer based in New York City in France guest a group of online publishers has set up a distribution of podcasts, working group to quote put in place. The necessary agreements with rights holders and to define best practice. The group mentions indexing of our assess feats, editorial presentation access to statistics respect for the integrity of the content and more about complete well Jacob Weisberg. Pushkin industries have released their latest podcast making a killing as new premium podcast on luminary this week conviction and new book by Denise Mina. Stars, a strong female protagonist who's obsessed by true crime podcasts and decides one day to investigate one of the unsolved crimes herself. It gets a positive review in the Washington Post one of the benefits of the open technical infrastructure of real podcast is that you can use the app, you want rather than a publishes app. The could have all kinds of other code in it like the app from Spanish football league alita, which listened to your microphone and worked out your location to discover bars that we using pirated video stream. Host read ads best or can you use a pre produced spot at instead, the sonic truth covers data from megaphones, Ken Lagaan ah, in an episode that we linked to today from our show notes, and our newsletter as he says, in an accompanying article some campaigns may require the power of an influence edge, just laying out the reasons why they love a product others may be better suited to a pre produced spot with an orchestral swell halfway through the ad and some campaigns may even require both. Editor spoke at podcast day last week. That's me with three podcasts that everyone can learn from we linked to what he said in podcast form, from our episode notes and our newsletter. Australia's at pro 'em costs offers a special. Podcasting music license is it at last away of licensing music for podcasts? We wrote an article on that. You'll find it links from our episode notes and our newsletter. Quick answer year. Nah, Spotify watch your editor has now been given the new interface, which gives parody for music, and podcasts, which is nice short. Howard points out that the ability to advertise podcast listeners, which we reported on yesterday is only available to large corporate advertisers for now. And we linked to Gustav soda Strom, the chief are indeed officer from the company giving a forty minute presentation on the company's history. I used to have a soda Strom, but I got bored filling up the gas bottles in podcast. Today. CNN films have launched Apollo eleven beyond the moon podcasts. Commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven lunar mission, your episodes of the true crime podcast. The lady vanishes have themselves vanished after two and a half million episodes. The podcast is following up new leads the football history dude, looks at the hundred years of the NFL that football. This is uncomfortable is a new weekly podcast about life in your twenties, and thirties, and how money Metis with it, and spectacular failures launches today, a ten episode season of the most spectacular business failures of all time. And that's the latest from our newsletter that pod news dot net.

Editor football France Gustav soda Strom Jacob Weisberg New York City Denise Mina Washington Post Ken Lagaan Pushkin industries NFL Australia CNN Goffin Bhutto Boya Howard producer officer hundred years
Introducing: Solvable

Solvable

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Introducing: Solvable

"Why can't we feed the world? Is it possible to cure cancer, what will it take for governments and citizens to commit to act on climate change? Why haven't we solved the issue of equal pay for equal work? Why are so many people trapped in work? That doesn't be in one of the world's richest countries. It's hard to believe the over billion people living without electricity. Why haven't we solve the ready? Yes, there are so money overwhelming questions. But also fill many inspiring aunties. My soul is to take energy to wake communities. We are not going to solve poverty in the twenty first century if we don't solve energy, poverty myself. A bowl is to get one million women and girls to learn how to could by the year. Twenty my solvable, is where homelessness, become something that is rare and is resolved as soon as someone experiences at my solvable is that refugees, and displaced people should have poverty rates inequality rates, lack of opportunity no greater than the rest of the population. I'm Maeve Higgins. And this is solvable from the Rockefeller Foundation. We're bringing you conversations between some of the world's best journalists and the incredible people working everyday to solve the world's biggest problems making a real difference to millions of lives around the world's Malcolm clad. Well. Interviews Nobel laureate. David Baltimore who scientific work made the treatment of aids possibles. Do you know what you've done? I knew what we had done in terms of cancer. We had broken over cancers. I didn't know what else we HIV hadn't been discovered. I didn't know we set up the understanding of HIV. Jacob iceberg speaks with activists Maryam Dom about her mission to get one million women and girls writing coat despite all the challenges and all the difficulty you have the key to unlock your life. I am the goal is about coding, Decem time is about giving in goes of power to good engender, lives and other extraordinary human sit down to discuss their solvable with Putin prize winning journalist, and apple bam and writer amid Ali-Akbar from Pushkin industries and the Rockefeller Foundation. This is solvable subscribe today in time for our law. And June fifth and prepare to be furiously, inspired.

Rockefeller Foundation Maeve Higgins Jacob iceberg David Baltimore Maryam Dom Putin Pushkin industries writer apple
Extinction-level crisis of local news

Axios Today

10:07 min | 2 months ago

Extinction-level crisis of local news

"Today's episode is sponsored by Goldman Sachs. Why am I under- arrested? If you're just tuning in. You! Are Watching. Our correspondent Omar Jimenez being arrested by state police in Minnesota. We're not sure why our correspondent is being arrested. Omar is just one of many journalists who were arrested during the recent black lives matter protests that one happened live on national television, but there were other journalists who were physically assaulted in teargassed all while just doing their job, and it was only the latest in a series of attacks on the press. Welcome to axios today. I'm Lou and it's Friday. July third for this Independence Day were dedicating this special episode to journalism and the role. It plays in our democracy. Journalism is in danger. It's under attack and distrusted by many and tens of thousands of journalists are out of work. Most of those job cuts were in local news where trust is highest, the extinction level, crisis and local journalism is. Today's one big. I'm not different from many journalists. And then I got my start in local news at my hometown paper. The Miami Herald local journalism is an issue. I care deeply about and so two Sarah Fisher. She's the media reporter for axios. Local media plays a huge role in elevating democracy. There have been studies that have shown that absent, a strong local newspaper or broadcaster local governments. Governments municipalities make bad decisions. And over the last fifteen years we've lost twenty one hundred newspapers mostly in small and mid sized towns, the economy and the pandemic have accelerated this even further, and just April and May of this year at least thirty newspapers have closed or merged all in all a quarter of the newspapers that used to exist in this country are now. If we go back to July of Seventeen, seventy six. Our Declaration of Independence was actually first published in many newspapers, including the Hartford current side note, it did not make the front page. The Hartford current is actually the only one of those newspapers that still around today it's owned by the Tribune company, which is typical of most newspaper companies nowadays because it's not a family owned business anymore and the reason that. That matters Nyla is because we you own something you wanna be able to pass that down to your kids. You WanNA put your personal stake into it, and so you care about the content you care about the impact. That paper has in your local community when you're a big hedge fund in a local paper as one of dozens of papers in your portfolio. You don't have an emotional attachment to it. The giants are also investing in local journalism companies including. In Google poured more than one billion dollars start funding to all kinds of local news companies. They're intern testing out nonprofit, and for profit destroy business models. One of the newest ones of these is the Oakland side. It just officially launched three weeks ago. Oakland hasn't had a newspaper devoted to covering the city for the past four years. Name. Russia is its editor in chief before the Oakland side launched. She spent hours talking with the community about what they wanted. Before we published a single-story spending months actually sitting down with people in asking about what they want journalists to do for their community, and how they might actually like to get involved in helping journalists do this work, and you know just yesterday actually. We published an investigation into issues that many Oakland residents told us. You know very new. We haven't been on the scene for very long at all, but I was just so happy to see that they wanted us to look into the story, and the response has been enormous. How much of a thought did you give to the business and finances of all of this? When it was being created equal thought, you have to our newsroom, the Oakland side is part of a larger nonprofit network called. Called City side our initial seed funding for the Oakland side comes from the Google News Initiative. We received one point five million dollars to see this project I. Wonder if you worry about the landscape of what that looks like across the country when you think about smaller communities versus a place like Oakland where in three weeks you've managed to have five hundred people sign up. You know I wouldn't say that I worry about. The local news landscape there's plenty of people doing that I am looking to work with people who want to find solutions and work really hard to show what is possible and what can be done if we rethink the role of local journalism in our communities if we rethink who we serve what we work for what success looks like? Since the side launched. The site has gained five hundred paid subscribers. It's a strong start, but it's just been three weeks and we know the path to sustainability. Survival is going to take much longer. We'll be MAC and fifteen seconds with the woman who called the current crisis in local journalism and extinction level event. COVID, nineteen is changing markets, industries and the global economy. You can hear the latest insights from Goldman. Sachs experts and thought leaders. At GS, dot com slash covid, nineteen or on any of your favorite podcasts platforms. Womack to axios today we're devoting this entire episode to the crisis in local journalism, and we've been talking about how much digital startups are trying to take the place of local newspapers, but we want to inject some harsh reality into this conversation. Penny Muse Abernathy is the nature of journalism and digital media economics at UNC and Penny was actually the person who used the term. Term extinction level event when it comes to the local journalism ecosystem. She's in charge of the news. Desert Project which tracks journalism at the local level, there are many noble efforts right now to try to fill the news gap. Many people looked in two thousand, eight as independent digital site, says the Great Savior and salvation. Unfortunately independent new sites are having the same trouble. That legacy meteoroid, having very easy to start a digital site, but it's much harder to build a sustainable business model, and so I m many of those, because of where the money is both nonprofit philanthropic money as well as four profit money is relocated in metro areas. Ninety percent of all digital sites are located in Metro, areas. So, that leaves large areas of the country without a digital opportunity. Do you feel like the corona virus could be a turning point in the future of local news. I sure hope it is a may not think it is a raised awareness in a way. Nothing else could have of just how important it is to know what's going on in your own backyard in your own community, and how that relates to the broader trends. You know a good news organization really shows you how you related to people. You might not know you're related to and I think that's. That's what the coronavirus has shown us is which are the good news organizations that we really need to focus on? It's also raised awareness of what happens when we don't have that penny is anthony about when we're having this conversation I. Wonder How you think this fits into our fourth of July celebrations and the press and our thoughts about democracy, we all have a stake in whatever form the local newspaper is delivered in the future and the content that it actually provides a so that we can make informed decisions as residents of community as citizens in a democracy. And as I would hope well intentioned people in a society about the choices that we have to make on an everyday basis and the choices that will affect our future I'm also glad you're doing this on the fourth of July, because it really is about our democracy, so thank you for doing that to thank you. Happy Fourth of July like you say to you. Here's the big picture for us. This holiday weekend during this time to celebrate our freedom, the very survival of the fourth estate, and its role in our democracy depends on all of us. That's it I this week. axios today is brought to you by axios Pushkin Industries special. Thanks to Sarah Fisher and Mike Allen for their help with today's episode. This episode was produced by Neria Marquess Martinez Carol. And Care Schilling alyx suge Yara is our sound engineer. Sarah Kahalani Google is our executive editor at Pushkin are executive producers are Lee Tell Milad and Jacob Weisberg. You can find me on twitter at NYLA. Voodoo and you can write to all of us at podcast at axios dot com. I'm NYLA BOO. Thanks for listening. Stay Safe and enjoy your holiday guest. Goldman Sachs experts and thought leaders are sharing their insights about the trends shaping markets industries in the global economy. You can hear the latest insights on cove, nine, nine, hundred economic and market implications at GS. Dot Com, slash cope in nineteen or any of your favorite podcasts platforms.

axios Oakland Goldman Sachs Sarah Fisher Hartford Google Omar Jimenez axios Pushkin Industries Lou NYLA Minnesota giants teargassed Penny Muse Abernathy Neria Marquess Martinez Carol Nyla Tribune
#1343 - Q&A: How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast?

Side Hustle School

06:40 min | 2 weeks ago

#1343 - Q&A: How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast?

"Support for this podcast comes from Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a new virtual room, collaborate live building ideas on the same page and see more of your team on screen at once learn more at Microsoft. Dot. com slash teams. Hello, hello, and welcome to signing school. This is your host Chris. Kilovolt. All Year I've been answering listener questions going to say answering listener questions and answers but there's a two part process listeners ask the questions I attempt to provide some sort of answer and it's been really fun to hear of all the different projects people out there are starting. Today's listener has a pretty wild idea. They actually want to start a podcast now, why would anybody want to do that? Well, as an active podcast listener, you might know the answer to reach people like you. Millions of people now use podcast as a primary medium for their news education and entertainment and millions more use it as a secondary medium there also a lot of people who don't listen to podcasts. Just means that the market has a lot more room to grow even despite all the people who are listening. So when it comes to doing it as a side hustle a money-making project, specifically, what do you need to know in terms of attracting sponsors? Do you do it on the front end to it a bit later as you build an audience, that's we're going to talk about in this episode. So here is a message from our sponsor a thank you so much answer. Thanks for your support at allowing us to bring this program to our listeners completely free, and then we'll jump into the question. How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast? No matter where you're selling Amazon. Oetzi. Your own website shift station brings all your orders into one simple interface making them easy to manage any device even phone. They've been supporting Sisal School for several years now, and I know that many of our listeners have had a great experience with them if you've not had a chance to check it out yourself and you're interested in being an. ECOMMERCE seller well, it's pretty easy because right now you can try it free for sixty days when you use offer Code Hustle, make sure your business is ready to meet the demands of delivery culture get started at ship station dot, com today click the microphone at the top of the homepage and type in hustle that is ship station dot com offer, Code Hustle Ship Station makeshift had. Hi, Chris this is rod from Omaha. And I've been listening to this show for over a year. Thanks for the helpful content. Planning to start a podcast and I want to do it seriously but maybe not professionally, but I want to plan well, then do everything I can to recruit inactive audience that will be attractive to sponsors. But what do I need to know in? How do I find those sponsors do I find them in advance or only after the audiences more established fact? Rogge what's up? Thank you so much for listening. Thanks for the question and I am excited about your podcast. Really glad to know that you're planning to take it seriously. You know not everything has to be professionally as you said, but to take it seriously, I think that is admirable. So let's talk a bit about sponsorship. Your question specifically is, what do you need to know? How do you find the sponsors? Do you find them in advance or later? So on that last point if it's important to have sponsors When the show launches most likely, you'll need to partner with a podcast network or distributor who will license and distribute your show. Now, this is changing by the month because I realized the follow up question is okay who are those people? Where do I find them while it's changing by the month? It's a very fast moving industry but a few well-known podcast networks at the moment include wondering Pushkin Industries, and cadence thirteen where side-hustle school has hosted. Now, in recent times, streaming services like spotify have also gotten in the game by producing and distributing their own podcast as well. Now, I just named a few of the bigger ones there, but there's also a lot of others as well. Assuming. You aren't going through a company like that, which is kind of like working with a traditional publisher for your book like there are pros and cons to it. So assuming you're not doing that, then you'll really need to focus more on building up your subscriber base before sponsors will be interested. And then once audience established. That's when you want to start looking for the sponsors a great place to start. Once you have a good number of downloads let's say five to ten thousand per episode more is Mid Roll. She can look at mid roll dot com they produce podcast of their own, but also sell ads on a commission basis for lots of other podcasts and as the other companies I mentioned mid roll is not the only option. So when you search fine podcast sponsors in Google or wherever you might find several other networks that do the same thing. Now lastly, in addition to those networks because let's say you're starting off and podcast is going well but you don't have really big numbers while you can still approach brands directly if there's companies that might be a good fit or you can invite them to approach you directly. So how do you do that? Well on your podcast website which you should have a website by the way include a prominent page called sponsor INFO or sponsor this podcast something like that. And I think if you don't have a ton of downloads, this is a good entry point because you can try to sell some other unique characteristic about your podcast. For example, it might be a small tight knit community that isn't ever going to have a huge listenership in terms of just the raw numbers, but this community is very loyal and it's in need of services that a sponsor could provide. So I've known a lot of smaller podcasters who have had. The same sponsor is often for years who have just really believed in in the podcast and they have kind of forced this good relationship between. The company, the PODCAST, her and the audience, and all without going through a network, which, of course, by nature and network is a middleman and there's commission involved and all that kind of stuff. So if you different options there, but I think overall whatever you do. The most important thing is building an audience like focus always on your audience focus on what can I do to create a great podcast? What can I do to provide valuable helpful content because that is the foundation for any relationship whether you're trying to work with a network trying to get your ad sold by distributor or trying to connect sponsors directly focused on your audience. All right listeners if you have a question com decided so school dot com slash questions. We will continue to feature them throughout the rest of the year along with updates from other listeners as they launch their projects I look forward to hearing about rods project and maybe even yours as well. Thank you so much for listening. My name is Chris Gayle about this is side, hustle? School. Boost. From the onward project.

Chris Gayle Microsoft Code Hustle Ship Station Sisal School Dot. spotify Rogge Google Pushkin Industries Omaha partner publisher sixty days
Coming Soon: The Happiness Lab Season One

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Coming Soon: The Happiness Lab Season One

"It's okay take prepare your ears for the sounds of happiness venous. What you're hearing is pure joy. This high school student just learned. She got into her Dream College. I'm Laurie Santos. I'm a professor at that very Dream College Yale University and Sadly I've seen that joyous moments like these don't last as long as my students think young people today are more more stressed anxious and depressed than they've ever been which is really tragic but it's not just college students. Many of us are starting to feel Mike Happiness. This is increasingly out of reach all right. Let's get started so I decided to do something about it. I developed a class on the science of happiness well then everybody everybody psychology good is it was a runaway success. It became the most popular class ever at you a little bit surprised many of can you hear so many people turned up that I had to teach the course in a concert hall. You have the power to transform everything out there into uh-huh. Thank you all for your engine. I believe in the class classic changed my life and the lives of thousands of other people and now I want to share these insights with you so I teamed up with Pushkin Industries to make this new podcast called the happiness. I want to invite you on a journey one in which will tackle a puzzling question what really makes us happy flung had five hundred million dollars but after working with these people. I understand the money is not going to buy you happiness so be careful what you wish for to find the answer answer. We'll learn from some of the happiest people around. I've looked at the good the bad and the ugly I'm blessed. I also introduce you to some of the top. Scientists and experts in my field turns out that when people get exactly what they want. They're not always happy when they get the opposite of what they wanted. They often are that's a little bit of a mystery kind of mystery that attracts psychologists. You'll hear that getting to happy. Place requires you to take a long hard. Look at yourself. There was a woman in the workplace. We'll recall her megan and she was a very negative person. We all have our Megan's in the office for better for worse. Yes well. You know what we're all Megan's in some ways we we often think we know what will make us happy but the science shows our minds don't always point us in the right direction. We long for fame and money beach body or a new car. We we expect those things will make us happier. It's just that those expectations are flat out wrong. We find that time and time and time again but we've found some truly inspirational people. We'll get it right. People who put the science into practice would a gold medal. Make me happier. It's not the metals. It's hearing the crowd and a hearing the Nice when I skated over so beautiful. This is why I do what I do. You're basically going to get an entire class completely for free and you'll you'll have a lot of fun along the way you hear a reaction that goes something like this old. So are you ready you to feel better than join me for the happiness lab. Launching on September seventeenth subscribed now wherever you get your podcasts.

Mike Happiness Megan Dream College Laurie Santos Pushkin Industries gold medal Yale University professor five hundred million dollars
Introducing Broken Record

Broken Record

03:34 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Broken Record

"I have a friend in California music, producer, Rick Rubin. He's a studio in Malibu called Shangri LA. And sometimes when I'm out in Los Angeles. I go up and see Rick, and we said look out at the ocean. And we talk. What in your mind is to? I pray. True. Hip hop record. I would say run DMC. Suck ramseys. That's probably the best. Hip hop record. They were rap records before that. But that was maybe the first hip hopper. You know in that era. I had a J tree in my dorm room run d m tree the ahead old. I rewrote the lyrics of the song to be all about my J Trie. I'm a sucker. Jade tree can't grow much higher. All you other J trees going to call me sire. At one day. We realized we're not the only ones who this crazy about music. So we started visiting lots of other people whose work we love producer now Rogers, you've probably had one of his songs. Stuck in your head? At some point the very first time, David played, let's dance for me. Walked into the studio, and he played something. That's. Two. Some and then I asked him if I could do an arrangement. But then when I moved from a minor up to be flat. It actually had a different vibe. It got it got brighter in Mike funkier signing sauce on you can only hear like. Now brings along his whole band and gives us a private concert. It's insane. Rufus Wainwright does the same thing. Just him in a piano. Rufus had a cold that day. You couldn't tell we talked to Wendy and Lisa from the revolution. We were the band that prints sang to we were the band that prince dance to we were the band that prince could take off his guitar and do nothing, and it was still a prince show, you know. And so then the gets experienced what he experienced what's a music podcast without a deep dive into the epistemology of Norwegian backpedal death knows more is more. Like, you know, what they call? It cookie. Monster vote legwork anybody other, you know, a lot of that. And with black mouse more a lot of it is more like a like more higher and. Yeah. And just sounds much crazier in my opinion. All this and more so much more is part of our new show. Broken record. Rick, my friend, Bruce had lem me. Conversations arguments stories remembering music, discovering new music, broken record liner notes for the digital world. Broken record from Pushkin industries coming to your podcast feed on November thirteenth. Subscribe now.

Rick Rubin Rufus Wainwright producer David Los Angeles California Malibu Pushkin industries J Trie Rogers Bruce Wendy Lisa one day
How to Stay Sane During a Pandemic

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

30:54 min | 6 months ago

How to Stay Sane During a Pandemic

"The from Pushkin Industries. This is deep background. The show where we explore the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm Noah Feldman every week we try to give you the story behind the stories but in this episode. It's a little bit different. We're going to explore how we feel about the news or specifically how we feel about corona virus in this strange moment where the epidemic is dominating our headlines. It's even more important than ever to pay attention to our emotions to our well. Being and to how those things relate to the stories we read in the news life as we know it is turned upside down. Schools are closed. Offices are closed long lines at supermarkets. It's very easy to feel anxious. It's very easy to feel hopeless but Lori. Santos has some good tips for how to cope or she would probably put it how to regulate herself. She's professor of psychology at Yale University. Where one of her classes called psychology and the good life has become the most popular class in the history of Yale University and has attracted five hundred thousand students on Sarah. You heard that right. Pushkin fans may also know Laurie as the host of the happiness. Loud for podcast where she uses scientific research to talk about how to achieve and maintain happiness and well-being in life. Needless to say Lori is more than qualified to help us deal with corona virus anxiety. She is in fact the one goto expert that you can think of laureate. Let's just start with your own personal experience and what you're doing to stay happy. You're in charge of a college of three hundred or four hundred undergraduates who are all have all flown the coup. So you have a very large very empty nest. How are you handling it? It's been surreal and really sad honestly. Y'All had this very incredible situation. Where as corona is emerging as this awful threat was while our students were on spring break. So yell made the really hard decision to kick students off campus when they are all off on spring break wherever they were. You know so. We had students who were in Cancun with a small backpack and things and they're told hey don't come back you know we'll figure out a way to get your text books in your laptops and all that stuff back to you and so for our students. It was really frantic right because they didn't even get to say goodbye to their friends or pack up their stuff. Many of them don't know when they're getting their stuff because we can't let them on campus and so managing that ICTY for four hundred other students at the same time as I'm managing my own anxiety and I'm sad I don't get to say goodbye to these students and I'm uncertain about what's going to happen next and how long it's GonNa take so it's been it's been a lot both processing it myself and seeing it through the students is you sound very much unsurprisingly in touch with what you're feeling which is excellent for the rest of us it may not always be simple to access our full set of feelings. How important is it in your view for us to try to be more or less aware of were conscious of the strain? Different emotions that are coursing through all of us. Still Right now I mean I think it's absolutely essential if for the only reason that the only way we're gonNA make it through. This crisis is to make sure our immune systems are functioning at their absolutely optimal level to protect us against this physical health threat. And I think that means that we need to take the mental health threat of this crisis really seriously like we're plunging people into social distancing basically not letting them do the one thing that they really want to do at this time in their life to feel connected and close with other people you know. Hug their mom. We basically can't do that anymore. I think we know that. Just the anxiety and uncertainty of the situation is the kind of thing that can lead to say. Have things like panic attacks and so on one of the most awful things is that you know Amine Symptom of Krona viruses that you have the shortness of breath. That's also the main symptom of feeling anxious right and so. I think a lot of us are even seeing these phantom symptoms and wondering you know do I have am. I really shorter breath. What am I feeling and so I think getting through this crisis successfully is going to require a lot. It's going to require figuring out political infrastructure of figuring out medical infrastructure. But I think it's also going to involve all of us individually doing everything we can to make sure we're flourishing as much as we can to keep ourselves sane and physically healthy. Were you hinting as I thought? Maybe you were that there might actually be some clinical connection between mental wellbeing and a well-functioning immune system. Oh there's so much evidence that immune function really requires not having stress and so on. So we know for example. That really upping your sympathetic nervous system function can affect immune functioning to right so. I think allowing yourself to be incredibly stressed out allowing yourself not to sleep that much. Both those things are not great for protecting your body against viruses and add to that the kind of panic eating that we're all doing of sugar and ice cream in these kinds of things. These aren't great for our bodies to fight off. Threats like normal level threats let alone the kind of threat that we're facing so violently contagious. I'm impressed you still have ice cream left. I had to. Md everything out of my everything in my freezer to put in the vast amounts of protein. That I need to support to growing teams is the plus and minus of living in a huge bunker that is normally their support. Four hundred students once. My college is empty. I'm sitting on freezers of thirty pounds of Mozzarella sticks and so on so I really have to keep for the panicky check. Can I ask you about something? That's really been on my mind. And you you alluded to it earlier when you mentioned that we can't do something that gives us a great sense of wellbeing namely to have meaningful human contact. I'm concerned that there's like a corona associated social media paradox and the paradox is on the one hand as you've shown in other people have shown too much reliance on phones and other technologies can actually have an alienating effect on our ability to form meaningful social connections and yet in this current moment when we say well how will we maintain social connection the immediate answer that everyone has let's use zoom. Let's use facetime. Let's transform snapchat from something that I'm trying to keep my kids off to something which I'm encouraging them to use in reasonable proportion. So is there in fact some social media paradox in this moment. Yeah I think even I even had some folks criticizing me over email. Because we've just for our own Pushkin. Podcast the happiness that we just started a facebook group because people wanNA connect in his time and people wrote to me saying like didn't you and your course say that facebook is really bad for us and it promotes anxiety and depression. And yes so. I think there's a a paradox. There I think for a long time technology in particular kinds of technology right using our phone to scroll through instagram. Feed rather than picking up our phone and like calling a parent from far away. We are often using technology in ways that socially limit us that prevent us from connecting with other people. The irony is that that is all we have right now. We can't physically connect with people and the way we normally would but these technologies are really going to be a lifeline. The key is that we have to use them the right way and I think most of us haven't built up the right muscles for how to use these technologies in a positive way to connect with people so for example. My first instinct when I'm feeling a little anxious to hop on twitter or to hop on facebook and just kind of scroll through like my instinct is like that will make me feel social. I'll see what other people are talking about. But that is having exactly the wrong reaction like. I'm not really connecting with people in real time. I'm kind of experiencing all their anxiety from their posts. A Better Way to connect with folks would be to use things like facetime resume when you can see people in real time see their expressions talk with them See the kinds of things that they're doing. Maybe even have shared activities together. We can watch netflix together or cook a meal together. Those things the science suggests are ways that technology really can connect us for the most part. I mean we do lose some things by having things on technology. Obviously things like touch and so on but for the most part in real life conversation where we are in real time watching video of what. Someone's doing if you have a decent connection that can make you feel incredibly connected and it's the one thing that a lot of us are going to rely on and so I think we need to be careful about this paradox because some people have this knee jerk. Reaction of like technology is bad. It's GonNa hurt social connection given that that's all we have. We need to find the best ways to make use of it so that we can decrease loneliness in this really potentially really lonely time so then to summarize than professor. Santos's lesson number one for social media. Is something like talk. Don't scroll yes. Yeah get close to replicating an unreal an IRA L. Human connection is as you can and avoid the scroll which we know is Is Not the most heartening undertaking as exactly right and I think I love the use. The word real social connection and it's important to remember what that looks like. That doesn't look like a work meeting where we scheduled on zoom and we meet exactly at seven PM and so on. That looks like I run into somebody at the water cooler or just chat with somebody at the coffee shop. We need to find ways to use these technologies in really like low key kinds of ways. That don't feel so formal so I I love. I keep hearing from friends who are using things like facetime to kind of make dinner together where you just put it on in the background. You're running around chasing after your kids and like when you can come to the screen you come to the screen. But it doesn't feel as formal I did this with my college roommates last night and we did a spa night together so once someone was steaming their face and someone was putting on a mask and someone was just like paying their nails. It's not formal. It's kind of low key. That's what we need right now. What we're losing is the low key stuff that kind of informal ways of running into each other but again if we if you kind of do a little scheduling and use these technologies. We can replicate that mostly. Well any advice on how to break the ice in those situations. I mean if you're with your college roommates where people you've loved for many years it might be a little easier than with people who are sort of in the middle ground that you you know when you like you know I have found that the distance between formal encountering non-formal encounter in these spaces is actually kind of big and I. I feel a little awkward even with people colleagues that I might sit down after. We're GONNA have a drink with one of them said well. Why don't we have a drink on zoom or on on facetime and I said yes but keep on laying because I think I'm worried that it'll be awkward. Yeah I think this is another spot where our minds lied to us. I think the startup cost is awkward. You know what I mean like we all have the like oh is your mic on like. Oh move your thing. I can't see your face there. Is that awkward startup cost. There's no question but once you get into it. It's actually a lot more pleasant than we expect. I think we put too much emphasis on that startup cost which causes us not to schedule these things but in practice once you do them. I mean I've had lots of different versions of these now because we've been kind of stuck in the house for about two and a half weeks now and all of them kind of feel like they're going to be awkward but in practice they work out pretty well with one group of friends. We did games with a roommate of mine from Grad school and like her ex boyfriend slash friend and he was in a different spot and we decided to play celebrity. Like done like you know party game and I was like this is just not going to work and I was again kind of dreading it and like putting off doing it but then in practice ones we did it. You know fifteen minutes in. We were playing the game and it was fine so our minds adapt incredibly quickly to these technologies. We just have to overcome that misconception. That it's not going to be fun or it's just going to be too awkward so it's not worth it. We'll be back in just a moment to working remotely can be a challenge especially for teams. That are new to it. How do you deal with your work? Environment being the same as home while staying connected and productive and then there's your newest co worker the cat well your friends at Trello have been powering remote teams globally for almost a decade at a time when teams must come together more than ever to solve big challenges. Trello is here to help trello part of Atlassian collaborative sweet is an APP with an easy to understand visual format plus tons of features that make working with your team functional and Just Plain Fun. Cello keeps everyone organized and on the same page helping teams communicate focus and connect teams of all shapes and sizes at companies like Google Fender Costco. And likely your favorite neighborhood. Coffee Shop. All Use Trello to collaborate and get work done. Try Trello for free and learn more at TRELLO DOT com. That's T. R. E. L. L. O. DOT COM TRELLO DOT COM. So okay next question. This has also been very much front of mind for me. Creation of routine and schedule. When stuck at home intuitively. It seems that would be very important. And so I- lectured my children unwisely before actually talking to the psychologist but is there anything to that. Routine is essential you know. That's not just an old wives tale. I think if there's anything we can do to have more routine in our life all the better and so one of the things I've been advising my students about is to create their own rituals whatever used to do in the morning before you were stuck in your parents house. Keep doing that right now. If that was getting up to go to the gym you know drag out a towel and do some exercises on the floor. If that was getting dressed up to like run off your first class and grab a coffee on your way there at the coffee shop. Find a way to replicate that the more we can feel like we have a normal schedule. The better we're going to get through this and part because when you don't have a routine you kinda just feel off one great thing about habits and routines is that they he just wants to do without anxiety you know. I just know that when I got up in the morning you know I hit my Yoga Mat and then I take a shower and then I get a coffee and then I start working on podcast off. It just is my day. If you don't have those routines in place it can feel kind of uncertain. You're like well what do I do next? Do I take a shower? What's going on? And that little bit of uncertainty on top of all the other anxiety on top of all the other uncertainties. We're facing right now. It does two things first of all just doesn't feel good but second of all it makes it harder to get your tasks done so imposing some kind of routine even if it's a fake routine even if it's a new routine. I think can be incredibly powerful and it's especially powerful for kids right even if you're doing kind of homeschooling right now you know set up like this is the reading hour and now it's the take a break our and now it's the lunch hour that can really really help kids and even if you have kids at home and you're like the heck with home schooling like. I'm just kind of let them watch Netflix. Even still have a routine like from nine to two is the net flex time and we take a break at noon for lunch and any routine. You can kind of impose on yourself is gonNA feel amazing or. I'm glad that I've managed to get that accidentally right But my question is actually why. Why are human beings creatures of scheduling inhabit in this way? I mean just from a purely evolutionary perspective doesn't seem super obvious that this would be so optimal for us you know when You know went out there hunting and gathering on the Veldt. What's so great about a routine? It just kind of reduces our choice and choice can feel really overloading right so if you have to make a choice every morning like should I shower. I should I exercise. I should I get coffee. I like check my email that can feel incredibly paralyzing and so the brain just has a trick to avoid those kinds of choices where it just says. Hey if you did something. Yesterday. That was rewarding. Lay Down that track in the brain so that you can just do that over again without having to make the choice of doing it it means. Sometimes that we sometimes lay down tracks that are awarding. That aren't great for us. You know some of us are now realizing that the habits that we have at night for say snacking all the time Those might not work when you're in your house. Twenty four seven right so sometimes we lay down bad tracks but often we've laid down tracks that are rewarding before and it just reduces the choice that allows us to kind of get on with our day without getting stymied by like well. Well what should come next? We kind of just know what comes next because it sort of feels natural. We can sort of do things on autopilot which to the extent that they're rewarding it kind of works to have as void all these choices that can feel so so overwhelming otherwise really overwhelming time. So routine is one mechanism of reducing anxiety by reducing choices. What are some other tools that people can use on their own to address anxiety in the current current situation? And I think I want to tweak the question to say you know. It's not just the general question of anxiety it's anxiety that's in some degree justified. It's not really the situation of the patient who comes to you and says you know doctor. I I have anxiety and you say what about and the person can't even express it. It's you know it's it's not. You know grounded in reason here if you're not a bit anxious about what's going on in the world right now of the probabilities of getting corona where the long-term economic effects or your job or your 401k. Or the well being your loved ones. You're actually not rational. Like I mean some degree of rationality here mandate some degree of anxiety. So how do you think people should manage that set of issues? Yeah I mean I think one way to frame it is. The emotions are tools right in. Some sense is the best way to think about them. They're there for a reason and as you said there's a reason we're supposed to feel anxious in this situation. We can't be going out and being social. It's an incredible risk right. We have to have some degree of anxiety. If we're GONNA fly in the curve if we're going to do what we need to personally do to protect ourselves in our family that said being so anxious that you're not sleeping being so anxious that you can't work if your job demands you working from home. This doesn't feel good and it's ultimately a great way to deal with the problem again because kind of spiking you're sympathetic. Nervous system is great for your immune function. That's not going to be an awesome thing that you're doing to your body to help it fight incoming viruses and it just feels really. Yucky and so I think it's not a matter of getting rid of anxiety completely are pollyannish Lee pretending that everything's fine. It's just using your anxiety wisely and I think that differs for different people. I mean I know I can just speak for myself. I can feel when I've been on social media a little bit too long. I've been kind of panicked scrolling when I'm learning information. That's not helping me. It's just making me incredibly more anxious right. I think everyone needs to know the symptoms of this virus. You know they need to be thinking about kind of planning for how they're going to get food and you know. Keep their families safe. But if you're on you know. Article Number Seven hundred. That says you know look for cough and shortness of breath and fever. That's not helping anymore. You have to watch for yourself. What it's doing to your emotions. What it's doing to your sleep schedule What is doing to your kids anxiety? I have lots of folks with young kids who are reporting to me that they're watching their kids pick up on their own anxious scrolling and so on and so so in terms of what to do I think part of it is just recognizing this noticing like I've kind of thrown my body into a tizzy reading that last article. About you know. Twenty year olds can catch this like useful information but I didn't need to spike myself that badly and then I think you're feeling that know what your own go. To's are to feel a little bit better for some of us. It can start with just taking a really conscious breath For me personally. I know that when I'm getting anxious I can just kind of watch my chest. Muscles tighten egg. I can feel that. I'm really taking US really shallow breaths and for sometimes in those cases. I just forced myself to be like all right. I'm GonNa do just like three deep breaths and just the act of doing that. Has a real physiological effect. What you're doing is you're kind of putting the brakes on your sympathetic nervous system and turning on your parents. Pathetic nervous system. Which if the sympathetic nervous system is sort of the fight or flight the Perez empathetic is kind of the rest and Digest. It's the thing that can allow you to do your normal bodily functions so your body can kind of go through. Its normal day but it needs a little help and deep belly breathing which is just kind of taking deep breaths where you're breathing lower in your belly rather than in your chest. That can help making sure. You're taking deep breaths. So you're not gonNA in the kind of mood where we breathe or a kind of having a panic attack. Those things sounds so simple but they can be incredibly powerful. The second thing I would suggest is to find ways to distract yourself. That is hard right now. Even our best podcasts are running. Their Corona virus episodes were contributing to the problem. Even as we speak even if we are telling people that have come down. Don't listen to us. You know I can feel that too and it's like you know I go on my social media. I'm like I wish it was just cat videos. People like what happened to my normal read it feed like silly animal stuff you know but you know that stuff is still out there you know. They're funny net flicks movies. You can watch and so on and laughter's real anxiety reducer and also thought to be something that can potentially bump up immune function by kind of letting the parasitic not nervous system. Take its action and sort of shut off the fight or flight even for a little while. It can be powerful. So what I'm hearing. I think is two different approaches. One is notice what Stimuli are making you respond anxiously and maybe don't subject yourself to those stimuli in constant subjection or no. When you're doing it right. I mean what I found is that for me. It's the specific awful stories of Corona virus. Hurting someone if I was at one of these folks who was not sheltering in place and I was thinking about. Well maybe I'll go out to a bar right now. Maybe I need a little bit of anxiety. Maybe I need to read that story but me right now. Who's been sheltering in place for two weeks? Who already knows the symptoms and is already worried? I didn't need that story right now or I definitely didn't need it right before I was about to go to bed and now my adrenaline is spiked. And I can't sleep So I think sure eating your own media around can be incredibly useful and powerful and that doesn't necessarily mean not paying attention to what's going on. I think you can be an incredibly informed citizen but still curate. What you're reading when you're reading it how much you're reading. All of these. Things are conscious strategies. You can control to feel a little bit better or to allow yourself to spike the anxiety when you need to. That's incredibly fascinating. Everything said and I'll just say why so you know going back. I think roughly to the Reagan years it became increasingly common for politicians and Reagan was the greatest genius this not to speak in terms of general policies in their overall statistical public facts but rather to use anecdotal examples of individuals. You know this is sort of like the state of the Union phenomenon where the President says you know. There's a nurse in Texas. Who did this then? It moves to the one where we bring that person to the state of the Union and basically the idea was that people don't necessarily have powerful responses to this policy has raised employment by twelve percent. They respond to you know to anecdote to human story. What you're saying in a sense is that can be too effective and so sometimes if you're aware about yourself that you'll be too empathetic so empathetic that will actually affect you. Maybe step aside from the anecdote and I noticed that I'm fascinated by this because I notice myself doing it all the time I mean I- triage reading the paper. I see a human interest story about this. I pass it right over. I see a story about you. Know the statistics. I look at the statistics. Somehow you know. I'm not sufficiently empathetic to have that kind of reaction just to the statistics alone and science suggests. No one is right You know psychologists talk about this so-called identifiable victim effect. You know if I tell you you know. Five hundred thousand people died today of you know there's earthquake or corona virus or something that doesn't affect as much as Jill. This one person who is thirty four years old and worked as a nurse like what happens near a scientifically as we have regions of the brain that process information about what other people are thinking and what they believe in what's happening to them. We have regions of the brain that respond to individual people evolutionary. We didn't build in regions of the brain that respond to statistics. And so the things that spike our fear is seeing someone else get heard not the statistics of someone getting her. The thing that spikes are anxiety. That spikes are empathy. Spikes compassion is seeing. You know that this one woman can't get her groceries this week Because she's so scared of going out and so I think it can be a really powerful technique. I mean Reagan was right like it gets people moving but it can sometimes get you it. Gets you moving too much? But the flip side is that you can do the opposite for the covert kindness stories right like I was reading the story of this Yale student in fact who started this project called invisible hands where he is recruiting a bunch of twenty year olds to give groceries to the elderly. Who can't go out. And that's a human interest story where it's pumping up. My compassion is pumping out my positive. Well it's making me feel like Oh my God. There's still good in the world. You want to read those in the flesh kinds of stories as opposed to read the statistics about it. That feels really good. And so we can curate that to a certain extent I mean I think that's the blessing and the curse of the twenty. Four hour. News cycle is that there's so much more content out there were pulled in affects our emotions in ways that we can't control but we can control what we're bringing in we can curate what that content is. Can I ask you a philosophical question that arises from this whole approach I mean I'm fascinated by it and especially in a crisis? It seems incredibly appealing. That one could do a little bit of curing of the information that one takes on board in order to help manage responses. I'm wondering if there is a philosophical kind of objection kind of hard nosed philosopher. Who would say well? Yeah no I mean. That's nice that you're doing that. You're there's a form of denial in all of that. There is a cold hard reality out there and you should be feeling some sense of existential dread because that's simply what the circumstances warrant when you hear questions like that. Do they seem to misguided or overstated? Or do you think yeah. That's that's fine but there's different ways to take your existential dread. You know you can take it with a spoonful of sugar. It'll be a little more manageable. Yeah I mean. I think those emotions whether it's existential dread or joy and compassion there for a reason. They're they're there to cause us to takes her and actions and I think right now. There are certain actions that are warranted. Like we need to be a little bit afraid to the point that we stay in our house. We need to be scared for our elderly relatives and for the economy so we can just kinda shelter in place and do what we need to do. But beyond that spiking are existential anxiety is not going to help anyone. You know. It's not gonNA help me make decisions about which stocks I should deal with because doing that from the position of Lake. Massive freaking out is not going to help. It's not going to help me plan for my family when I finally do. Go out and go to the grocery store. I'm not going to be thinking rationally about okay. What do I need my pantry for the next two weeks? I'm just going to be like panic shopping. And so the idea. Is that what you want? Is the appropriate level of emotion. That's what emotion researchers often talk about. Is You want appropriate level of anxiety the appropriate level of compassion and the appropriate level of empathy. And so on and we can kind of get a sense of one. We're off track. You know I mean I think some folks honestly. My college students were experiencing it and Opposite Direction. Where they're realizing like wait. Hang on like they're canceling Yale University or not canceling their moving Yale University to online classes. Navy. This is something I need to take released. Clarification we telling ourselves canceled. Classes are happening right now but but I think that was a moment when they up regulated things -iety which is what they needed to do for many of us if they're listening to this thinking. I'm an existential panic. That's not going to help anybody right. And it and it doesn't feel good right and so I think those are times when you really want to down regulate things to be able to function in this environment. Laurie what are questions that I'm not asking you that I should be. You're doing a whole series for your podcast. The happiness lab about ways to deal with challenges to psychological wellbeing connected to the corona virus crisis. What are some takeaways that I haven't even asked you about? Yeah well you've covered a lot. I mean one of our first episode was about emotion regulation In particular this idea that we can decrease our anxiety by changing our frame. And there's lots of different ways. We can do that. One way we can change. Our frame is to gain a little psychological distance. So you can. It sounds kind of goofy what you can talk to yourself in. The third person you know like Lori is GonNa make it through this. This is really challenging for Laurie. Having to teach online and having you get stuck in her house but she's GonNa make it through turns out. There's lots of evidence to suggest that taking that kind of slightly different. Linguistic approach to talking to ourselves allows us to kind of think. We're hearing from a coach. Who's telling US important information about what our life is like? And so those can be incredibly powerful techniques so each of us has really just picking off different tiny tip that users can use to either feel better feel less anxious in this time but also to use the time. Well we have another episode coming up about how you can use the fact that you're stuck in this new situation to harness these new habits oftentimes habit researchers really work to figure out you know. How can you change the situation? How can you move the donuts from you? Know The table where your office always needs to somewhere else. We're always trying to change the situation to form better habits but all of us are now faced with this incredibly weird unprecedented situation and we could set it up with the right routines and the right habits to be able to do the things we've been wanting to do for awhile. You know exercise more. You know connect with our friends who are far away on a more regular basis. This is our opportunity to set up new habits and so we shouldn't miss out on the opportunity. I think that's the single most positive thing I've heard any human being say in a month. I'm super grateful. Jewelry for all of these very valuable insights and for everything that you're doing you for the time and thanks for this new series. Thanks so much. Let me on the show while I think actually feel a little better after talking to Laurie. Not so much about the underlying facts as about how we can go about coping with those facts if you want to hear more from. Laurie listened to her podcast. The happiness lab from Pushkin Industries deep background is brought to you by Pushkin Industries. Our producer is lydia gene caught with research. Help from zooey win. Mastering is by Jason Gabrielle. Martine Gonzalez or showrunner is Sophie mcgibbon. Our theme music is composed by Louis Garra special. Thanks to the Pushkin Brass Malcolm Guel Jacob Weisberg and Michelle Obama. I'm Noah felt. I also write a regular column for Bloomberg opinion which you can find at Bloomberg dot com slash Felton to discover Bloomberg's original slate of podcasts. Go TO BLOOMBERG DOT COM slash podcasts. You can follow me on twitter. At Noah are Felton. This is deep backward.

corona Laurie Yale University facetime sympathetic nervous system Lori facebook Pushkin Industries Noah Feldman netflix twitter Santos Reagan Bloomberg ICTY
A monkey economy as irrational as ours | Laurie Santos

TED Talks Daily

20:13 min | 5 months ago

A monkey economy as irrational as ours | Laurie Santos

"Hey it's hugh and this is. Ted Talks daily. Humans are a super smart species right but we also make consistently dumb decisions. Why in this archive talk from Ted Global? Twenty ten cognitive psychologist. Laurie Santos uses a fascinating field experiment to shed. Some Light Lori is also a podcast. Host of her own hers is based on the popular site course. She teaches at Yale and in it she takes you through the latest scientific research and share surprising stories. That will change the way you think about happiness. You can check out that podcast. The happiness lab from Pushkin Industries. Wherever you listen to podcasts I wanNA start my talk today. With two observations about the human species. The first observation is something that you might think is quite obvious. And that's that our species homo sapiens is actually really really smart. Like ridiculously smart. Like you're all doing things that no other species on the planet does right now and this is of course not the first time you've probably recognized this of course in addition to being smart. We're also an extremely vain species we like pointing out the fact that we're smart. So I could turn to pretty much any sage from Shakespeare to Stephen Colbert to point out. Things like the fact that we're noble in reason infinite in faculties and just kind of awesome er than everything else on the planet when it comes to all things rebirth. But of course there's a second observation about the human species that I want to focus on a little bit more and that's the fact that even though we're actually really smart sometimes uniquely smart we can also be incredibly incredibly dumb when it comes to some aspects of our decision making now. I'm seeing lots of smirks out there. Don't worry I'm not going to call anyone in particular out on any aspects of your own mistakes but of course just the last two years we see these unprecedented examples of human ineptitude. We've watched the tools. We uniquely make to pull the resources out of our environment. And I've just blow up in our face. We've watched the financial markets that we uniquely create these markets. That were supposed to be foolproof. We've watched them kind of collapse before our eyes but both of these two embarrassing examples. I think don't highlight. What I think is most embarrassing about the mistakes that humans make. Which is that. We'd like to think that the mistakes we make are really just the result of a couple bad apples or a couple really sort of fill blog worthy decisions but it turns out what social scientists are actually learning. Is that most of us. When put in certain contexts will actually make very specific mistakes. The errors we make are actually predictable. We make them again and again and they're actually immune to lots of evidence when we get negative feedback. We still the next time. We're faced with a certain context tend to make the same errors and so this has been a real puzzle to me as a sort of scholar of human nature. What I'm most curious about is. How is a species? That's as smart as we are capable of such bad such consistent. Errors all the time you know. We're the smartest thing out there. Why can't we figure this out in some sense? Where do our mistakes really come from and having thought about this a little bit I see a couple of different possibilities? One possibility is in some sense. It's not really our fault. Because we're a smart species we can actually create all kinds of environments that are super super complicated. Sometimes too complicated for us to even actually understand even though we've actually created them we create financial markets that are super complex. We create mortgage terms that we can actually deal with and of course if we are put in environments where we can't deal with it in some sense makes sense that we actually might mess certain things up. If this was the case we'd have a really easy solution to the problem human error. We'd actually just say okay. What's figure out the kinds of technologies? We can't deal with the kinds of environments that are bad. Get rid of those design things better and we should be the noble species that we expect ourselves to be. But there's another possibility that I find a little bit more worrying. Which is maybe it's not our environments that are messed up. Maybe it's actually us. That's designed badly. This is a hint that I've gotten from watching the ways that social scientists have learned about human errors. What we see is that people tend to keep making errors exactly the same way over and over again. It feels like we may almost be built to make errors in certain ways. This is a possibility that I worry a little bit more about. Because if it's us that's messed up. It's not actually clear how we go about dealing with might just have to accept the fact that we're error-prone and crank tried to design things around it so this is the question my students and I wanted to get at. How can we tell the difference between possibility? One possibility to what we need is a population. That's basically smart can make lots of decisions but doesn't have access to any of the systems. We have any of the things that might mess up. No human technology human culture maybe even not human language and so this is why we turn to these guys. Here this is Brown capuchin monkey. These guys are new world primates. Ouch means they broke off from the human branch about thirty five million years ago. This means that your gregory great great great great with about five million greats in their grandmother was probably the same great great great great great great grandmother with five million greats in there as holly up here so you can take comfort in the fact that this guy up here is a really really distant but albeit evolutionary relative the good news about holly though is that she doesn't actually have the same kinds of technologies we do you know she's smart very cute Creature of primate as well but she lacks all this stuff we think might be messing us up to seize the perfect test case. What if we put holly into the same context as humans? Does she make the same mistakes as us? Does she? Not Learn from them and so on and so this is the kind of thing we decided to do. My students that. I got very excited about this a few years ago. We said all right. Let's throw some problems at Holly. See if she misses these things up. First PROBLEM IS JUST. Where SHOULD WE START? Because you know it's great for us bad for humans. We make a lot of mistakes a lot of different contexts where we actually going to start with this and because we started this work around the time of the financial collapse round the time went. Foreclosures were hitting the news. We said maybe we should actually start in the financial domain. Maybe we should look at monkey's economic decisions and try to see if they do the same kinds of dumb things that we do. Of course. That's when we hit a sort of second problem a little bit more methodological which is maybe you guys don't know but monkeys don't actually use money you haven't met them. This is why you know they're not in the queue behind you at the grocery store at the you know they don't do this stuff so now. We faced a little bit of a problem here. How are we going to actually ask monkeys about money? If they don't actually use it so he said well maybe we should just just suck it up and teach monkeys how to use money. So that's just what we did. We weren't very creative at the time we started these studies so we just called it a token but this is the unit of currency that we've taught our monkeys yell to actually use with humans to actually buy different pieces of food. It doesn't look like much in fact it isn't like much like most of our money. It's just a piece of metal as those of you who've taken currencies home from your trip know once you get home? It's actually pretty. Useless was useless to the monkeys at first before they realized what they could do with it when we first gave it to them in their enclosures they actually kind of picked them up. Looked at them news. Kind of weird things but very quickly. The monkeys realized that they could actually hand. These tokens over two different humans in the lab for some food. And so you see one of our monkeys made it up here doing this. This is a and B are kind of the points where she sort of a little bit curious about these things doesn't know there's this waiting hand from human experimenter and made it quickly figures out. Apparently the human wants this handover then get some food. Turns OUT NOT? Just mayday all of our monkeys. Get good at trading tokens with human salesmen. So the monkeys get really good at this surprisingly good at this with very little training we just allowed them to pick this up on their own. Question is is this human money. Is this market at all or did we just do a kind of weird Psychologist trick by getting monkeys to do something looking smart but not really being spun and so we said well. What would the monkeys spontaneously do? If this was really their currency they were really using it like money. Well you might actually imagine them to do all the kinds of smart things that humans do when they start exchanging money with each other my have them start paying attention to price paying attention to how much they buy sort of keeping track of their monkey token as it were. Do the monkeys do anything like this? And so our monkey marketplace. I was born the way this works is that our monkeys normally live in a kind of big zoo social enclosure when they get a hankering from some treats we actually allowed them away out into a little smaller enclosure where they could enter the market upon entering the market it was actually a much more fun market for the monkeys than most human markets because as the monkeys entered the door of the market human would give them a big wallet full of Tokens so they could actually trade. The tokens with two different possible. Human salesmen that they could actually buy stuff from the salesman where students from my lab. They dress differently. They were different people and overtime. They did basically the same thing so the monkeys could learn. Who sold at what price? Who was reliable. Who wasn't in so on and you can see that each of the experimenters is actually holding up a little yellow food dish. And that's what the monkey can get for a single token. Everything costs one token. But as you can see. Sometimes tokens by more than others. Sometimes more grapes than others. So I'll show you a quick video of what this marketplace actually looks like. Here's a monkey. I view so monkeys are shorter. So it's a little short but here's honey. She's waiting for the market to open a little impatiently all of a sudden market opens. Here's her choice. One or two grapes. You can see honey very good. Monkey economists goes with the guy who gives more. She good teacher financial advisers. A few things too so not just honey. Most of the monkeys went with guys who had more most of the monkeys went with guys who had better food when we introduce sales. We saw the monkeys paid attention to that. They really cared about their monkey. Token dollar the more surprising thing was that when we collaborated with economists. Actually look at the monkeys data using economic tools. They basically matched not just qualitatively but quantitatively with what we saw humans doing a real market so much so that if you saw the monkeys numbers you couldn't tell whether they came from a monkey or a human in the same market and what we'd really thought we done. We've actually introduced something that at least for the monkees. Us works like a real financial currency. Question is do the monkey start messing up in the same way as we do. Well we already saw anecdotally a couple signs that they might one thing. We never saw in. The Monkey. Marketplace was any evidence of saving. You know just like our own species. Monkeys entered the market spent their entire budget and then went back to everyone else. Other thing we also spontaneously saw embarrassingly. Enough is spontaneous evidence of larceny. The monkeys would rip off the tokens at every available opportunity from each other often from us. You know things we didn't necessarily think we were introducing but things we spontaneously saw so we said this looks bad. Can we actually see if the monkeys are doing exactly the same dumb things as humans? Do one possibility is just kind of let the monkey financial system play out if they start calling us for bailouts and a few years. We are little impatient so we wanted to speed things up a bit so we said let's actually give the monkeys the same kinds of problems that humans tend to get wrong in certain kinds of economic challenges certain kinds of economic experiments and so since the best way to see how people go wrong is to actually do it yourself. I'm going to give you guys a quick experiment to sort of. Watch your own financial intuitions in action. So imagine that right now I handed each and every one of you thousand. Us dollars so ten crisp hundred dollar bills take these put it in your wallet and spend the second thing about what you're going to do with it because it's yours now you can buy whatever you want. Donate it take it. Sounds great but you get one more choice to earn a little bit more money. And here's your choice. You can either be risky. Which case I'm going to flip one of these monkey tokens? If it comes up heads you're going to get a thousand dollars more. If it comes up tails you get nothing. So it's a chance to get more but it's pretty risky. Your other option is a bit safe. You're just going to get some money for sure. I'm just going to give you five hundred bucks. You can stick it in your wallet and use it immediately. So see what. Your intuition is here. Most people actually go with the play. It safe option. Most people say why should I be risky when I can get fifteen hundred dollars for sure? This seems like a good bet. I'm going to go with that. You might say no. That's not really a rational. People are a little risk averse so what well the so what comes when we start thinking about the same problem set up just a little bit differently so now imagine that I give each and every one of you two thousand dollars twenty crisp hundred dollar bills. Now you can buy double the stuff you'RE GONNA GET BEFORE. Think about how you'd feel sticking in your wallet and now imagine that. I have you make another choice. But this time it's a little bit worse now. You're going to be deciding how you're going to lose money but you're going to get the same choice. You can either take a risky loss. So I'll flip a coin if it comes up heads you're GONNA actually lose a lot comes up tails you lose nothing. You find gift to keep the whole thing or could play it safe which means you have to reach back into your wallet. Give me five of those one hundred dollar bills for certain so. Maybe you're having the same intuitions as the subjects. That were actually tested in this. Which is when presented with these options. People don't choose to play it safe. They actually tend to go a little risky. The reason this is irrational is that we've given people in both situations the same choice. It's a fifty fifty shot of a thousand or two thousand or just fifteen hundred dollars with certainty but people's intuitions. About how much. Risk to take varies depending on where they started with. So what's going on? Well it turns out this is seems to be the result of at least two biases that we have at the psychological level. One is that we have a really hard time thinking in absolute terms. You really have to do work to figure out that well one thousand two thousand one is fifteen hundred instead we find it very easy to think in very relative terms as options change from one time to another so we think of things is going to get more or along to get less. This is all well and good except that changes in different directions actually affect whether or not we think options are good or not and this leads to the second bias which economists have called loss aversion. The ideas that we really hate it when things go into the red we really hate it when we have to lose out on some money and this means that sometimes we'll actually switch our preferences to avoid this while you saw that last scenarios that subjects get risky because they want the small shot that there won't be any loss that means we're in a risk mindset or excuse me when we're in a loss mindset. We actually become more risky. Which can actually be really worrying these kinds of things play out in lots of bad ways and humans there why stock investors hold onto losing stocks longer. Because they're evaluating them in relative terms there why people in the housing market refuse to sell their house because they don't want to sell at a loss. The question we were interested in is whether the monkeys show the same biopsies if we set up those same scenarios in our little monkey market would they do the same thing as people and so. This is what we did. We gave the monkeys choices between guys who are safe. They did the same thing every time or guys who are risky. They did things differently half the time and then we gave them options that were bonuses like you guys did in the first scenario so they actually have a chance to get more or cases where they were experiencing losses. They actually thought they were going to get more than they really got. We introduced the monkeys to to monkey salesman. The guy on the left and right both start with one piece of grape so looks pretty good but they're going to give the monkeys bonuses. The guy on the left is a safe bonus all the time he adds one to give the monkeys to the guy on. The right is actually a risky bonus. Sometimes the monkeys get no bonus so this is a bonus of zero. Sometimes the monkeys get two extra for a big bonus now they get three but this is the same choice you guys just faced. Do the monkeys actually want to play it safe and then go with the guy who's going to do the same thing on every trial. Do THEY WANNA be risky and get to try to get a risky. But big bonus but risk the possibility of getting no bonus people here played it safe turns out the monkeys. Play it safe too qualitatively and quantitatively. They choose exactly the same way as people when tested in the same thing. You might say. Well maybe the monkeys just don't like risk maybe we should see how they do with losses so we ran a second version of this now. The monkeys meet to guys who aren't giving them bonuses. They're actually giving them less than they expect so they look like they're starting out with a big amount. These are three grapes. Monkeys really psyched for this. But now they learn. These guys are gonNA give them less than they expect. The guy on the left is a safe loss every single time. He's GonNa take one of these away and give them monkeys just to the guy on the right. Is the risky loss. Sometimes he gives no loss. The monkeys are really psyched but sometimes he actually gives a big loss taking away to to give the monkeys only one and so. What are the monkeys do again same choice? They can play it safe for always getting grapes every single time or they can take a risky bet and choose between one and three the remarkable thing to us. Is that when you give monkeys this choice? They do the same irrational thing that people do. They actually become more risky. Depending on. How the experimenters started. This is crazy because it suggests that the monkees tour evaluating things in relative terms and actually treating losses differently than they treat gains. So what does all this mean? What we've shown is that first of all we can actually give the monkeys a financial currency and they do very similar things with it. They do some of the smart things we do. Some of the kind of not so nice things we steal it and so on but they also do some of the irrational things we do. They systematically get things wrong and in the same ways that we do. This is the first take home message through the talk. Which is that if you saw the beginning of this and you thought all. I'm totally going to go home and hire a capuchin monkey financial adviser. They're way cuter than don't do that. They're probably going to be just as dumb as human. You already have so a little bad. Sorry sorry sorry a little bad for monkey investors but of course you know. The reason you're laughing is bad for humans too because we've answered the question we started out with. We wanted to know where these kinds of errors came from and we started with the hope that maybe we can tweak our financial institutions tweak our technologies to make ourselves better but what we've learned that these biases might be a deeper part of us in that in fact they might be due to the very nature of evolutionary history. You know maybe it's not just humans at the right side of this chain. That's Dungy maybe it's sort of done. See All the way back and this if we believe the capuchin monkey results means that these dunphy strategies might be thirty five million years old. That's a long time for a strategy to potentially get changed around really really old. What do we know about other strategies like this well? One thing we know is that they tend to be really hard to overcome. Think of our evolutionary predeliction for eating sweet things fatty things like cheesecake. Kiss shut that off because just look at the dessert cart and say none of that looks disgusting to me. We're just built differently. We're GONNA perceive it as a good thing to go. After my guess is that the same thing is going to be true when humans are perceiving different financial decisions when you're watching your stocks plummet into the red when you're watching your house price go down. You're not going to be able to see that in anything but old evolutionary terms this means that the biases that lead investors to do badly that lead to the foreclosure crisis are going to be really hard to overcome. So that's the bad news. Question is is there any good news? I'm supposed to be up here telling you the good news. Well the good news I think is what I started with at the beginning of the talk. Which is that. Humans are not only smart. We're really inspirationally. Smart to the rest of the animals in the biological kingdom. We're so good at overcoming our biological limitations you know. I flew over here in an airplane. I didn't have to try to flap my wings. I'm wearing contact lenses now. So that I can see all of you don't have to rely on my own near sightedness. We actually have all of these cases where we overcome our biological limitations through technology and other means seemingly pretty easily but we have to recognize that we have those limitations. And here's the RUB. It was Komo who once said that man is the only species who refuses to be what he really is but the irony is that it might only be in recognizing our limitations that we can really actually overcome them. The hope is that you all will think about your limitations. Not necessarily as on overcome -able put to recognize them accept them and then use the world of design to actually figure them out. That might be the only way that we will really be able to achieve our own human potential and really be the noble species. We hope to all be thank you. Hey Ted talks to listeners. I'm Adam grant host another podcast Ted. It's called work life and it's about the science of making work not suck coming up. We're tackling Huddah best be your authentic selves. Especially if you describe yourself like this as a heretic heretic. I like the word because it means someone whose views are different from the prevailing worth of toxic. Find Work With Adam. Grant on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen.

Ted Global monkees salesman Adam Laurie Santos Pushkin Industries Lori Us Stephen Colbert Shakespeare Spotify Komo Apple
Revisionist History Presents: Broken Record

Revisionist History

03:39 min | 2 years ago

Revisionist History Presents: Broken Record

"I I've a friend in California music producer, Rick Rubin. He's a studio in Malibu called Shangrila. And sometimes when I'm out in Los Angeles. I go up and see Rick, and we said look out at the ocean. And we talk. What what in your mind is to? I pray true. If op- record. I would say run DMC. Suck ramseys. That's probably the best. Hip hop record. They were rap records before that. That was maybe the first hip hopper. You know in that year. I had a j tree in my dorm room run d m tree the head. I rewrote the lyrics of the song to be all about my J Trie. I'm a sucker J tree. Can't grow much higher. All you other J trees gonna call me sire. At one day. We realized we're not the only ones who this crazy about music. So we started visiting lots of other people whose work we love producer now Rogers, you've probably had one of his songs. Stuck in your head? At some point the very first time, David played, let's dance for me. Walked into the studio, and he played something. That's. Really? Some and then I asked him if I could do it arrangement. But then when I moved from a minor up to be flat. It actually had a different vibe it got it got brighter in Mike funkier sounding sauce. You can already here. Now brings along his whole band and gives us a private concert. It's insane. Rufus Wainwright does the same thing. Just him in a piano. Rufus had a cold that day. You couldn't even tell. We'll talk to Wendy and Lisa from the revolution. We were the band that prints saying to we were the band that prince dance to we were the band that prince could take off his guitar and do nothing, and it was still a prince show, you know. And so then the gets experienced what he experienced what's a music podcast without a deep dive into the epistles demolish of Norwegian black battle death knows more is more. Like, you know, what they call a cookie monster vote liquour, very? You know, a lot of that. And with black males more a lot a lot of it is more like a more higher and. Yeah. And just sounds much crazier in my opinion. All this and more so much more is part of our new show. Broken record. Rick friend. Bruce had lem me conversations arguments stories remembering music, discovering new music, broken record liner notes for the digital world. Broken record from Pushkin industries coming to your podcast feed on November thirteenth. Subscribe now.

Rufus Wainwright Rick Rubin David producer Rick Rick friend Los Angeles J Trie California Pushkin industries Bruce Rogers Wendy Lisa one day
Introducing: Cautionary Tales

Cautionary Tales

02:47 min | 11 months ago

Introducing: Cautionary Tales

"I opened the wrapping paper. Hurriedly with nervous hands excited to get the gift inside the little did I know disaster was about to enter my previously. Happy Childhood now worry. It wasn't a disaster for me. It was a catalogue of disasters for everyone else. The gift was a book titled The world's Greatest Mistakes. Some of the stories were absurd the bride alright who accidentally merit the best man. Some of them were famous tragedies like titanic swallowed by the IC. All of them fascinated me and I realized learning from other people's mistakes is a lot less painful and learning from your own. My name is Tim Halford. Some people call me the undercover economist. I use scientific ideas to help people think more clearly about the world in my books. My BBC radio shows and my column for the Financial Times. Now I'm using the same rigorous research to understand. Stand what we can learn from other people's Aris my new podcast cautionary tales takes you aboard a doomed Asheq sits sits you wanNA concept stage in front of broken piano and puts you in a room with cult members counting down the final seconds before the end of the world helping me tell these cautionary tales arson marvelous actors such as Alan Cumming and Archie job from the good wife the bond villain toby toby Stevens and Russell tovy from Quantico we also presents the acting debut of a certain Mr Malcolm glad well so I am spellbound this is the most beautiful creature I have ever listen to together yeah though we we've stories of human error have tragic catastrophes and hilarious fiascos Hansman concert. We've vast oil tankers head for the raw turning Oscars Goto the wrong movie in the world's most brilliant economist becomes the world's most famous financial basket case. When all all those this high stakes gambling amuses me alongside the drama? Each story has a moral. Each story will make you wiser cautionary tales from Pushkin Industries launches on November fifteenth. Subscribe now on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your shows trust me it would be a mistake not to.

Tim Halford toby toby Stevens Financial Times Pushkin Industries BBC Russell tovy Alan Cumming Apple arson Mr Malcolm Quantico Asheq Archie
The new race-conscious media diet

Axios Today

11:17 min | 3 months ago

The new race-conscious media diet

"Today's episode is brought to you by Goldman Sachs. Morning, it's Tuesday June twenty third welcome to axios today, I'm. Here's our promise to. You will make you smarter about Your Day if you just give us ten minutes of your time every weekday morning. We're getting started today with one big thing. That's our store. You can't Miss Right now. Every top tanner bestseller list is filled with movies. TV SHOWS BOOKS ABOUT FIGHTING SYSTEMIC RACISM. Maybe you're breathing. One of these books yourself. We break down why it's happening and why this matters? Also president trump is using the pandemic to shout highly skilled workers from the US. But I the sudden rapid and mass consumption of race. Conscious media is today's one big thing. Explaining it all is Sarah Fisher. She covers media for Axios so Sarah. We saw for for example like demand for the TV show, dear white people went up three hundred and twenty nine percent on Netflix. Justice Healing, but this is this is racism. Bomber fixed. where else are we seeing this kind of trend? We're seeing it with other shows on Netflix for a brief period of time another show when they see us was also up a hundred and forty seven percent spike. Lee's newly released film defy bloods has gotten increased attention because it's been included in Netflix's black lives matter collection. One thing to to keep in mind is that it's not just about the content that's in. In demand, but the content that's being rejected. Notice that of TV shows that highlight police brutality like lies. PD OR COPS are being canceled HBO. Max had temporarily suspend gone with the wind until it figured out how it was going to reintroduce it. With more context, media companies aren't just going to be held accountable for what they don't air, but also for what they choose to air as well. Some of this is content. Content that's being put in front of us whether we flip on Netflix or Amazon or spotify, and they're suggesting this to us. How much of this is propelled by platforms that are pushing this or making it more visible, excellent question I mean on the TV and movies for I, think platforms are largely responsible for putting this in front of consumers. If NETFLIX's didn't create that, black lives, matter channel. I don't know that enough people. People would have been able to search through its vast library of titles to find things that spoke to this moment and same thing goes for music that's distributed on various platforms, etc, but at the same time I also think that platforms figure out what type of content to inform by what people or organically sharing on social media, and what's going viral, so an example of that childish Gambino twenty eighteen hit. This is America. There have been remixes of that going viral on Tiktok. And so that might be a signal to spotify that this is a song that we should be adding to our curated lists about the movement, because it's something, users really care about so I'd say half it is yes. Platforms making editorial decisions to push things to people, but it's also people making decisions at the ground level at the grassroots level about what is resonating with them. What speaks to this moment for them and that's pushing platforms. Platforms to pay attention as we see more people asking for it. Does that even create a space for more representation? More diversity as companies are seeing, this is more mainstream to have more, and I'll just be very specific to have more black artists to have more black. TV shows like I'm thinking of like blackish blackish is coming back earlier this fall right Yup blackish has pushed to the beginning of the fall season instead of midseason. midseason because ABC said a show like that speaks to this moment. Yeah, I think there's a business case for it. I think that once networks and platforms recognize that consumers care about this stuff. They're going to feel a lot more empowered to put conversations about race about police brutality upfront in their programming, because they know that people are GonNa WanNa consume it, Sarah. Why do you think this matters because i? Sure, there's some people who think. Think like this is just pop culture. This is a fleeting moment who cares Americans for generations are going to rely on. The media were creating today as a way to relate to what we're going through now, and that's critical, because if it wasn't for those pieces of contribution to our culture through music through books through movies through television, there's few other ways that we're going to be able to document it for the rest of time. Sure News articles can last a few weeks maybe tops, but a good song. I mean that could last decades. Sara Fischer covers media for access. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with President Trump's new visa restrictions on highly skilled workers, but first a word from our sponsor. In nineteen is changing markets, industries and the global economy, you can hear the latest insights from Goldman Sachs experts and thought leaders at GS DOT com slash, Cope nineteen or on any of your favorite podcast platforms. Welcome back to axios today. Let's catch up quick president. Trump keeps urging states to reopen and jump start the economy, but yesterday he used the economic decline caused by the virus as his reason for shutting down large parts of our immigration system. axios political reporter Steph Kite to explain more about how the president is using the corona virus to achieve his immigration agenda. This is actually the second time that president trump has used the coronavirus in order to introduce some temporary restrictions on what immigrants are allowed to come into the country, and which ones are not allowed to come in anymore, so these current restrictions are in regards to H.. H. One B. Visa holders, so the original band did not include a be holders only applied to different kinds of immigrants who are coming on permanent visas, but this time not only trump extend the original order which impacted Green Card applicants, but he also added restrictions for immigrants who are coming on short term work visas, including H., one B. visas which are really relied on in the tech. Tech Industry in the US instead I wanted to ask you. What the Tech Industry's response has been to you. What president trump plans to do? Yeah, the response from many tech companies has not been great, because they really do rely on these immigrants and a lot of ways, these are high skilled immigrants visas, and so they're looking to other countries to find specific specialties in really high skill. Skill jobs so companies like Google and twitter. Amazon have all come out and oppose the president's latest restrictions on their ability to get those workers into the US working for their companies and step. Do we have any idea what impact this may have on our economy? If these workers are not allowed to be part of it well, a lot of people think it's not gonna be Great. Republican Lindsey Graham said in a twitter thread that he thinks this could have a negative impact on the economy, because not only do these restrictions impact, h., one B. Fees, they also impact other visas which include some lower level jobs that are also sometimes hard for US companies to fill, and that the US economy really does rely on and the trump administration estimates that this could impact five hundred and twenty-five thousand jobs, and according to the trump administration. They think that. That means that well now. That's five hundred twenty five thousand jobs. Americans can take, but in another sense, many companies might struggle to fill those jobs, and that's why this matters stuff I mean the bottom line is even as the trump administration is urging states to reopen. They're still using the coronavirus as a tool to continue to crack down on immigration and one thing I'm looking for is how long these kinds of restrictions are going to be renewed and captain place. Steph kite is on axios politics team. axios insider is our sneak peek into the axios newsroom. One of our co founders Mike Allen is with me good morning. Good morning, a great debut. Rave reviews, thank you. You know Mike. I feel like there are many of us who are anxious about what's going to happen in the fall, and you've got some really interesting data about college campuses, which as it turns out main, being a bit of a laboratory for the pandemic or how the virus might spread this a poll by college reaction Tuck to. Fifty Four. College students and they said what if there's no vaccine, are you still going to go back in person and two thirds of Students said yes, we are and nine. Listen to this one. Here's the question. If there are parties like those that occurred before the virus on your campus this fall will you intend even if there is a risk of contracting the virus and a third of students say I'm in. He may have a great day Nyla thank you and have a great breakfast. Why it matters, young people are more likely to take risks and will be much more exposed when they had back to college in the fall. We'll be right back after one more word from our sponsor. poelman facts, experts, and thought leaders are sharing their insights about the trends, shaping markets, industries and the global economy. You can hear the latest insights on Covid nineteen economic market implications at GS DOT com slash cope in nineteen or on any of your favorite podcast platforms. Thanks for listening axios, today is brought to you by axios Pushkin Industries, and special thanks to Felix Salmon for bringing axios Pushkin together. This episode was produced by Carol. SCENARIO MARQUESS MARTINEZ CARA, Dillon Naomi Shaven with music from Evan Viola Alex Yara is our sound engineer Sarah. Keelan Goo is our executive editor and push in our executive producers. Are Lee tell melodic and Jacob Weisberg. You can write to us at podcast at axios Dot Com and you can find me on twitter at Nyla Voodoo. Don't forget to catch us tomorrow morning, but until then tuninter afternoon show recap. I'm Lou. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we'll see you back here tomorrow morning.

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