26 Burst results for "Pushkin Industries"

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:38 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"I'm going. I making like one to two db moves up or down. And because we've gotten our gain structure really dialed in with kind of the plug ins and we have the benefit of usually our hosts on the same chains more or less so we can get them set. We have the master busts set with the narration set so the guest is the x. factor and if we get their gain right then you know what i'm doing is i'm trying to get my gain structure set so that is sitting at zero db and then i always know how much i'm turning them up or down. It's really easy to keep track of right. So i'm i'm trying to keep my baseline at zero db and then it's rare that i'm going more than to be in either direction for an interview like that. If people are laughing a lot of really dynamic you know you got to grips bikes but yeah that show is just like you know to to mix as a day of one to two db moves up and down across a forty five minute interview and like that's the deeper level. That's the deepest level positive. Just kidding just kidding you know when you mentioned lives. It reminded me when i worked with Nick de back in the early nineties we worked on a god street wine record and orange nine millimeter record and he mixed it. I was his assistant and he mixed it. Although i did i did do some engineering on the god street wine record but anyway what a what kind of music is a god street. Wine is kind of like little like almost like the grateful dead a little little different but similar maybe even a little more song structure little more poppy but not poppy. Obviously but okay and then orange. Nine millimeter was like like hardcore hardcore music. Housing brings hardcore name. Like damn. yeah but anyway when we printed the mixes because back then we used to print makes on half inch tape yet baby. He would always read a base up mix he would always after we record the main reason i mean we we bounce the main mix and then he would record a base up and he would also record a vocal up and And others to another guys would record all different variants but that base up one does doesn't. He's the first guy. I saw do that and i was like that is so cool because that gives the mastering engineer it might make more sense in mastering for the base to be higher..

Nick de
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

03:35 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"I can't understand what's going on at all and then you listen back and you're like oh it made sense to me but yeah this is total chaos and so that collaboration is really key the no. I got a lot on last archive. Actually on both shows on into zone and last archive i would get notes back from the producers. Who like i absolutely love this. Can you turn it down or like can you back the mix off on this effect or whatever like it's really cool. It's too much. can you dial back right. And you're like alright alright ahead to like tested. I had kind of find a vibe and like then you kind of like search for together and so the collaborative aspect is really rewarding and pushing his big on just like collaboration teams people working together. It's just like it's really awesome. You're not to be a solo artist like working on your own. You don't have to be an isolation just receiving audience sending audio out. You're talking to people and dialogue you. You just illustrated another problem. That like the the solo podcast producer. Faces is like you. You know although not using ri verbs and not using building virtual spaces and stuff in the stereo spectrum but just using accusing compressors. It's like you can use compression and you're like oh this sounds great and because there's no one to there's no one for you to play it for and then get feedback from so then it just goes out like that and then like you might listen three months later and you're like oh man that's way over. Compressed like yeah. That was to be quite frank with you. That was us in the early stages of the pandemic with people recording at home is jason. I both big users of rx voice to noise and i just on a mission to murder like all sound of someone's house. And it will be super clamp down and weirdly gedeon stuff senator the producers navy like you kinda sucked the life out of it. Yeah and then. I would be like the noise gone and then back back down. I actually just remixed one from like end of may and i remixed episode for we just launched a subscription thing. We did like an extended bonus. Cut and i was like oh man. Yeah i did clamp down on this too much. Because i was just like god. It's not people in a studio and after like a year and a half that or whatever you just like as close enough lower. I learned to like lower my threshold of like what was acceptable or not. Because i would on this american life or radio lab or whoever with the biggest budgets they had to use zoom audio to sometimes. And you're like okay like it's not the end of the world they come back to saying. If if it's interesting you can get around. A certain amount of weirdness right recording. So i'm curious how you and we've been talking for a while. This is we could talk forever here. But i'm curious this down. But i could talk all day. Yeah so i don't have anything after. This is my last thing for the day so well. I'll say that this is my last question. But we'll we'll see about that So talk to me about how you handle dynamics because again you're doing podcasts. With some sound design really trying to elicit emotion with music and sound effects and space. And all this stuff as opposed to someone like me and other podcast producers. Who are literally just working on interview. Podcasts with no sound designer all so when.

gedeon frank jason navy
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

03:49 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Through a story and so sometimes you just need like i need one more beat here too just like think about what i just heard before. My brain is ready to pivot to a new concept to new thought. So we talk about that a lot actually adding a beat here or giving people space to process what they just heard. That's something we talk about all the time. Yeah i hear that on on a lot of Podcasts that are more highly produced there. Sometimes they'll finish. Someone will stop speaking and there'll be a little bit of music in the background and they'll literally let it just don't be like seconds of just space and it really like you said it does a good job because then that's when the listener that's when their minds starts to drift a little because that's what you want them to do Yeah if you listen to this american life. It's they let her ride alongs like i get. Impatient sometimes have a hard time letting music ride that long. They'll just let it ride and it's kind of cool because you're like. Oh let me sit with that for a sec. But it depends on the speed of the show to like you can be very. Yeah that can be slowing show. We this amazing show. I worked on the fall called into the zone. It came out starring last september and has hosted by hurry. Koons who's awesome author. Shrimp some great stuff. He wrote a book called white tears. You may be really done with. It's about you know these guys who they are so frustrated with digital that they go down this rabbit holes like what is the ultimate authenticity and they get down to like old blue seventy eight. And then they find a haunted blue seventy eight and it turns into a go story. This guy is like such a good writer and for his fiction books. He does this deep deep research so everything is based on real historical facts. Real people like it's has such grounding in truth even though it's a fiction book and so he did show for us where he took some of that and apply a so. He took some of the research that he did for his books. And we made podcast episodes about it. But he comes from this. Cool background of like British nineteen nineties like jungle music and stuff like that. Like 'cause you know like rayvey kinda stuff like i'm too young for that but you know it's the era of like right when like techno and stuff was becoming thing and you know. There's some punk rock in. They're like his. His aesthetics are kind of geared towards that and so the pace of that show and a lot of the influence of the show even though they're buried really deeply like it's almost subliminal but it's cut to like kind of a faster puncture beat than something like the last archive. Is you know a little more like it's working with history so it's like sometimes you really need people to take an auto information into the zone by contrast there's a lot of just like shenanigans in it's kind of ridiculous sometimes and so the sound designer come in but there's also very touching poignant and so We had a lot of fun with that and a lot of what i was doing. Working with writer producer on that. Who's absolutely amazing and sheila sound design. And then sometimes it'd be adjusting the pacing or adjusting the sense of space. You're in using these rivers and stuff to place things in different spaces and You know it's just every show has it's own vibe and you have to tinker and experiment to settle on what that is together. You know like sometimes all whip up some cool effects or all like do the sequence. And i'll send over a little bounce and they'll be like this is totally chaotic..

Koons sec sheila
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Know and then funnily enough though sometimes i do talk to interviewees because what we do is i. I kind of came up with a standardized process. We have road ntsb. mike actually. I have one here. this road. Ntsb and that's in the studio booth so that if malcolm do an interview he actually can. He hasn't had the engage with all this crazy. I just need to interview someone real quick. I'll use one of these. Espn mike's right. And we tried out a bunch of different. Usb my we'd like these are the best they're always out of stock. I'm probably you know it's always are dressed. Gallon of probably gonna make it worse but we tried out yet es and all that stuff we try to the shore like their usb version esam seven which are a bunch of different ones. We keep going back to the ntsb so we put together kit with like the usb. Mike we got one of these like dangles because people never have them and then. Just you know some Sony headphones some sony headphones. Same as when. I'm wearing and we send him a box with a fedex return labeling some instructions and they just you know set it up do the interview centreback but usually have to hop on do tech support for people. Because it's like it's a little counterintuitive especially if you're older but luckily most of the artists on broken record they know how to record themselves. They're they have a you know like a focus. Right voca micro whatever right but every once in a while yeah you're talking to someone who's like in their seventies and all hop on zoom with some like legend or something like hello very famous person. Okay so you go in the bottom left corner where it says mute. No dome you. There's a up arrow cook on audio settings. Yeah it's justice. The is like someone super famous. You're like oh my god. I absolutely ridiculous right now. Describe my. I did that pretty much every day for like at least five years and it's it's really funny. It's really funny. And and usually you get through it and it worked out fine but in my case because i had so many clients and i was recording so much audio over the internet. And we weren't no one was sending microphones. It was like so you had to deal with whatever the guest had. It's like well. What do you have a headset from. Nineteen eighty six. Exactly it's like. Oh yeah we we have a stack of boxes. And it's shit. They're the number of the mic is on the box and it's just it's a very efficient process that i developed Probably in like december january. I i was like you know this pandemic could be going on for a really long time and we need to have a plan winging it for months and so You know we bought like a dozen and these usb my ex put together the kits and just ship out people and we started using zan caster to be before we to like do zoom but have them record a quick time and send it to us and it was just a nightmare and i also realized you're asking a lot of people even just ask them.

ntsb mike sony malcolm Espn fedex Mike
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:18 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"A bunch of stuff takes place in a grain silo and so it was like all right. Well let me dig up like Okay here's a cavern from those was recorded fifty miles away from the actual place. We're talking about. I'm gonna put the voice actor in an underground cavern in upstate. New york you know. I love conversion river. 'cause you can place things in actual spaces if someone's listening to some if someone's in a car you again you can put them into the space of a car. So it's it. These are tools for like a film post And the nice thing is that like in film post they have to kind of match it to. What's on screen and then here. There is no screen where everything's like you can really create some evocative stuff because it doesn't have to be realistic at all. It doesn't have to match. You can just everything takes place in their machinations. So you're just giving people something their imaginations till onto. Yeah so it sounds cool then you can use it. So let's talk about broken record. So oh yeah. Broken record is mainly. Obviously rick rubin interviews various people and sometimes malcolm is on there as well. He's he's he's had a busy year. We're doing actually. I'm pretty sure. I'm pretty sure i can talk about this. Because it's almost done and he's he's talked about it He did a book with paul simon. Like and it's It's this new thing. It's an audio book that doesn't exist in a written forum it's just based on interviews so it's kind of almost like a book length broken record. So he's he's putting a lot of energy into that so we'll get him back once you know once this things on bits. It's in the broken record family of shows so that's why hasn't been on the main one God but if you if you like burger it's like you're a repulsive and lose the cool. Oh so yeah. So rick. Rick is in la right yeah. Yeah and then he interviews people. Though a lot of times they come to his hou- home and studio right. They sit in that tour bus right. I know it's legendary. Yeah i we're like kind of on the precipice of being able to do that again. It's like things are reopening. It's like that that's on the table. It hasn't happened yet. But we're slowly starting to resume doing in-person activities. So that'd be really cool because you know a huge part of broken record was the performances and the that would be in the studio at the same time you know. Some be being interviewed with the guitar in their hand and loser like let me play something and that happens a little bit at home but not so much You know so were we. Just i actually just got meaning like how can we bring this live performance element back because it's just so lovely to hear someone talks about something and then they play it for you and your oh. I see what you mean totally. Yeah i mean there's nothing like In fact i just you know for years. I've heard the name. Billy bush. And i like i've i've heard little snippets..

upstate rick rubin paul simon malcolm New york rick Rick la Billy bush
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

04:34 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"And there's there's a few scenes episode one of season two the scopes monkey trial and so we were able to make this really nice hunting courtroom episode three. Has this kind of like noir. Detective going around. Berlin trying to find this american traitor. You can hear the the rain and the thunder you know. It's really beautiful. So i was really proud of of a lot of what we did and even the archive the sound of the archive. When you at the beginning of the episode the first season we just kind of made little spooky put a river. Whatever this one. What i did is i. When i do these recordings i put a little test tone beep boop so i could align them sample accurate so you wouldn't get some phase cancellation or anything I would line them up. Saint bacher tools. And what i did is i just played the entire. First minute and a half or jill's like in the last archive and then she emerges out into the world. So the sound of the last archives actually her going her like everything her the music sound effects are being played back through these radios and i created like the archive sound that way. But also because it was phase aligned. I could blend back in the dry too so it wouldn't be just over the top like all you're hearing. Is this thin radio sound. So that's how you know you get some nice lows back in there you get some nice directness and clarity by blending the two. Wow so i went full nerd. That is so cool man. I love that. Yeah i would love to see if you still have those Radio setup. i'd love to put a picture house interesting in pictures. And all my god so we took it to so many patients away when you were when you were making that up though with a stereo mike. Did you. just use the eighty-seven in bidirectional. I actually used it was very You know the it was humbling. Diy i used. Zoom h five. And i just the bilton x. y. Mike and i used the. I also have the mid side shotgun one and that was nice. 'cause i could use that if i wanted to really focus on the voice actor and have the stuff be The ambiance and music and stuff be more secondary. I could use this mid side shotgun. Mike the allows you to control. You know Mid side is another technique. It's really common music but not so much podcasting. We don't have that much use for it. But basically there's a shotgun element that catches like mono straight what's in front of it. And there's a figure element the captures whatever's coming in through the sides and so in post you can control the stereo with by turning the sides mike up or down so i used that sometimes when i wanted to really focus on the actor and then i use the x. y. capsule sometimes. I wanted to blend more as a scene. And so you know. I do wish i'd been able to use nicer mike's but I didn't want to disturb the eighty. Seven voiceover setup and rope it into that. And the only. Mike's i have or like you know. Shotguns dynamics is just like you know i'm just gonna use this. And then a couple of times. I also close miked with like ari twenty but yet actually to me. It sounds like the using the h..

Saint bacher Berlin jill Mike mike ari
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

04:46 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Interesting things. I've done the gear wise and theoretically wise which was I know jason talked about this last week. This show the last archive. So it's It's a history show and a lot of what happens is based on. You know things were written or things that happened before the era of recorded sound. So we've got these voice actors and to reenact things So you know you need to make that fit in with texture grainy history textures of the show and so the previous season Everyone went to a sound stage studio and gathered around one like vintage. Rca ribbon mike. And when it was the actors turn they would step up to the mike and deliver their line and step back. They did it. It's very inspired by orson welles radio dramas and so they produced it like a radio drama and it was Is really cool. I worked on season. One that was in. That was going when i first started. And so the sessions would just be like because there's so many tracks and so many sound effects were using like vintage film sound effects and one's record from seventy aids and everything together was chaos. So i would just go through and do a round of prepping the session for jason so that it made sense and was linear and then he would he would do it and so then for season two. I took over for him and and i just do it. All and producer. Ben is just a legend. He like sound designs in the most crazy. Beautiful way and i needed to kind of for season two. All these actors were over zoomed. So we couldn't do these kind of like hetty like oh we're going to do it like or smells radio drama. It was just like well. We sent them a usb mike and they're recording at home right so i needed a way to get some vibe on there to get some some kind of air moving some kind of feeling and i you know. Have a bunch of different plug ins. We use Ulta verb and speakerphone by audio ease. Audio thing makes springs and wires and speakers like these. Are there like bookings you can use to make stuff sound energy. But i haven't idea. My dad is basically electronics hoarder. You know we high turntables tape players. Hi fis everything like. I know you've can find it a junk junk store..

jason orson welles Rca mike aids Ben
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

03:35 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"It's just very fuzzy concept because loudness is over time so he was like if you just get. Tc clarity meter which he has talked about last week. I can't recommend it enough. All of our engineers have them. And you said this nice little meter on your desktop and you just watch that and after the wild you of learn how to surf it. you know. you're like okay. I can kinda right levels and so Just take so much of the gassing out. Yeah so he just absolutely rocked my world with that. I was like this is so so so yeah recommended and alert. Learning the meter is the key so like after like you said after a while you look at the meter and you you yes you see the meter and you see the level but you also just get this feeling like oh. It's a little bit weak or it's a little bit strong and you. it's it's a veal thing to just sorta adjust it and when you get to that level that's it becomes much easier at that when you do at that level with that experience. Yeah yeah My numbers are going down. Better bump thattaboy up gentle hot. Pull it back And so that really helps with Streamlining mixing an interview. Show 'cause so record is a two way and usually it's rick There's there's a few different hosts and so you know you just kind of go through the meter and you want you. And i'm really listening for Edits i really. I'm really a stickler for getting on my edits nice and tight and just invisible and transparent And so you know you just go through and listen through but then a narrative show like i just wrapped up working on the last archive Which is jill lepore this history show and those are like super dense mixes with fifty Seventy tracks sometimes it gets really out of control because we're nerds and it just helps keep you from getting lost. You're like okay. This sound effect comes in for six seconds. Oh it's objectively very loud. Like lemme bump this down It helps the meter like helps. Keep you from getting lost really right so now. You're in the studio. They're now and you're going to be going back to new york but do you do any like. Do you have a laptop that you take home. Do you do anything outside the studio at all. yes so. I have A singer picture my home setup to. It's pretty sleek Have this hp monitor in both places the twenty seven inch with a thunderbolt cable and it acts as a usb hub to some both places. I just plug in power and this one thunderbolt cable and hooked me into you know the tc over usb Wired ethernet add whatever and bluetooth keyboard mouse so I just. It's almost like a docking station. So i can use my home. Setup can use one here And it's very nice to have that consistency. and i the dangle situation really stinks. It's a huge pain in the bud and this one specific case okoye plugged in one thunderbolt cable and it connect me the entire rest of the studio and float around with my laptop. I love that and like sometimes you know if you're around other people it can be really hard to get something. Sometimes you just have to be home alone in zone of something and so it both things you need to be able to do. Both and one of the nice things about doing dark. I was i was able to come in the studio here and i had this big pile of radio setup. I should send you a picture. This too but The for me..

jill lepore hp new york
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

03:26 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"I'm really like i can't wait to get back. Hudson's beautiful like say eight thousand person town but there's a lot going on up here but you know it was funny. I i started this job on march. Eighth twenty twenty you know and we were in the office for like three days. We moved into a new office on the same day. Wow and so it was really intense. I had to like kind of adjust to working in a new place and learning all this new stuff. I really got thrown in the deep end. And so then you know. Four or five months later Jason's like yeah. What should we do about the studio. And hudson. And i don't know there's companies really rat. I'm gonna take a chance to move up here for a year and So the testament to you know what a great place to work. I was like all right. I'll roll the dice. Like this thing is awesome. Yeah yeah that's so you went with your gut feeling basically right. Yeah yeah yeah and it was cool. You know one shirt. I wouldn't wouldn't ordinarily be working on revisionist history. We have Louise does the music. He's a legend. Flawn does announcing he's legend but just by virtue of being here. I got to sit in. Because i was recording all of malcolm's interviews and voiceover and stuff. So i got to really see how they shape episodes and that was just totally also he would just call up people and it was almost like seeing him. Synthesize the information like he he would do them in an order made made sense and he would get knowledge from everyone along the way. And then there'd be almost like a final boss of the episode where he'd be like all right well. This expert told me this. This expert told me this. So what do you think about that. And so it was. It was so cool to see those things. And i wouldn't have gotten to see it so up close if i was down in the city That was a pretty big advantage of of being able to be up here and just see how that go down yes. That's really interesting. What you just said about the way he works with like that. 'cause i've thought of that before i haven't done it but like i always thought like if you let's say you had ten interview questions and then what you do. Is you interview just for simplicity sake. Let's say three people and you ask the same three people you ask. Sorry ask all three people the same ten questions so you have for question one. You have three answers for question to you. Have three answers and then is that similar to what you were just talking about. Or it's almost like it builds on each other like he uses the knowledge from each previous interview to inform the next interview and then by the time he gets to like the highest expert of all. He's so thoroughly prepared. But the way that what you're talking about is really how i learned. Engineer is i was like i would ask everyone i encountered just like. Hey how do you do this thing. How do you do that thing. And then sometimes you be like oh my god why i think of that timeshare like oh really. That's how you do it. Like no i into. I don't know anything and i know that that's weird And so you try out a little bit everything and you steal. Everyone's tricks intel. Basically you have your own vocabulary and so You know there's a lot of tricks. I stole from jason straight up. Like you know you guys talked about having a loudness meter hitting loudness is is a really..

Flawn Hudson hudson Jason Louise malcolm intel jason
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"And they do this. Residential workshop on cape cod obviously on pause because the pandemic. But you go there for nine weeks and their teacher rob is just like really amazing and teaches you all about story and how to write scripts and how to go on the field and reports people and then turn that into a a story and you know we had Truth who's reply. All the time came for weekend iraq last weekend they like helped us editor stories so i got really deep in learning how to do that. Narrative stuff and then was really awesome. Because i had to set the engineer part of my brain aside for a little while because the engineer side comes in the end and all these things happen in the gathering stages so you can really get lost in the gear stuff and then you're kind of like forgetting about the person who's right in front of you so i just did a recording actually in connecticut for pilot it. You know we went to this. Woman's house Some birds and we were recording birds as really exciting because it was like. Oh my god. I'm going someone's house for the first time in a while and i just tried out I was demoing Jason talked about last week. The sound devices mixed pre pre six. And so it's getting to know this new pc gear. And it's funnier like fiddling with the field recorder and then meanwhile someone's talking in your brain's not thinking about that you're thinking about the here so some so in a lot of scenarios is like the gear can be such a distraction. So it's really important to us stuff that you trust and know that you can just get results from and at the same time like you know gears really inspiring to like i. I'm a big sense guy. And i just like any sense. It's just like just all this beautiful stuff comes out of it. And then i record that and use it for sound design stuff. So it's it's funny. It's a fine line between being like. Oh the gear needs to be transparent. And like i just love gear so anyway. That was a long answer. You wanna know. About what kind of gear i use. Well let's get into that. I wanted to comment on what you just said. But you make a great point because i think in higher end productions like especially like for instance. Tv and radio. The engineer is different from the producer. Like the engineers that are hired. I think with wh when when projects have much higher budgets they hire dedicated engineers so that engineer is only looking at the equipment only.

rob iraq connecticut Jason
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:27 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Okay i am so psyched for martine gonzales to be here with me and by this is another episode where i don't have my intro music. I don't have my sidekicks voice. I'm going just raw dog style here. Just me and martin hanging out talking about podcasts audio production at basically the deepest level possible. So i i should let everyone know. You're listening to the podcast engineering. Show my name. is chris. kern. I produce podcasts. For a lot of companies and people and on this show we talk about podcast production techniques and we have great guests who are supremely talented audio and podcast producers. And that's what's great listener. You can hear how everyone else's producing podcasts. And you can use that information to produce better podcasts on your show so so thanks everybody for listening Martina i'm happy to have you here. You you're an audio engineer. And you also do some scoring and sound design for pushkin so glad to have you here man me. Too man. deepest Supported you say you're at the deepest level that's awesome. Yeah that's like you know. I'm an audio engineer. I came from the music business. And like when i entered podcasting like i don't even know eleven years ago. No not eleven to two thousand twelve so nine years ago and there are some jets flying above my house by the way. If you hear any else there's some jets from the air force academy just turned on their flying over the air force. I live right near the air force academy here in colorado springs. And there's a there's a there's an air force base on the other side of town and sometimes they do fly overs for graduation. They did a flyover with f. No you what this year. They flew a stealth. Bomber is the first time i've ever seen stealth bomber in real life It's crazy and it was flying really slow you know the thing about being in colorado is It sounds better there. No joke because the speed of sound and so You know before this. I was touring doing sound for bands like doing live sound and my shows in denver and boulder always under the best because sound travels faster at those velocities and so it sounds like much more clear without being as loud. So like you know Was it the the fox and the blue bird. It's all the all those theaters a. They just sound amazing and one time it just show in telluride and it was like i was delirious. I had to take hits from like an oxygen tank but the show sounded amazing. Why all right did did did we get an oxygen check there. Are you sure it was oxygen. That was a psychedelic experience. Being that higher but Yeah no same with utah and albuquerque and santa fe like anything that's above sea-level man just sounds better. It's kinda great to you. Gotta unfair advantage there..

martine gonzales air force academy kern pushkin Martina martin chris colorado springs air force colorado boulder denver telluride fox albuquerque utah santa fe
"pushkin industries" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ibm a podcast. From pushkin industries high heart media and ibm about what it means to look at today's most challenging problems in a new way. I'm malcolm god well in this episode. I'm speaking with jim. Whitehurst senior adviser at ibm in his time with ibm as both an advisor and former president. Jim was responsible for the ibm cloud and cognitive software organization and corporate strategy. Jim is an expert in open innovation during his time as president of ibm. Jim embedded his philosophy into the company helping clients and partners on their own digital transformation journeys. Today we'll be talking about the ways open. Culture accompanies can change the way we lead and work together realize. Hey this isn't insanity your chaos..

ibm pushkin industries high heart Jim Whitehurst malcolm jim
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"I think i think one of my students might have bought one too anyway. It looks almost like a flat looking. Microphone and it also has different polar patterns. Doesn't that mike do some real special stuff. This one i don't think does Different polar patterns. I think they have a higher end. Of course i can tell. This has has different Roll offs and then Attended twenty pad. But i think there's there's a version that's that's higher up they don't do a polar baton patterns but i just like the i like the of it it just sort of you know it gives you a big A big place to put your mouth. You know just like a big big square you know that sits right in your face and And i i really have been enjoying the. It's a little low output but I enjoy the tone. It's it's it's you know it's nice low mid not mud Yeah yeah good. Good body not not any You know it doesn't doesn't plus about crazy and Even though i think. I just did plus a bright and it's a condenser right. Yeah that's a condenser good and about. How much does it cost i. I'm curious i think eight. I'd like i said. This is a loner. So i'm just kind of feeling it out on eight hundred something like that. Yeah yeah yeah. I think around very interesting anyway. I'm sure drew from podcast. Which i'm sure he did a review of that mike..

eight hundred eight one twenty pad students mike
"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:00 min | 3 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Something like that okay He bought a victorian house there last year. Gutted it and We bill tae a little studio on the top floor and the rest of it has been made into offices. And so it's we. Call it pushkin north or he calls it pushkin north oklahoma in. It's just a little workspace but we set up a A dante studio up there. It's pretty simple to dante. Can you explain just briefly. What dante is and and how you're using it in that studio curium dante's just an audio variety p Language so it's you know it. Basically involves You know connecting audio devices via ethernet cables. And they they speak to one another in of i've done a lot of Audio variety p work. This is the first time i've done dante. Dante is is more obey wide open You know open source you know. There's fifty different companies that make dante devices but there are other versions Like a live wire which abused. and that's that's only a tell us product product. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah and that's Anyway the great thing about about audio vip versus you know regular analog audio That that you can you can set the boards up to just always work the same way you know you can do. These presets someone you know. You set up an analog board. Someone comes in and hits every button then you have to go in and investigate like sherlock holmes to figure out what the hell they did wrong. And maybe they did this. Maybe they did that. Maybe they hit this ox night or whatever but with know with with without over ip you can just hit a button and go reset to begin zip and everything goes right where it was all your in ouster batching. Everything just goes back to where it should be so You know our producers do a lot of their own engineering we try not to do you know A whole lot of actual sitdown engineering of the session so that allows for that too right right. Yeah and just to be clear for the listeners When when you're talking about audio going over ethernet cables. This is like obviously you still need. To use regular microphones and use. Xlr cables to plug it. You know get the microphone into some sort of a preemptive and then after the the audio gets into the preempt and then made probably get digitize then when it flows through the studio or the consul wherever then it goes over ethernet and all that but so it. Because i've never used the dante system but But yeah once once the microphone audio gets to the preempt from there on is just digital right so we have An eight channel..

last year eight channel first time sherlock holmes north oklahoma fifty different Dante
Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

podnews

03:06 min | 11 months ago

Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

"A constant patron of just announced a collaboration enabling creators to publish subscriber only content across different podcast platforms and make it easier for fans to financially support patriot creators. who works on almost all podcast. Players is profitable. Fuck i heart media. Podcasting revenue grew seventy four percent year on year for the company. Downloads are up. Seventy one percent new advertiser also spending with the company and other places to bob pittman. Ceo committed in a revenue colder fifty percent of the new. Podcasts launched on the podcast network be from female and verse creators and we now know that iheart paid fifty million dollars to buy. Vox nurse last month. I heart media has also signed sales and production partnership with pushkin industries. It'll make iheartmedia. The company's exclusive sales partner. And pushkin will also co produce new original. Podcasts iheartmedia over the next few years quite enough iheartmedia. It's focused on somebody else. Stitcher has rolled out a new website in the process. The url for podcast has changed old addresses. Though will read rx by you might as well update you website. It's probably a good idea. A are ends iheart podcast network trailer that they are again. They've signed up with pod sites to enable podcast attribution for every campaign triton. Digital's omni studio has partnered with ghana india's largest music streaming app to bring omni studio podcasts into the garner platform. Keep listening for how well garner is working for. Us and podcasts was a category in. Us quiz show jeopardy on monday. Podcasts highlighted stitches. Science rules with bill. Nye luminaries fiasco wonder is we crashed an audible. Original weirdly called it burns us neither and it will conan. O'brien needs a friend taped earlier. It was the first podcast since the death of the host. Alex trebek surprise. It's time for some more tech stuff. Garner the indian podcast app appears really high impart news podcast downloads. Statistics which are linked to today are numbers are produced using both rss us agent and player user agents but the garner app itself doesn't set any obvious user agents so this traffic might not be visible in your own podcast host anyway willing to all of our workings today in our show notes nine newsletter phase one is about to close editions and suggestions for the new podcast. Namespace willing to that today. Buzz sprout now supports visual. Soundbites away to mark sharable portions of podcasting apps and social media attack from podcast index. New podcast namespace willing to a bite from the podcasting two point. Oh show on pont verse and we all sending a little more about the lightning network and podcast monetization and another piece of news that to just in case you understand it more than we do.

Bob Pittman Pushkin Industries Omni Studio Pushkin Omni Ghana Alex Trebek Brien Garner United States Conan India Mark Sharable
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"To you by Pushkin Industries. We're back with this inside look at how Madonna is developing a vaccine through their chief medical officer tall. Zack's we pick up with tall on July twenty eighth. Here we go. With a good week. Look my son got married on. Sunday. They did this small ceremony and my son is marrying this. She's so good is his wife he's a physician he's a third year resident. been. Under the greatest joys in my life could afford that adult relationship with but I get telling him that he's GonNa wake up one day. Realize that. Meaning is missing for he should primarily focused on Jason meaning as opposed means. He quit his job to go back to host back so that he could get into Mexico, at the age of twenty. And I think it just all clicked for him between my influence I. Think it was mostly is his his wife now and and cope it. Frankly I mean look if you're a New York City the clapping every every evening rights for these guys who? Put their life on the line to oil. I, think? Things have changed..

Pushkin Industries medical officer Madonna Zack New York City Jason Mexico
Faking IAB-compliant downloads

podnews

03:06 min | 1 year ago

Faking IAB-compliant downloads

"Can Be compliant download numbers. The faked Antony Guo thinks. So indeed he's built contraption for about two hundred and ten dollars. Theoretically. Fake thirty thousand downloads a month. If you're really determined and quite technical, he's documented how he did it and how podcast hosts can detect. We've linked to its today from show notes and Dr Newsletter. It's a national podcast day September thirtieth, but it's already September thirtieth in some parts of the world. So bunch of live presentations happening right now, you can watch for free at international PODCAST Day Dot Com Hindenburg is planning a set of free workshops and a forty percent discount for Hindenburg products that's on now and tomorrow the match talk podcast network and founder Jason Bryant will be hosting a fourteen hour. Wa. livestream interviewing and showcasing wrestling podcasters from around the US. College High School in Olympic style of wrestling the drama that is sports entertainment were told a livestream starts at nine. AM central time. Love the podcast you're listening to Daniel J Lewis has added a new feature to my podcast reviews cold, love the podcast and it'll help your listeners give reviews for your podcast linking to the right platform for their device. If you'd like to see an example, thank go to love the podcasts dot com slash news because you. Apple spending money on podcast advertising McClellan I has published list of US podcast advertisers who increase spend the most in August. Apple spent three hundred eleven thousand dollars on advertising according to the company all for that Apple News plus products. The twenty two thousand discover pods awards are open nominations the fourth annual awards fan nominated fan voted without a paywall. We've only got two weeks to nominate your favorites though Pushkin Industries has a nice new website that like you to know another podcast APP in India Kuku FM has a number of podcasts as well as live radio and music and congratulations to the podcast global summit who set a Guinness World Record in August for the largest attendance for virtual podcasting conference. In one week, we're told Guinness, wanted at least five thousand attendees to set the record and they achieved five, thousand and three. Well. And pocano Kaczynski's it's fine to hit from millionaires financial whiz kids about what to do with money. But better the hear from real experience small change money stories from the neighborhood highlights smarts practical and collaborative money skills develops by people living with lower an unstable incomes new from NPR news in Minnesota. Horror Narration podcast creepy is launching their thirty one days of horror series beginning on October. The first series will new chilling tale each day of the month culminating in a special episode on Halloween against more than a million downloads a month we're told,

Antony Guo Apple United States Pocano Kaczynski Guinness NPR College High School Daniel J Lewis Founder Dr Newsletter Jason Bryant Pushkin Industries India Kuku Fm WA. Minnesota
How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast?

Side Hustle School

03:40 min | 1 year ago

How can I find companies to sponsor my podcast?

"Hi, Chris this is rod from Omaha. And I've been listening to this show for over a year. Thanks for the helpful content. Planning to start a podcast and I want to do it seriously but maybe not professionally, but I want to plan well, then do everything I can to recruit inactive audience that will be attractive to sponsors. But what do I need to know in? How do I find those sponsors do I find them in advance or only after the audiences more established fact? Rogge what's up? Thank you so much for listening. Thanks for the question and I am excited about your podcast. Really glad to know that you're planning to take it seriously. You know not everything has to be professionally as you said, but to take it seriously, I think that is admirable. So let's talk a bit about sponsorship. Your question specifically is, what do you need to know? How do you find the sponsors? Do you find them in advance or later? So on that last point if it's important to have sponsors When the show launches most likely, you'll need to partner with a podcast network or distributor who will license and distribute your show. Now, this is changing by the month because I realized the follow up question is okay who are those people? Where do I find them while it's changing by the month? It's a very fast moving industry but a few well-known podcast networks at the moment include wondering Pushkin Industries, and cadence thirteen where side-hustle school has hosted. Now, in recent times, streaming services like spotify have also gotten in the game by producing and distributing their own podcast as well. Now, I just named a few of the bigger ones there, but there's also a lot of others as well. Assuming. You aren't going through a company like that, which is kind of like working with a traditional publisher for your book like there are pros and cons to it. So assuming you're not doing that, then you'll really need to focus more on building up your subscriber base before sponsors will be interested. And then once audience established. That's when you want to start looking for the sponsors a great place to start. Once you have a good number of downloads let's say five to ten thousand per episode more is Mid Roll. She can look at mid roll dot com they produce podcast of their own, but also sell ads on a commission basis for lots of other podcasts and as the other companies I mentioned mid roll is not the only option. So when you search fine podcast sponsors in Google or wherever you might find several other networks that do the same thing. Now lastly, in addition to those networks because let's say you're starting off and podcast is going well but you don't have really big numbers while you can still approach brands directly if there's companies that might be a good fit or you can invite them to approach you directly. So how do you do that? Well on your podcast website which you should have a website by the way include a prominent page called sponsor INFO or sponsor this podcast something like that. And I think if you don't have a ton of downloads, this is a good entry point because you can try to sell some other unique characteristic about your podcast. For example, it might be a small tight knit community that isn't ever going to have a huge listenership in terms of just the raw numbers, but this community is very loyal and it's in need of services that a sponsor could provide. So I've known a lot of smaller podcasters who have had. The same sponsor is often for years who have just really believed in in the podcast and they have kind of forced this good relationship between. The company, the PODCAST, her and the audience, and all without going through a network, which, of course, by nature and network is a middleman and there's commission involved and all that kind of stuff. So if you different options there, but I think overall whatever you do. The most important thing is building an audience like focus always on your audience focus on what can I do to create a great podcast? What can I do to provide valuable helpful content because that is the foundation for any relationship whether you're trying to work with a network trying to get your ad sold by distributor or trying to connect sponsors directly focused on your audience.

Omaha Rogge Chris Spotify Pushkin Industries Google Partner Publisher
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Fiction inspired by the headlines, Each episode features a new work of fiction on topics like What does Kobe 19 due to our relationships? How do we make sense of climate change and extinction? In such uncertain times. Sometimes art fiction is the only way to make sense of it all subscribing apple podcasts or wherever you listen brought to you by Pushkin Industries. Last year. I was living with this indigenous family in India. One afternoon. The young sun was eating. Man at the site off me. He quickly hit his gaudy behind his back. It took a lot of position to get him to show me what he was eating. It turned out to be most larvae, a traditional delicacy with the Medea indigenous peoples. I cried. Oh, my God, you're eating thes. I hope there's a little left for me. I thought this belief in the boy's eyes you heed this. I love peas. I replied. I could see he did not trust me one bit. How couldn't open educated woman like the same food as him? Later, I broach the subject with his father, and it turned out to be a mighty touchy or fish. He said. Things like Oh, only the son ofthe mind likes treated. We tell him Give it up. It's bad. He doesn't listen. You see, we gave up eating all this ages back..

Pushkin Industries India apple
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Solvable

08:31 min | 1 year ago

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"I want you to hear another show from Pushkin that I think you'll like it's called deep background and it's hosted by Harvard Law. Professor Noah Feldman Minute Noah's been interviewing top. Scientists thinkers and authors to understand the stories behind the news. The episode. You're about to hear is a special one. Because because Noah himself was the newsmaker in the hot seat testifying before Congress. I'll let him pick up the story on deep background. This is a show about understanding the news. And if you like you're about to hear I hope you'll subscribe from Pushkin Industries. This is deep background. The show where we explore the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm Noah Feldman joining us for the first time. Welcome if you've missed any of our earlier episodes which used it'd be behind a paywall. You can now get them for free exactly where you found this one a bit about me. I teach constitutional law at Harvard. I love oh well tailored suit and I had a pretty eventful winter break swear or affirm under penalty perjury and the testimony. You're about to give. It is true and correct to the best of your knowledge information and belief to help you got this past December. I was an expert witness called by the Democrats to testify at the impeachment inquiry and the House of Representatives into president. Donald Trump. To be honest with you it was extremely nerve wracking. My job is to study and to teach the constitution solution from its origins until the present. I'm here today to describe three things. Why the framers of our Constitution included a provision for the impeachment agent of the president? What that provision providing for impeachment for high crimes and misdemeanors means and last how it applies to the question before for you and for the American people whether president trump has committed impeachable offenses under the constitution? The other expert witnesses called by the Democrats were Pamela Carlin. A law professor at Stanford when President Trump invited indeed demanded foreign involvement in our upcoming election. He struck at the very heart of what makes makes this a republic to which we pledge allegiance and Michael Gerhardt a law professor at the University of North Carolina Chapel. If what we're talking about is not impeachable the nothing impeachable. I recently got the chance to talk to Michael Gerhardt about that day and all that has happened since I was was unfortunately recovering from a slight cold Michael. Thank you so much for joining me. We've spoken on the phone but we actually haven't seen each other. Since December December four th when we both had the opportunity and maybe dubious honor of testifying at the House. Judiciary Committee's hearing on impeachment impeachment. How you been doing since then it's It's been busy Teaching classes and also trying to be part of the national conversation on a very important subject what I would love for us to do in. This conversation is open up for listeners. Some of the the back story in the back scenes of what we experienced that day. How we prepare for it and also sort of bigger picture consequences Of what's been going on. So maybe the way to start is. I had never done this before before so it was a surprise to me but you had done this before. Twenty years previously When they were a group of professors I think twenty one in total? Who testified about Bill Clinton's impeachment to the House Judiciary Committee and not only were you one of them but you are also the only one who is jointly put forward by the Republicans and the Democrats so take us back if you will twenty years and tell us how that happened you know? Nowadays it's almost inconceivable to imagine there being somebody who is acceptable to both sides on twenty years seems longtime ago. It's GonNa the seem even longer when we Put together what was happening back then. It'll seem completely alien to us. So I had spent a fair bit of my academic career studying and writing about impeachment also testifying and consulting with members of Congress that was all known by the time we got to nineteen ninety eight and there was a special moment for me in one thousand nine hundred eight when Jim Leach Republican David Skaggs Democrat called me up on the phone said. Would you come talk to us in Washington generally if members of Congress want to talk to me about something I think. That's a great honor and I went and they said to me. Well what would like you to do after you talk to us right now. Go speak to the entire House of Representatives. The I didn't know that coming into that moment while And they had ring like they want you to speak to the house right. Then yes right then So I thought well wow this is going to be a good test with another another subject matter And so then we walked over to the House and I had to get special permission to walk onto the floor of the house and then behind closed doors with no staff. No press or anything. I then talked to the entire House of Representatives about impeachment spent about two hours doing it at no no cameras fresno nothing knows nothing just nothing is all. Is there a written record of your. Don't think there's a written record. I think it was also amazing. You had a confidential conversation with four hundred and thirty five people hard to say the biggest lecture of my life or one of the big lectures but it was a tried to designed more conversation and it was a very congenial collegial conversation at the end of a Charles candidate Republican. Bobby Scott a democrat. Who happened to be my representative came up to me and said well? If you ever have a hearing on this would you come and I said well sure I'd be honored honored and then that hearing to which you just alluded Happened a few weeks later where I was then. Brought in by both Republicans and Democrats to testify is one of the experts One of the many experts including Alan Dershowitz On the question of Whether or not President Clinton's alleged misconduct rose to the level of being an impeachable offense. And what did you say When I talked about was basically The law of impeachment. I try to kind of lay out the things we knew that that I thought were clear and then kind of talked about some things that were maybe unsettled and said here's what we know about them here. The arguments on both sides and and kind of walked everybody through that and then got questions but there was no personal attack was always very much. You know in this footnote. You said this but now today you're saying that Fair I can try to answer that. Do they actually give you a chance to to answer it. I'd say that has light of our experience. They asked a question and then they actually let you answer it. It's like you know as you said it. Sounds like the Middle Ages. That's right yeah so when we had our hearing there was is no chance to answer it or at least we were giving maybe a second and then that was about it but yes they would then give me a chance to answer it and they they appear to be listening and it was really more of a conversation Than Twenty years later it would be. It's sort of fascinating on many levels but one of the reasons it's so fascinating is that most people at the time identified the impeachment of Bill Clinton that moment as a high point in partisanship the most partisan moment that people can remember the in the United States in more than a century and I think that was actually a fair assessment in historical terms and now twenty years later. It sounds almost like a model of bipartisan and cordiality and collegiality even if they voted along along party lines let me ask you a question Michael so the reason you yourself in that extraordinary position in the Clinton impeachment is it you were and remain the leading expert law professor on the subject of impeachment your guide to the impeachment and processed book you know has come out and I think three additions now why in the world as a young law professor did you get interested in the impeachment as the topic. It was not a hot topic. You know in the late eighties when you must have started diving into it or the middle ladies and you start diving into it. Why did you choose the subject? Well it's a good question I grew up Jewish Alabama in the nineteen sixties. That that that comes with that. That's a big sentence. We're we're in Alabama a mobile on. Okay got it and so I was my entire childhood. aalto was sort of shaped and defined by the Civil Rights Movement at the tail end of that civil rights movement was of course Watergate so like many people of my generation I I watched Watergate. I was kind of thought it was incredible moment to see Congress sort of investigating the president and eventually the President resigned and that that that stuck with me. That was something that I felt. The civil rights movement and Watergate had in common a respect for the rules law. They had in common the idea that law could bring order to chaos and so that was very appealing to me. I had an interest in the law as a

President Trump President Clinton Noah Feldman Congress House Of Representatives Michael Gerhardt Donald Trump Professor Harvard Law Pushkin Industries Alabama Pushkin House Judiciary Committee Civil Rights Movement Perjury Harvard Judiciary Committee Pamela Carlin
"pushkin industries" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

14:31 min | 2 years ago

"pushkin industries" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Of pushkin industries jacob malcolm glad well started pushkin industries twenty eighteen to pushkin notes put artists in creators. I this podcast network currently has six shows and more shows in development prior to starting push with malcolm jacob was the c._e._o. Of the slate group co oh founder of penelope an editor in chief of slate magazine. He has written for several publications including the new york times new yorker and financial times. He's author of several books folks and a lecturer at yale university where he graduated from and this episode stephanie and jacob discussed the beginnings of podcasting what makes audio storytelling different from other mediums and where the podcasting industry is headed into the future. Take a welcome to.

jacob malcolm pushkin industries malcolm jacob pushkin the new york times slate magazine yale university editor in chief penelope lecturer stephanie founder
Castbox integrates with Waze

podnews

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Castbox integrates with Waze

"Box has announced integration with ways of popular navigation service drivers canal. Listen to their favorite podcasts on cast box while navigating to their destination with the ways app in New Zealand. One in three people listen to podcasts every week. That's according to figures, released by RN's Ed and asked. The figures also claimed that listening has doubled in the past ten months, the Google podcasts. Create a program has announced then you round of teams who will be participating in the program, including six independent podcast production teams from Brazil, India, Spain Lebanon Columbia and the US podcast movement, have published their full speaker shovel. The event is in mid August in Orlando and Florida in the US, and we'll be there. The organizers have also announced twenty scholarship recipients, lipstick and via. Final sponsoring these society culture and advocacy track ensuring a place for diverse voices to speak at the conference. They tell us the company has fourteen podcasts. Mckellen have released May's top US podcast, advertisers, ZipRecruiter is still number one pod. Track have also released May's top US podcasts, the proprietary opt in data claims that the daily is at number one this American life at number two and stuff, you should know is it. Number three, US radio broadcaster MS communications has invested in undisclosed amount into Los Angeles based sound that brands branded podcast company radio. Public are working to expand less in American podcasting. Partnering with a podcast platform in Chile called sue Bela radio NPR and Edison. Research unveiling their new smart audio report on June twenty fifth two o'clock eastern. You can register for the free webinar in a link which you'll find episode notes and. Our newsletter. It'll be presented by Tom Webster and Joe superman post production company resonate recordings have an answer. Sister company, black mountain media, which will focus on pre-production aspects of podcasting. Sanchez content creation and development of new shows the company's first podcast is culpable in partnership with ten to foot TV further to our recent mention of the new Pushkin industries podcast for luminary UK podcast. Producers chalk and blade contact us with the news that they are producing a total of three shows for Pushkin this year too for luminary and a further title for the Rockefeller Foundation. The company is also working with other US networks, marshal Louis from wondering has been interviewed by music ally. This really is its own medium. He says of podcasting audio boom, is to spend four million dollars on new podcasts. According to a piece that we discovered in prolific London today. One voice one. Mike is a new. Film documentary about the rise of podcasting. It'll be released on Amazon prime on international podcast day September, thirtieth, and it screening at festivals before then we link to a trailer today. Spotify watch since the company released the your daily drive playlist in the US, both NPR news now and Pierre is the world audio segments feed snappy title. Both went to the top of the top podcasts chart on the service. The daily was already there multitude live is an event for you in the bell house in New York City, it's this Friday night, and they'll be showcasing segments of their most beloved shows and trying out new live only formats, and we mentioned a bunch of new podcasts today. It's almost as if we had four hours to go through our Email, isn't it blinded faith? New podcast from voice works and social chain the CBC have lodged chosen family. Their first long form interview podcast, the bunnies podcast is. Back from the luxury retailer with a new host journalist and activist, nor tag ary bleeped is all about censorship. And some of the times when people have been censored, and when they fought back and sides door from the Smithsonian MPR X has kicked off a new season, looking at the museum, and that's the

United States New Zealand NPR Marshal Louis New York City ED Google Ary Bleeped Orlando Rockefeller Foundation Pushkin Mckellen Chile Spain Lebanon Columbia Amazon Brazil Los Angeles Pushkin Industries London Spotify
Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

podnews

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

"Duo, lingo launched today. What the company claims is the first of its kind ever knew and welcome to the dueling. Go French podcast, it's a jewel podcast in French and English aims to help people understand French using compelling stories. It's presented by, and Goffin and Bhutto Boya a journalist, lawyer and podcast producer based in New York City in France guest a group of online publishers has set up a distribution of podcasts, working group to quote put in place. The necessary agreements with rights holders and to define best practice. The group mentions indexing of our assess feats, editorial presentation access to statistics respect for the integrity of the content and more about complete well Jacob Weisberg. Pushkin industries have released their latest podcast making a killing as new premium podcast on luminary this week conviction and new book by Denise Mina. Stars, a strong female protagonist who's obsessed by true crime podcasts and decides one day to investigate one of the unsolved crimes herself. It gets a positive review in the Washington Post one of the benefits of the open technical infrastructure of real podcast is that you can use the app, you want rather than a publishes app. The could have all kinds of other code in it like the app from Spanish football league alita, which listened to your microphone and worked out your location to discover bars that we using pirated video stream. Host read ads best or can you use a pre produced spot at instead, the sonic truth covers data from megaphones, Ken Lagaan ah, in an episode that we linked to today from our show notes, and our newsletter as he says, in an accompanying article some campaigns may require the power of an influence edge, just laying out the reasons why they love a product others may be better suited to a pre produced spot with an orchestral swell halfway through the ad and some campaigns may even require both. Editor spoke at podcast day last week. That's me with three podcasts that everyone can learn from we linked to what he said in podcast form, from our episode notes and our newsletter. Australia's at pro 'em costs offers a special. Podcasting music license is it at last away of licensing music for podcasts? We wrote an article on that. You'll find it links from our episode notes and our newsletter. Quick answer year. Nah, Spotify watch your editor has now been given the new interface, which gives parody for music, and podcasts, which is nice short. Howard points out that the ability to advertise podcast listeners, which we reported on yesterday is only available to large corporate advertisers for now. And we linked to Gustav soda Strom, the chief are indeed officer from the company giving a forty minute presentation on the company's history. I used to have a soda Strom, but I got bored filling up the gas bottles in podcast. Today. CNN films have launched Apollo eleven beyond the moon podcasts. Commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven lunar mission, your episodes of the true crime podcast. The lady vanishes have themselves vanished after two and a half million episodes. The podcast is following up new leads the football history dude, looks at the hundred years of the NFL that football. This is uncomfortable is a new weekly podcast about life in your twenties, and thirties, and how money Metis with it, and spectacular failures launches today, a ten episode season of the most spectacular business failures of all

Editor Football France Gustav Soda Strom Jacob Weisberg New York City Denise Mina Washington Post Ken Lagaan Pushkin Industries NFL Australia CNN Goffin Bhutto Boya Howard Producer Officer Hundred Years
Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"It started with feeling some nagging worry about this world. We find ourselves in. Deep Curtis through the clipboard. Steve Kerr has got teed up. Steve Kerr has got a jacket. A world where everyone hates the referee. Those who could kickable playful bone does account referee. Heels like someone keeps poking you in the back of the shoulder. And then saying foul foul foul. I would never say the things that I do to referees to a person in normally. I'm Michael Lewis, author of the blindside moneyball the pig short the fifth risk. This is my first podcast. It's called against the rules. This season taking you to all the poorly refereed corners of life. Look where we're sitting right now, Michael we're in a crappy parking lot across the street from one of the most important capital market building on the globe on the globe. I just have some simple basic questions through my trash people. Do it questions about what's happened to our idea? Fairness when you first float this idea. How's it greeted? Okay. So when I first float this come on. This is the early two thousands. And I'm talking about new government agency. Oh, just what everybody's looking for right? Here's what I think we still need our referees someone to make the call someone to protect us when lice unfair. But these days, it's not easy. Why would anybody want to be ref seriously? I wonder that too man. And they're not allowed to say anything. They're not allowed to explain themselves not allowed to defend themselves. So I'm going to defend them. It starts April. Second against the rules is the new show from Pushkin industries. You can subscribe now for free wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have anything you'd like to say to the referees of the world before we turn this recording off don't pick sides, unless it's my son?

Steve Kerr Michael Lewis Pushkin Industries Curtis