35 Burst results for "Purdue University"

"purdue university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:44 min | Last week

"purdue university" Discussed on KGO 810

"As soon as the disaster occurs and you're gonna get payment on that claim lightning fast because it's all going to be fully automated through AI So it's just an illustration of how everything everywhere is going to be taking advantage of technological innovation Texas has just built a barracks for its military personnel at camp swift training center This barracks is 3800 ft² or what's the big deal about that It was 3D printed The biggest 3D printed building in North America The only building bigger than that that's 3D printed is in Dubai That one is 6900 ft² The barracks in Texas will hold 72 soldiers and because it was printed in concrete it ought to last for decades Meanwhile they're going to have to paint that barracks and what they might want to use is the world's whitest paint scientists have now developed it at Purdue university It could eliminate the need for air conditioning The paint is so white it reflects 98% of sunlight away from the building while emitting infrared heat Normally white paint gets warmer rather than cooler because it absorbs light and heat from the sun even though it's white This ultra white paint doesn't do that What makes it so ultra white a very high concentration of barium sulfate which is used in cosmetics They expect to bring the paint to the marketplace within the next two years All these are pretty fascinating innovations coming our way And I'm here to tell you all about them And one key way I want to do that for you is by inviting you to a brand new webinar that I've just created Debuts this coming Tuesday.

camp swift training center Texas North America Dubai Purdue university
Golf Pro Shot, Killed at His Georgia Golf Course

WSB programming

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Golf Pro Shot, Killed at His Georgia Golf Course

"Following the shooting at Pine Tree Country Club in Kennesaw. Over the weekend Golf pro Director Paul Sylar was shot to death when he went to check on a car that had gotten stuck on the golf course on the 10th told family and friends. Numbers of this club are remembering 41 year old Jean Sylar, the husband and father of two, was a graduate of Purdue University who had been working as the club's director of golf since 2019 now prior to that, he worked in the same capacity at Summit Chase Country Club that's in Gwinnett County. Now we have learned from Channel two is Michael Sidon that investigators have also found a white ran 3500 pickup truck parked on the green to other bodies were found in the bed of that truck. Both had been shot. One of the two bodies in the truck was identified as Paul Pearson, the registered owner of the truck. The third victim has not yet been identified. The shooter Is still on the run. 82

Pine Tree Country Club Paul Sylar Golf Jean Sylar Kennesaw Summit Chase Country Club Michael Sidon Purdue University Gwinnett County Paul Pearson
How do Income-Share Agreements Work?

Side Hustle School

02:26 min | 5 months ago

How do Income-Share Agreements Work?

"So income share agreements. Let's break down. One of the first and most well known. Examples is lambeth school. Which is a programming school. I coating school. And you don't pay tuition until you're earning fifty thousand dollars a year the way it works. If you go to lambeth school dot com you can learn more you agree to pay seventeen percent of your post lamba school salary for twenty four months. But only after you're making fifty thousand dollars a year at least and they have a cap at thirty thousand dollars so basically you never pay more than thirty thousand dollars tuition and if you don't get hired and you never pay so isn't that pretty cool like they also have options to just pay tuition up front if you're able and that's what you prefer But to me the groundbreaking thing is this income share agreement because it's allowed a lot of people from poorer countries or from a disadvantaged background to really get a world class education and then a high paying job so there are a few other schools that are offering similar programs. I just did some brief research university of utah's doing it. Purdue university But in the world of entrepreneurship to focus our discussion here most iras are from startup. incubators one of the big ones that you may have heard of. It's called y combinator and their jail is first of all very selective so you can't just apply and get in like a lot of people who apply. Don't get in but if you are accepted there deal is they will invest one hundred and twenty five thousand dollars in return for seven percent of your company. Okay and that would be great if you qualify. First of all i said and also if you need more than one hundred thousand dollars in start-up capital so there is a world in which that is the case for lots of different businesses but here on site us'll school ninety nine percents of stories that feature. You don't need anywhere near that much money. Our whole point is to do this frugal to do this on a budget. To use the resources you have instead of just trying to find somebody to invest money so the reason i essays exist which as i said overall i think they're awesome but the reason they exist is because of expensive tuition or start up costs for some businesses. You were attending college. That was affordable for your budget. Then you wouldn't need the and so two. Is it for the side. Hustle model like total startup costs five hundred dollars. Let's say which we've had hundreds of stories that fit in that category then. An essay wouldn't really be worth for either party like you don't need somebody to own. X. percentage of your company in exchange for that five hundred dollars. You should just find a way to get the five hundred dollars or less on your own so that you don't have to give up any equity in your company.

Lambeth School Research University Of Utah Purdue University
How we can climate-proof the power grid

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 8 months ago

How we can climate-proof the power grid

"We climate proof our energy infrastructure going forward. This week's blackouts are just the latest example of how vulnerable are grits are two more extreme climate change driven weather events. She nazi is an assistant. Professor at purdue university school of industrial engineering hierachy welcome to climate. Cast thank you so much for having me. Start at this with compassion. Millions of our fellow americans without power heat water food even gas in subfreezing temperatures with that in mind. We much colder winters here. In minnesota than texas and our power grid is very reliable here in the winter. Why did the energy infrastructure in texas fail so tragically this week so it's not so much about the absolute values of the temperature. Right it's more about your region has been historically you still is just the fact that the temperatures really caught them by surprise. But i wouldn't say that. This story is unique to tax us. Well so on that point. Extreme cold isn't the only weather events challenging our grids. What other ways does climate change impact power so if you look on the power outage data collected by the department of energy but you can easily see First of all severe weather and climate events have been the major culprits for the large-scale sustain. Outages if you look at the data from early two thousands you see that there's actually been a three fold increase in the frequency and intensity of major power outages and exactly to your point. You know these extreme events can range from cold snaps to heat waves two hurricanes the wildfires. I mean there's no shortage of unfortunately You know natural disasters that hit our greg. So what are the best practices in hardening electric grids to climate change and extreme weather events. So there is really a number of different solutions. one micro-credits grids. They've been shown to have a positive impact on the overall resilience of the region during disasters Peres undergrounding some of the key. Assets and leveraging the techniques that we've already developed for other for seeing you know the impact on not only demand or physical infrastructure but also supply capacity prior to the onset of events roshii for people who aren't familiar. What are the benefits of micro grids so for example right now. What we're seeing in texas They're not able to balance the note right. So with micro grid not only it can alleviate note from the overall grid and allow the busing to happen a little bit more easily but also can sort of provides energy to stop off the customers trying to get to the source of what happened in texas and why it doesn't happen in other places right. Some people trying to falsely blame frozen wind turbines for power loss in texas but natural gas coal nuclear infrastructure accounted for eighty seven percent of the loss of generating capacity there. This week renewables just about thirteen percent is overall the shift to renewable also improving resilience. Absolutely there is plenty of evidence adds diversity and moving more towards renewables and distributed resources. Just improve the overall resilience not to mention the sustainability outcomes. Right while i'm grateful to everyone who plans and delivers energy to our homes than this week. So a big. Thank you to everybody who does that. She nateghi assistant professor at purdue university school of engineering. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast. Today thank you so much for having me. I really enjoyed speaking with you today.

Purdue University School Of In Texas Department Of Energy Minnesota Peres Greg Purdue University School Of En
NASA prepares to land Perseverance rover on Mars

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

01:11 min | 9 months ago

NASA prepares to land Perseverance rover on Mars

"Today will determine the fate of NASA's perseverance. Mars Rover mission The Red Planet will have a new robot resident. If all goes well, and this morning a produce scientist is talking about what she calls the scariest moment of the mission. New Santana Mordo is here with more on what to expect in those seven minutes. Well, it's called the seven minutes of terror, describing the rovers entry descent and landing to Mars. Basically, it takes seven minutes for NASA's perseverance to go from the top of Mars atmosphere to the planet's ground. For the entire descent to general crater. The rover will have no help or commands from NASA's team on Earth. Perseverance will be plummeting to Mars at about 12,000 MPH and must slow down to zero in that seven minutes. The rover will use parachutes and retro rockets to help it will also use to rain, relevant navigation. Basically, that's mapping of the ground, determining where it's safest to land in real time. Purdue University associate professor of planetary science. Briony Horgan, dubbed the seven Minutes the scariest moment of the mission organ played a key role in the mission, and she and the NASA team of worked for this moment, saying it's crucial, but they say it's just the start Surviving

Nasa Santana Mordo Briony Horgan Purdue University
Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 10 months ago

Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

"The us produces so much shale gas it needs to find new markets overseas. The trump administration has approved moving a liquefied form of the gas by rail. But some say that is too dangerous. Susan phillips of member station. whyy reports on a route. That would be one of the longest in the country. The guests will go first to a new plant in northeast. pennsylvania where refrigeration units will chill it too negative two hundred and sixty degrees fahrenheit. That's how it goes from a guest to a liquid. The part of the plan that scares a lot of people is the transport two hundred miles by truck or rail through some of the most densely populated areas of the east coast to a planned export terminal in new jersey. Vanessa keegan lives nearby with her family including three year old. Theo thank you want to take a picture. Okay you gotta get mommy ipad. We take another picture right. Era go railcars. Full of highly flammable liquefied natural gas or lng would roll about a block and a half away from keegan's home a daycare center sits right at the company gate so they want special permits to transport them right there. That train track. You could skip on down to in about a minute and a half and that terrifies me. This project is part of a larger push to export natural gas last summer. The trump administration changed long-standing federal policy to allow rail transport of ellen g anywhere in the country fifteen states including pennsylvania and new jersey challenged the move saying it puts people's lives at risk in this rust belt reason of new jersey. The export project does have support from building trade unions and powerful state lawmakers including assemblyman. John bursa kelly. He says grandfather worked at a former dupont plant on the site of the planned export terminal. That's will create jobs as it once did contribute to tax base as wants to be an important economic driver for people to make a living in fear families. I says safety issues should be raised and addressed but he says railcars carry much more hazardous materials through the region every day. Ray mentzer is a chemical engineer at purdue university who spent his career on ellen g projects for exxon mobil he says specially designed containers have a good safety record but he says transporting the guests through densely populated areas increases the risk if there's a leak. It's not flammable until it's vaporized but it's going to bait rise pretty damn quickly and then it's going to seek an ignition source. Believe me it will find an ignition source. Pretty darn readily mentor says. A vapor cloud would definitely catch fire. If i was at a town meeting and i lived there i would want to know. Just what routes are you going to us right now. The exact roots are unclear. Multiple attempts to reach the developers of the project. New fortress energy went on answered if the overseas export terminal gets built. None of the guests will go to power new jersey homes instead the state is planning a large coastal wind farm off atlantic city to help new jersey reach the goal of all clean energy by twenty fifty

Susan Phillips Ellen G Vanessa Keegan New Jersey Whyy Pennsylvania John Bursa Kelly Theo Keegan East Coast Ray Mentzer Dupont United States Exxon Mobil Purdue University Atlantic City
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Data centers will consume almost thirty percent of the power on the planet. If we keep building data centers, the way we are, and of course. When you talk to the five G. Guys doing full networks, they WANNA put edge computing that is to say miniature data centers I in a result our second in every regional place around the around the world or the have regions with cells in That's going to be a lot more. Data centers out tiny but you know there's the there's the fact that there are so many of them think. Cell. Networks and how many. Computing facilities you need to have one I a result, our second then in a region and every larger area. Yeah. So that's also point to Maybe be need a major innovation Harvard design. So now there are some talks about members to base computing really fundamentally changed the power requirement equation. In computing it seems to me that if you're going to consume the status quo technology, thirty percent of the power generated that seems second on sustainable design into the trenches. But it's not just you know individual. Devices, it's not joss is. Consumer, demand. Businesses want consumers want everybody wants clouds so Yeah. So did you see Doug Any sort of you know there was some talk about quantum computing any sort of fundamental change in the hardware aspect of compute. Or their fundamentals coming. Well, as you pointed out, there are lots of people doing research on how to. How to optimize power in whatever how increase battery life? How on on and on so power is is a big thing. And everything from individual transistors the the solid state physics people figuring out how to minimize power there too large scale cooling how do better cooling. Yeah. There are lots of things are fundamentals coming. I. Don't know Tarpley predict. I'm sure I'm sure that someday will wake up and somebody will say, Hey, we can do things with less power. Yet nothing much has happened right lost look at last ten years I don't think we have changed much from a hardware design perspective, right? Well if you talk to chip manufacturers..

Tarpley joss Doug
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Iraq. Send the packet across network looking only that magic number. Older forwarding in in the whole network is completely static. It's been built in we know Iraq tourists or just look at the prefixed line, the rack number Goto. When Ratu? When the top wreck switch Iraq to gets that it looks at the packet says. The the rack number here the prefix of this Mac address is me. I next bit figure out which serving my rack should get this and send the packets of that serve. OCAL server gets it and that's where the service is. Okay. This packet has reached its final destination. I can use the IP address in the packet because it's a regular old packet with a regular old data ram minute I can use that to figure out which application or which virtual machine which container on my server should receive that packet. And so in all the inbound traffic, that is no need floor night p destination. There's no need until you get to the final server and that's how you look at the Ip destination. Okay okay. So is this is this being done in the in the large systems ws resor. Unfortunately. It's still an ongoing research project. We have Darko funding, we are working on a prototype. As you can imagine. Covert has had. A very damning of fact we'd been locked out of the lab for six months We're supposed to go. Work in the lab on. So a TAD A. About. Bad effect but we hope that it will come to people's attentions. Yep. Yeah yeah it seems like it's something that has solely needed. So it will accurately if you're successful. it will have both a speed latency effect. as well as sort of cost effect- because you can reduce the complications of spinning up and spinning containers sound site, right? Yeah it'll. It'll make a whole bunch of things faster but Everything you can do in a data center to reduce things like the cost of creating and the cost of tearing down. Machines and can virtual machines and containers is important. So yes, will help a lot. Okay okay. I won't be jumping blend of the people that you have a dot. This is entitled towards this aggregating the SDN controlled plane. SDN software defined. Networking. you said, current SDN controllers have been designed based on a monolithic approach that integrates all of the services and applications into a single huge program. And this monolithic design if control for six programmers who management applications to the specific programming interfaces and services that give an s control provides making application development dependent on the.

Iraq Ratu Iraq. Darko Covert
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"They have obviously they have a big large redundant infrastructure around the world any single company trying to replicate that will be too expensive. So. It is that true that they're providing a disadvantages is in terms of business interruption issue for not stumbling. Oh they have. If you go to the Lao large clock providers, you can find a long list of services they provide. That would be very hard for you to do in an enterprise outside of that yet they have. They start with things like security how about backups they have Really Nice backup schemes where they transport your data to a faraway place, they can multiple copies they do all automatically. You know it's really hard for you to if you're an enterprise, how are you going to lease space in some storage facility faraway? Yeah Yeah and the flexibility they offer this. This may not be a big deal for large companies but small to medium sized companies that compute requirements requirements might be quite volatile and so you know in some sense you can get you know high compute Ben, you need it, and then you know sort of two hundred dollars if you donate play Oh exactly in fact that that notion elastic computing where you can pay for what you need is central to cloud. But beyond that, we talked about the hybrid cloud with a private cloud and public cloud. Yet another reason for having hybrid cloud is economic. Suppose you're a company that has very seasonal business. Let's take I duNno. Tax Returns I assume that's a seasonal. I'm just not attacking Abbas. Really hope and on April first cerebral fifteen..

Abbas
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Places like Walmart Fateh. You know you mentioned visor going down the list? In fact, almost all of them are now moving to. A hybrid. Cloud. They are renting. Space in the public cloud, an Amazon or Azure or Google cloud, and they also have some private cloud stuff. But more and more they're moving the sort of I don't know what you call it a pedestrian computing to the public cloud and using their private cloud only for. Specialized things. For example, if you're in healthcare, you may need to keep certain records head or compliance get. We don't want to move them to a public cloud. Right. Right. So only for Security and privacy reasons if they need to keep some data, they seem to have some sort of a privatized former fed So if they are doing that dog Arianna Pat so that is obviously is scale. huge amount of scale in this business for Amazon. Microsoft. So a large companies saying the per unit cost off compute and storage is going to be lower by going to the public cloud strategically. Ultimately, they're going to do that anyway unless they have a need for some sort of privacy security data storage, right? Well, there's there's just. One side of the coin is all the cloud providers are telling everyone hey, we get quantity discounts. and. We such cloudy discounts that you can't get these the big cloud providers are called hyperscale. Now, you've heard that term, but there are so big that they're far beyond what any organization is and and if you go to some of the organizations and look at their infrastructure, you'd be amazed for example, dig about an organization like. Walmart. About an organization like Bank of America, every AGM is on the Bank of America network. Huge. And Yet And yet the big hyperscale. Have even more infrastructure, and so they get bigger discounts and they also claim that they amateur is the cost of training. Over many customers so that Amazons of the world aws Azure they each have multiple tenants in their data center and they're saying, look the reason we're so cheapest Yay, you need somebody who's a real expert on pick a topic. Oracle, database configuration, debugging all of the things about Oracle database. Well we'll have we have that expertise. But you don't have to pay for all your self. Will discharge you a small fraction because our experts are shared among all were tenants. Hundreds or thousands of tenants. So it looks like they really win on economics but the other side of the coin. The other side of the coin is. They're trying to lock in customers. Yeah switching costs at quite high. So once you get them, you have to continue, right Yes, they're working very hard to make it easy to get in. It's like my mother used to say about trouble. Trouble is easy to get in. It's really hard to get out. Right right. But you see eastern advantage from a business interruption perspectives. If you think about.

Amazon Bank of America Oracle Walmart Arianna Pat Microsoft Amazons Google
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yeah. Quote Him in one place and find a way to take. Processing and put it on this new architectural. I'd honestly Doug is it sort of coming full circle right I remember in engineering school? I was going to school in India. I used to work on IBM three seventy mainframe. and then be bend to distribute computing for awhile and then clouded sort of bringing it back in senators computing architecture, right? That's absolutely right inside. I'm writing a book on cloud computing and you will find that exact statement. Pets. We have we spent a long time moving toward a distributed environment where we got smaller and smaller computers in the hands of individuals. and. We ended up with this hugely distributed environment and then all ISM cloud comes along and it really says we're going to centralize things. Right. One of the ironies it used to be called the computing center and now it's called the data center. which was because centers a bad idea but latest center is a good idea and. And if you look at the infrastructure, it's really ironic that they're using raised floor with the coolant going underneath the floor just like an old computer set it's the same old technology from the sixties. But yeah. So. So I knew that you know that we'll talk a little bit about the big cloud providers like Amazon Microsoft, but also large companies like Pfizer Boeing or somebody like that. cavs sort of their own cloud right? They have data centers spent around the world is that how they do it? Well if you If you went back five day years it'd be right. Every company was building their own private cloud they were taking all infrastructure. So a large enterprise company would move all servers out of individual departments, which is what distributed world was every army had their own servers, put him in a centralized data center and call it a private cloud. They would use the same technology as Google, Amazon, and the same cloud infrastructure technology, but it would do it all on their own premises. But if you go talk to the big companies.

Doug India IBM Amazon Pfizer Boeing Google Microsoft
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

During the pandemic, social media can be an information lifeline for rural communities

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:44 min | 1 year ago

During the pandemic, social media can be an information lifeline for rural communities

"So hard to quit facebook is that it's actually really essential for information support and connection. That's especially true in small rural communities where local news is mostly happening on facebook and people are turning to the platform is a resource for information about covid nineteen. But K. UNC's Adam raise reports from Colorado that in groups that were meant to keep people updated divisiveness is creeping in. Like many school districts across the country in Morgan. County, Colorado has been working on a plan for the fall. So some parents in the rural county have been turning to a more than five thousand, nine hundred member facebook group to get and share information. This is exactly what Christie spots Cobley had in mind when she created the group in two, thousand, twelve, I kept thinking we need a place where the community can go and find information many posts from people, asking questions or sharing information about covid nineteen restrictions, local politics, community resources, the local paper that covers the counties biggest city used to have four reporters. But now it shows just one full time reporter with another paper out here in. Rural America sometimes, we don't get information as fast as doing urban counterparts asked Nathan Trout he works on a farm near the town of Gan's and primarily uses facebook groups to buy or sell farm equipment, but he sees a broader value in them. So I think it's really or that we need to open up all meetings or communications that we we as AS Roma citizens know what's going on in our rural communities. These groups can provide a platform that wasn't available before Roberto Gherardo has helped rural areas take advantage of social media as director of the Purdue University Center for Regional Development. If you use it properly, you can convey value win formation. You can really truly have discussion and discourse. That helps he says there are also downsides and Morgan County facebook group administrator Cobley is seeing those now with covid nineteen I think there's so much longer before the pandemic she says, facebook group remained fairly civil now small number of posts provoked dozens of argumentative vulgar comments some with misleading or false information cobley was a hand off moderator before the pandemic but now I think I, it was time I. I need to get control back over of the group in March she posted some ground rules. That's vital part of moderating community based social media says Jeremy Lipshultz he's a professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Who Researches Social Media I think if you're honest and transparent and you keep your audience in mind in your fair with everybody fares as you can be, you're not going to make everybody happy. But I think it will work fairly well over time the moderating rules for the Morgan County facebook groups seemed to help but we still has weeks or she doesn't even want to look at the group and yet I think it will always be around one way or another. It's not something I will ever shut now still in mid-july. Cobley to crack crackdown on threads about mask-wearing requirements that devolved into arguments laced with profanities. That's K. UNC's Adam race from Colorado. And now, for some related links, it's hard to get numbers on how many people are joining new facebook groups during this pandemic. But lots of stories from all over the country and the world point two people gathering figure out how to deal with school reopening teachers getting together to share tips for remote learning small businesses, creating support networks for each other and sadly stories of groups devolving into such toxic discourse that their moderators closed them down. I will say I opened facebook for the first time in over a year to try to around and get a sense of how many community groups there might be, how many people are in them little light research and I did almost immediately find a page in my area had some updated information about my county and some restrictions on hair salons had recently been eased, and now I have hope I might be able to get a haircut soon. So that was actually kind of helpful although I did not read any of the comments. The thing that's frustrating is that although facebook makes it easy to create groups and you can kind of assume sadly that most people are on it. This is literally what the Internet started as a series of forums and chat groups and bulletin boards. It's what people have done online since online began and in some ways, the great lie about facebook is that you can't do this anywhere else. Have the groups, dumped the engagement algorithms and the hyper targeted ads and you know what you've got. The World Wide Web I'm

Facebook Cobley Colorado Morgan County Roberto Gherardo K. Unc Morgan Adam Jeremy Lipshultz Nathan Trout America Reporter Purdue University Center For R Christie University Of Nebraska Omaha GAN Director Administrator
"purdue university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Calls out Bannon for siphoning a large chunk of money he raised for personal benefit and expenses that basically portrays him as self serving and unconcerned about the people who gave money for the cause he was pushing, which was raising money to build a private border wall. Another college. Another case of Copan 19 transgressions, CBS's Jim Krystle Purdue University has suspended three dozen students for attending a large off campus party. The action came less than 24 hours after the president of the school in West Lafayette, Indiana, made it a university violation Tau host or even go to a party that didn't follow the school's Koven 19 guidelines on Appeals court in California has granted US day the delayed a suspension of uber and lift services in the state. CBS News Legal analyst Stain Rosenbaum. All of this arises under California law that forces companies to hire independent contractors as actual employees, making them entitled to overtime, sick leave and insurance. It also adds taxes for the state's benefit lift, had threatened to suspend service just before midnight. A fierce critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin remains in the hospital after a suspected poisoning. CBS's Ian Lee report video appears to show Alexei Navalny groaning on the plane when paramedics arrived. Pilots made an emergency landing in Siberia after he started to feel sick, his spokeswoman told the Moscow radio station. Little Children change. He drank only black tea in an airport cafe. We reckoned that he was poisoned, and that had happened with the team. Stock futures are pointing upwards Friday morning. This is CBS News. Traffic and weather together. The Subaru retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes. It's 203. We're gonna take a look downtown way have delays on 93 south of Triple Left Lane Closure Mystic after the O'Neil Tunnel and then traffic is Detroit often exit 20, mass. Pike North Found you down two left Lanes. O'Neill Tunnel to the Tobin Bridge Exit 27. To the Tobin is closed and on the pikey, reducing speed both directions in the potential tunnel work crews taking lanes both ways south of town Express way North bound, no trouble passing work at Savin Hill. The South bound side reduces speed for a double enclosure and Randolph from Route 37 a route 24 the ramp to route 24 is closed. Route three North down to one lane and slow from route 2 28 2 Derby Street. North of town. 1 28 south going to slow down as you pass in the Cot Street. Only one lane gets by its in Danvers for 95 north, reducing speed with two left lanes taken from 1 19 in Littleton to Boston Road up in Westford. 93 North Watch for work crews slowing things down by 2 13 In Methuen, west of the city, Mass. Pike slows a bit westbound with work of Newton corner and on route to delays for roadwork East In limits, thereby route 12 and then again, from Shirley Road to Jackson rode out in Devon's This report sponsored by Compassion International. We're all feeling the weight of covert 19. But for kids in poverty around the world, things are becoming desperate. Joined compassion International and provide for a family in poverty. Make your one time $40 gift by texting Hope, 283393 mostly clear skies. 70 degrees DI Perez, the ZBZ traffic on the threes. Here's the four day W B Z AccuWeather forecast early on this Friday morning. It will be mostly clear those between 60 and 65. Becoming warmer later today with son but not all that human high 87 in Boston and many Western suburbs. It'll be in the low eighties near the beaches mostly clear tonight Low 69 Tomorrow son Vixen with clouds will feel hot and humid in the afternoon highs between 84 90, However, it'll be in the lower eighties near the beaches human on Sunday with a thunderstorm possible high 86. Our Mackey weather meteorologist Cur Bobinsky W B Z Boston's news Radio. Good morning. I'm done half here's what's happening. Attorney General William Bar tells The Associated Press The Justice Department will seek to reinstate the death sentence of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. The Ape's Mike Russia has more. In July, a three judge panel of the first U. S Circuit Court tossed Tsarnaev's death sentence and ordered a new trial to determine whether he should be executed for the 2013 attack. The panel found. The judge who oversaw the 2015 trial did not adequately question potential jurors about what they had read or heard about the case. Tsarnaev and his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, carried out the attack that killed three people and wounded 260. Others. The older.

CBS Dzhokhar Tsarnaev California Bannon Boston Compassion International president Alexei Navalny Mass Jim Krystle Purdue University Triple Left Lane Closure Mysti O'Neill Tunnel West Lafayette Vladimir Putin Copan Stain Rosenbaum Indiana analyst Ian Lee
36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

Jay Talking

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

"Another college. Another case of Copan 19 transgressions, CBS's Jim Krystle Purdue University has suspended three dozen students for attending a large off campus party. The action came less than 24 hours after the president of the school in West Lafayette, Indiana, made it a university violation Tau host or even go to a party that didn't follow the school's Koven 19

Jim Krystle Purdue University Copan West Lafayette CBS President Trump Indiana
36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

Broncos Country Tonight

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

"Suspending three dozen students for attending a party and breaking Covad Protocol, School officials say Just one event can undo everything they've done to allow students to continue their educations in person. Colleges and universities across the country have opted for online learning after finding positive virus cases on campus. Next news Update at

Covad
36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

WGN Nightside

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

"Purdue University has announced. It's a spending 36 students who attended an off campus party at Co op housing School says the students violated a protect Purdue pledge a rule that's been in effect since May, students will have a hearing and could be booted from the

Purdue University Co Op Housing School
36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

Lance McAlister

00:11 sec | 1 year ago

36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

"Purdue University has announced. It's a spending 36 students who attended an off campus party at co op housing schools says the students violated a protect Purdue pledge a rule that's been in effect since May.

Purdue University
"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Mr Dennis Morgan on back home again in Indiana, killing us all now to the starting line, and Luke Walton. Purdue University band marching away from the starting area there in the pit area. The cars lined up in 11 rose three abreast. Look, Walden is standing by to pick up our immortal words from Tony home and the president of the speedway, Luca, you said. The engines are being started as you can. Well here in the background. This is the moment we've been waiting for.

Mr Dennis Morgan Luke Walton Purdue University Luca Walden Indiana president Tony
Obituary: Herman Cain

TIME's Top Stories

05:52 min | 1 year ago

Obituary: Herman Cain

"Herman Cain helped define the American black conservative movement. He also set the stage for trump by Philip Elliott. Herman. CAIN remembered the nineteen ninety-six moment that changed his political trajectory as clearly as any in his life. The businessman was advising Jack Kemp's vice presidential campaign and accompanied the boss to the iconic Sylvia's soul food restaurant in Harlem for an event a man in the crowd shouted out to Kane and colleagues Black Republicans, there's no such thing. The. Same Man in canes telling called them Uncle Toms. The episode. So angered Kane that when he got home from that campaign swing, he switched from a registered independent to a card carrying member of the Republican. Party and over the next quarter century, the child of the segregated south became one of the best known black Republicans in the country briefly rising to be his party's presidential front runner for the two thousand twelve nomination and remaining one of the most quotable stars in conservative media. So committed to his party's stick it in the I e host was Cain that he flew to Tulsa. Oklahoma for President Donald, trump's first return to the campaign trail after one hundred thousand US corona virus deaths despite dire warnings from public health experts at that endure rally on June twentieth the stage four colon cancer survivor posed for pictures without wearing a mask and sat in the packed stands with fellow fans of the president on June twenty-ninth Cain tested positive for the corona virus. On July second, his aides announced he had been hospitalized while fighting the disease his twitter account continued to criticize mask wearing and to promote unproven endorsements of hydroxy. On. July. Thirtieth CAIN aides announced he had died from the White House trump attributed the death to the thing called the virus cain among the most prominent Americans to die during this pandemic who was seventy four In many ways, Kane and trump were cut from the same cloth neither had been elected to any political post before running for the White House, both delighted in needling the Republican Party's establishment and the mainstream press they shot from the hip campaigned in slogans and didn't much care to learn the details. Both men were dogged by allegations of sexual affairs and inappropriate behavior, and both denied the allegations they proved disqualifying for Kane who ended his bid in December twenty eleven under intense scrutiny. But they did not derail trump just one election cycle. Later, they were also both savvy exploiters of the media. In saying things they knew would provoke outrage and thus amplify the celebrity at the core of their bids indifference toward if not hostility against what had come before was a cornerstone of their strategy, not a flaw. CAIN was born in Memphis in nineteen forty-five to a domestic worker mother and a janitor father when his dad was hired to be the chauffeur for the head of coca-cola, the family moved to Atlanta where cain would graduate from Morehouse College. He then completed his graduate studies at Purdue University after civilian service in the navy from there Kane moved from engineer to executive with Pillsbury and its subsidiaries of Burger King and Godfather's pizza where he would be its CEO. In nineteen, Eighty Eight, he oversaw Godfather's. From, Pillsbury throughout the same time yelled positions with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. That part of his resume lead trump to consider cane for a position in his administration a move that drew dissent from fellow Republicans who were not eager to revisit the allegations against Kane for three years. Kane led the national. Restaurant Association a lobbying arm for the industry that paid settlements to at least two women who detailed canes unwanted advances. His was not a typical career in his post. CEO Years Cain became a sought after motivational speaker and unsuccessful presidential candidate in two thousand and a Senate one in two thousand four. As, the tea party movement started to organize after Barack Obama's election to the White House. Kane emerged as one of its strongest spokespeople when the twenty twelve election cycle began kane decided to run the scrappy est of campaigns focused on untrue additional travel schedule that often seemed more like a book tour than an organizing effort. His novel nine, nine nine tax plan proposing a nine percent corporate business flat tax, a nine percent personal income flat tax and a nine percent national sales tax drew I rolls from economists but curiosity from voters. Antipathy toward front runner Mitt Romney proved sufficient to give cain a chance to rise in the late summer and fall of twenty eleven until his personal life just proved too much. But he didn't shrink from podcast life. Instead he became a ubiquitous voice and reliable critic of Democrats

Ceo Years Cain Kane Donald Trump Cain White House Mitt Romney Jack Kemp Pillsbury Philip Elliott Republican Party Godfather Oklahoma Twitter Harlem Barack Obama United States Tulsa
How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

Environment: NPR

04:55 min | 1 year ago

How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

"Some of our biggest environmental problems like water, pollution and endangered wildlife caused by large scale farming, which means farmers are in a position to reduce environmental damage or at least mitigate it. Why don't they one reason? They often don't own much of the lands that they farm here's. NPR's Dan Charles Lisa Solti more loves nature. I reached her while she was visiting. The forests of northern Minnesota I can only describe it as healing. All the stress of our world, and said she just forget about it when you're in one of these beautiful old growth, for as she teaches ecology at Iowa State University, but when she moved to Iowa seventeen years ago, she struggled a little. She didn't have that same feeling standing in vast fields of corn. She wasn't hearing any birds or seeing many bugs all I can here are the leaves of the rustling corn around me and not one other. Biological Noise at all right. It's you know they call it the Green Desert and there is a lot of land like this this year. Corn and soybeans covered land. That's equal in size to all the East Coast States from New York to Georgia. But solti more says it doesn't have to be a green desert. She's been studying what she calls. Prairie Strips stretches of land, running through fields of corner soybeans. We're farmers of set-aside may be percent of the land for tall, stemmed grasses and wildflowers. It's a different world there. She says birds singing their bees buzzing. They were crickets chirping. There was stuff hopping around. These bits of prairie also protect soil and water capture carbon dioxide from the air. For this to happen. Though farmers have to be willing to give this land back to nature and many experts on farmland say it can make economic sense. One of them is Steve Brewer President of People's company in Des Moines Iowa who buys sells and manages farmland across the country. One of the first things that we do and we do this on every farm that we managed as we run, these profitability maps. His company creates a detailed map of the. The farm what they spend and what they earn on every acre, and they're finding consistently that some of that land loses money. It's amazing about ten to fifteen percent of all the acres in Iowa. aren't profitable. They're those hillsides with eroded soil spots where water collects in a big puddle after every rain. That is where they advise farmers to cut their losses may be bring back the prairie. Some farmers are doing this kinda thing most are not. And one reason the farm experts say is an under appreciated fact about America's farmland farmers only owned about half their land the rest of it. They rent year-by-year from a collection of landlords. Linda pro copy from Purdue University has studied those landowners. There are very diverse group of people much more diverse than farmers. Many are elderly retired farmers now renting the land to the next generation, some inherited it from grandparents. You have younger urban people who co owned a piece of land with cousins. Don't know anything about farming so when it comes to managing that Land Steve Brewer from People's company says it often plays out like this. Let's say somebody owns one hundred sixty acres. Thirty of those acres are lousy for growing crops, but they'll rent out. The whole thing is a landowner you want. Those thirty acres farmed because you're trying to get rental revenue on every acre that you can get, and the farmer will go along because he or she really wants one hundred thirty good acres. Sarah? Carlson longtime environmental advocate with the group. Practical farmers of Iowa gets annoyed by landowners who just want their rent check? We need to start calling landlord, slum lords and a lot of cases. They're just as guilty she says consider something else. Cover crops vegetation that farmers can plant in the off season to protect and enrich the soil. It's great for the environment and for your crops in the long run, but it costs money upfront, so tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run are reluctant to spend that money. Carson says some landlords do care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the Environment Bill. Does prairie strips pay for cover crops? But they're the exceptions. I mean even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord and I'm her daughter like I'm like what do you mean we're not going to do? Cover crops was wrong with you Steve. Brewer land. Brooker says he does see. Signs of things are changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up people who didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment, others are purely investors for them. The land is a financial asset, but they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected Dan Charles NPR

Green Desert Steve Brewer Dan Charles Lisa Solti Iowa Iowa State University NPR Minnesota Des Moines Iowa Dan Charles Npr Purdue University America New York President Trump Brooker Iowa. Georgia Carlson Sarah
Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

Environment: NPR

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

"Some of our biggest environmental problems like water, pollution and endangered wildlife caused by large scale farming, which means farmers are in a position to reduce environmental damage or at least mitigate it. Why don't they one reason? They often don't own much of the lands that they farm. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. Lisa Solti more loves nature I. Reached Her while she was visiting the forests of northern Minnesota I can only describe it as healing. All the stress of our world, and said she just forget about it when you're in one of these beautiful old growth for as she teaches ecology. At University, but when she moved to Iowa seventeen years ago, she struggled a little. She didn't have that same feeling standing in vast fields of corn. She wasn't hearing any birds or seeing many bugs all. I can here are the leaves of the rustling corn around me and not one other. Biological Noise at all right? It's you know they call it the green. Desert and there is a lot of land like this this year. Corn and soybeans covered land. That's equal in size to all the East Coast States from New York to Georgia. But solti more says it doesn't have to be a green desert. She's been studying what she calls. Prairie Strips stretches of land, running through fields of corner soybeans. We're farmers of set-aside may be percent of the land for tall, stemmed grasses and wildflowers. It's a different world there. She says birds singing their bees buzzing. They were crickets chirping. There was stuff hopping around. These bits of prairie also protect soil and water capture carbon dioxide from the air. For this to happen, though farmers have to be willing to give this land back to nature and many experts on farmland say it can make economic sense. One of them is Steve. Brewer President of People's company in Des Moines Iowa who buys sells and manages farmland across the country. One of the first things that we do and we do this on every farm that we managed as we run, these profitability maps. His company creates a detailed map of the. The farm what they spend and what they earn on every acre, and they're finding consistently that some of that land loses money. It's amazing about ten to fifteen percent of all the acres in Iowa aren't profitable. They're those hillsides with eroded soil spots where water collects in a big puddle after every rain. That is where they advise farmers to cut their losses may be bring back the prairie. Some farmers are doing this Kinda. Thing most are not. And one reason the farm experts say is an under appreciated fact about America's farmland farmers only owned about half their land the rest of it. They rent year-by-year from a collection of landlords. Linda pro copy from Purdue University has studied those landowners. There are very diverse group of people much more diverse than farmers. Many are elderly retired farmers now renting the land to the next generation, some inherited it from grandparents. You have younger urban people who co owned a piece of land with. Don't know anything about farming so when it comes to managing that Land Steve. Brewer from People's company says it often plays out like this. Let's say somebody owns one hundred sixty acres. Thirty of those acres are lousy for growing crops, but they'll rent out. The whole thing is a landowner you want. Those thirty acres farmed because you're trying to get rental revenue on every acre that you can get, and the farmer will go along because he or she really wants one hundred thirty good acres. Sarah Carlson longtime environmental advocate with the group practical farmers of Iowa gets annoyed by landowners who just want their rent check? We need to start calling landlord, slum lords and a lot of cases. They're just as guilty she says consider something else. Cover crops vegetation that farmers can plant in the season to protect and enrich the soil. It's great for the environment and for your crops in the long run, but it costs money upfront, so tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run are reluctant to spend that money. Carson says some landlords do care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the Environment Bill. Does prairie strips pay for cover crops? But they're the exceptions I mean. Even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord and I'm her daughter like I'm like. What do you mean we're not going to do? Cover crops was wrong with you Steve, brewer? Land Brooker says he does see signs of things are changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up people who didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment, others are purely investors for them. The land is a financial asset, but they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected. Dan Charles NPR

Lisa Solti People Iowa Steve NPR Dan Charles Des Moines Iowa Minnesota Dan Charles Npr Purdue University President Trump America New York Brooker Sarah Carlson Georgia Brewer Carson
Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding.

Fever Zimmer Vice Zamel Austria Vienna General Hospital Hungary Nets Zuma British Medical Journal Purdue University Kaletsky Zimbabwe Professor Garner Michael Melanson Berle Adjunct Professor Supervisor
"purdue university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

13:32 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And welcome back to coast to coast William fortune with us he holds a PhD in history from Purdue University specializing in military history as other areas of study include the American Civil War the history of technology he's a faculty fellow professor of history at the Montreat college near Asheville North Carolina she published more than fifty books I got to know bill when we started talking about his work one second after and then one year after as you talked about protecting the power grid a subject that is now so dear to me that I've joined with bill to try to get this thing fixed and resolved Mr Forster and welcome back to the program good to be with you tonight George you too my friend you know this mess we're going through with the corona virus is the tip of the iceberg if the grid goes down isn't it it's a wake up call it's a wake up call you know I just saw a program the other day remember alternately is dependent upon human personnel let us say we have a second rebound corona you go below a certain percentage of people showing up things start point Porsche and they fall apart quickly you know you had said we've got three hundred some billion people in this country and if the power grid goes down the systematic Cheryl that over a course of a year ninety percent of the population would be dead we're talking two hundred and seventy million people now already we've had some close to sixty thousand people die from the seasonal flu forty four forty some thousand people died apparently from the corona virus so I think some of those numbers are all mixed up but that's not nearly two hundred and seventy million people bill that could be a disaster and look at their reaction just two backs we're we're talking not one third of one percent but now but I think it's like one tenth of one percent of the population so taking up to one percent of the population you're at three million had my gosh one to societal order start to break down readers edges of it right now we're starting to see already that people are protesting it could turn very quickly into something far more significant and then with that social order and break down William are we anywhere is closer to getting the grid protected anything happening there oh boy you got your answer that's my answer we I was extremely optimistic six eight months ago what happened one one because president trump put forward a commission and there was a specific order for three or four departments of the federal government to within sixty days come up with comprehensive plans for dealing with the issue E. M. P. and also cybersecurity that has gone by the wayside now because of the current crisis all yeah we would you know George cross what we've been on this now for what ten years at least yeah yeah we've been so close several times twice because kia of Alaska blocked applies single world Obama well he claimed he was trying to do something he never did I really did think there from all of my god we're starting to turn the corner not because everything is gridlock and you know bill our enemies are thinking about this right now we're not put anything in their head they're thinking about this right now god yes M. if you're not least for one person in China or elsewhere who's just sitting there just laughing his **** off over tell us how much it's not like we've taken is taken for about the whole mess of fire ants and we're running around yeah we're doing the right things but still it's it's created a tremendous societal stress just at this level what is our buddy Peter pry up to these days I have not been in contact with Peter probably since our last show with him yeah but Peter and I I've been saying for years he's the godfather Peter is the one that has been ringing the warning bell for thirty a lot of the almost said something else yes don this is real it's live radio yeah thirty bloody years I'm trying to raise American awareness to the threat of the empty handed I'm not see how that man keeps his sanity at times by now we would be on our way to legislation funding look at the money we're spending god for bid we're happy to help you Americans just get body and businesses what we're talking about billions and billions and trillions of trillions of dollars the grand what did you say the grid would cost us a couple billion dollars well yeah Peter is optimistic with two to three billion I would say fifty dollars and well we've we've we've got the money to do that obviously if they found it for all these other things we could have found it for the for the grand yep and again I one word answer yup Tim Conway who hosts campfires program before I come on in Los Angeles was telling me tonight we do a little crossover promo before the network show starts coast to coast and he said you maybe now the only talk show hosts that just isn't giving up on this topic and I said I'm not I'm not gonna give up on it we are going to keep on this until we get it done because one day either the sun will hit us with the next flare and we've been lucky we've dodged a few lately or some rogue government is going to launch a nuke in the atmosphere to try to shut down our power grid in destroyed the American way of life I'm not concerned bill not looking at what's happening with the corona virus I'm not concerned about are retaliating in our defending ourselves as a nation I'm concerned about our internal structure falling apart like it is right now well you know I've discovered an incredibly good pride podcasts which all advertise call Paul civilizations very well done not hysterical and and no one is talking about the fact that the sun is a variable star a five to ten percent decrease even for a brief period of time well because worldwide famine and Angela too many things happening near simultaneously and if they do we are totally screwed yeah absolutely you know I can understand the frustration this administration is going through with this coronavirus I can understand the frustration of local governments and state governments but this is something that we have been talking about for years should've been taking care of years ago years ago we should be talking about this today well you know mark meadows is dot will be used to send a new position in the administration he used to represent my district I knew him personally he M. P. with the very top issue for but I'm not hearing it now they are so wrapped up a corona virus that other things of equal importance are on the back burner at the moment and every day it's on the back burner takes is one day closer to an arm again yes there's no question about it if something were to happen today in the form of an X. flare from the sun or some rogue or some governments decides you know what let's take advantage of the corona virus the Americans are all screwed up let's launch let's let's blow something up in the atmosphere they won't even know who sent it and let's shut them down we would be up a creek I mean already people are going crazy in most people staying home do you know closed down in the fact that if you don't have any electricity then you have no power known the your credit cards will work at the store well you know it's ten one now products mainly forty five days about that yep the data that we've been into a lockdown and for the first two or three weeks he was a bit like that Old World War two song we did it before and we can do it again and it's now starting to wear it for them and suppose it turned around and it goes for another forty five to sixty days and then even temporarily pulled the power and I have to go back to what I said at the start we are so dependent upon a very high turnout of workers in the electrical industry suppose they don't start showing up because they're sick or they just had it yup and it doesn't take much of a percentage before were somebody going into brownouts you can you imagine a brown out hitting downtown New York for six hours all my god or Los Angeles yeah just a nightmare of biblical proportions yeah I mean just A. I. N. in you and I have been warning we've been ringing the bell about this for years now you started it you're the reason I jumped on board and you know we've got to have somebody stop for a moment say folks this situation that's going on is a very crucial one but here's something that is devastating and could happen and we've got the money now we're spending it like crazy we might as well start you know fixing the grid and letting America go back and we can do it how long would it take to insulate the grid if they started in a month it would be about five to ten percent per year but we can't speed that up we could but the did key thing there is what I call trunk lines or you know what webs in the spider if we just get the first five or ten percent up and running that even if like a main trunk line is down we're still getting power and every town in America okay that makes a lot of sense yeah at least protect its needs its main infrastructure even if you might not be able to save everything initially save some of that the important stuff so it's not so devastating yes exactly William fortune is our guest we've got bill for just this hour we will take phone calls with them at the half so jump on board and we're talking about his work one second after one year after killer to this guy his website is linked up it coast to coast AM dot com do you talk to Newt Gingrich anymore we've got a network wise doing a podcast for our for I heart radio but the not as much as I wish I could see he was very vocal about this wasn't any news said that the security issues in the United States this is number one absolutely and when that guy said this is number one it's number one what is your take on this coronavirus situation I don't want to get in the conspiracy theory I don't know what to think at this point are you baffled yes but we're way overdue the latest major pandemic was sixty years ago with polio and I am old enough to remember the very ending the year of that and they came out with and you probably haven't sold Y. tainted vaccines with that monkey virus that they put in there yeah but we were locked out we were little children we were locked up for the summer everything was dead and then of course the great pandemic of eight nineteen eighteen nineteen ninety I'll always remember a picture William all the little kid in an iron long oh gosh spending the rest of his life which was not going to be too long in one of those little breathing tubes I would go absolutely crazy in one of those things here the iron lung where you were slipped inside which is essentially an oversize call for an and you were stuck in there for you for you for the rest of your life you're in there.

Purdue University Montreat college faculty fellow professor of history Asheville North Carolina
"purdue university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:29 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KGO 810

"William fortune with us she holds a PhD in history from Purdue University specializing in military history as other areas of study include the American Civil War the history of technology he's a faculty fellow professor of history at the Montreat college near Asheville North Carolina published more than fifty books I got to know bill when we started talking about his work one second after and then one year after as you talked about protecting the power grid a subject that is now so dear to me that I've joined with bill to try to get this thing fixed and resolved Mr Forster and welcome back to the program good to be with you tonight George you too my friend you know this mess we're going through with the corona virus is the tip of the iceberg if the grid goes down isn't it it's a wake up call it's a wake up call you now I just saw a program the other day remember alternately is dependent upon human personnel let us say we have a second rebound corona you go below a certain percentage of people showing up things start falling apart and they fall apart quickly you know you had said we've got three hundred some billion people in this country and if the power grid goes down the systematic show that over a course of a year ninety percent of the population would be dead we're talking two hundred and seventy million people now already we've had some close to sixty thousand people die from the seasonal flu forty four forty some thousand people have died apparently from the corona virus so I think some of those numbers are all mixed up but that's not nearly two hundred and seventy million people bill that could be a disaster and look at their reaction just two laps we're we're talking not only one third of one percent but now but I think it's like one tenth of one percent of the population so take it up to one percent of the population you're at three million had my gosh one to societal order start to break down meters edges of it right now we're starting to see already that people are protesting it could turn very quickly into something far more significant and then what that social order and break down William are we anywhere is closer to getting the grid protected anything happening there oh boy you got your answer that's my answer we I was extremely optimistic six eight months ago what happened one one because president trump put forward a commission and there was a specific order for three or four departments of the federal government to within sixty days come up with comprehensive plans for dealing with the issue of E. M. P. and also cyber security that has gone by the wayside now because of the current crisis well yeah we would you know George cross what we've been on this now for what ten years at least yeah yeah we've been so close several times twice went close of Alaska blocked applies single world Obama well he claimed he was trying to do something he never did I really did think there from all of my god we're starting to turn the corner right now because everything is gridlock and you know bill our enemies are thinking about this right now we're not put anything in their head they're thinking about this right now god yes M. if you're not least for one person in China or elsewhere who's just sitting there just laughing his **** off over Charles how much it's not like we've taken is taken for about the whole mess of fire ants and we're running around yeah we're doing the right things but still it's it's created a tremendous societal stress just at this level what is our buddy Peter pry up to these days I have not been in contact with Peter probably since our last show with him yeah but Peter and I I've been saying for years he's the godfather Peter is the one that has been ringing the warning bell for thirty a lot of the almost said something else yes this is real it's live radio yeah thirty bloody years I was trying to raise American awareness to the threat to be empty and I'm not see how that man keeps his sanity at times by now we would be on our way to legislation funding look at the money we're spending god for bid we're happy to help you Americans just get body and businesses what we're talking about billions and billions and trillions and trillions of dollars the grand what did you say the grid would cost us a couple billion dollars well yeah Peter is optimistic with two to three billion I would say fifty billion but what we want we've got the money to do that obviously if they found it for all these other things we could have found it for the for the grand yep and again I one more answer yup Tim Conway who hosts kafei's program before I come on in Los Angeles was telling me tonight we do a little crossover promo before the network show starts coast to coast and he said you'll maybe now the only talk show hosts that just isn't giving up on this topic and I said I'm not I'm not gonna give up on it we are going to keep on this until we get it done because one day either the sun will hit us with the next flare and we've been lucky we've dodged a few lately or some rogue government is going to launch a nuke in the atmosphere to try to shut down our power grid in destroyed the American way of life I'm not concerned bill not looking at what's happening with the corona virus I'm not concerned about are retaliating in our defending ourselves as a nation I'm concerned about our internal structure falling apart like it is right now well you know I've discovered an incredibly good pride podcasts which I'll advertise golf ball civilizations very well done not hysterical and in the lawn is talking about the fact that the sun is a variable star a five to ten percent decrease even for a brief period of time well because worldwide famine and this is the counselor to many things happening mere simultaneously and if they do we are totally screwed yeah absolutely Hey you know what I mean I can understand the frustration this administration is going through with this coronavirus I can understand the frustration of local governments and state governments but this is something that we have been talking about for years should've been taking care of years ago years ago we should be talking about this today well you know mark meadows is dot will be used to send a new position in the administration he used to represent my district I knew him personally he M. P. was a very top issue for but I'm not hearing it now they are so wrapped up a corona virus that other things of equal importance are on the back burner at the moment and every day it's on the back burner takes is one day closer to an arm again yes there's no question about it if something were to happen today in the form of an X. flare from the sun or some rogue or some governments decides you know what let's take advantage of the corona virus the Americans are all screwed up let's launch let's let's blow something up in the atmosphere they won't even know who sent it and let's shut them down we would be up a creek I mean already people are going crazy in most people staying home and you know close then and the fact that if you don't have any electricity then you have no power no one the your credit cards will work at the store well you know it's ten one now products mainly forty five days about that yep the data that we've been into a lockdown and for the first two or three weeks it was a bit like that Old World War two song we did it before and we can do it again and it's now starting to wear it for them and suppose it turned around and it goes for another forty five to sixty days and then even temporarily pulled the power and I have to go back to what I said at the start we are so dependent upon a very high turnout of workers in the electrical industry suppose they don't start showing up because they're sick or they just had it yep and it doesn't take much of a percentage before were somebody going into brownouts you can you imagine a brown out hitting downtown New York for six hours all my god or Los Angeles yeah just a nightmare of biblical proportions yeah I mean just A. I. N. in you and I have been warning we've been ringing the bell about this for years now you started it you're the reason I jumped on board and you know we've got to have somebody stop for a moment say folks this situation that's going on is a very crucial one but here's something that is devastating and could happen and we've got the money now we're spending it like crazy we might as well start you know fixing the grid and letting America go back and we can do it how long would it take to insulate the grid if they started in a month it would be about five to ten percent per year but we can't speed that up we could but the did key thing there is what I call trunk lines or you know what webs in the spider if we just get the first five or ten percent up and running that even if like a main trunk line is down we're still getting power and every town in America okay that makes a lot of sense at least protect its needs its main infrastructure even if you might not be able to save everything additionally save some of that the important stuff so it's not so devastating yes exactly William fortune is our guest we've got bill for just this hour we will take phone calls with them at the half so jump on board and we're talking about his work one second after one year after killer to this guy his website is linked up at coast to coast AM dot com do you talk to Newt Gingrich anymore we've got a network wise doing a podcast for our for I heart radio but the not as much as I wish I could see he was very vocal about this was any news said that the security issues in the United States this is number one absolutely and when that guy said this is number one it's number one what is your take on this coronavirus situation I don't want to get in the conspiracy theory I don't know what to think at this point are you baffled yes and but we're way overdue are the last major pandemic was sixty years ago with polio and I am old enough to remember the very end being the year of that and they came out with and you probably haven't sold Y. tainted vaccines with that monkey virus that they put in there yeah but we were locked up we were little children we were locked up for the summer everything was dead and then of course the great pandemic of eight nineteen eighteen nineteen ninety all always remember a picture William all the little kid in an iron long oh gosh spending the rest of his life which was not going to be too long in one of those little breathing tubes I would go absolutely crazy in one of those things here the iron lung where you were slipped inside which is essentially an oversize call from and you were stuck in there for you for you for the rest of your.

William fortune Purdue University Montreat college Asheville North Carolina faculty fellow professor of history
"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

13:32 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And welcome back to coast to coast William fortune worth as he holds a PhD in history from Purdue University specializing in military history as other areas of study include the American Civil War the history of technology he's a faculty fellow professor of history at the Montreat college near Asheville North Carolina published more than fifty books I got to know bill when we started talking about his work one second after and then one year after as you talked about protecting the power grid a subject that is now so dear to me that I've joined with bill to try to get this thing fixed and resolved Mr fortune walking back to the program good to be with you tonight George you too my friend you know this mess we're going through with the corona virus is the tip of the iceberg if the grid goes down isn't it it's a wake up call it's a wake up call you now I just thought program the other day remember alternately is dependent upon human personnel let us say we have a second rebound corona you go below a certain percentage of people showing up thanks Starpoint then they fall apart quickly you know you have said we've got three hundred some million people in this country and if the power grid goes down the systematic show that over a course of a year ninety percent of the population would be dead we're talking two hundred and seventy million people now already we've had some close to sixty thousand people die from the seasonal flu forty four forty some thousand people have died apparently from the corona virus so I think some of those numbers are all mixed up but that's not nearly two hundred and seventy million people bill that could be a disaster and look at their reaction just two laps we're talking not only one third of one percent but now but I think it's like one tenth of one percent of the population so take that the one percent of the population you're at three million head my gosh one to societal order start to break down meters edges of it right now we're starting to see already that people are protesting it could turn very quickly into something far more significant and then what about social order and break down William are we anywhere is closer to getting the grid protected anything happening there oh boy that your answer that's my answer we I was extremely optimistic six eight months ago what happened one one because president trump put forward a commission and there was a specific order for three or four departments of the federal government to within sixty days come up with comprehensive plans for dealing with the issue of E. M. P. and also cyber security that has gone by the wayside now because of the current crisis all yeah we would you know George Wallace what we've been on this now for what ten years at least yeah yeah we've been so close several times twice went close he via allafrica blocked by a single vote Obama well he claimed he was trying to do something he never did I really did think there from all of my god we're starting to turn the corner we're not because everything is gridlock and you know bill our enemies are thinking about this right now we're not put anything in their head they're thinking about this right now god yes M. if you're not least for one person in China or elsewhere who's just sitting there just laughing as pot all over how much it's not like we've taken is taken for about the whole mess of fire ants and we're running around yeah we're doing the right things but still it's it's created a tremendous societal stress just at this level what is our buddy Peter pry up to these days I have not been in contact with Peter probably since our last show with him yeah but Peter and I I've been saying for years he's the godfather Peter is the one that has been ringing the warning bell for thirty blood and he almost said something else yeah tell the teacher it's live radio yeah thirty bloody years I'm trying to raise American awareness to the threat of the empty handed I'm not see how that man keeps his sanity at times by now we would be on our way to legislation funding look at the money we're spending god for bid we're happy in the help of Americans just get body and businesses what we're talking about billions and billions and trillions and trillions of dollars the grand what did you say the grid would cost us a couple billion dollars well yeah Peter is optimistic with two to three billion I would say fifty dollars and well we won't want we've got the money to do that obviously if they found it for all these other things we could have found it for the for the grand yep and again I one word answer yup Tim Conway who hosts kafei's program before I come on in Los Angeles was telling me tonight we do a little crossover promo before the network show starts coast to coast in he said you'll maybe now the only talk show hosts that just isn't giving up on this topic and I said I'm not I'm not gonna give up on it we are going to keep on this until we get it done because one day either the sun will hit us with an extra layer and we've been lucky we've dodged a few lately or some rogue government is going to launch a nuke in the atmosphere to try to shut down our power grid in destroyed the American way of life I'm not concerned bill not looking at what's happening with the corona virus I'm not concerned about are retaliating in our defending ourselves as a nation I'm concerned about our internal structure falling apart like it is right now well you know I'm discovered incredibly good pride podcasts withdrawal advertise golf balls civilizations very well done not hysterical and in the lawn is talking about the fact that the sun is a variable star a five to ten percent decrease even for a brief period of time well because worldwide famine and pendula too many things happening near simultaneously and if they do we are totally screwed yeah absolutely you know I can understand the frustration this administration is going through with this coronavirus I can understand the frustration of local governments and state governments but this is something that we have been talking about for years should have been taken care of years ago years ago we should be talking about this today well you know mark meadows is dot will be used to send a new position in the administration he used to represent my district I knew him personally he M. P. with the very top issue for but I'm not hearing it now they are so wrapped up a corona virus that other things of equal importance are on the back burner at the moment and every day it's on the back burner takes is one day closer to an arm again yes there's no question about it if something were to happen today in the form of an X. flare from the sun or some rogue or some governments decides you know what let's take advantage of the corona virus the Americans are all screwed up let's launch let's let's blow something up in the atmosphere they won't even know who sent it and let's shut them down we would be up a creek I mean already people are going crazy in most people staying home and you know close them in the fact that if you don't have any electricity then you have no power known the your credit cards will work at the store well you're not it's ten one now products mainly forty five days about that yep the data that we've been into a lockdown and for the first two or three weeks he was a bit like that Old World War two song we did it before and we can do it again and it's now starting to wear them and suppose it turned around and it goes for another forty five to sixty days and then even temporarily pulled the power and I have to go back to what I said at the start we are so dependent upon a very high turnout of workers in the electrical industry suppose they don't start showing up because they're sick or they just had it yep and it doesn't take much of a percentage before were somebody going into brown outs you can you imagine a brown out hitting downtown New York for six hours all my god or Los Angeles yeah just a nightmare a biblical proportions yeah I mean just an in you and I have been warning we've been ringing the bell about this for years now you started it you're the reason I jumped on board and you know we've got to have somebody stop for a moment say folks this situation that's going on is a very crucial one but here's something that is devastating and could happen and we've got the money now we're spending it like crazy we might as well start you know fixing the grid and letting America go back and we can do it how long would it take to insulate the grid if they started in a month it would be about five to ten percent per year but we can't speed that up we could but to do keeping marriage well what I call trunk lines or you know what weapon the spider if we just get the first five or ten percent up and running that even if like a main trunk line is down we're still getting power and every town in America okay that makes a lot of sense at least protect its needs its main infrastructure even if you might not be able to save everything initially save some of that the important stuff so it's not so devastating yes exactly William fortune is our guest we've got bill for just this hour we will take phone calls with them at the half so jump on board and we're talking about his work one second after one year after killer to this guy his website is linked up at coast to coast AM dot com do you talk to Newt Gingrich anymore we've got a network wise doing a podcast for for I heart radio but the not as much as I wish I could see he was very vocal about this was any news said bad of the security issues in the United States this is number one absolutely and when that guy said this is number one it's number one what is your take on this coronavirus situation I don't want to get in the conspiracy theory I don't know what to think at this point are you baffled yes but we're way overdue are the last major pandemic was sixty years ago with polio and I am old enough to remember the very end being the year of that and they came out with and you probably haven't sold Y. tainted vaccines with that monkey virus that they put in there yeah but we were locked up we were little children we were locked up for the summer everything was dead and then of course the great pandemic of eight nineteen eighteen nineteen ninety all always remember a picture William all the little kid in an iron long oh gosh spending the rest of his life which was not going to be too long in one of those little breathing tubes I would go absolutely crazy in one of those things we have the iron lung where you were slipped inside which is essentially an oversize call from and you were stuck in there for you for you for the rest of your life you're in there right.

Purdue University Montreat college Asheville North Carolina William fortune faculty fellow professor of history
"purdue university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"William fortune worth as he holds a PhD in history from Purdue University specializing in military history as other areas of study include the American Civil War the history of technology he's a faculty fellow professor of history at the Montreat college near Asheville North Carolina published more than fifty books I got to know bill when we started talking about his work one second after and then one year after as you talked about protecting the power grid a subject that is now so dear to me that the I've joined with bill to try to get this thing fixed and resolved Mr Forster and walking back to the program good to be with you tonight George you too my friend you know this mess we're going through with the corona virus is the tip of the iceberg if the grid goes down isn't it it's a wake up call it's a wake up call you now I just saw a program the other day remember alternately is dependent upon human person now let us say we have a second rebound corona you go below a certain percentage of people showing up thanks Starpoint and they fall apart quickly you know you had said we've got three hundred some billion people in this country and if the power grid goes down the systematic show that over a course of a year ninety percent of the population would be dead we're talking two hundred and seventy million people now already we've had some close to sixty thousand people die from the seasonal flu forties forty some thousand people died apparently from the corona virus so I think some of those numbers are all mixed up but that's not nearly two hundred and seventy million people bill that could be a disaster and look at their reaction just to that we're we're talking not one third of one percent but now but I think it's like one tenth of one percent of the population so taking up to one percent of the population you're at three million head my gosh one to societal order start to break down reduce edges of it right now we're starting to see already that people are protesting it could turn very quickly into something far more significant and then with that social order and break down William are we anywhere is closer to getting the grid protected anything happening there oh boy that your answer that's my answer we I was extremely optimistic six eight months ago what happened one one because president trump put forward a commission and there was a specific order for three or four departments of the federal government to within sixty days come up with comprehensive plans for dealing with the issue E. M. P. and also cyber security that has gone by the wayside now because of the current crisis well yeah we would you know George cross what we've been on this now for what ten years at least yup yeah we've been so close several times twice because of allafrica blocked by a single vote Obama well he claimed he was trying to do something he never did I really did think there from all of my god we're starting to turn the corner we're not because everything is gridlock and you know bill our enemies are thinking about this right now we're not put anything in their head they're thinking about this right now god yes M. if you're not least for one person in China or elsewhere who's just sitting there just laughing his **** off over shows how much it's not like we've taken is taken for about the whole mess of fire ants and we're running around yeah we're doing the right things but still it's it's created a tremendous societal stress just at this level what is our buddy Peter pry up to these days I have not been in contact with Peter probably since our last show with him yeah but Peter and I I've been saying for years he's the godfather Peter is the one that has been ringing the warning bell for thirty a lot of the almost said something else yeah tell the teacher it's live radio yeah thirty bloody years I'm trying to raise American awareness to the threat to be empty and I'm not see how Batman keeps this Saturday at times by now we would be on our way to legislation funding look at the money we're spending god for bid we're happy to help you Americans just get body and businesses what we're talking about billions and billions and trillions of dollars yes trillions of dollars the grand what did you say the grid would cost us a couple billion dollars well yeah Peter is them the mistake with two to three billion I would say fifty billion well we won't we will we've got the money to do that obviously if they found it for all these other things we could have found it for the for the grand yep and again I one word answer yup Tim Conway who hosts kafei's program before I come on in Los Angeles was telling me tonight we do a little crossover promo before the network show starts coast to coast and he said you maybe now the only talk show hosts that just isn't giving up on this topic and I said I'm not I'm not gonna give up on it we are going to keep on this until we get it done because one day either the sun will hit us with the next flare and we've been lucky we've dodged a few lately or some rogue government is going to launch a nuke in the atmosphere to try to shut down our power grid in destroyed the American way of life I'm not concerned bill not looking at what's happening with the corona virus I'm not concerned about are retaliating in our defending ourselves as a nation I'm concerned about our internal structure falling apart like it is right now well you know I've discovered an incredibly good pride podcasts which I'll advertise called false civilizations very well done not hysterical and and the one is talking about the fact that the sun is a variable star a five to ten percent decrease even for a brief period of time well because worldwide famine and thanks let too many things happening near simultaneously and if they do we are totally screwed yep absolutely you know what I mean I can understand the frustration this administration is going through with this coronavirus I can understand the frustration of local governments and state governments but this is something that we have been talking about for years should've been taking care of years ago years ago we should be talking about this today well you know mark meadows is dot will be used to send a new position in the administration he used to represent my district I knew him personally he M. P. with the very top issue for but I'm not hearing it now they are so wrapped up a corona virus that other things of equal importance are on the back burner at the moment and every day it's on the back burner takes is one day closer to an arm again yes there's no question about it if something were to happen today in the form of an X. flare from the sun or some rogue or some governments decides you know what let's take advantage of the corona virus the Americans are all screwed up let's launch let's let's blow something up in the atmosphere they won't even know who sent it and let's shut them down we would be up a creek I mean already people are going crazy in most people staying home and you know closed down in the fact that if you don't have any electricity then you have no power no one the your credit cards will work at the store well you know it's then what now proximate Li forty five days about that yep did that that we've been into a lockdown and for the first two or three weeks he was a bit like that Old World War two song we did it before and we can do it again and it's now starting to wear thin and supposed to turn around and it goes for another forty five to sixty days and then even temporarily pulled the power and I have to go back to what I said at the start we are so dependent upon a very high turnout of workers in the electrical industry suppose they don't start showing up because they're sick or they just had it yep and it doesn't take much of a percentage before resuming going into brownouts you can you imagine a brown out hitting downtown New York for six hours all my god or Los Angeles yeah just a nightmare of biblical proportions yeah I mean just a a in in you and I have been warning we've been ringing the bell about this for years now you started it you're the reason I jumped on board and you know we've got to have somebody stop for a moment say folks this situation that's going on is a very crucial one but here's something that is devastating and could happen and we've got the money now we're spending it like crazy we might as well start you know fixing the grid and letting America go back and we can do it how long would it take to insulate the grid if they started in a month it would be about five to ten percent per year but we can't speed that up we could but the duty thing there is what I call trunk lines or you know what weapon the spider if we did get the first five or ten percent up and running that even if like a main trunk line is down we're still getting power and every town in America okay that makes a lot of sense at least protect its needs its main infrastructure even if you might not be able to save everything additionally save some of that the important stuff so it's not so devastating yes exactly William fortune is our guest we've got bill for just this hour we will take phone calls with them at the half so jump on board and we're talking about his work one second after one year after killer to this guy his website is linked up at coast to coast AM dot com do you talk to Newt Gingrich anymore we've got IT network wise doing a podcast for a for I heart radio but the not as much as I wish I could see he was very vocal about this was any newt said bad of the security issues in the United States this is number one absolutely and when that guy said this is number one it's number one what is your take on this coronavirus situation I don't want to get in the conspiracy theory I don't know what to think at this point are you baffled yes but we're way overdue the latest major pandemic was sixty years ago with polio and I am old enough to remember the very end being the year of that and they came out with and you probably haven't sold Y. tainted vaccines with that monkey virus that they put in there yeah but we were locked up we were little children we were locked up for the summer everything was dead and then of course the great pandemic of eight nineteen eighteen nineteen ninety I'll always remember a picture William all the little kid in an.

William fortune Purdue University Montreat college Asheville North Carolina faculty fellow professor of history
Bitcoin College Radio - Mo Sadoghi

Bitcoin Radio

08:06 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin College Radio - Mo Sadoghi

"What's up my man. Welcome to the show dude. Hello hello everyone. Hi Ashley. High Joe's wonderful to be here absolutely for everybody who I obviously just gave them a very brief introduction moe you're an assistant professor at UC Davis. Right yes I'm faculty at UC Davis and Iran Expo Lab and absolutely and as I was saying introduction. You may got a chance to hear that It's you know we're in a place where blockchain the this technology is becoming a useful. It's becoming it's not just a speculative ICO craziness of two thousand seventeen like there's really important incredible people working with the technology governments. You know there's different agencies and and people that have been doing things outside of the blockchain space whether in tech or not including this and you know you're a perfect example that being on faculty at UC Davis and putting yourself position to to take on this role as a Ambassador for the CRYPTO space in the blockchain space. You know it's it's probably got a lot of pressure on you. Well when you look at research you don't ever take on Sort of a mature technology always gonNA take that. There's a lot of associated and started several years ago The picture was not as credible as you kind of express than it is today. So it's definitely a excitement of taking that risk and have been happy to be part of that at UC Davis absolutely. So let's first start off with this before we get into your background Let's talk about what exactly is the resilient DB DOT com website? What's it doing what we're what are we looking at here so I could? Maybe perhaps before that I could give you a little bit introduction of Harvey or is it sort of Jordan that brought us into resilient and resilient dot com. Is that for the last ten years or so I've been looking into transactions space and transaction all know what it is the you'll make a credit card transaction. You go to Walmart you go to Amazon. You buy something everything that we do realize around the concept of transaction and transaction. It's reminder of go back in the days a simple contract so when people want to engage in into any form of transaction they're really writing contract and transaction in computer science is the digital form of The old age a concept of the contract. So we've been looking at paradigm shift in the last decade is that how do we look at the changes in hardware? That changes in the application needs in order to improve The the efficiency of transaction processing. And what are the new application that could result from this in Dover and but in the last few years there has been the move and the push of this idea of the cryptocurrency. What if you look at digital market that is surrounded around this crypto and also the way we are going to look at the blockchain is no longer as we're going to put our trust into a single entity like like a single bank but we want to be able to at a level of a society? We want to be able to have what I consider those ideal of cornerstone of our societies. Democrat is Asian and decentralisation so now how do the form does digital contract in very democratic and decentralized way so that's exciting problems that we started looking at it also kind of looking at it as a secure transaction as a kind of a transaction that brings accountability trust and integrity without the need of relying on essential entity so that has been what initiated or research and as part of that we have In Expo Lab my research team at UC Davis behaved launched our fabric or blocking fabric. Which is a global scale Resilient blockchain fabric and called resilient. So that's that's where we are right now. Yeah by the way I really love the name too. I think it's really relevant and You know it stands out especially in the space so as as this process is kind of taking taking place How have the students really transformed this idea? Like as you as you noted and of course I don't Wanna get ahead of ourselves because it's actually one of the questions I have down the road but when he didn't know noted that process. You're right like you guys didn't happen yesterday. This has been going on. What you guys have been building's been going on for some time like what has that that that student. How was that student transform? What are you looking at these days when it when it comes to the people who are getting involved in this kind of show a lot of a funny story about the name has since as you mentioned it so we have every entering a new space and technology is there's going to be resistance and especially the risk of the technology is the more resistant you get? I had a pleasure working about ten or so graduate and undergraduate student along this journey and the one thing that we have Encounter over and over again the rejection of our papers the rejection of our ideas and so the resilient. Abo was kind of is that our team has become so resilient in building this blockchain fabric and. That's what actually the name of is that not only did. The fabric has become resilient but also the team has become precise in sort of pushing through this Yeah pushing pushing through from every aspect and we'd be successful at many fronts and we're still pushing and others. So that's that's how the name came came about and and you see that transformation into students is because it's part of it is even have to educate research committee. Not Everybody is aware of what the blockchain is. It's it's not a traditional topic so the student needs to educate himself. They need to educate the community and While this education sort of rippled down to other part of the university is that this is writing for example Move Spell. Come into the picture. In sort of empowering that the grass root is not just in computer science but sort of campus wide in order to get to that education of the auction as well too for sure. And I'm a firm believer like in and I'll say in this goes with mouse brought to you know when you find personalized story in a kind of Esprit de Corps to an extent of why you exist in your name you know I mean mouse ball stories a little bit different dalen Patrick and Gaylon walking with an actual mouse belt cord around his waist belt You know I it stands by the same thing I love watching people pour their heart and soul in these to these entities these these projects to these ideas and when they when their own. It seems like they're always far more successful as the best way to put it all right. So let's go. Let's go into a little bit about you. Who are you what did you do? How'd you get into this so I graduate? I did my phd at the University of Toronto. I graduate in two thousand thirteen and the focus of my research back then was I have sort of stream of data coming in and how to use modern harbor to do the analysis for efficiency and then from there I went to. Ibm Research and I was a IBM Watson in Westchester groups on Heights. That's sort of the headquarters of research and there are more and more came into the problem of transaction and Sudan in particular I looked at the problem of. How do I unify At an analysis the analytics with the transaction in a very general than unified way so and so that has continued at IBM. So I was there for about four years. Then I was faculty at Purdue University and that's where we really got into the space of large-scale disabled transaction and by the time I had a rich. Uc Davis you've already sort of planting seed of Looking at secure transaction or the blockchain and the moment sort of join a UC Davis that has been the The main

Uc Davis IBM Ashley Sudan JOE Iran Expo Lab Davis Purdue University Assistant Professor University Of Toronto Jordan Dover Research Committee Ibm Watson Walmart Westchester
"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Purdue University announced a partnership with modern states education alliance last week that will let students save as much as eleven thousand dollars he also talked about national is going on in the number of universities around the country so it's it's something that a number of schools are connecting with Gerry Dick with inside Indiana business tells ninety three W. Y. B. C.'s Tony cats it's important to get and keep talented people so we don't get passed up by big time employers like Amazon and he was driving a hundred five miles an hour in a fifty five mile an hour zone say state police they arrested the driver who they say had a point eleven blood alcohol content while driving on the Indiana toll road Saturday night the legal limit this point oh eight I'm John Herrick on the level on the go and on Twitter at ninety three W. Y. B. C. and W. I. B. C. dot com now here's the forecast from the American standard heating weather center with Ashley brown overnight areas of fog will develop use caution as you're traveling out will definitely those low beam lights for that Tuesday morning commute will see showers on and off throughout the day on Tuesday temperatures in the mid to upper forties custom truck A. T. meteorologist Ashley brown ninety three W. why BC it's often said that the only sure things in life are death and taxes but there's definitely a third one and that's change life is full of inevitable changes and your success and happiness can depend on how you respond to changes you face I'm so trump attorney and CEO the domestic litigation firm Cordell and Cordell we help men deal with the light changes triggered by divorce such as child custody and property division among many others but life changes also occur after divorce these changes come in parts of the existing court order here relevant for harder to follow in either case you need the support of a trusted legal partner talk to us a Cordell and Cordell we're a partner men can count on and that never changes contact investor relations firm of Kordell and Kordell to schedule.

Purdue University Gerry Dick W. Y. B. C. Tony Amazon John Herrick Twitter Ashley brown attorney Cordell Kordell Indiana A. T. CEO partner
Causality 101 with Robert Ness

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Causality 101 with Robert Ness

"I am on the line with Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert is a machine learning research engineer at Gammel on and an instructor at northeastern North Eastern University Robert and I met at the last nerves conference where he had an accepted poster session around his paper integrating hitting Markov processes with structural. Causal Modeling Enables counterfactual inference in complex systems which he also presented at the black doc in a in a workshop This kicked off a bunch of great conversations between the two of US leading ultimately to collaboration. That we'll talk a little bit about in this conversation. Robert thanks so much for joining me on the Tuomo. Ai podcast thanks for having me Sam. You're injured us. It makes me think I should've. It came up with more clever name for that paper. You know what a lot of papers we talk about on. This show are quite the mouthful so yours is no exception exception Maybe someone will build a model. You know that. seeks to determine a inverse correlation or correlation between the lengthiness papers the title and It's number of citations or something like that. Let's set that aside for now and have you spent a few minutes introducing yourself. How did you get started in machine learning what piqued your interest You know ultimately will be spending a lot of time here talking about causality. How did you come to Become interested in that you know my path to machine learning was a bit. I'd say unconventional I started off working In Asia Tanna specifically I was the degree at Hopkins in International Studies and was planning adding to pursue a degree in economic In economics focusing on economic development I got involved with some Internet companies out in Beijing That got me into coding. And database is in data in general and I decided I was interested in in debt in that and went to apply for programs in statistics. Particularly with a focus on computational statistics I back to the states came back to the states went to Purdue University to do my PhD in stats My PhD work was on causal. Inference graphical models Basically how to learn causal models from data particularly in the context of systems systems biology and from then after I graduated I went to trade industry. Got It now. We hear very frequently folks refer to their path into machine learning as unconventional are indirect In your case you came into an interesting gaming net leads you to apply live for Or into Grad School for statistic. What was that particular connection really? It's when you're on the back end of an APP and you're looking at the data and you're realizing that there's a lot of insights to be had if only we could model this data and turn it into some service on the front end Um I realized I mean this was you know people had were just kinda starting to talk about data science and then Hell Varian had just recently came out and said I said that's the districts is the new sexiest will. I can't remember the exact quote was pick your Metaphor Metaphor New Black statistics is the new. I don't know Rockstar and so And Yeah that's that's kind of why pivoted to do the two stats in machine. Learning I guess through stats view. May people might argue whether or not stats machine. Learning Are same thing. Might the problems that I was working on my PhD or using Publicity graphical models so which has strong roots in artificial intelligence. So that was my introduction machine learning. Yeah one of the things that's come up in our conversations about causality and The work that you're doing with your courses is the idea that it historically talking about causality has been the you know the domain of statisticians and in Yeah folks like economists And that a lot of that conversation is inaccessible or isn't really tailored to do the needs of developers and data scientists machine learning engineers. I didn't realize all the time we were talking about that. That your background wasn't economics. You you have some of the exposure to the way that causality is has been traditionally kind of us and talked about. Maybe I guess I'll just use this as a segue to Kind of opening up the floor to to ask you. What how do you define causality? The interesting thing about causality may be part of why maybe is a challenging thing to deal with particularly for statisticians I would say is that. It's very difficult to talk about it without finding yourself having a philosophical conversation and you know so going you know this is something that fill in. What is the causality? These in that philosophers have been wrestling with through the ages. Right hume had has counterfactual definition initial possibility. That's you know a follows from being had a not happy would not have happened But you know philosophers going back to the Buddha all kind of take their stab at what is caused -ality so there's a different philosophical arguments for causality and what it means I think from a practical standpoint. What most people mean when they say? causal inference is. They mean the estimation of Causal Effects. So if you're safer example at a tech company and you want to run some kind of experiment about the about whether a feature will drive a click or some other key performance indicator or metric. You're asking you. Your experiment is essentially trying to get at the question of what is the causal effect of this feature on this outcome and you'll be using the assumptions and methods from Statistics to estimate assuming Air Assumptions are valid those causal effects. But when we've talked in machine learning where now hearing you know. So I hadn Europe's like you said This talk about having agents that can understand that. Causal Structure of the world and and that causes allergies essential from moving from system one system to cognition day Pearl was very preeminent. Causal inference researcher talks about causal reasoning in in terms of free will and the ability to understand Dan intention and so there are definitely definitely a lot of angles to tackle this question from the perspective of artificial intelligence is that you know people who are running experiments in facebook. Netflix are not really thinking about

Causal Effects Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert United States AI North Eastern University Tuomo Purdue University Gammel Netflix Research Engineer Hell Varian Instructor Grad School Rockstar Beijing Asia Facebook Pearl Hume
National Archives removes exhibit that altered images of Women's March

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

National Archives removes exhibit that altered images of Women's March

"Photos from the twenty seventeen women's March are on display at the National Archives but they've been altered to leave out some controversial messages the exhibit is intended to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteenth amendment and women's right to vote but a closer look at the images on display showing waves of crowds along Pennsylvania Avenue for the two thousand seventeen women's March you'll see the parts of the image have been blurred out the National Archives tells The Washington Post yes words on signs held by mergers referencing women's anatomy or criticizing president trump or blurred the reason archive spokeswoman Miriam Kleiman said in a statement quote as a non partisan non political federal agency we blurred references to the president's name on some posters so as not to engage in current political controversy a history professor at Purdue University wait in telling the post the decision shows it's okay to silence women's voices Melissa held

National Archives The Washington Post Donald Trump Miriam Kleiman President Trump Professor Melissa Purdue University
Can We Win the War on Cockroaches?

BrainStuff

03:06 min | 2 years ago

Can We Win the War on Cockroaches?

"Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel I'm here with great news. Cockroaches are quickly becoming resistant to several different insecticides. All at the same time. Cool cool cool one Michael SCHARF. A professor in the Department of Entomology at Purdue University along with his team found these pests are developing cross resistance to multiple classes of exterminators insecticides insecticides. The team's work was published in the June twenty nineteen issue of scientific reports. The problem is that each class of insecticides works differently to kill these his creditors so exterminators frequently mix them or switch them up to combat infestations. Cockroaches are resistant to multiple insecticides. Well you can see where this is going. Sheriff and his team used apartment buildings in Indiana and Illinois. That had infestations of German cockroaches as their experimental grounds I because it is very glamorous. They caught some of the roaches and tested them to see which insecticides had the lowest resistance on the roaches low resistance Austin spins the roaches would be more vulnerable to the treatments which scientists went onto us for six months. Sharf said in a press. Release if you have the ability to test just the roaches. I and picnic insecticide. That has low resistance that ups the odds but even then we had trouble controlling populations the researchers rotated -tated three different insecticides. That method kept the roach population stable over six months. Meaning it neither increased or decreased when they mixed to insecticides leads. The Roach population flourished according to the press release flourished being just about the last verb. Anyone wants to hear when talking about cockroaches when the the team used just one insecticide for the entire six months and the roaches had low resistance to that particular insecticide they were nearly wiped out. Well great right not really. Because of even ten percent of the roaches had resistance to that insecticide. The population would increase. Sharf said quote four to six fold in just one generation ration-. We didn't have a clue that something like that could happen this fast during this test. The Roach is also developed resistance to several other kinds of insecticides decides even if the new generations had never been exposed to them before so now what Scharff said he recommends combating roaches with more than chemical warfare including traps and vacuums quote. Some of these methods are more expensive than using only insecticides but if those insecticides aren't going to control or eliminate a population you're just throwing money away oh and hey you've probably heard that

Sharf Scharff Michael Scharf Vogel Lauren Professor Indiana Purdue University Department Of Entomology Austin Illinois Six Months Ten Percent
"purdue university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

12:05 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"From Purdue University. Specializing in military history is secondary areas of study included, the American civil war in the history of technology. He has published more than fifty books and has been focusing on threats to our world's infrastructure for years, one second after came out in two thousand eleven one year after two thousand sixteen forty eight hours, just several months ago, and Mr. force, June, one of our favorite guests and a dear friend, welcome back to coast to coast. Pleasure George how you doing? I'm doing wonderful. I hope you are too. You're still out there in Nashville. Absolutely God's country, we might be there again for another show next year. Yeah. Can you show kicking that around? It's, it's such a great city for us. I mean they they fill the stands and everything else. So it's perfect place. It'd be great to have you out here again. Not love the love the people to love the people. Tell me about forty eight hours, the book, okay? Forty eight hours. I start with that one. I did three books related to EMP as, as you mentioned, one second after one year, after and then the final day publisher wanted more. But I really felt the whole issue of EMP is I wrote anything beyond that it just starts dragging out. I wanted to work at something different initially the work was on C, M A, which you and I've talked about before solar storms. But there's a real nasty one out there called C, P, E coma proton emission or ejection that if it hits an a certain sequence. Would become an isolation event and the whole forty-eight hours means we have forty eight hours of notice that this is going to have it. Well, yeah. Hence the title and the title, and it has a plot device. It's a real threat. I don't want audiences worrying. Oh my gosh. Got forty eight hours starting tomorrow. But question became what would we do individually and societally if we knew we might be at the end game? I mean, forty eight hours, left some people would survive if they're in shelters. And then the plot moves into who gets to use the shelters naturally shelters built for what's called continuity government. The power elitists. Which in one sense, we understand if the sirens, go off, and there's like two hundred missiles interacting coming in Ecorse, they're going to get in there. There's going to be time to deal with the rest of us. If you have forty eight hours in this hundreds of thousands of people scanning at the gates into these place places insane. What about us? But what's left after that, Bill? A full blown C T E could be boy. We're throwing around a lot of acronyms, this warning could be an alien extinction level event. It's a pretty well, wipe out everything on the planet, and we'd be at a restart there is some fierce Hussein, maybe it was not astronaut and at. Two more. You've invented a new word. We could extrapolate. Asteroid and maybe it wasn't pastor is triggered some of the massive extinctions in the past. But instead, a C P. So. That's, that's what, what do you hear a whistle in the background, well, actually twenty alarm, which is the sound of a flying saucer landing it is trying to break into your house. It's like it's my cellphone telling me you better be awake by now. Yeah. You don't wanna miss in. It is three in the morning where you are right down three fourteen. So the story I had the lead in with you about what happened in South America. Have you been following that story? Yes. Tens of millions of people left in the dark power was out for fourteen hours. They're not sure exactly what happened. I'm going to tell you what my guesses some nation is experimenting with hacking and shutting down power grids. That's my guess, fully agree. You think so? Absolutely, yes. Yep. It's safest thing the succumb and that is another unfortunate part of all of this scenario, the hacking possibilities of just shutting down the power grid by getting into it. The. Given the honour two months ago by the FBI to attend a conference Downey's down by Raleigh one hundred and fifty agents whose primary task is related to cyber security issues and. I'm actually feeling a little bit optimism and times in the past you and I have talked and it's been like is anybody doing anything? And we were both and no right. Well, FBI and others. I got another one, I could tell you about later, the taken seriously. In fact, the deputy director of the FBI, and she said to the audience, if we do not do our job read fortunes, book, because you're going to find out how your families are going to be living today. After did you wake them off, maybe help hopefully through us, but was you that did this? But did they finally say we've heard about William force chin? We've read his books, this is real stuff. I don't want to wrap you researched myself and say it was made it was it's been a lot of people. It's george. How many people do you reach, you know, if your program and we've been talking about for years? Doc, Dr Peter Paul Ryan, and the commission, a couple members of congress who encompass things like Mark meadows, will you got Peter prior on our program, and well, he's been on Friday. The subject, and I mean, that guy's the godfather, how close are we the legislation, first of all about being this done? Finally finally, finally. The former president. Put out some executive order related to see 'em me that was to use. Another acronym. Hewer bs. All right. The current President Trump put out, I think you and I even talked about it. Back in March. He put out a really powerful executive water ordering various branches of government to respond within ninety to one hundred twenty days to start setting up initial plans. So I mean they're not actually out there, heart, adding it, yet and doing the things that are necessary, but I do know somebody in the administration, and it's the president is eighteen is very seriously. The problem is. Gridlock on everything on everything, and the snake chasing its tail while the real stuff that needs to be taking care of is being ignored, and this is one of the biggest, they need to look at what happened in South America last weekend in say, this could be us. Here's our wakeup call. Thank God we didn't get hit. But we need to fix this and fix this right now because this is real well now whether somebody hack them or something else happened who knows at this point. But the, the, the part is it went down. It looks like a hack. Let's go to American territory, put the Rico is American territory, and it's been almost two years. There's still parts of Puerto Rico without electricity because of the hurricanes. Yes. And the bureaucrat bureaucratic stupidity. Blundering arrogance remember, the mayor of San Juan denouncing the president. And you know, you're not helping us while stacked up behind her. Remember where hundreds of FEMA boxes. They got most of the grid backup. It's been mostly army project, engineering department and then went back down again. I mean if you're gonna live in a hurricane zone, build to deal with gains Puerto Rico got wiped out there's still not fully functional you fortune with us. His latest book is called forty eight hours. She's got the several others, that are all very important on this subject, William, let's start with EMP. First of all, explain what that is, and how it can be dangerous to the grid. Well, let's go to EMP one zero one, you got okay, electro, magnetic pulse. It is produced by detonating a relatively low yield nuclear weapon. You don't need some megabomb something around fifty to one hundred K, which is small horrible as it is. I mean Hiroshima was about twelve to fifteen K detonate that children fifty miles above York's atmosphere. Electrostatic discharge cascades, down to the earth surface from the detonation of the bomb intensifying, traveling that just be the light hits. The earth's surface and all of the hundreds of millions of miles of wiring out there. Instantly. Get hit with an electrical overload. It blows the grid offline it overloads, particularly your high transmission lines aluminum towers with those big lines, Sean, they are literally exploding off the pylons were without power estimates from within the industry. In a DOJ report. Excuse me deal report indicate eighty percent of a power grid would still be off line after five years. Here's how many people could die after that. I conference some years ago of people who work in the industry. I mean, experts on this issue, and there was a team there that was running down, what happens to us. And the estimated casualty rate in America would be close onto ninety percent percent of the whole in just so folks, no you don't die from the direct neom p you die from the answer. Larry things that happen without having electric city. Well, let's go to what I would call, you know, maslow's hierarchy, and needs in the EMP instantly, your water supply is gone. Any major city you lose your pumping facilities. You've lost that scouter your, your banking system is down. Everything is down within sanitation is down the stores. The food stores are down. I was just looking something up the other day on that, that, you know, your major markets all have heavy duty backup generators built into them. Because if they lose if they totally totally lose power after X amount of time.

president FBI executive William Purdue University Nashville Mr. force George South America Ecorse Puerto Rico Dr Peter Paul Ryan publisher FEMA Hussein Bill DOJ
"purdue university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:58 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"For Purdue University. Specializing in military history and the history of technology. He is a faculty, fellow and professor of history at mantra college near Asheville North Carolina, and he has gotten interested in a number of doomsday scenarios. Now he does right? In addition to other books, these that we've been talking about are works of fiction to be sure, but they're fiction based on scientific fact. Yes, it would be possible to cripple this country even if you were a third rate power. Like let's say the North Koreans have both a fair missile program and also nuclear weapons. Three placed over this country strategically from. Say okay ships freighters. Let's say off Atlantic coast of civic coast of the Gulf of Mexico, and that could be deadly to this country. Maybe to ninety percent of our population might die within a year. And now in this new book, forty-eight hours. He's talking about something that nature might do to us in the form of our own sun with a one two punch and things called coronal mass ejections, coronal, proton ejections, suffice it to say as we take some more calls for you. Bill that for those who just joined us. We're talking here about things that we know the sun can do. And if it did it in the right order back to back, that would be curtains for most life on this planet. Correct. And game or as the term E L E, which you correctly point out with us in a movie about twenty years ago actually pretty good one sudden impact deep impact deep impact. Yeah, it stands for extinction level of that. So, again, we're not we're not talking here about just a science fiction here. We're talking about things that could actually happen. And indeed have in the past. There was an event from the sun that shorter that much of the world's brand new delivery system and, and railroad system back in eighteen fifty nine. Fortunately, at the time, we didn't depend that much on it. And things were repaired, the wires were put back up, and, and the rail lines replaced, the we went about our business today. We are so dependent on things. Electron EQ that we would not be so fortunate. Here's a call from David in Creston, Iowa. Hello, david. Thanks for taking my call. Sure. I kind of court that may sound stupid, a lot of people, but why requires savior, I like for mankind. Rovner dive eggs for a more regaining say, but, you know, there's nothing we're going to be really do about it except maybe dislike suffering go onto when we tip what we got, you know, the one where I, I would I would have to say this, David, I mean, and I don't mean to be callous here. But how about if I just walk over to your house? Let's say about thanksgiving and I shoot all of your kids and your grandkids because they're all going to die anyway. God that before. But obviously you see my point, we want to live as long as well as we can. I mean, this is not the kind of thing that you would just roll over and play dead about. I mean obviously humanity would do what it could to survive, right? Wouldn't play. I mean we're not play dead, but that they got religion. You know, you're there another life after this word for that. That's fine enough. But I'm in no hurry to see that other life. I'd like to keep this one going for awhile. I mean. Well, it depicts the Polk. I know this is like, David I again, I doubt I could be philosophical Bill as, as, as David was my instinct would be no. We survive we survive in the here and now. I started with a family rather late. I was forty two and my daughter was born. Yeah. And you know it's true. Seventy people have cynically, the ages the moment you hold your new own everything changes. Absolutely. How you look at life, your purpose? What the future is it all changes? So. Yeah, I mean, I've led a good life. My daughter just got married. She's got a great job at Yellowstone twenty-five. I want my girl to have her fifty to seventy five hundred years. Yeah, and I'll do anything possible to make sure of it. And in fact, in the introduction to one second after I actually did. Right. I hope thirty years from now he will have forgotten about me four she was a crank. And that means my daughter is reached middle age and family around and things worked out. Okay. The most important in my life, and not not to be Armageddon this year or apocalyptic. But of course you know, Yellowstone could blow one of these days, we've already talked about. I'm sure you have. All right. Very good. Eight six six five zero JIMBO. Here's all if who calls in from Maryville, Missouri on the Jim Bohannon show. Hello olive. And thank you for having manner show. Sure. Listen to you every chance I get and you are eligible and has so many different guests on so many different subjects. It's amazing. Thank you. Thank you. On the subject tonight. I guess a little pilot go, I know I several years ago, I was hearing all this, and it seemed that nobody was talking about it that at least they're starting to talk about grids. I think we have about twenty major day something like that in the United States, and they're so unprotected. And it's this information said that we were building protection for other countries, but we weren't doing anything for only, and it would take on time to get that going. But then it also talked about the. The natural decides to with the sun. And I think it was eighteen fifty eight. They said that they think fifty nine yeah. Nine. There wasn't much for to destroy things. We didn't have much electron accents. The Senate happened again. And I'm not sure exactly that you're something around the nineteen hundreds there, nineteen five or something. I guess you could probably address that I'm sure that there have been a maybe nothing quite as severe as eighteen fifty nine you tell me have there been similar events. Regional the intensity of CME increases close, you get to the magnetic pole, therefore, Canada and parts of Russia. More susceptible it was one that impact the Canada in the nineteen twenties didn't draw much notice. There was another one that took Quebec down for a couple of days, but realize these are regional abets, which means they can call their friends and Vermont, or whatever and say, hey, you got any extra transformers weeding here? Now when you're dealing with a global event there, ain't no extra supplies. Yeah. All right. One eight six six five zero jimbo's. Go to Steve and jeered North Carolina. Hello, steve. Hey, JIMBO, enjoying this conversation. Thank you. The question I have I frame that whale because I'm very interested in the answer because I've heard I've heard you before different shows the ninety percent. Frightening in the first year. And, and I agree with you. I'm, I'm not sure if that's coming mostly from star basing or from humans mankind, killing mankind. But second part of my question is. Camper survive, which would be like twenty five twenty eight million whatever. Toplessness. How, how does exa by because men live without electricity. Full, many thousands of years, quite fat, you know, without electron for electric cars or anything. Would the Bassett necessity? So for water and over from the elements, of course, there was a higher death rate. And, and again, we didn't have so many. So I as I recall from the your, your first book on the issue of EMP one, second after a lot of it was starvation. Some of it was weather related. Right. I'm gonna say question, because I would like to try and explain some people go ninety percent. This guy's crazy. It's like a maslow's hierarchy of needs. But rather than, you know, math low in terms of oxygen water and such, but it does come down to. You've lost your pure water supply immediately. Second. You've lost your sanitation within a matter of days. You're cities around inhabitable and about let's that week to ten days, you're gonna start having massive outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, gastrointestinal, your average community has a food supply of between twenty to twenty five days on hand and a lot of that is job within four or five days all those freezers in your supermarket. Soup, and they're dangerous after a week or two. So there's your primary causes than other causes, our medical fair percentage of people are on light, sustaining medications such as diabetes heart regulation painkillers for cancer, things like that, all of that Scott, your nursing homes, turn into nightmares, and then you have command and control breakdown civil disorder starts to take over and with that you have a collapse. What happens to the remaining ten percent, a year later, they're in enclaves or like in my little village ri- live here in North Carolina there in primarily rural areas where they can adapt and survive. Yeah, I it, it suffice it to say it spells it out of the book, but it's, it's, it's pretty scary and quite plausible. Unfortunately. I tended to talk some years ago in which it was pointed out that about eighty percent of the grid would still be off-line after five years silence. In a room three or four hundred experts on this, and then one wag spoke up, and it was chilling you said, well, if ninety percent of his die, but we still have twenty percent of our electric city. We'll have a surplus electric seeing things will be okay. Again. Okay. No laughter on that one was. We'll come back at Edward, we'll talk some more. I if Bill can stay with a little bit more. We get more people when I've talked to you, sir. Okay. Absolutely absolutely. All right. Stay more calls to come for Bill forced in and again forty eight hours. It's like I said, it's a great read too great read. But then when you put it down, you realize that can happen. That's kind of scary more to come back in a moment for those fortunate enough to help the person who.

David I North Carolina Bill jimbo Purdue University Mexico Asheville professor of history Canada Steve Senate Creston United States Maryville Iowa Jim Bohannon Yellowstone Polk
"purdue university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KOMO

"A speech at Purdue University potential presidential candidate Howard Schultz, the former Starbucks CEO talked about issues ranging from healthcare immigration and education, come sewer marrow tells us he stopped short of making any. Official announcement in front of a row of American flags. Shield started off by saying I'm considering a run because members of both parties are not yet. Doing the job. They were elected to do. But says he is still quote seriously considering it in response to critics about how an independent run by him would lead to President Trump's reelection. I can assure you, no one wants Donald Trump fired more than I Schultz called for changes in immigration, healthcare, gun control and education reform. See Romero, KOMO news. Komo news time four thirty-six house. Democrats took their first step toward obtaining, President Trump's personal tax returns convening a hearing today to examine legislative proposals and laws dictating the process to acquire the documents. Here's an exchange between democratic congresswoman, Linda Sanchez and tax expert. Dr Joseph Thorndike, Dr Thorndike you previously mentioned that you would like to see the release of tax returns. Codified. Are you worried that this tradition because it is just a tradition right now is being routed, I am concerned that it may in fact, be completely broken. And I think that we can't count on traditions. If again, if we believe that this sort of transparency is important, and I do then we can't really depend on a tradition to get the job done GOP. Congressman Darren lahood has a different take. I look at the legitimate purpose and the legal purpose on this. And I do not see it. And I go back to what a number of my colleagues said on weaponising, the tax code and setting a precedent. That's never been done. And we should all be concerned about that. With more on this. We say Hello to ABC's alley Rogan. She joins us from Capitol Hill. Alley. Thanks for your time. This apparently in this one respect with Democrats. I believe are trying to do is get a law passed forcing presidential candidates to release their tax returns. Correct. That is correct. That is one of the options that they are trying to put in place, obviously that would apply for every president in after President Trump. But they're also today exploring the authority that exists for only a couple of people, including the chairman of the House Ways and means committee. That's the comedian the house it writes tax law. He has the ability to request. Presidential tax returns. It is something that's been in the wasp since nineteen twenty four it has been rarely invoked because president usually disclosed their tax returns voluntarily. And so today, we're hearing from a bunch of experts who are saying largely that it is in the public interest for a chairman of the ways and means chairman to exercises authority, if it is in the public interest, and if it is necessary, and in this case, they're saying that the criteria in both cases is met. So we heard some pushback from a Republican congressman Darren lahood, look, obviously, if this were to become law that impacts not only Republicans, but Democrats or Republicans saying they're not for full disclosure moving forward on the issue of tax returns. Or is the pushback only as a relates to President Trump? Well, it's interesting that you mentioned that because I actually think there is some hesitancy on the part of the moderate Democrats too. Codify this into our because as you just said, it would cut both ways. Although I think they would also say that you know, Democrats wouldn't nominee someone who was reluctant to release their tax returns. But it would cut both ways. This is the experts are saying this is a nonpartisan thing. I think in the context of the criticism that I've heard so far in this committee from Republicans. It sounds like it has a lot more to do with President Trump. Specifically ABC's alley Rogan. Joining us from Capitol Hill alley thanks so much. Thank you. It's four forty and time to guess the KOMO afternoon. Sound bite your chance to win. Oh, a special little trip on us. Listen carefully. Here's today. Soundbite. I don't think that we lose elections by addressing climate change. I don't think we ever have..

President Trump alley Rogan Republicans Howard Schultz Komo president chairman ABC Congressman Darren lahood Dr Joseph Thorndike Starbucks Linda Sanchez Purdue University potential Official CEO Romero GOP