23 Burst results for "Pushkin industries"

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

03:40 min | 2 weeks ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"Hi, Chris , this is rod from Omaha. . And I've been listening to this show for over a year. . Thanks for the helpful content. . Planning to start a podcast and I want to do it seriously but maybe not professionally, , but I want to plan well, then , do everything I can to recruit inactive audience that will be attractive to sponsors. . But what do I need to know in? ? How do I find those sponsors do I find them in advance or only after the audiences more established fact? ? Rogge what's up? ? Thank you so much for listening. . Thanks for the question and I am excited about your podcast. . Really glad to know that you're planning to take it seriously. . You know not everything has to be professionally as you said, , but to take it seriously, , I think that is admirable. . So let's talk a bit about sponsorship. . Your question specifically is, , what do you need to know? ? How do you find the sponsors? ? Do you find them in advance or later? ? So on that last point if it's important to have sponsors When the show launches most likely, you'll , need to partner with a podcast network or distributor who will license and distribute your show. . Now, , this is changing by the month because I realized the follow up question is okay who are those people? ? Where do I find them while it's changing by the month? ? It's a very fast moving industry but a few well-known podcast networks at the moment include wondering Pushkin Industries, , and cadence thirteen where side-hustle school has hosted. . Now, in , recent times, , streaming services like spotify have also gotten in the game by producing and distributing their own podcast as well. . Now, , I just named a few of the bigger ones there, , but there's also a lot of others as well. . Assuming. . You aren't going through a company like that, , which is kind of like working with a traditional publisher for your book like there are pros and cons to it. . So assuming you're not doing that, , then you'll really need to focus more on building up your subscriber base before sponsors will be interested. . And then once audience established. . That's when you want to start looking for the sponsors a great place to start. . Once you have a good number of downloads let's say five to ten thousand per episode more is Mid Roll. . She can look at mid roll dot com they produce podcast of their own, , but also sell ads on a commission basis for lots of other podcasts and as the other companies I mentioned <hes> mid roll is not the only option. . So when you search fine podcast sponsors in Google or wherever you might find several other networks that do the same thing. . Now lastly, , in addition to those networks because let's say you're starting off and podcast is going well but you don't have really big numbers while you can still approach brands directly if there's companies that might be a good fit or you can invite them to approach you directly. . So how do you do that? ? Well on your podcast website which you should have a website by the way include a prominent page called sponsor INFO or sponsor this podcast something like that. . And I think if you don't have a ton of downloads, , this is a good entry point because you can try to sell some other unique characteristic about your podcast. . For example, , it might be a small tight knit community that isn't ever going to have a huge listenership in terms of just the raw numbers, , but this community is very loyal and it's in need of services that a sponsor could provide. . So I've known a lot of smaller podcasters who have had. . The same sponsor is often for years who have just really believed in in the podcast and they have kind of forced this good relationship between. . The company, , the PODCAST, , her and the audience, , and all without going through a network, , which, , of course, , by nature and network is a middleman and there's commission involved and all that kind of stuff. . So if you different options there, , but I think overall whatever you do. . The most important thing is building an audience like focus always on your audience focus on what can I do to create a great podcast? ? What can I do to provide valuable helpful content because that is the foundation for any relationship whether you're trying to work with a network trying to get your ad sold by distributor or trying to connect sponsors directly focused on your audience. .

Chris Gayle Omaha Rogge spotify Pushkin Industries Google partner publisher
How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast?

Side Hustle School

03:40 min | 2 weeks ago

How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast?

"Hi, Chris this is rod from Omaha. And I've been listening to this show for over a year. Thanks for the helpful content. Planning to start a podcast and I want to do it seriously but maybe not professionally, but I want to plan well, then do everything I can to recruit inactive audience that will be attractive to sponsors. But what do I need to know in? How do I find those sponsors do I find them in advance or only after the audiences more established fact? Rogge what's up? Thank you so much for listening. Thanks for the question and I am excited about your podcast. Really glad to know that you're planning to take it seriously. You know not everything has to be professionally as you said, but to take it seriously, I think that is admirable. So let's talk a bit about sponsorship. Your question specifically is, what do you need to know? How do you find the sponsors? Do you find them in advance or later? So on that last point if it's important to have sponsors When the show launches most likely, you'll need to partner with a podcast network or distributor who will license and distribute your show. Now, this is changing by the month because I realized the follow up question is okay who are those people? Where do I find them while it's changing by the month? It's a very fast moving industry but a few well-known podcast networks at the moment include wondering Pushkin Industries, and cadence thirteen where side-hustle school has hosted. Now, in recent times, streaming services like spotify have also gotten in the game by producing and distributing their own podcast as well. Now, I just named a few of the bigger ones there, but there's also a lot of others as well. Assuming. You aren't going through a company like that, which is kind of like working with a traditional publisher for your book like there are pros and cons to it. So assuming you're not doing that, then you'll really need to focus more on building up your subscriber base before sponsors will be interested. And then once audience established. That's when you want to start looking for the sponsors a great place to start. Once you have a good number of downloads let's say five to ten thousand per episode more is Mid Roll. She can look at mid roll dot com they produce podcast of their own, but also sell ads on a commission basis for lots of other podcasts and as the other companies I mentioned mid roll is not the only option. So when you search fine podcast sponsors in Google or wherever you might find several other networks that do the same thing. Now lastly, in addition to those networks because let's say you're starting off and podcast is going well but you don't have really big numbers while you can still approach brands directly if there's companies that might be a good fit or you can invite them to approach you directly. So how do you do that? Well on your podcast website which you should have a website by the way include a prominent page called sponsor INFO or sponsor this podcast something like that. And I think if you don't have a ton of downloads, this is a good entry point because you can try to sell some other unique characteristic about your podcast. For example, it might be a small tight knit community that isn't ever going to have a huge listenership in terms of just the raw numbers, but this community is very loyal and it's in need of services that a sponsor could provide. So I've known a lot of smaller podcasters who have had. The same sponsor is often for years who have just really believed in in the podcast and they have kind of forced this good relationship between. The company, the PODCAST, her and the audience, and all without going through a network, which, of course, by nature and network is a middleman and there's commission involved and all that kind of stuff. So if you different options there, but I think overall whatever you do. The most important thing is building an audience like focus always on your audience focus on what can I do to create a great podcast? What can I do to provide valuable helpful content because that is the foundation for any relationship whether you're trying to work with a network trying to get your ad sold by distributor or trying to connect sponsors directly focused on your audience.

Omaha Rogge Chris Spotify Pushkin Industries Google Partner Publisher
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:39 min | 3 weeks ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Of that magnitude well, inevitably lead to new business models were advertising becomes just one of the many revenue sources. I'm very focused now on on figuring out the non advertising. Revenue This is my friend Jake Weisberg, he's the CEO of the PODCAST company Pushkin Industries, he co founded his company in two thousand eighteen with Arthur and podcast host Malcolm? Glad. Well, I think ultimately. Media businesses that depend exclusively on advertising don't tend to be sustainable businesses or businesses that are healthy over the long term. So I, think it's very important for if podcasting is going to become a industry that viable over the long term that it figures out how to get revenue from listeners as well as from advertisers. The shift away from advertising has already begun. Some hide gas are now funded by listeners to platforms such as patriotic. Luminary are one, hundred, million dollar startup launched. Last year has recruited some celebrity hosts and put their podcasts behind a subscription pay wall. And then there's platforms such as spotify like serious with Howard Stern's spotify using Joe. Rogan. As leverage to say to his listeners if you WANNA keep listening to this thing that you love you have to do it on spotify you're not going to be able to hear Joe Rogan on Apple podcast after September I think or any other APP, and then presumably, if you're listening to him on spotify, you'll, WANNA listen to other podcasts on spotify. So spotify starting from a very small base in terms of its listenership is making these very, very bold moves acquiring. Big audiences and big podcast companies are big in the world of podcasting to say that this is this is central to their to their strategy.

Joe Rogan spotify Jake Weisberg Pushkin Industries Howard Stern Apple Arthur Malcolm
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:40 min | Last month

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Fiction inspired by the headlines, Each episode features a new work of fiction on topics like What does Kobe 19 due to our relationships? How do we make sense of climate change and extinction? In such uncertain times. Sometimes art fiction is the only way to make sense of it all subscribing apple podcasts or wherever you listen brought to you by Pushkin Industries. Last year. I was living with this indigenous family in India. One afternoon. The young sun was eating. Man at the site off me. He quickly hit his gaudy behind his back. It took a lot of position to get him to show me what he was eating. It turned out to be most larvae, a traditional delicacy with the Medea indigenous peoples. I cried. Oh, my God, you're eating thes. I hope there's a little left for me. I thought this belief in the boy's eyes you heed this. I love peas. I replied. I could see he did not trust me one bit. How couldn't open educated woman like the same food as him? Later, I broach the subject with his father, and it turned out to be a mighty touchy or fish. He said. Things like Oh, only the son ofthe mind likes treated. We tell him Give it up. It's bad. He doesn't listen. You see, we gave up eating all this ages back..

Pushkin Industries India apple
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

02:34 min | 3 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Much <Speech_Male> discrimination <Speech_Male> and violence <Speech_Male> is there ever has <Speech_Male> been and <Speech_Male> these people do not <Speech_Male> have lawyers if we <Speech_Male> don't come in <Speech_Male> and try to protect <Speech_Male> them. <Speech_Male> So. Yes, I <Speech_Male> think you're doing God's <Speech_Male> mission <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> contain to protect <Speech_Male> the vulnerable. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I think that <Speech_Male> ought to be the mission <Speech_Male> going forward <Speech_Male> to get statutory <Speech_Male> regulatory protections <Silence> for those <SpeakerChange> people. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Bill I WANNA. Thank <Speech_Male> you not only for <Speech_Male> your clear analysis <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> your willingness <Speech_Male> to talk about ideas <Speech_Male> and play with them, but also <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your extraordinary <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> work that contributed <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to the outcome <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> here, <Speech_Male> and for your <Speech_Male> long <Speech_Male> dedication to the <Speech_Male> twin topics <Speech_Male> of lgbtq <Speech_Male> rights and statutory <Speech_Male> interpretation, which <Speech_Male> magically and perfectly <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> together. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much, <Speech_Male> thank you know. It was <Silence> a real pleasure. <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> there. You have it <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a hugely important <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> day. In <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the history of <Speech_Male> the gain, transgender <Speech_Male> rights movements in the United <Speech_Male> States as <Speech_Male> explained and described <Speech_Male> by an expert <Speech_Male> who has been <Speech_Male> at the heart of <Speech_Male> the process <Speech_Male> on top of <Speech_Male> that we delved into the <Speech_Male> usually arcane <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> topic of how you should <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> go about interpreting <Speech_Male> a statute <Speech_Music_Male> and the debate <Speech_Male> between Textra, <Speech_Male> ISM, which is now <Speech_Male> the official Orthodox <Speech_Male> doctrine of just about <Speech_Male> the entire Supreme <Speech_Male> Court, and <Speech_Male> the alternative view, <Speech_Male> according to which we <Speech_Male> should do more than <Speech_Male> just look at the words <Speech_Male> of the statute <Speech_Male> where. Where we are now <Speech_Male> with all of the opinions <Speech_Male> issued by the Supreme <Speech_Male> Court, majority and <Speech_Male> descent insist <Speech_Male> that you should only <Speech_Male> interpret the constitution <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> according to its taxed, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but bill ask Ridge <Speech_Male> not giving up. The fight <Speech_Male> claims it. What's <Speech_Male> really going on, <Speech_Male> is it? Other factors <Speech_Male> are still in <Speech_Male> play <Speech_Male> are going to continue <Speech_Male> to watch this issue as <Speech_Male> further debates <Speech_Male> emerge about <Speech_Male> exemptions <Speech_Male> from civil <Speech_Male> rights law on <Speech_Male> the basis of religion <Speech_Male> when it comes discrimination <Speech_Male> against Gay <Speech_Male> Lesbian and transgender <Speech_Male> people, and <Speech_Male> maybe just maybe <Speech_Male> someday <Speech_Male> we'll come back to the <Speech_Male> topic of statutory <Speech_Music_Male> interpretation. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Until the next time I speak <Speech_Music_Male> to you, be <Speech_Music_Male> careful. Be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Safe and be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> well. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Deep <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> background is brought to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you by Pushkin Industries, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our producer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Lydia Jean <Speech_Music_Male> caught with mastering <Speech_Music_Male> by Jason, Gabrielle <Speech_Music_Male> and Martine <Speech_Music_Male> Gonzales <Speech_Music_Male> are showrunner is Sophie <Speech_Music_Male> mckibben? <Speech_Music_Male> Our theme music is <Speech_Music_Male> composed by Louis Skara. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Special. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks to the Pushkin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> brass. Malcolm, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> well Jacob Weisberg <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Mellow Bell. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Noah <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Feldman <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I. also write a regular <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> column for Bloomberg <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> opinion, but <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can find at Bloomberg, <Music> <Advertisement> dot com <Music> <Advertisement> slash felt. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> To discover <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bloomberg's original <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> slate of podcasts <Music> <Advertisement> go to Bloomberg <Music> <Advertisement> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> slash podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And one last thing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I just wrote. A book <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> called the Arab <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> winter. A tragedy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I would

Bloomberg Pushkin Industries Ridge Jacob Weisberg official Louis Skara. Lydia Jean Malcolm Mellow Bell. Noah producer Martine Jason Gonzales Gabrielle
"pushkin industries" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Lewis hosted against the rules and we're back for a second season you're talking about coaches it wasn't that long ago that we only had coaches in sports now they're everywhere their life coaches in deaf culture you can hire a coach to improve your executive skills your online dating performance even your charisma the coaching has also become an odd source of unfairness just look around ask yourself who has access to these coaches in the edge they provide and who doesn't and what does it mean for us all find against the rules on radio dot com or wherever you like to listen brought to you by Pushkin industries at Fisher investments we do things differently and other money managers don't understand why because our way works great for us but it may not work for your clients that's why Fisher investments as a fiduciary obligated to put clients first is the highest standard for a financial adviser so what do you provide cookie cutter portfolios like the rest of us no cookie cutter portfolios here Fisher investments Taylor's portfolios to meet each client's goals and needs but you do sell investments that are new high commissions right and make commissions when you make trades for clients no Fisher investments doesn't sell any commission investment products and we never earn commissions on trades so what's in it for you Fisher investments fees.

Lewis Pushkin industries Fisher investments Fisher executive fiduciary Fisher investments Taylor
"pushkin industries" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Hi there I'm Michael Lewis hosted against the rules and we're back for a second season you're talking about coaches it wasn't that long ago that we only had coaches in sports now they're everywhere their life coaches in deaf culture you can hire a coach to improve your executive skills your online dating performance even your charisma the coaching has also become an odd source of unfairness just look around ask yourself who has access to these coaches in the edge they provide and who doesn't and what does it mean for us all find against the rules on radio dot com or wherever you like to listen brought to you by Pushkin industries at Fisher investments we do things differently and other money managers don't understand why because our way works great for us but it may not work for your clients that's why Fisher investments as a fiduciary obligated to put clients first is the highest standard for a financial adviser so what do you provide cookie cutter portfolios like the rest of us no cookie cutter portfolios here Fisher investments Taylor's portfolios to meet each client's goals and needs but you do sell investments that are new high commissions right and make commissions when you make trades for clients no Fisher investments doesn't sell any commission investment products and we never earn commissions on trades so what's in it for you Fisher investments fees are.

Michael Lewis Pushkin industries Fisher investments Fisher executive fiduciary Fisher investments Taylor
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

01:33 min | 4 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Noel spends five days on campus sleeping on various couches. He introduces Andy to his new life. After five days he leaves and Andy. Stays a bit later. Andy's parents finally visited. They went there and they're like what is this place. There's no one here. Do you have any like our Asian food? There's no rice so as a coach shock for them too but I trust everywhere Hundred percent trusted Andy. Saw graduated from Ohio Wesleyan. Four years later in two thousand and eighteen with a degree in microbiology. Was it good experience? Best for your life. I'm Michael Lewis. Thanks for listening to against the rules against the rules is brought to you. By Pushkin Industries the shows produced by Audrey dilling and Catherine Gerardo with research assistance from Lydia Gene. Kotb zooey win our editor. Is Julia Barton meal o? Bell is our executive producer. Our theme was composed by Nick. Retell with additional scoring Bhai Stellwagen symphony. We got fact check by Beth Johnson. Our show was recorded by tougher. Ruth and trace shots at northgate studios in Berkeley and thanks to BBDO San Francisco for providing audio for this episode as always thanks to Pushkin's founders Jacob Weisberg and Malcolm.

Andy Pushkin Industries Noel Ohio Wesleyan Beth Johnson Pushkin northgate studios Julia Barton Michael Lewis Jacob Weisberg Lydia Gene Catherine Gerardo Audrey dilling Ruth executive producer Nick Bell zooey San Francisco Berkeley
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:58 min | 4 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

"I understand you. Examine this defendant with your remarkable Amazonean Lasso. Well it's highly irregular. I'd like to hear your finding show you judge Judy? Objection Sustained Okay. So then wonder woman. Lassos the defendant priscilla rich and drags her to the witness stand and gets her to confess the Yes yes she really is the super villain known as the Cheetah after which the odd grateful and besotted judge shakes wonder woman's hand. Your advice was invaluable. Wonder woman. I wish you'd give me further hill. Marston rewrote the story of the trial. The Way He'd wanted it to come out with himself as the hero and judge McCoy worshipping him but in nineteen forty four just when Marston finally realized this triumph with wonder woman. He got really sick. He had apparently was polio. And this coincided with the success of one he was finally making some GonNa pay him enough money to support all these people be successful in wash. You'd be successful and it was kind of tragic. Life can't because wonderman has endured outside of the last archive very little lasts. James Frye is all but forgotten except for his last name. A test of truth but injustice injustice endures. And if you WANNA fight it you don't need a lasso of truth or a lie detector but you do need knowledge and evidence. Even the kind of evidence will try to find in the next episode of the last archive the evidence of the invisible. The last archive is produced by Sophie. Crane mckibben and Ben Net of free. Our Editors Julia Barton and our executive producer. Is Me low bill? Jason Gabrielle has engineer fact checking by Amy Gains Original Music by Matthias Bossi and John Evans Still Wagons Symphony. Many of our sound effects are from heritage at junior and the sergeant. At Foundation are foolproof. Players Are Barlow Adamson Daniel. Berger Jones Jesse Hidden Johnson's becker a Louis and Maurice Manual parent. The last archive is brought to you by Pushkin Industries. Special thanks to Ryan mckittrick in the American repertory theater. Emily Shulman at Harvard Law School. Alex Allinson at the bridge. Sound stage. And it Pushkin Heather Fain Maya caney carly meekly Ori Emily Rustic Maggie Taylor and Jacob Weisberg a research assistants Michelle Kaoh Olivia Oldham Henrietta Riley. Oliver risk in cuts and Emily Specter particular. Thanks to the National Archives and the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College. I'm Jill Lepore..

Marston Amazonean Lasso Pushkin Heather Fain Maya Barlow Adamson Daniel Ori Emily Rustic Emily Specter Jill Lepore Emily Shulman Pushkin Industries polio James Frye Judy priscilla rich Sophia Smith McCoy Smith College Ryan mckittrick Crane mckibben Alex Allinson Julia Barton
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

11:36 min | 4 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Two of my oldest friends. Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business Malcolm Jake or now. The CO founders of Pushkin Industries the company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way Pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like Malcolm Zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with Dr Lori. Santos I've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as Malcolm and Jacob started the company so I was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause I don't actually know the story so I would love to know how you decided to start Pushkin shake right it was Jacob's doing star. Well I'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate But as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought I was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started was revisionist history With Malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under a CEO. I'd hired who I thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that I said. Hey maybe it's time. That doc nice started our own company and only do what we WANNA do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where I was somewhere in your Italy. Admittedly and Jacob in some I think if I can tell the truth truly horrible live the villain said and he said he said on that he he summoned and instead we do something crucial need to talk about says I. You don't drove halfway across Italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he re like sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said I want to start a company that began. What did you say yes right away? Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that Jacob has been. I've known Jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say Jacob. I don't know why you want the journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. If you just became a business be you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jamir forgotten. It's but I always worry that if I said that I was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was doing a bad writer and I thought it'd be an even better business fan so I remember you saying this thirty years ago And so. Jake is a wonderful journalist but agreed it. He's they sort of a natural for this sort of thing. He's got the temperament for it. Unlike your do but you know what would surprise me. The thing that can take you back even a little further. It surprised me that you to went off on this podcast jagged first place you both had very happy successful careers in the world. Why did you decide that you wanted to do something different? You know Michael. I'd gotten the bug really in the early days of podcasting at slate were sort of because of a random connection with an NPR show. Slate had been working on. We started making some of the first podcast. Anybody listened to and everybody at slate all the journalists love doing them and there was this little audience small at first but growing that. Just love them and the giveaway was that everybody at slate who didn't have a podcast one of the podcast and they were just a joy to do. So you know. I'm a little evangelical about things I get excited about and I tried to talk Malcolm into doing one and I tried to talk you into doing what and Ultimately talk both of you into doing it. I talked to at first and then I think The fact that he was doing it may have helped to persuade you. It was worse than that. You Got Malcolm to lie to me and say it was easy. You lied but that's all right. We'll I forgive you so you're too old friends. Go into business together. How's it working out? Like how do you find working with each other? You surprised by anything. You finding things out about each other that you didn't know that you wish you didn't know we'll I I. I'm reminded of years ago. I wrote a piece. That was a really about my friendship with Jacob and it was about the idea that I'm what's called Collective memory which is that we outsource a lot of the things we know to our friends and family and I was reading about this. Because the Jacob Jacob who respect and trust so much that significant parts of my knowledge and cognition are simply outsource to Jacob. I was saying I knew longer. Read anything about politics or try and figure out simply ask Jacob what he thinks and adopt those ideas as my own. That was my position and I was sort of joke but it's actually true. It's just a way better way to live your life to make to appoint experts in your friendship circle and outsource everything to them. I do the same thing with my brother and wine and this so this is in business. I've just applied this principle. Which is just let him do all the things that I know. He's better at me. And since that's a rattle longlist means my life is very easy so this is that. True Jacob is there. Are you basically running the business in Malcolm's decoration? No I wouldn't say that I mean I handle more of the day to day. Say but Honestly at this point more the ideas come from Malcolm. And that's that's a bit of an adjustment because I've always thought of myself as the idea person but I'm like a good idea week person. Malcolm's like a five good idea. Day person and so big part of my job now is just like being. Malcolm's filtered try to talk him out of some of the ideas and then try to figure out how some of the others can can happen But these are ideas for shows these ideas for shows these are ideas for new businesses Malcolm. A lot of ideas and the typical day is you know at about eleven. Am He'll call me and say this is so much fun we really don't WanNa get too big too fast. Let's keep it just like it is and I say Malcolm I totally agree with that. This is the good parts. Let's not grow too fast. And then after lunch he'll call me and he said all right. I've got three ideas and each of them would involve like adding like ten new staff members and so if we if we pursued all ideas we'd have six hundred people right now instead of twenty five and that's kind of tension. There's not attention in that. Malcolm I disagree about. I think we're both pulled in both directions liking having a small business. Where were we know everybody? And it's sort of close like a family and we control everything but then all this opportunity and all these good ideas we want to pursue. I'm in these conversations that are you able to see the possibility of a really big business or everything is naturally better as a small business. You you've hit on the the hard part you know. I think we see that we do see the opportunity to be big. I mean I don't know you know when you say really big I mean now it's not. I don't think it's I don't think it's Google did. I don't think facebook big. But in the world of podcasting I think it has the potential to be really pay-setting and dominant But we also want to really really choosy and have everything we make really represent what we're interested in and the quality level. We've set so far so you know I think it's just kind of working out of those. Two things will result in the right size. I honestly don't know what the right size is. We're going to get bigger. It's just a question of how fast we'RE GONNA get bigger Malcolm. Yeah I think would occur to. I think all of us very quickly in this project is experiment. Is that We're not really in the PODCAST business. We're you know it's a cliche. We're in the storytelling business. And we happen to want us to tell stories to audio but that means you can compete against all kinds of like we re. There's no reason why we can't behave like a book publisher in many respects Is just that our books are on our audio not on page but once you realize that well look at book. Publishers there really big I mean. They have thousands of employees. They have so you know concede that way. If you think of yourself being into podcast world you you might think of yourself as being pretty small but if you think of yourself is just as using a different medium to tell stories that there's no reason why you can't be really big so to all appearances. This thing has been an incredible success. And it's been really fun to make a podcast for you I'm curious what troubles you've had especially like Given the pandemic how you had to adjust and respond and and How much difficulty is introduced into Your Business? Well we're we've all been improvising in various ways. I think we feel very lucky in that. What we make is is make a ball. Under these circumstances people set up recording studios at home and we have meetings virtually. I don't know that we could have done this with the digital tools that existed ten or fifteen years ago I mean things like zoom and then Slack and Google hangouts and shared drives Seem so essential to long distance. Collaboration in a way they've arrived just in time and it's sort of the moment for those tools we can make our shows and luckily we work with writers of caliber. Starting with you and Malcolm who can use their writing to adapt with what they're doing if there's an interview that you were going to do for your season this year Michael and you can't do it. You can write your way out of it That's not a position. A TV producer is usually in. I mean if you have physical production that requires people to be in a group and a place. It's just gotTa be suspended. Podcast we can. We can still make it. It's not Albanesi but people have been incredibly flexible and Nimble about how we're still going to get the show's done with this new challenge. So it's funny I'm about to. I've got five of my seven episodes for this sue. The the second season done. But I've got I've got one that really did require me. I thought require me to go out onto the road and I'm not able to do it and you said to me you know you can write your way around this and this weekend. I'm about to find out whether Dan and and I'm kind of wondering if you think that's really true. I mean what do you think? I what I'm thinking is just generally when you're thrown this kind of This kind of curve ball Look her ball and you hit it that you that you try to turn it into a strength and you see what you can do given that given the constraints but but there's apartment here in my voice. The podcast producer saying we need scenes. We need scenes and now you can't really get those scenes D does it for trouble that trouble you at all. You think..

Malcolm Jacob Jacob Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jake Malcolm Zone Jacob Slate writer Google Pushkin Pushkin Industries Michael CEO Santos Italy Dr Lori facebook producer
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

04:01 min | 7 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Hello Hello revisionist history listeners. Malcolm grabble here coming to you from the road actually literally on the road right now on my way to another interview for season five of viciousness history. Maybe the most epic season yet. We're gonNA tell crazy stories about the art world. Go inside the minds of the bombing. Mafia hang out with some hilarious high school students in New Jersey. A whole lot of fun things but right now since I'm driving I wanNA talk about cars. He Karna Right. Szeswith listened to an episode coupling game in season one where race to beat up camry at hundred miles an hour around a track in Michigan. You know I take very seriously so Japanese car company. Lexus called up Pushkin Industries and said they wanted to make with us and I said Oh you kidding me yes. I'm GONNA play a little bit for you now. It's our first piece of branded content at Pushkin. A six part series called go and see is basically one long highly entertaining digression into the inner lives of Japanese race. Car Drivers engineers at leads and sound gigs. Simplify it launches. Today I hope you like it and if you do go and subscribe to go and see wherever you get your podcasts. Back soon by when I was a kid my father would take me to the big Art Museum in Toronto. He would go inside. I would stay outside the whole time sitting on the steps so I could watch. The cars go by the age of ten. I would much rather look at traffic then. Rembrandt's I'm not sure anything's changed. My name is Malcolm Glob. Well I'm a car nut when I go online in the morning. My first stop is bring a trailer dot com where people me auction off their cars to other people like me just so we're clear. I read the comments. I'm bring a trailer which is one level of obsession beyond the standard. Bring a trailer obsession. I have on a shelf in my office every issue of car magazine the British Vogue about a magazine's going back to April of nineteen ninety nine with the exception of June and October issues of two thousand and one which for the life of me. I cannot find and I'm almost embarrassed to tell you how many cars I've owned over the years. A nineteen seventy two Mercedes to eighty in original factory lime green a bunch of VW. Gov Rs Porsche boxster. Gts An immaculate. He thirty nine. Bmw M. Five. And once many years ago Alexis I S. Two fifty delightful little Japanese sport sedan fantastic gearbox a loved but then the lease was up and I replaced with a golf. Gti In my memory. I somehow filed away. Lexus has just another kind of luxury car. Like an Audi only from Asia then one day. Lexus called me up and said Malcolm we'd like to prove you wrong. Lexus is its own thing. My first thought was. Oh Wow they're going to give me a free car. Which by the way I would totally be fine with but no it was better than that. They said come to Japan because we think what it means to be. Lexus is something that you can only understand firsthand in its home country. Go and see so I said what any self respecting Karnal would say. Twist my arm from Lexus and Pushkin Industries. This is go and see.

Lexus Lexus is Malcolm grabble Pushkin Industries Malcolm Glob Car Drivers Szeswith Pushkin Alexis car magazine Malcolm Karna Right New Jersey big Art Museum Bmw Rembrandt Audi Toronto
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 7 months ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Solvable

08:31 min | 8 months ago

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"I want you to hear another show from Pushkin that I think you'll like it's called deep background and it's hosted by Harvard Law. Professor Noah Feldman Minute Noah's been interviewing top. Scientists thinkers and authors to understand the stories behind the news. The episode. You're about to hear is a special one. Because because Noah himself was the newsmaker in the hot seat testifying before Congress. I'll let him pick up the story on deep background. This is a show about understanding the news. And if you like you're about to hear I hope you'll subscribe from Pushkin Industries. This is deep background. The show where we explore the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm Noah Feldman joining us for the first time. Welcome if you've missed any of our earlier episodes which used it'd be behind a paywall. You can now get them for free exactly where you found this one a bit about me. I teach constitutional law at Harvard. I love oh well tailored suit and I had a pretty eventful winter break swear or affirm under penalty perjury and the testimony. You're about to give. It is true and correct to the best of your knowledge information and belief to help you got this past December. I was an expert witness called by the Democrats to testify at the impeachment inquiry and the House of Representatives into president. Donald Trump. To be honest with you it was extremely nerve wracking. My job is to study and to teach the constitution solution from its origins until the present. I'm here today to describe three things. Why the framers of our Constitution included a provision for the impeachment agent of the president? What that provision providing for impeachment for high crimes and misdemeanors means and last how it applies to the question before for you and for the American people whether president trump has committed impeachable offenses under the constitution? The other expert witnesses called by the Democrats were Pamela Carlin. A law professor at Stanford when President Trump invited indeed demanded foreign involvement in our upcoming election. He struck at the very heart of what makes makes this a republic to which we pledge allegiance and Michael Gerhardt a law professor at the University of North Carolina Chapel. If what we're talking about is not impeachable the nothing impeachable. I recently got the chance to talk to Michael Gerhardt about that day and all that has happened since I was was unfortunately recovering from a slight cold Michael. Thank you so much for joining me. We've spoken on the phone but we actually haven't seen each other. Since December December four th when we both had the opportunity and maybe dubious honor of testifying at the House. Judiciary Committee's hearing on impeachment impeachment. How you been doing since then it's It's been busy Teaching classes and also trying to be part of the national conversation on a very important subject what I would love for us to do in. This conversation is open up for listeners. Some of the the back story in the back scenes of what we experienced that day. How we prepare for it and also sort of bigger picture consequences Of what's been going on. So maybe the way to start is. I had never done this before before so it was a surprise to me but you had done this before. Twenty years previously When they were a group of professors I think twenty one in total? Who testified about Bill Clinton's impeachment to the House Judiciary Committee and not only were you one of them but you are also the only one who is jointly put forward by the Republicans and the Democrats so take us back if you will twenty years and tell us how that happened you know? Nowadays it's almost inconceivable to imagine there being somebody who is acceptable to both sides on twenty years seems longtime ago. It's GonNa the seem even longer when we Put together what was happening back then. It'll seem completely alien to us. So I had spent a fair bit of my academic career studying and writing about impeachment also testifying and consulting with members of Congress that was all known by the time we got to nineteen ninety eight and there was a special moment for me in one thousand nine hundred eight when Jim Leach Republican David Skaggs Democrat called me up on the phone said. Would you come talk to us in Washington generally if members of Congress want to talk to me about something I think. That's a great honor and I went and they said to me. Well what would like you to do after you talk to us right now. Go speak to the entire House of Representatives. The I didn't know that coming into that moment while And they had ring like they want you to speak to the house right. Then yes right then So I thought well wow this is going to be a good test with another another subject matter And so then we walked over to the House and I had to get special permission to walk onto the floor of the house and then behind closed doors with no staff. No press or anything. I then talked to the entire House of Representatives about impeachment spent about two hours doing it at no no cameras fresno nothing knows nothing just nothing is all. Is there a written record of your. Don't think there's a written record. I think it was also amazing. You had a confidential conversation with four hundred and thirty five people hard to say the biggest lecture of my life or one of the big lectures but it was a tried to designed more conversation and it was a very congenial collegial conversation at the end of a Charles candidate Republican. Bobby Scott a democrat. Who happened to be my representative came up to me and said well? If you ever have a hearing on this would you come and I said well sure I'd be honored honored and then that hearing to which you just alluded Happened a few weeks later where I was then. Brought in by both Republicans and Democrats to testify is one of the experts One of the many experts including Alan Dershowitz On the question of Whether or not President Clinton's alleged misconduct rose to the level of being an impeachable offense. And what did you say When I talked about was basically The law of impeachment. I try to kind of lay out the things we knew that that I thought were clear and then kind of talked about some things that were maybe unsettled and said here's what we know about them here. The arguments on both sides and and kind of walked everybody through that and then got questions but there was no personal attack was always very much. You know in this footnote. You said this but now today you're saying that Fair I can try to answer that. Do they actually give you a chance to to answer it. I'd say that has light of our experience. They asked a question and then they actually let you answer it. It's like you know as you said it. Sounds like the Middle Ages. That's right yeah so when we had our hearing there was is no chance to answer it or at least we were giving maybe a second and then that was about it but yes they would then give me a chance to answer it and they they appear to be listening and it was really more of a conversation Than Twenty years later it would be. It's sort of fascinating on many levels but one of the reasons it's so fascinating is that most people at the time identified the impeachment of Bill Clinton that moment as a high point in partisanship the most partisan moment that people can remember the in the United States in more than a century and I think that was actually a fair assessment in historical terms and now twenty years later. It sounds almost like a model of bipartisan and cordiality and collegiality even if they voted along along party lines let me ask you a question Michael so the reason you yourself in that extraordinary position in the Clinton impeachment is it you were and remain the leading expert law professor on the subject of impeachment your guide to the impeachment and processed book you know has come out and I think three additions now why in the world as a young law professor did you get interested in the impeachment as the topic. It was not a hot topic. You know in the late eighties when you must have started diving into it or the middle ladies and you start diving into it. Why did you choose the subject? Well it's a good question I grew up Jewish Alabama in the nineteen sixties. That that that comes with that. That's a big sentence. We're we're in Alabama a mobile on. Okay got it and so I was my entire childhood. aalto was sort of shaped and defined by the Civil Rights Movement at the tail end of that civil rights movement was of course Watergate so like many people of my generation I I watched Watergate. I was kind of thought it was incredible moment to see Congress sort of investigating the president and eventually the President resigned and that that that stuck with me. That was something that I felt. The civil rights movement and Watergate had in common a respect for the rules law. They had in common the idea that law could bring order to chaos and so that was very appealing to me. I had an interest in the law as a

President Trump President Clinton Noah Feldman Congress House Of Representatives Michael Gerhardt Donald Trump Professor Harvard Law Pushkin Industries Alabama Pushkin House Judiciary Committee Civil Rights Movement Perjury Harvard Judiciary Committee Pamela Carlin
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

Cautionary Tales

01:36 min | 9 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

"If you've been with me for the entire first season of cautionary tales kind you. He'll have heard ashes. Teach us about the downsides of competition what an apocalyptic cult shows us about our minds mortar. Charismatic con artist tells us about the power of persuasion one small step at a time. I hope that my strange stories have made you wiser and I hope they've been fun to listen to you. I've certainly enjoyed making them. Thanks again for joining me. Please tell your friends. I hope to be back with the second season of cautionary tales before long there is alas no shortage of calamities from which we can all learn. Cautionary Tales is written and presented by me. Tim Harford our producers are Ryan Deli in Maryland. Rust the sound designer and mixer was Pascal wise who also composed the amazing music. This season stars Alan Cumming. Archie Punjabi Toby Stevens and Russell. Tovey with end. So Lenghty Ed Gordon Melanie Gutteridge Messiah Monroe Rufus. Right and introducing Malcolm Gladwin. Thanks to the team at Pushkin Industries Julia baton have the Fame Meal Lebel Colliery Jacob Weisberg. And of course the mighty. Malcolm Dodwell and thanks to my colleagues at the Financial Times..

Archie Punjabi Toby Stevens Ed Gordon Melanie Gutteridge Malcolm Gladwin Ryan Deli Pushkin Industries Julia Malcolm Dodwell Jacob Weisberg Alan Cumming Tovey Financial Times Monroe Rufus Pascal Maryland Russell
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

Cautionary Tales

01:57 min | 10 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

"Fisher and canes died within a few months of each other not long after the end of the Second World War Fisher had become irrelevant? Canes Haynes was the most influential economist on the planet fresh from shaping the World Bank the IMF and the entire global financial system looking back canes reflected. My only regret is that I have not drunk more champagne in my life. But he's remembered far more for the words that he probably never said nevertheless lived by them when my information changes I ultimate conclusions. And what do you do sir. If only taught that lesson to Irving Fisher you've been listening to cautionary tales if you'd like to find out more about the ideas in this episode including links thanks to our sources the show notes on my website. Tim Halford Dot Com. Cautionary Tales is written and presented by me. Tim Harford our produces are Ryan Deli and Marilyn Rust. The sound designer and mixer was Pascal wise who also composed the amazing music. Starring starring in this season are Alan Cumming. Archie pange rb Toby Stevens and Russell Tovey alongside Enzo Celente at Gahan Melanie Gutteridge Messiah Monroe and Rufus Right and introducing Malcolm Bradwell. Thanks to the team at Pushkin Industries Julia Julia baton had a fain meal. Abell Colleen Yori Jacob Weisberg and of course the mighty Malcolm Dodwell and thanks to my colleagues at the Financial Financial.

Irving Fisher Canes Haynes Gahan Melanie Gutteridge Messi Colleen Yori Jacob Weisberg Julia Julia Tim Halford Tim Harford Malcolm Dodwell Malcolm Bradwell Archie pange Alan Cumming World Bank Pushkin Industries IMF Russell Tovey Ryan Deli Toby Stevens Rufus Right
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

06:20 min | 10 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

"I've a friend up in Hudson Newark Tomorrow. Adler Tamar has written some incredible books about food including an everlasting meal cooking with economy in grace. She's been a cook at the famous shape police Berkeley but more than any of that. She's just hilarious. Laureus an over the years of talking eating tomorrow. I've come to wish that everyone could meet Tamar now. You can in her new series soon. Pushkin called food. Actually it's on luminary in this part. She gets me to try Georgian wines and that's not Georgia as in you now Atlanta Georgia as in former Soviet Union Georgia with a very cool guy named Steven and now I'm looking at this and I'm not I think I might be able to. She warned us in some white. So it's sort of biracial wine to suits. It's my personal preference is the U. of wine. It's the me. Apply the colors of natural wine and if the Georgian wine and Stephen serving us aren't binary they're not red or white. I mentioned this before. These wines are all different hues and that's considered a positive ositive attribute not a flop. This is totally different from conventional wine. which like other binary systems like male female black or White House to be filtered to fit its categories categories conventional wines white wines when you press the juice from the grapes you remove the skins and you just do the fermentation with the grape juice? So you maintain the clarity. But when you allow the fermentation to happen with the skins then the Tannin's and the color earlier. The pigmentation will start to show up in the wine. And so you see kind of honest spectrum of color the length of time that the skins have been in contact with the juice of the one. And why would you not want that. Why would you bother taking the skins out because people like purity people like things that are sparkly and transparent so? I think there's just kind of like people like things that are really sanitized. And so the idea of have like these skin contact winds up until recently was really like a bit murkier. You know it was Not something that seemed as commercially viable based on our own ideas about wine and along the same lines as demanding that wind be sparkly and pure red or white is the demand that wine never change which is also the antithesis of being accepting influx queer. or at least open. UH natural wine most Georgian wine. The kind that can be any color it doesn't get stabilized to slow down the fermentation. If you want something estate exactly the same oxygen is your enemy. Bacteria like us need oxygen to survive. Well yeah I mean I guess. In the context of wine the biggest first thing the biggest impediment is oxygen. It's just like fruit right so if you cut an apple in half and you eat half in the morning and then you go to work you you come home and then. The apples oxidized so brown. That's right so the same thing is true with these basically raw wines. I'm fine with apples. Turn Brown I. Don't throw that apple out. I eat it a little brown or I save it until I have a lot of Brown. Apples stressing me out and late at night at the last possible moment meant I make applesauce I tell even this and he calls me a benevolent eater. Maybe I am but I don't actually buy that people so oh enjoy being stuck in pursuit of perfection. I think they're just told that's what they're supposed to do in wine and food but the truth is perfectionist. That's just not that fun. I think most of us would be happier feeling permitted to use brown apples and stale bread. I think embraceth imperfection might eight not be benevolent to ingredients but to ourselves cheers. Cheers cheers. Thank you welcome suggests that the best route to embracing all the changes that come. I'm from leaving. Grapes with their skins is recasting. It as a positive like stop calling it skin contact wine. You could call these this this whole grape point as opposed to a half grape wine but when you use the word which sounds sounds like. He'd want the whole grapevine right see he malcolm glide world skin contact wine whole grapevine. Sounds so much better like a whole foods whole grain whole milk who wouldn't want the whole grape tree dixit patten. That feels a lot less. That feels a lot less unusual. That feels a lot more like the kind of white wine which I rarely drink. Present may five rules but it se- seems conventional lot more conventional not conventional but more conventional than the last one did and that's a perfect assessment congratulations. You're that was me would tomorrow Adler and former Sommelier Steven Satterfield. I was the Guinea pig in tomorrow's wine tasting experiment. But let me tell you there are very few actual guinea pigs who get a GIG that good get yourself on luminary and subscribe to her show food. Actually and you'll hear just what I mean now. Don't go anywhere because I'm not not done with this cozy extravaganza in just a little while. We have a man who seems to think he has no friends. He could not be more wrong a little a special excerpt from my forthcoming interview with the Great Conan. O'Brien stay tuned. I'm tomorrows learn I'm host of the new show food. Actually that you just heard some of. I'm so happy to have a seat at the Pushkin table and I want to wish you a calm and happy holiday with this party advice straight from the Bible it is better to eat a dry crust to threaten peace than to eat a feast in a house full of fighting in in other words. Relax any meal. You're happy at will be great..

apple Adler Tamar Steven Satterfield Brown Hudson Newark Georgia White House Pushkin Berkeley Stephen Soviet Union Georgia Atlanta Guinea O'Brien malcolm
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

03:31 min | 10 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Here at Pushkin. We have such profound sympathy sympathy for all of you out there being slowly jingled to death that we've decided to step in bringing you a little December. Cheer Ladies and Gentlemen the First Annual Pushkin Holiday special today I will answer some of your burning questions about visions history. You will hear a taste of my hilarious. This conversation with Conan O'Brien for his podcast Conan. O'Brien needs a friend. And you'll hear excerpts from two new Pushkin Industries shows. I am so proud of the work. The Pushkin elves had been doing all year. And I WANNA show it off to you so shake off your boots and join me by the fire. The first new show from Pushkin Pushkin that I want to tell you about is tim. Harford's cautionary tales. Tim Writes for the Financial Times where he's known as the undercover economist. He's a genius. Musa telling stories that. Illuminate our world. And in cautionary tales. He takes stories of disasters and mistakes and asks what we can learn from them. In bringing we know stories to life we brought in a whole cast of great actors including Alan Cumming. Who you're about to hear in the role of an authority figure who's not what he seems? Here's Tim Harford. There may be times and places where it's a good idea to talk back to a military officer officer but Germany in one thousand nine hundred six isn't one of them so the young corporal doesn't the corporal. Let's let's call him. Corporal Mueller has been leading his squad of four privates down Celta Strasser in Berlin only to be challenged by captain. The the captain is about fifty a slim fellow with sunken cheeks the outline of his skull prominent above large White Moustache. Truth be told. He looks strangely down on his luck but corporate muller doesn't seem to take that in like any man in uniform. The Captain Looks Taller and broader. Thanks to his boots. Smart Grey overcoat. Prussian blue office CAP. His white gloved hand rests arrests casually on the hilt of his rapier. Are you taking those men back to the battery Turned him around and follow me. I have an urgent mission from the own highest command. The all highest. Everyone knows that means orders from the Kaiser as the small group. March towards polit- Strasser station should the charismatic captain. Sees another squad. You meant yes. Captain behind the Kaiser himself has commanded. Yes captain the captain now commands a little army and all ten soldiers ride the train across Berlin towards Capet. Charming little town. Just south east of the capital on arrival adventure continues corporate lined up for inspection lineup. Men Hurry fix bandits. It's already been an extraordinary day for Corporal Muller and his men with just getting started what they're about to do he's going to be the talk talk of newspapers around the world. You're listening to another retail.

Pushkin Pushkin Corporal Muller Tim Harford Pushkin Industries Conan O'Brien Corporal Mueller Berlin Musa Alan Cumming polit- Strasser station Tim Financial Times Germany Capet
Castbox integrates with Waze

podnews

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Castbox integrates with Waze

"Box has announced integration with ways of popular navigation service drivers canal. Listen to their favorite podcasts on cast box while navigating to their destination with the ways app in New Zealand. One in three people listen to podcasts every week. That's according to figures, released by RN's Ed and asked. The figures also claimed that listening has doubled in the past ten months, the Google podcasts. Create a program has announced then you round of teams who will be participating in the program, including six independent podcast production teams from Brazil, India, Spain Lebanon Columbia and the US podcast movement, have published their full speaker shovel. The event is in mid August in Orlando and Florida in the US, and we'll be there. The organizers have also announced twenty scholarship recipients, lipstick and via. Final sponsoring these society culture and advocacy track ensuring a place for diverse voices to speak at the conference. They tell us the company has fourteen podcasts. Mckellen have released May's top US podcast, advertisers, ZipRecruiter is still number one pod. Track have also released May's top US podcasts, the proprietary opt in data claims that the daily is at number one this American life at number two and stuff, you should know is it. Number three, US radio broadcaster MS communications has invested in undisclosed amount into Los Angeles based sound that brands branded podcast company radio. Public are working to expand less in American podcasting. Partnering with a podcast platform in Chile called sue Bela radio NPR and Edison. Research unveiling their new smart audio report on June twenty fifth two o'clock eastern. You can register for the free webinar in a link which you'll find episode notes and. Our newsletter. It'll be presented by Tom Webster and Joe superman post production company resonate recordings have an answer. Sister company, black mountain media, which will focus on pre-production aspects of podcasting. Sanchez content creation and development of new shows the company's first podcast is culpable in partnership with ten to foot TV further to our recent mention of the new Pushkin industries podcast for luminary UK podcast. Producers chalk and blade contact us with the news that they are producing a total of three shows for Pushkin this year too for luminary and a further title for the Rockefeller Foundation. The company is also working with other US networks, marshal Louis from wondering has been interviewed by music ally. This really is its own medium. He says of podcasting audio boom, is to spend four million dollars on new podcasts. According to a piece that we discovered in prolific London today. One voice one. Mike is a new. Film documentary about the rise of podcasting. It'll be released on Amazon prime on international podcast day September, thirtieth, and it screening at festivals before then we link to a trailer today. Spotify watch since the company released the your daily drive playlist in the US, both NPR news now and Pierre is the world audio segments feed snappy title. Both went to the top of the top podcasts chart on the service. The daily was already there multitude live is an event for you in the bell house in New York City, it's this Friday night, and they'll be showcasing segments of their most beloved shows and trying out new live only formats, and we mentioned a bunch of new podcasts today. It's almost as if we had four hours to go through our Email, isn't it blinded faith? New podcast from voice works and social chain the CBC have lodged chosen family. Their first long form interview podcast, the bunnies podcast is. Back from the luxury retailer with a new host journalist and activist, nor tag ary bleeped is all about censorship. And some of the times when people have been censored, and when they fought back and sides door from the Smithsonian MPR X has kicked off a new season, looking at the museum, and that's the

United States New Zealand NPR Marshal Louis New York City ED Google Ary Bleeped Orlando Rockefeller Foundation Pushkin Mckellen Chile Spain Lebanon Columbia Amazon Brazil Los Angeles Pushkin Industries London Spotify
Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

podnews

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

"Duo, lingo launched today. What the company claims is the first of its kind ever knew and welcome to the dueling. Go French podcast, it's a jewel podcast in French and English aims to help people understand French using compelling stories. It's presented by, and Goffin and Bhutto Boya a journalist, lawyer and podcast producer based in New York City in France guest a group of online publishers has set up a distribution of podcasts, working group to quote put in place. The necessary agreements with rights holders and to define best practice. The group mentions indexing of our assess feats, editorial presentation access to statistics respect for the integrity of the content and more about complete well Jacob Weisberg. Pushkin industries have released their latest podcast making a killing as new premium podcast on luminary this week conviction and new book by Denise Mina. Stars, a strong female protagonist who's obsessed by true crime podcasts and decides one day to investigate one of the unsolved crimes herself. It gets a positive review in the Washington Post one of the benefits of the open technical infrastructure of real podcast is that you can use the app, you want rather than a publishes app. The could have all kinds of other code in it like the app from Spanish football league alita, which listened to your microphone and worked out your location to discover bars that we using pirated video stream. Host read ads best or can you use a pre produced spot at instead, the sonic truth covers data from megaphones, Ken Lagaan ah, in an episode that we linked to today from our show notes, and our newsletter as he says, in an accompanying article some campaigns may require the power of an influence edge, just laying out the reasons why they love a product others may be better suited to a pre produced spot with an orchestral swell halfway through the ad and some campaigns may even require both. Editor spoke at podcast day last week. That's me with three podcasts that everyone can learn from we linked to what he said in podcast form, from our episode notes and our newsletter. Australia's at pro 'em costs offers a special. Podcasting music license is it at last away of licensing music for podcasts? We wrote an article on that. You'll find it links from our episode notes and our newsletter. Quick answer year. Nah, Spotify watch your editor has now been given the new interface, which gives parody for music, and podcasts, which is nice short. Howard points out that the ability to advertise podcast listeners, which we reported on yesterday is only available to large corporate advertisers for now. And we linked to Gustav soda Strom, the chief are indeed officer from the company giving a forty minute presentation on the company's history. I used to have a soda Strom, but I got bored filling up the gas bottles in podcast. Today. CNN films have launched Apollo eleven beyond the moon podcasts. Commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven lunar mission, your episodes of the true crime podcast. The lady vanishes have themselves vanished after two and a half million episodes. The podcast is following up new leads the football history dude, looks at the hundred years of the NFL that football. This is uncomfortable is a new weekly podcast about life in your twenties, and thirties, and how money Metis with it, and spectacular failures launches today, a ten episode season of the most spectacular business failures of all

Editor Football France Gustav Soda Strom Jacob Weisberg New York City Denise Mina Washington Post Ken Lagaan Pushkin Industries NFL Australia CNN Goffin Bhutto Boya Howard Producer Officer Hundred Years
Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"It started with feeling some nagging worry about this world. We find ourselves in. Deep Curtis through the clipboard. Steve Kerr has got teed up. Steve Kerr has got a jacket. A world where everyone hates the referee. Those who could kickable playful bone does account referee. Heels like someone keeps poking you in the back of the shoulder. And then saying foul foul foul. I would never say the things that I do to referees to a person in normally. I'm Michael Lewis, author of the blindside moneyball the pig short the fifth risk. This is my first podcast. It's called against the rules. This season taking you to all the poorly refereed corners of life. Look where we're sitting right now, Michael we're in a crappy parking lot across the street from one of the most important capital market building on the globe on the globe. I just have some simple basic questions through my trash people. Do it questions about what's happened to our idea? Fairness when you first float this idea. How's it greeted? Okay. So when I first float this come on. This is the early two thousands. And I'm talking about new government agency. Oh, just what everybody's looking for right? Here's what I think we still need our referees someone to make the call someone to protect us when lice unfair. But these days, it's not easy. Why would anybody want to be ref seriously? I wonder that too man. And they're not allowed to say anything. They're not allowed to explain themselves not allowed to defend themselves. So I'm going to defend them. It starts April. Second against the rules is the new show from Pushkin industries. You can subscribe now for free wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have anything you'd like to say to the referees of the world before we turn this recording off don't pick sides, unless it's my son?

Steve Kerr Michael Lewis Pushkin Industries Curtis
"pushkin industries" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Of the reproach that out there. Jacob Weisberg who is the editor in chief of the slate group which produces a ton of hot great hot cast. He left and took Malcolm Lavaux with him. And for a long time had no idea where it was very we had no idea where they were gonna land. And now they've just announced they're starting something called Pushkin industries, and they all out the distribution deal with Kate Starre team is actually a company I want to keep my eye on there, really building their portfolio. So I don't know what they're going to build out beyond what they already started at slate. They had one podcast called broken record. That nocco is doing. I'm sure there's gonna be a lot to come. So I really want to keep my eye on those two. And then if I can out a couple of other names, leeann Nathe who was the host of flow burn in Andrew person who his executive producer slower was at the top of a lot of different Besta too. Eighteen lists. I love the cafe self. And he just recently announced say or leaving. They don't even have a website after what they're doing either. It's going to be called the ASO traffic is a great name. It sounds like they'll be doing something similar to slow over. But they're going to be something, but they're giving elsewhere. I think the the when you are talking about is is the activated via Joan thing, or there's some rumblings that maybe they could be going to this company called luminary media, which is sort of been under wraps for awhile vais made announcement back in bed if they have raised forty million dollars Q make podcast that would be solely premia. So no, you know, most. Hi, Cathy, listen to our free and premium content..

Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Lavaux leeann Nathe Pushkin industries Kate Starre editor in chief Cathy Joan nocco executive producer Andrew forty million dollars
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Broken Record

"Get it affect you a motion motionlessly to do you're sitting in a close proximity to this mythical man singing these songs with unbelievable emotional weight to them. A you emerging at the end of the day like. Devasted you go curl up at a ball. And you're pretty excited because when you hear something a really good version of what it is. It's wouldn't go into the emotion of it so much as the excitement of seeing something come together that that has this power. Yeah. Did you ever talk to who's the Trent Trent? I did. I actually sent it to him when we finished. And I don't think he liked it so much when I heard it. Yeah. Then Mark manic made the video for it. And then when he saw the video trance-like, oh, I see what this is. I think it was to close at first, and it was just odd hearing someone else. I can remember we covered a Beck song. And I remember playing it for back. And I remember saying this is the first time I've ever heard anybody sing my lyrics. Besides me. And it's Johnny cash. He was like so it was just so mind blowing because he was probably twenty two at the time twenty one at the time. Yeah. I would think it must be. So thrilling to understand that you what you think of is very deeply personal song has a life outside of you that it, you know, it can have an an alternate meaning in a different universe. When sung by someone from a different. That's got to be like, so interesting. What's really interesting? This idea that we started talking on the beginning about your sort of indifference to boundaries to musical boundaries. And that clearly allows you to kind of move don't get defined by your relationship with hip hop. You end up doing what I do. And I don't so from a creative standpoint. I don't but from outside standpoint anytime, I tried to do something different than what I did before. There was always great resistance every step that way, only a little bit about that. Whoever I was in business with major label wise, or they just wanted more of the thing that happened before that was successful. And every step of the way, it was a just a struggle. And I was told often that I couldn't do what I was doing whether it was slayer or Johnny cash or whatever it was. It was just like the idea of working on different kinds of music was really frowned upon for some reason. I don't know. What's so weird? Of course, is that the very reason you are you are so good at working in hip hop. World was that you were already crossing boundaries hundred percent. And I think most people who make the best music. I think that's the case. Like people who grow up. Listening to electron ick dance music, and then making electric dance music tend to make. More mediocre dance music was people who come from some other form of music and cross into ants music. Make much more interesting dance music. Yeah. It's just the perspect-. It's just a wider perspective. Rick, and I talked for a lot longer, and we'll talk again, we've only scratched the surface. Whether we'll meet again, a Chengda is another matter. I hope so. Coming up broken record, many many more new episodes, including now Rogers Rufus, Wainwright, country music, songwriting greats. Don Henry, Don, schlitz, and Bobby Braddock and conversation, heavy metal demi-god, Dave hill. This is the first new show from Pushkin industries new audio studio. I started with Jacob Weisberg and named in honor of the great Russian biracial. Holly matted poet Alexander Pushkin, who is patron Saint and whose name we think sounds really cool. Coming up from Pushkin a whole new show from Michael Lewis called against the rules. Not to mention another season of revisionist history. Broken record is produced by meal Lebel and Jason Gambro with help from Bruce headlamp Jakisa Paschal Jacob Smith. Julia Barton Justin Richmond Jacob iceberg. And of course, Rick Rubin. Theme music is by Evan viola to hear all the songs featured in today's episode checkout, broken record podcast dot com. This show is brought to you by Pushkin industries. I'm out that. Well. You I forgot to do. I forgot to I wrote a whole rap back. Then about the J Trie. I'm a sucker. Jade tree can't grow much higher. All you other J trees gotta call me sire. And I forgot I say I was like no this is too stupid. I can't break up Rick's flow with this guy. Anyway.

Rick Rubin Pushkin industries Alexander Pushkin Johnny Trent Trent Mark manic Jacob Weisberg Beck Don Henry J Trie Evan viola Jakisa Paschal Jacob Smith Rogers Rufus Julia Barton Bobby Braddock Michael Lewis Holly Lebel Dave hill
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Get it affect you a motion motionlessly to do you're sitting in a close proximity to this mythical man singing these songs with unbelievable emotional weight to them. A you emerging at the end of the day like. Devasted you go curl up at a ball. And you're pretty excited because when you hear something a really good version of what it is. It's wouldn't go into the emotion of it so much as the excitement of seeing something come together that that has this power. Yeah. Did you ever talk to who's the Trent Trent? I did. I actually sent it to him when we finished. And I don't think he liked it so much when I heard it. Yeah. Then Mark manic made the video for it. And then when he saw the video trance-like, oh, I see what this is. I think it was to close at first, and it was just odd hearing someone else. I can remember we covered a Beck song. And I remember playing it for back. And I remember saying this is the first time I've ever heard anybody sing my lyrics. Besides me. And it's Johnny cash. He was like so it was just so mind blowing because he was probably twenty two at the time twenty one at the time. Yeah. I would think it must be. So thrilling to understand that you what you think of is very deeply personal song has a life outside of you that it, you know, it can have an an alternate meaning in a different universe. When sung by someone from a different. That's got to be like, so interesting. What's really interesting? This idea that we started talking on the beginning about your sort of indifference to boundaries to musical boundaries. And that clearly allows you to kind of move don't get defined by your relationship with hip hop. You end up doing what I do. And I don't so from a creative standpoint. I don't but from outside standpoint anytime, I tried to do something different than what I did before. There was always great resistance every step that way, only a little bit about that. Whoever I was in business with major label wise, or they just wanted more of the thing that happened before that was successful. And every step of the way, it was a just a struggle. And I was told often that I couldn't do what I was doing whether it was slayer or Johnny cash or whatever it was. It was just like the idea of working on different kinds of music was really frowned upon for some reason. I don't know. What's so weird? Of course, is that the very reason you are you are so good at working in hip hop. World was that you were already crossing boundaries hundred percent. And I think most people who make the best music. I think that's the case. Like people who grow up. Listening to electron ick dance music, and then making electric dance music tend to make. More mediocre dance music was people who come from some other form of music and cross into ants music. Make much more interesting dance music. Yeah. It's just the perspect-. It's just a wider perspective. Rick, and I talked for a lot longer, and we'll talk again, we've only scratched the surface. Whether we'll meet again, a Chengda is another matter. I hope so. Coming up broken record, many many more new episodes, including now Rogers Rufus, Wainwright, country music, songwriting greats. Don Henry, Don, schlitz, and Bobby Braddock and conversation, heavy metal demi-god, Dave hill. This is the first new show from Pushkin industries new audio studio. I started with Jacob Weisberg and named in honor of the great Russian biracial. Holly matted poet Alexander Pushkin, who is patron Saint and whose name we think sounds really cool. Coming up from Pushkin a whole new show from Michael Lewis called against the rules. Not to mention another season of revisionist history. Broken record is produced by meal Lebel and Jason Gambro with help from Bruce headlamp Jakisa Paschal Jacob Smith. Julia Barton Justin Richmond Jacob iceberg. And of course, Rick Rubin. Theme music is by Evan viola to hear all the songs featured in today's episode checkout, broken record podcast dot com. This show is brought to you by Pushkin industries. I'm out that. Well. You I forgot to do. I forgot to I wrote a whole rap back. Then about the J Trie. I'm a sucker. Jade tree can't grow much higher. All you other J trees gotta call me sire. And I forgot I say I was like no this is too stupid. I can't break up Rick's flow with this guy. Anyway.

Rick Rubin Pushkin industries Alexander Pushkin Johnny Trent Trent Mark manic Jacob Weisberg Beck Don Henry J Trie Evan viola Jakisa Paschal Jacob Smith Rogers Rufus Julia Barton Bobby Braddock Michael Lewis Holly Lebel Dave hill