36 Burst results for "Purdue"

Fresh update on "purdue" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "purdue" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"December 29th Hokies interim coach JC price pump to be on the sidelines at Yankee Stadium Me personally I'm from Maryland and the Yankee Robert with the Orioles I've lived through that as a kid growing up and obviously I'm an orals fan but always that great admiration for the Yankees and all the championship they've won Each team won their final regular season game to qualify for postseason play Meanwhile Maryland tenon chigo announces that he will head to the NFL in 2022 the red shirt senior caught 49 passes this fall NFL Washington quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick was injured in week one two months later He is officially done for the season hip surgery is on the horizon Women's college basketball Maryland is up one spot from 8th to 7th of this week's coaches pulled terrapins play their Big Ten home opener tomorrow against Purdue med swoops Virginia visits James Madison at 6 30 George Mason meets navy at 7 mount saint Mary's out west at Santa Clara back to the NFL Sean last night we talked about the wins at buffalo 50 miles an hour New England through just three passes the lowest the fewest attempts by a team since 1974 jets and buffalo the bills attempted to passes didn't complete any What's worse is the jets went two for 18 with a Hall of Famer Joe Namath at the helm The lone jets touchdown scored by future Washington football running back John Reagan's That's when he had the Mohawk.

Yankee Robert Tenon Chigo Maryland NFL Hokies Horizon Women's College Basket Yankee Stadium Orioles Ryan Fitzpatrick Red Shirt Yankees Terrapins James Madison Washington George Mason Purdue Buffalo Jets Santa Clara
No. 2 Purdue holds off Iowa 77-70 in Big Ten opener

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 d ago

No. 2 Purdue holds off Iowa 77-70 in Big Ten opener

"The the number number to to produce produce survived survived a a late late Iowa Iowa rallied rallied for for a a seventy seventy seven seven seventy seventy win win the the victory victory over over the the previously previously unbeaten unbeaten Hawkeyes Hawkeyes will will likely likely propel propel the the Boilermakers Boilermakers into into the the top top spot spot in in the the rankings rankings Iowa Iowa cut cut a a nineteen nineteen point point produce produce second second half half lead lead to to two two with with just just over over two two minutes minutes left left but but was was shut shut down down over over the the remainder remainder of of the the game game Jaden Jaden Ivey Ivey led led the the boilers boilers with with nineteen nineteen points points and and brought brought down down on on the the phone phone like like you you know know there's there's you you know know we're we're on on the the run run and and you you know know we we just just we we just just kept kept battling battling on on we we got got some some rebounds rebounds and and you you know know the the led led to to you you know know them them filing filing striving striving on on Williams Williams pulled pulled down down eighteen eighteen rebounds rebounds were were produced produced Patrick Patrick McCaffrey McCaffrey had had fifteen fifteen points points to to lead lead Iowa Iowa Tom Tom McCabe McCabe west west Lafayette Lafayette Indiana Indiana

Iowa Hawkeyes Hawkeyes Boilermakers Boilermakers Jaden Jaden Ivey Ivey Williams Williams Patrick Patrick Mccaffrey Mccaffrey Tom Tom Mccabe Mccabe West Lafayette Lafayette Indiana
No. 2 Purdue uses scoring combination to KO Seminoles 93-65

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

No. 2 Purdue uses scoring combination to KO Seminoles 93-65

"Purdue Purdue out out shot shot and and out out rebounded rebounded Florida Florida state state in in a a ninety ninety three three sixty sixty five five win win the the second second ranked ranked Boilermakers Boilermakers said said fifty fifty nine nine percent percent of of their their shots shots and and held held the the thirty thirty six six to to twenty twenty five five rebounding rebounding advantage advantage five five Purdue Purdue players players were were in in double double figures figures led led by by Jaden Jaden ivy ivy with with eighteen eighteen points points we we take take you you know know what what the the coaches coaches say say and and we we you you know know we we just just buy buy and and and and then then when when the the game game comes comes you you know know we're we're we're we're ready ready we're we're executing executing it it perfectly perfectly and and you you know know if if we we just just keep keep doing doing that that I I think think we we can can be be a a really really good good team team led led by by sixteen sixteen at at halftime halftime then then put put the the game game out out of of reach reach in in the the second second half half the the Boilermakers Boilermakers are are now now seven seven oh oh heading heading into into their their big big ten ten opener opener the the Seminoles Seminoles now now five five and and two two got got twenty twenty two two points points from from Caleb Caleb mills mills Tom Tom McCabe McCabe west west Lafayette Lafayette Indiana Indiana

Purdue Purdue Boilermakers Boilermakers Jaden Jaden Florida Seminoles Seminoles Caleb Caleb Mills Mills Tom To West Lafayette Lafayette Indiana
Stroud throws 5 TD passes, No. 6 Ohio State routs Purdue

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Stroud throws 5 TD passes, No. 6 Ohio State routs Purdue

"Moving to nine and one on the season the number four ranked Ohio State Buckeyes dominated the nineteenth ranked Purdue Boilermakers fifty nine to thirty one at home Ohio state after one half lead forty five to seventeen scoring on their first aid offense of Dr Gerry Wilson in his first game back from injury collected ten receptions for a hundred twenty six dollars and a fifty one yard rushing touchdown on a jet sweep as well Ohio state quarterback CJ scribes also terrific throwing five touchdown my job is to sit back there and deliver them also I mean when they get to play fast and and then go do the things so on the off line on the fly with we go better is often spotted at despite the loss of your car make a no call for Purdue played well during the nearly four hundred yards and four touchdowns Maxwell Kongolo miss Ohio

Dr Gerry Wilson Ohio State Buckeyes Purdue Boilermakers Cj Scribes Ohio Purdue Maxwell Kongolo
RJ Young reacts to CFB rankings for Week 9, Oklahoma disrespected at No. 8 | No. 1 Ranked Show

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | Last month

RJ Young reacts to CFB rankings for Week 9, Oklahoma disrespected at No. 8 | No. 1 Ranked Show

"And Alabama remain one to win the latest CFP rankings came out on Tuesday third ranked Oregon fourth rated Ohio state and number five Cincinnati all moved up one spot following Michigan state's loss to Purdue the Spartans are seventh just behind Michigan the Spartans beat the Wolverines thirty seven thirty three just two weeks ago unbeaten Oklahoma remains eighth followed by Notre Dame and Oklahoma state there are three more regular season rankings before the CFP selection committee sets the semifinal match ups on the ferry

Spartans Michigan Alabama Cincinnati Oregon Purdue Ohio Wolverines Oklahoma Notre Dame CFP
O'Connell, Bell help Purdue take down No. 5 Spartans 40-29

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

O'Connell, Bell help Purdue take down No. 5 Spartans 40-29

"The last of the big ten unbeatens has gone down Purdue in becoming bowl eligible stage for forty to twenty nine win over Michigan state with boilermaker quarterback Aiden o'connell passing for five hundred thirty six yards goes back to our team our coaches the players on our team just wanted to win and believing that they can win so that's what it's all about you know week after week it's it's a battle in the big ten and every week's gonna be a dogfight Purdue receiver David bell hauled in eleven catches for two hundred seventeen yards eight in one Michigan state tied it at twenty one only to see the Boilermakers score sixteen unanswered points Spartan running back Kenneth Walker rushed for one hundred forty six yards Tom McCabe west Lafayette Indiana

Aiden O Purdue Connell Michigan David Bell Boilermakers Kenneth Walker Tom Mccabe Lafayette Indiana
Aidan O'Connell, David Bell lead Purdue past No. 2 Iowa 24-7

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Aidan O'Connell, David Bell lead Purdue past No. 2 Iowa 24-7

"Eight no colonel threw for three hundred seventy five yards and accounted for three touchdowns as Purdue beat second ranked Iowa for the fourth time in their last five meetings twenty four seven David bell had a career best two hundred forty yards receiving it produced first victory over a top two teams since nineteen seventy four against second ranked Notre Dame I was just going out there trying to make plays and missed on finding a way to beat number six in the country so I knew that not only myself but the whole receiving corps led to come the one reason everyone again I was scored its fewest points at home since a thirteen seven loss to Nebraska in twenty twelve the law since the Hawkeyes twelve game winning streak Purdue intercepted Spencer teachers four times the most thrown in a game by Iowa in twelve years I'm the ferry

David Bell Purdue Iowa Notre Dame Hawkeyes Nebraska Spencer
Kelly Ties Rockne as No. 12 Irish Hold off Purdue 27-13

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Kelly Ties Rockne as No. 12 Irish Hold off Purdue 27-13

"Karen Williams scored two long touchdowns the second a fifty one yard run with six oh five remaining as twelfth ranked Notre Dame held off Purdue twenty seven thirteen Jack corn was sacked four times and struggled with his accuracy completing fifteen of thirty one passes for two hundred twenty three yards and two TV's Avery Davis led the Irish in receptions with five for one hundred twenty yards the victory was the one hundred fifth in Brian Kelly's twelve year career at Notre Dame tying him with legendary Knute Rockne is the winningest coach in school history I'm the ferry

Karen Williams Jack Corn Avery Davis Notre Dame Purdue Brian Kelly Knute Rockne
Use of OxyContin Profits to Fight Opioids Formally Approved

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Use of OxyContin Profits to Fight Opioids Formally Approved

"The judge has formally approved a plan to turn oxycontin maker Purdue pharma into a new company no longer owned by members of the Sackler family and with his profits going to fight the opioid epidemic bankruptcy judge Robert drain officially has confirmed the reorganization more than two weeks after he announced he would do so pending to launching technical changes however several states among all the parties have already appealed the decision the deal resolves some three thousand lawsuits filed by state and local governments native American tribes unions hospitals and others who claimed the company's marketing of prescription opioids help Spock and continue overdose epidemic linked to more than five hundred thousand deaths in the U. S. in the last two decades I'm Charles there that's my

Sackler Family Robert Drain Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Spock U. Charles
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

07:35 min | 3 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Afternoon thanks for joining us for monday. Cornyn sleigh being update. I'm jim entered fesser director of commercial agriculture. Joining me today. Or my colleagues. Dr vincent thompson. Who's in social esser. The department of agriculture of mannix at the langham who is a professor and economics and also the associate director the senate commercial agriculture were broadcasting today because usda released updated world eggs supply demand estimates on friday and so there was a lot of information on fridays. Your mental that were spud winstons. Wellstone updated coproduction report which includes Adjustment so let's get right to september will exploit estimate so Usda dip revised the carryover estimates in the twenty twenty crop into the twenty twenty one year. up to one point one eight. Seven billion wish does ads about seven point. Nine percent of projected or actual usage and the increased marketing near corn average price to four forty five some Looking at twenty twenty one crop balance sheet which really got most of the attention. Usda adjusted the hearts today. Cr- adjustment up by five hundred ninety thousand acres and they asked about ten days or so ahead of the reports that they were going to be looking at. The acreage is largely resulted them. Looking at the farm service agency. Information and news met makes adjustments to the june Acreage report that they had previously published. So we all knew they were going to come out with make bridge estimate most people thought it was gonna rise somewhat compared with virus mid message happen they also raise the yield projection from one. Seventy four point six which remember a months ago was surprisingly low to one. Seventy six point three bush's breaker that combination of increasing acreage and increase in neil action estimates. The twenty one crop up by two hundred forty six million bristles convert to august. There was no change rejected usage for the twenty twenty one crop year. Still at five hundred bushels. They raise projected exports by seventy five million bushels compared to what they've forecast last month at two point. Four seven five billion bushels. That's about ten percent less than their estimates for twenty twenty and they raised the projected ending stocks that carry over from the twenty twenty one crop into the twenty twenty two year By seventy five million bushels compared to last month so there at one point four billion bushels an pushes carryover backup over one point. Four just where it was earlier. We'll talk a little bit more about some changes over time later in the broadcast stocks at the end of the checked. It at the twenty two thousand one crop year projected to be just under ten percent of usage at about nine point five percent of usage on the world's side No real change. In brazil's foreign production that raised argentina's slightly on no change in china's expect the imports from all sources Compared to what they had published reduced back in august and a mentioned earlier. If you look at the numbers Could stay yield for the twenty twenty one not all the way back to the trend line but it gets a lot closer. Of course the big surprise months ago was how low. Usda's you was meant was this brings back. I will say all the way to tread line depending on what he has to make a trend line. It was probably about one. Seventy eight one seventy nine defend them exactly slice the years so we're still below trend but certainly a better higher stung. You'll estimate than what we saw last month and michael. I know you took a look at the individual state estimates. There were some big revisions on some of the individual states lower. Some of those. Yeah there was some revisions both on the eastern corn belt and and the northern plains for example indiana was bushels higher than the previous estimate but more importantly from production stamp white Some of the states that were really low and particular minnesota. I were some pretty large increases are now the yield is expected to be one hundred seventy four minnesota certainly still less and last year. But that's a. That's a pretty sizable improvement. Compared to a month ago also nerve north dakota was adjusted was adjusted upward as well as iowa so i am so he could see why you would with these state but you can see why there was an increase in the. Us estimate. yeah the ones that really matter. I think the most are obviously are going to be minnesota iowa and those are pretty. Sizeable percentage changes on a one month basis on minnesota almost five percent kapoor month earlier in iowa up to one six percent so those are really the drivers behind indiana kind of came in third place. Maybe in terms that one point five senators that we saw in indiana and if you look at the drought monitor and compare that to when we did our last webinar. Which coincides with more or less release serval whiskies august or wants to report. You can see what was going on. So i split this into a couple of different slides here on the first one looks at the august. Chance drought monitor versus september seventh. Most recent drought monitor and looks kind of at that western part of the corn. Go that you can see some improvement as you look at north dakota install a lot of dryness up there some better situation than it was august and same story with inspect to south goethe and even as you get down to kansas things a little better in september than they did and august when you flip forward and then look at the kind of north central part of the corn belt You really see some change. As indicated by usda with respect to minnesota and iowa a motorcycle particular that southern half of minnesota. How red let's disappears on. The september seventh outnumber saint story. With respect to iowa. The rent will disappears and even some of the more dry conditions in the brown areas. Actually disappointed that time as you. Look at indiana. Maybe the interesting thing. But in the end this we actually got a little bit drier here at least in our part of eastern corn belt woman. The question mark. There's going to be what by that. Might have unswayed me election on august deanna In general there was enough moisture improvement slum. The august september to give us some infamous your estimates niles come live with the drought monitor. Was kind of a a lagging indicator because it moves on slowly and i think as one of the reasons no. The timely rains occurred away. Lebron seasonal bubbliness incident on and look at total corn production on that combination aboard. Acreage in better yield. Does give us a misdemeanor. Crop size of fifteen billion bushels. That will the second largest on record the only prompt size larger than that will be back in the twin sixty. Brought your at sixteen point. One five day bushel. So it's a relatively large crop Despite some of the weather we've had this year as you look at the ending. Stocks estimates that yo- students published. I mentioned earlier that they raised their estimate of the ending. Starts coming out of the twenty twenty. You're in the twenty twenty one year you can see how those change dramatically as the move slew. The course of the copier lavin's last couple of reports have raise those ending stocks from the twenty twenty five year in the twenty twenty. One frog fear to kind of see. The slowdown was taking place. Let's inspecting usage at the end of twenty twenty crop year. then we'll take a look at their initial estimates for the.

Usda fesser Dr vincent thompson department of agriculture of m minnesota iowa esser Cornyn langham Wellstone indiana usda senate
Rays Beat Red Sox 12-7

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Rays Beat Red Sox 12-7

"We gotta start with a crazy game in boston. Yesterday the tampa bay rays against the red sox early on it looked like the red sox. We're going to be in control. You'll launch weighing line drive down. Alethia likes the extra bases hits the track roles in the corner. What run is scored. Here comes j. d. wrapping held at third. It's an rbi double a to double for doll back. And the red sox lead sixth one. Joe castiglione w e ninety three point seven. Fm the red sox would extend their lead to seven to one. But you know what the race came back on the pitch swing and a fly ball to center field but while it's gonna pushback for dugo. He's on the worst track and it's going to clear the basis wall scores arose arena. Scores rocco scores toward a third is what goes into the dug up bed crews will come around and score fair chris. Oh wait as indeed quite back in it. It's seventy five w da with that call right there. Yep so look at college. Whoever's been really good offensively but there's no doubt that When you work to get him into the lineup it means it's going to be defensive compromises and other parts and we showed that yesterday for alex purdue go playing center field. The adventures were not over. Here comes to meadows swinging a high dr straightaway center moving back for go back to the track till the wall off the top of the wall and terrorist experts. The infield metals are second. He's going to try for third waving of these ona's way to the play and it did homer on those and we're all tied up and could hear the boston fans booing at the end of that clip right there from w. da. The two sides went into extra innings. This happened swinging ally dr underneath the glove of the first basement. Cordeiro down the right field line. Here comes a rose arena. Here's the throw from renfro hits late crews flying in the second. Here's raise take the lead. Ten

Red Sox Alethia Joe Castiglione Tampa Bay Rays Boston Alex Purdue Rocco Chris ONA Cordeiro Renfro
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

02:57 min | 3 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"It'd be using <SpeakerChange> cover crops <Speech_Male> more acres <Speech_Male> and it's a good point <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We did ask them <Speech_Male> why they choose <Speech_Male> to plant cover crops <Speech_Male> so if you plant cover <Speech_Male> crops. Why do you do <Speech_Male> it. And the most common <Speech_Male> responses <Speech_Male> in order <Speech_Male> were number one <Speech_Male> was improved soil. Health <Speech_Male> number two was <Speech_Male> improved erosion control <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> number three was improved. <Speech_Male> Water quality <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Those didn't surprise <Speech_Male> me too much. <SpeakerChange> How about you. <Speech_Male> Not <Speech_Male> really i me. <Speech_Male> We had crop yields <Speech_Male> in there <Speech_Male> in worded <Speech_Male> in an another question <Speech_Male> so it <Speech_Male> wasn't a common for <Speech_Male> people to say we'll <Speech_Male> slow health and <Speech_Male> You'll higher <Speech_Male> crop yields and <Speech_Male> so that was a fairly common <Speech_Male> response but soil. <Speech_Male> Health was <Speech_Male> overwhelming <Speech_Male> overwhelmingly. <SpeakerChange> The <Speech_Male> most common response <Speech_Male> and of course. That's <Speech_Male> how it's being promoted most <Speech_Male> heavily so it wasn't <Speech_Male> too surprising to get that <Speech_Male> back as a response <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> One of the <Speech_Male> options out there though <Speech_Male> was And we <Speech_Male> wanted to learn more about <Speech_Male> this was the relationship <Speech_Male> of usage <Speech_Male> of cover crops <Speech_Male> to carbon <Speech_Male> sequestration <Speech_Male> contracts <Speech_Male> and those carbon <Speech_Male> contracts requiring <Speech_Male> the use of cover <Speech_Male> crops. That's a pretty <Speech_Male> new phenomenon that's <Speech_Male> only been around for a relatively <Speech_Male> short span of <Speech_Male> times. We weren't sure <Speech_Male> how many people would tell <Speech_Male> us that that that <Speech_Male> was an issue for him. <Speech_Male> Ten percent <Speech_Male> of the people said <Speech_Male> that that was one <Speech_Male> of the reasons why they chose <Speech_Male> to plant cover <Speech_Male> crops and given. <Speech_Male> how new that <Speech_Male> is. I was <Speech_Male> a little surprised that <Speech_Male> we got that many responses. <Speech_Male> How about you. I <Speech_Male> didn't think it'd be that high. <Speech_Male> There must be people <Speech_Male> planning cover. Crops <Speech_Male> thinking <Speech_Male> That they're going to under <Speech_Male> some kind You <Speech_Male> know carbon contract <Speech_Male> and the next one <Speech_Male> to two to three <SpeakerChange> years. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well i <Speech_Male> i would probably disagree with <Speech_Male> that because if they do before <Speech_Male> they sign the contract. <Speech_Male> They're they're gonna <Speech_Male> fall into a trap <Speech_Male> there. So i suspect <Speech_Male> those people that they <Speech_Male> may be <Speech_Male> signed a <Speech_Male> carbon contract <Speech_Male> at least <Speech_Male> on a small portion of <Speech_Male> their acreage. You know <Speech_Male> one of the farms. We had a chance <Speech_Male> to work with this summer. <Speech_Male> On the farm management <Speech_Male> tour here at purdue was very <Speech_Male> interesting <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> were in that situation. <Speech_Male> They had signed up <Speech_Male> a portion <Speech_Male> of their acreage <Speech_Male> under a <Speech_Male> carbon contract <Speech_Male> and they were using <Speech_Male> cover crops on <Speech_Male> that portion of their <Speech_Male> acreage in fact <Speech_Male> it was a <Speech_Male> kind of a <Speech_Male> combination <Speech_Male> decision for them. They <Speech_Male> were interested in and <Speech_Male> using cover crops <Speech_Male> and sign. The carbon <Speech_Male> contract was a <Speech_Male> way to get an incentive <Speech_Male> to actually put <Speech_Male> carbon cover crops. <Speech_Male> In right let <Speech_Male> me reword. What i <Speech_Male> what i met. Maybe they're trying <Speech_Male> to try to <Speech_Male> use cover crops <Speech_Male> to see how this would work <Speech_Male> if they sign <Speech_Male> a car a <Speech_Male> contract <Speech_Male> you say carbon contract. <Speech_Male> You don't have to do it on <Speech_Male> every single acre <Speech_Male> and so i think <Speech_Male> there is some experimenting <Speech_Male> going on <Speech_Male> Just just <Speech_Male> related to <Speech_Male> these carbon <SpeakerChange> carbon <Speech_Male> markets. <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> that wraps up our discussion <Speech_Male> today. So <Speech_Male> for more details <Speech_Male> about the producing <Speech_Male> me group. Economy-barometer <Speech_Male> go to our website. <Speech_Male> Purdue dot edu <Speech_Male> slash <Speech_Male> barometer. <Speech_Male> Encourage <Speech_Male> you to join us for our next corn <Speech_Male> and soybean outlook <Speech_Male> webinar following the release <Speech_Male> of usda's <Speech_Male> september <Speech_Male> world eggs supply <Speech_Male> demand estimates. That <Speech_Male> comes out. I <Speech_Male> think the <Speech_Male> tenth of september <Speech_Male> in our webinar will <Speech_Male> be on september thirteenth <Speech_Male> So the report <Speech_Male> comes on friday and <Speech_Male> we're doing the web or on monday <Speech_Male> that'll <Speech_Male> be at twelve.

purdue usda
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

03:59 min | 3 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"A little bit about the margins. Now that they're going to be seeing going forward so farmland value expectations Pretty strong Both the short term index and the long-term index rose by four points this month. And i i don't wanna too big a deal about the month to month movement in these Farmland value indexes. I think the key point is the both of them are hovering near not exactly at but pretty close to the all-time highs and both of these indexes right. We certainly safe to say. There's a lot of optimism with regard to the farmland market. And i think. I think that optimism is warranted When you look at the low interest rates the The probability of having higher than higher inflation than we've seen for a while strong crop returns all of those things translate into upward pressure on farmland values and if you look at the index now here in august of twenty twenty one versus august twenty twenty. The change is pretty remarkable right a year ago that short-term farmland value expectation index was at ninety five this month that was at one forty six. And you know we're seeing that we just Had united the webinar with todd keith. A few weeks ago Looking at land values from the land value survey that purdue conducted in the month of june and those values in indiana were up From june to june twelve to fourteen percent and expectations for further increases the rest of the year. So think you know. The the index is reflecting reality and This rally and farmland values is probably not over based on what we're seeing right. That's definitely the case and again as you said jim it's short term and long term typically long-term the the the index does not change as much as it would short term as you'd expect but there's a lot of confidence even in farmland values going out five years which is what the long-term farmland value expect- expectations index is is is tracking and it's august. It's close to the record. And if you compare the two indices the one difference is we've seen a big rebound in that short term value expectation index compared to this time last year There's a rebound as well in that longer term index. But as you point out it was never nearly as negative It was always much more positive even last year. At the height of the pandemic concerns it was stronger last year than it was than the than the short-term index We've been asking people about cash rental values particularly corn and soybean producers. We've been asking about that going back to may asking them what they think. The farmland cash runner rates will be in the twenty twenty two crop season versus the twenty twenty one crop season and there has been somewhat of a shift Particularly when you compare results these last couple months to may in may people were really thinking that these Cash roman rates were really going to take off. I think forty three percent of the people expected to see an increase in rates which was about half of the survey said they thought the increase would be ten percent or more People aren't quite that bullish about what's going to take place now. They've dropped back this month. I think Of the again among the people that expect to see her and rise in rates third thirty three percent of them say the rates are going to go up ten percent or Michael you've looked at cash. Rental rates a lot especially here in indiana. How often do we see a ten percent increase or more and farmland cash rana rates. It's a lot rarer than it is with land values if you look at land values Since two thousand seven for example there's been six different times in indiana where were land land values of went up over ten percent In in a single year. That's only three times for cash rent. So it's a little rare to see these large increases in cash rent One of the things..

todd keith purdue indiana jim rana Michael
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Jim mentor director of the center for commercial agriculture. Joining me today is michael. Langham are professor of economics. Purdue we're going to review the results from the august purdue university. Cme group economy barometer survey of farmers from across the nation each month we survey four hundred farmers from across the us to learn more about their perspective on the economy and this month's egg economy barometer survey was conducted from the twenty third through the twenty seventh of august. So michael looking at the results. We saw a very small change in the economy. Broder moved up four point reading of one thirty eight. That was up from one. Thirty four last month still leaves us quite a ways below where we were last spring when we had some readings up in the high sixties and even broke through. I think one seventy one month. What's your take. yes i think. Prices are still below what they were back in may for example and so i think that's part of the reason why specifically corn soybean prices. I think that's one of the reasons why we are lower today than what we were. Back in may It did pick up a little bit though. An and as you said the report jim i think one of the factors was some timely rains In the corn belt and planes. And so i think that helped a little bit and i think whether conditions and crop conditions in particular can be very important as we move forward. September october november Talking about the economy barometer index. That's a good point because when you look under the hood and look at the index of current conditions in the index of future expectations. The biggest driver that small improvement was really next to current conditions. That from a reading of one forty three last month to reading one fifty two this month and you know even though prices are lower than they were back in. May i think people probably did feel a little bit better about their revenue prospects and corners sweeping country particularly because of some improvement and maybe yield expectations And those prices..

Jim mentor center for commercial agricult purdue university Langham michael Broder us jim
Purdue Bankruptcy Is Approved, Shielding Sackler Family

NPR News Now

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Purdue Bankruptcy Is Approved, Shielding Sackler Family

"Federal bankruptcy judge has approved a historic settlement between purdue pharma the company that makes the opioid oxycontin and thousands of state and local governments. The controversial settlement will allow the owners of purdue pharma the sackler family to escape legal liability from opioid lawsuits. The sackler family will still have to pay more than four billion dollars.

Purdue Pharma
U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

the NewsWorthy

01:07 min | 3 months ago

U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

"Drugmaker behind the highly addictive prescription. Painkiller oxycontin is formerly shutting down. We're talking about purdue pharma. Instead of selling opioids the company's resources will be put toward addressing the opioid epidemic mainly with addiction treatment and prevention programs. It will also compensate people and families who have been hurt by purdue products that was just one of the terms laid out in a wide ranging bankruptcy settlement. Judge approved this week. It also says the company's owners the sackler family will have to pay four and a half billion dollars to settle thousands of opioid related lawsuits. Without though this actors will be immune from any more lawsuits about opioids. And they'll still be one of the richest families in the world. They're worth about eleven billion dollars. A lot of states support. This plan saying it's the best way to help pay for a problem. That's only gotten worse. During the pandemic but others like connecticut. In washington planned to appeal saying the settlement shields. The sackler is too much from liability. They say the sackler is downplayed. How addictive opioids are while they aggressively marketed. Those drugs purdue pharma as a company has pleaded guilty twice for that but the sackler is have not been charged with crimes. At least not yet and they say they did nothing illegal or

Purdue Pharma Drugmaker Sackler Connecticut Washington
Judge Conditionally Approves Purdue Pharma Opioid Settlement

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Judge Conditionally Approves Purdue Pharma Opioid Settlement

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting a judge conditionally approves the Purdue pharma opioid settlement a federal bankruptcy judge has given conditional approval to a potential ten billion dollar plan submitted by oxycontin maker Purdue pharma to settle lawsuits filed over its role in the opioid crisis under the settlement the Sackler family would give up ownership of Purdue pharma and contribute four point five billion dollars to the fund the Sacklers would also be freed from any future lawsuits over the opioid crisis U. S. bankruptcy judge Robert drain said he will formally approve the plan Thursday if to technical changes are made but nine states Washington DC Seattle and the U. S. bankruptcy trustee oppose the settlement the state of Washington plans to appeal hi Mike Rossio

Purdue Pharma Mike Rossi Sacklers Oxycontin Judge Robert Drain Washington Dc U. Seattle Washington Mike Rossio
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

07:33 min | 3 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"India's thing So even if it's short it can be. Farmers can have withstood like brief challenging period before. But it's never fun to do. So and the other factor that you took a look at michael was the liquidity and you might want explain that your definitions there a little bit. What are there's settled over ways to measure liquidity but to keep this very contemporaneous What i'm what i'm using to talk about. Liquidity is some survey done with the federal reserve bank of chicago that looks at loan demand and loan repayment as what i'm what am indicating here if a loan demand has been dropping rapidly in the last couple of quarters and loan repayment has been increasing rapidly in last two quarters as some using that information to suggest that improved dramatically The fact that people are are repaying loans. These they have the money or the wherewithal utter repay the loans. The fact that they're not demanding more loans compared to you know the previous year for example means these if they have liquidity they have working capital. There they don't need to borrow as much from an operating standpoint. So and so i found that very interesting when When todd was talking about all those factors that are positive towards land been awhile since liquidity has been a positive factor on a. He's been very tight. I and i'm in production agriculture. Since since about two thousand fourteen two thousand fifteen. So this is a dramatic change. I and and really does a great more optimism with regard to buying land again as you think about what might happen over the course of the next year. That's another positive right definitely. I think you're looking at least one one more year of of of of of increases in liquidity and then if things level let's say things level out that means liquidity would stay about where it was in twenty twenty two. That would still be very positive compared to what we went through from two thousand fourteen two thousand nineteen or we saw some pretty serious deterioration in in in working capital on forms. So todd you mentioned at the outset that you collect information that allows you to talk about regional variation and farmland not just the state level information from the state of indiana so share with us. Some of those regional results is so When i am here is the is broken. The state gets broken into six regions so In the clusters of counties We usually see the best number sort of come in at the west central and central regions of the state This year we've seen it particularly on the high end We've seen a lot of growth in the southwest portion in the southwest high high productivity. Land is now. Where we sort of the highest value breaker. So if you think about it. And i'm looking at your percentage changes here. The percentage changes in for example southwest indiana. Quite large of top quality. Land in twenty twenty one was up almost twenty eight percent average. Cloudy land up twenty percent. you compare that to the central part of the state central part. The state quality was up about sixteen percent. So that's a pretty big gap between what was going on those two regions but the other way you like to look at farmland. Bao's is the value her bushel of estimated corn productivity right. Yeah in in in those It it it held relatively sort of stable across those regions Maybe you could say that. Southwest is kind of catching up to the other parts of the state But you know it in terms of sort of Return per eight or return per bushel of corn produced They're held relatively close in with the With the other productive reason state so what. What was that number. So if you think about Price as a function of of corneal. How many dollars per bushel was forty. Eight michael w forty eight to fifty would capture central west central in southwest The other regions would be a little bit lower than that but I elderly at the but the main point here is is the southwest is similar a central and central. And so it in my mind that means that things are out of line in south west. I mean as todd said. It appears that there was just catching up to perhaps west central and central. Yeah i think that's also kind of a useful rule for our viewers to to think about in terms of looking at individual property and thinking about the value of that property. These got a good grip on a productivity. You can use that dollars per bushel of corneille as waited to collaborate across properties right. Yeah you're the wondering and you don't know the corneal. That's something you definitely want to ask your operator in. What is what is your crop. Insurance corn yield because that is one way to do a back of the envelope calculation not only for cash rampant also for labbe in the other one is thinking about commodity prices. Same time essentially. How many years to pay off You know just on the revenue side at least How many years of revenue would it take to capture them before my point. So are the questions you ask. People is what he thinks going to happen to farmland values in the next six months right. So you've got some information. What happened from december to june of this year. And then you ask him okay. you're in. Your survey was conducted in june. So then you ask them. Okay what are you. Thanks can happen from june of this year to december of twenty twenty one and share those results this time yes so They expect the growth to continue But at sort of a moderate pace. In fact i was mentioning this earlier when we were three of us. Were talking but have some work with a graduate student now that we recently are working through publication But looking at these expectations over time going back to the seventies generally speaking respondents pharma experts. If you ask them about what's going to happen in the future They get the direction right but there are always a little bit more cautious right so they don't wanna Sailing over to get double digit again. Right. it'll be even if you think there's gonna be double digit. Usually kind of respond of you know pie but not crazy high so It it it shows that there's positively there's There's belief that what we've seen over the last six months is going to continue But again with the idea that there was a little bit. More cautious about west can happen if you as-as rates of Increase the expecting which roughly four percents wouldn't be surprising than based on history to actually exceed that. Especially when you think about the fact that people are indicating that virtually all the factors were positive. Essentially we had you know over the last six months from december to june Closer to eight percent so almost twice what they're expecting and so they're expecting to sort of like have it again but in half so the purdue land value survey is really good information source for farmland is your indiana and some other states. Do something similar. I know iowa. Does something similar. Those results will be released later in the fall. But usda publishes some numbers as well as the lake collects information. There's some differences in terms of how usda collects data versus. What you do. And maybe what. I was stayed does so.

todd federal reserve bank of chicag indiana corneille michael w Bao India michael west central Southwest south west pharma usda iowa
The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

Morning Edition

01:43 min | 3 months ago

The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

"Trials underway in New York for Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. Members of Sackler family who owned the drug company have testified they bear no responsibility for the nation's deadly opioid epidemic. As part of the bankruptcy deal, the Sackler czar demanding immunity from lawsuits for themselves and for a network of companies and organizations. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been following this Brian you've reported before the Sackler want to clean slate for themselves, no more opioid lawsuits. But this deal in particular would also shelter a bunch of other people and companies from liability. How would that work? This has been a major flashpoint in this trial A and it was again yesterday as part of produce farmers bankruptcy settlement The sack Lear's who say they've done nothing wrong, have agreed to pay $4.3 billion to fund addiction treatment programs, but the Sackler want something really big. In return, their attorneys have drawn up this single spaced list of individuals, organizations and companies. This list runs for 12 full pages. If this deal is finalized, everyone on the list would be sheltered permanently from lawsuits linked to opioids and oxy cotton and from a wide range of of other lawsuits. And why does that matter? So this is interesting. Critics say the Sackler is in their empire are at the center of one of the biggest man made public health disasters in US history. Hundreds of thousands of people have died in this epidemic. Their company has pleaded guilty to federal crimes linked to the OxyContin business. First in 2000, and seven and again last year again, the Sackler is deny wrongdoing and have never been charged. But there are still big unanswered questions about how this prescription opioid crisis happened and who in the sack Lear's network might be liable. For some of the harm and let me give you

Sackler Sackler Czar Brian Mann Purdue Pharma Oxycontin NPR Lear New York Brian United States
Purdue Pharma Bankruptcy Case: Sackler Family Apologizes for Pain OxyContin Caused

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Purdue Pharma Bankruptcy Case: Sackler Family Apologizes for Pain OxyContin Caused

"A member of the family that owns Purdue pharma says it is horrible that oxycontin the medicine developed to ease pain actually caused pain to families affected by addiction in a bankruptcy proceeding conducted by video conference board member Mortimer Sackler says his family had hoped it could help turn the tide on the opioid addiction crisis by altering oxycontin to make it harder to crush up to be snorted or injected but instead of reducing overdose deaths the problem got worse and Sackler testified we're sorry if a medicine we put out that was intended to relieve pain caused pain his sister Kathy Sackler testified she believed her family has a moral responsibility to help fix the addiction crisis under a bankruptcy proposal the Sackler family members would give up ownership of Purdue pharma and future profits would go largely to help abate the opioid crisis I'm Jackie Quinn

Mortimer Sackler Purdue Pharma Kathy Sackler Sackler Jackie Quinn
Heir: Sacklers Won't Settle Unless Freed From Opioid Suits

Buck Sexton

00:16 sec | 4 months ago

Heir: Sacklers Won't Settle Unless Freed From Opioid Suits

"Donahue, a member of the family that owns Purdue Pharma has told the court that the family will not contribute billions to abate the US U. S opioid crisis unless it's granted protection from current and future lawsuits. David Sackler made a rare public appearance as he testified at the bankruptcy

Purdue Pharma Donahue David Sackler U. United States
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

07:18 min | 4 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"One fifty five is pretty much right in line with where. Usda is coming out with twenty twenty But that leaves instead that at at about three and a half percent of stock in twenty one marketing year. Going into the twenty twenty teeth crop season at twenty twenty estimate a chart that three point five is a little larger than what we were showing last month. We were actually below three percent on last month's chart so it's it's a little larger than people were anticipating but if you look at it from a historical standpoint those are really tight end in stocks estimates. Right i mean we're pretty much talking pipeline supplies or maybe just a little more than pipeline supplies not much wiggle room there on either the production side or on the demand side So a volatile situation ahead of us. I think in terms of sleeping prices. If you look at the world's standpoint on not exactly the same what we saw in foreign but overtime on particular going back to two thousand eighteen. Those ending stocks estimates from a world standpoint had been tightening so of course in two thousand eighteen We got up on a worldwide basis up thirty three percent. Were pulling it down since then down to twenty five percent. It's not as tight as it was back in two thousand eleven and twelve and thirteen. But it's not too much above that either white. Those numbers were in the twenty to twenty three percent in stocks estimates range and were sitting just touch over twenty five percent So again very tight. Supply situation misleading side relatively usage so with that maytham will look into sobe basis. Yes we'll start off here with soybean basis here in central indiana again. I'm looking at this relative to the september slovene futures contract for the entire crop marketing year. In we have The black line current years sleeping places level in the blue line being the two year historical average is somewhat similar to corn. We've seen basis will back the difference for soybeans. That that's been a much more steady in a much more obvious trained on a moving reverting back to that kind of in store average so we had a swimming basis again relative the september futures contract of as much as two dollars forty two cents above the historical average back at the beginning of the summer and that has kind of lindell down to really only being able a forty four cents above the historical average. Basically we've seen so basis deteriorate you know about two dollars. Bushel Between beginning of summer and now in again how you calculate that is Affects what that number books like. That number might be shocking. Some people but it based on you know That september futures contract relief seen soybean basis really Decline moving towards the historical average and again You know that's probably A little bit interesting to think about as being about where basis is going to be fall so again when i look around at ford contract bitch. Football delivery acis appears to be right in line with that historical average in so even with the tight supplies we haven't seen Folks lining up to the bid up soybean prices this fall That may change. We've already mentioned what happens between now and harvest and have a big impact on sleeping yields. And so and again there might be some local effects so again on the next slide here just for a relative comparison. I pulled soybean basis in north dakota again using cantu states basis again. Don't forget the presentation of information here is very different than what you're looking at. On the purdue crop bases charts so again we're starting not at the could september but instead elect inside of charges starting at j. first week of january on and again on my chart showing that september contract-based this year We're looking at this on your by basis. That's that's kind of how they have their calculators. So this smear slogan basis continuing rolling on without hereby uterus andre as always you see is again we volatility there and against some of that has to do with roles between different futures contracts but nonetheless We've seen strong sleeping basis on their north dakota brought marketing year at least a calendar year given the way this is set up. But what's really interesting to look at is kind of where we are today So that last week on the chart they're you know their basis for soybean is sixty one cents above where it would normally be and again based typically very negative basis there in the northern plain states. So you know looking at the chart there somewhere you know. Dollar under is not abnormal for them But now they're looking at basis the baby only fifty cents under The the interest contract and so again given crop conditions in that part of the world. I i would expect to see Their basis Be a little bit stronger At where ours is continued to kind of decline But but time will tell in as far as you know again moving soybeans used to last and what the needs are going to be able to get the crop harvested so nathan when i look at these charts and i think about some of the things that we set on these webinars. Few months ago I'm humbled a little bit because we thought there might be some deterioration basis but we also recognize that some prior years with these tight supplies we had seen some pretty good pops in late season basis. And that did not materialize this year. And i guess. I'm wondering thinking about the export values if that was the big driver if you think about those prior years when we saw some some real positive strengthened basis late-season. It was in part because of very strong export demand. Mets simply did not materialize this summer. And i i suspect probably what led to the collapse and basis assembly. Didn't that export demand uber. That i think i agree and again you know there's kind two sides there one production while You know varying in different geographies. The national production air appeared to be relatively good But then i agree. I think that the main driver there was little. We have decent overall production what what is the demand side of it in export demand clearly At least leveled off or declined there as we move on disarmament where we didn't see sleeping moving much did there in the early part of the year so i think that definitely was the driver there we needed to see those big pops we needed to maybe have some production issues combined with you know some some big buying on the export market in we. Just we got kind of the complete opposite right. We got relatively good.

maytham Usda lindell north dakota cantu indiana swimming ford andre Football
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

06:14 min | 4 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Have some timely rains across the corn bill. Yeah it's important to remember. These yields estimates are effective as of approximately august. One and of course already had a couple of weeks a- weather but as you point out we've got a couple more before the september one estimates than you know if you think about the weather impact he'll probably all the way out so at least the middle of september right so let's see the point here. Jim is the record yields in both indiana and illinois and illinois as sixty four bushel average. My goodness that's that's a as a high average and so It'll be interesting to see whether that whether that actually happens for our viewers. Yesterday we had the crop. Report down at the indiana states. There a press conference in one discussion points with our soybeans specialist shawn to steal from purdue was What's been the impact of early planning soybeans. And i think gun somebody's Eastern corn belt states in particular. We're seeing some of that. There was really an emphasis on planting sleigh beads early this year in fact for the first year that i really remember seeing a number of people plant soybeans and leaving their corn planting the yard Because they thought it was too early and Early planning soybeans has really turned out to be profitable movie that i'm a farm management. Were earlier this summer uncle so again you took a look at the crop condition. Ratings on the saving side when my skip the slide. Sorry so So if you look at the production estimate. Four point three four billion bushels. That's up about two hundred million bushels compared to last year and that was very very close to the report estimates so no big variation there. It's kind of interesting yesterday when the report came out. We did see ensure run. We did see cantopop marketplace but it seemed like after people looked at the report. A little more closely. They realized that this really didn't differ much. From what the pre release estimates were unsolvable sudden prices kind of came back to where they were before the report on the before the market opened that they actually not so much before the report on. So michael again. You've taken a look at those crop conditioner ratings. Yeah there's a very similar story. what what what what. We talked about Vis-a-vis corn indiana's looking well above the five year average of percent of of the of the soybean crop rated good to excellent in indiana at the. Us is the opposite story. Twenty twenty one Is below the five year average. And that's why. I say there is a band around that a us soybean yield. Because when you look at the comparison for both corn and soybeans a us us 2021 a compared to us five year average is a similar story. I remember the corneille was was very low. Cup compared expectations were the you'll lead. It came up right about the mill of a a free report estimates of that soybean yield and so we could see i could see a a deterioration in the us soybean yield in the next production estimate think our viewers kind of pick it up on the fact that we kind of take. The drought august is million apps. More back than its yield story is i mean. I'm just you're saying there is there is. It is an open question yet. Back towards local Let's take a look at the export situation so If you look at it sleeping exports this summer especially china will really pretty darn slow And as a result. Usda's pulled back their export projection Still a pretty good number from a historical standpoint. Obviously at a two point one eight billion bushels but a little less than what we're anticipating earlier in the year and of course china continues to be extremely important. You can see that on the chart if you look at the export projections coming off the world. Egg supply demand estimate report. And look at where we're at so far we've exported ninety six percent of what your stays fourteen allston. Well that's partly because they keep going back to the expert number right so as we've gone through the summer they've kinda gradually pull that number down a little bit and as result. Yeah i think we're gonna hit the target But not confident that if you look at the recent numbers. I don't think we're going. Whoa through it either. So then as you start looking at the ending stocks. This is a pretty interesting story. It's it's a little different story than what we saw. In porn in porn the stock sentiments pete fac in the beginning of the marketing year. On actually before the beginning of the marketing year and then we kinda pull them down pretty much continuously. Throughout the course mark media soybeans looked pretty similar up until the sprint went. All the sudden it beginning at the export numbers would start in slowdown. And if you look at the change since may on two occasions now. Usda has raised twenty twenty ending stocks numbers so a period of about four months in a row where the energy stocks estimate was sitting in about one hundred twenty million bushels than back in june. They bumped it up to one hundred thirty five this month. They bumps up twenty five lane bush's to one sixty. That's still very tight. End the stock estimate but in the futures market and the commodity markets. It's always change today. Relative yesterday or ms case changed this month relative the last month and so two changes going. The wrong way weren't using as much as expected and as a result that explains some of the softness that we've seen in soybean prices this summer if you move ahead and then start looking at the forecast for twenty twenty one marketing year so far no been sitting at that one hundred fifty five million bushels going back to june report. Didn't change that. It'll be interesting to see if that changes on september report. And let's if there is a driver of teams are going to be on the yield side so If you look at specimen hysterical standpoint that.

indiana illinois corneille purdue shawn Jim Us Usda pete fac china allston michael sprint bush
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

07:25 min | 4 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"To see those ethanol production numbers and you're going to have to see better margins and that probably is going to be related to. What's going on with dan in terms of the rate of recovery. That we each durance so i'll pause there kind of turn over to nathan nathan you've been looking at The basin situation here in the form ball. Yeah so just. Start out with a quick look at. What's going on with basis here in central indiana So here we're looking at korn. Basis and central indiana using the center for commercial agricultural crop basis tool. I'm looking at the current years faces. Which would be the black line and relative to the historical three your average blue line and we're looking at this relatives of september futures for the entire crop mark where we're at the end of the crop marketing year looking at nearby basis to be a little deceiving so we're just going to look at it relative to the september futures for the entire crop marketing year to kind of get a better idea of what the trend has been there Of late. what you can see is that you know back Early in the summer months be well throughout the crop marketing year. Be relatively strong basis in that really got To its peak there in the early summer months where we were as much as a dollar forty above where we would expect to see based on that historical average basis so very strong basis levels there early in the summer monks. That has kind of pulled back a little bit but You know. I wouldn't say that it's had a steady or a trend of decline. It's just kind of a little bit out of time. We'll back and really flatten off your of late. Where currently we have basis levels. That are in the ballpark of dollar above that historical average Which for this year. We would expect basis somewhere around zero meaning. Cash writes the same but instead we have you know a dollar basis right now and so you know as we look forward to what to expect you know. Obviously the report. Yesterday the big news was Corneille being brought down at a national level but as has already been mentioned right In the state of indiana corneal is projected to be record highs and so basis being inherently local concept. You know we have to think about. What do we expect seeing of corn basis here in indiana where we're likely to half ample corns Supplies until. I think if you look forward a little bit and we'll talk about this just a second and a little bit more detail but you know those ford contract bids for new crop delivery or currently at levels. That would be more normal with normal being a very dangerous word when we think about what's happened in in the last several years but more in those normal levels as opposed to seeing how to continued strength in basis going forward so to kind of give a slightly different. I look at you know. We expect basis levels corn based in particular to maybe revert to those Seasonal normal this fall you know. What in state of indiana what what might be happening other places. So we've talked about at length and of some of the production issues that are being had in the northern plain states so i'm went our counterparts act. Kansas state university have a basis tool that similar to what we have at the center for commercial agriculture but within kind of their geographic scope. They include north dakota and so i thought it would be interesting to look at what goes corn basis levels In north dakota look like and then again kind of think about what what they might do. just kind of an interesting exercise provokes that might not be in indiana this to be useful information a couple of caveats just about what the of set up for the Tool that kansas state has where our tool hop marketing year starting in september on they can use more of a calendar year. And so what we're looking at Starts the first week jamerson. Very left hand side of charges the first week of january and then moving forward so for example weeks twenty would be last week of may right so the fifth year four weeks year. And so what you can see again. You know in north dakota Horn basis. This is for individual location. That's kinda in the center of the state. Their basis has been above what they would typically see is far as there through your average basis in order plain states tends to be much more negative see here in eastern cornell but again the red line being the current years corn basis has been above. That are green line. We saw that dip There in the middle of slide which is a shift from his again this nearby basis we were looking at deferred basis on that september contract for our tool here. We're just looking at nearby basis that dip roll from one contract for the next as far as look futures contract work comparing to really wanna wanna focus on is what's happened hearing last four weeks or so as it relates to corn basis. There north dakota and that is it's it's similar what we here's pretty strong right so a dollar above that three year average in as opposed to what i said as it relates to indiana and thinking about You know while nationally yields are down. We're gonna see record year yields here in indiana. We know that they're going to take a pretty big hit on yields on notre plain states. And so i would expect that the strength that we're seeing in basis year in discharge will likely continue as opposed to eroding like. We're probably going to see in the eastern hormonal stage where we're crop. Conditions are better. You're gonna be interesting something to keep keep an eye on and track but just the idea basis being local. That's what's going to happen. We've seen this in the past. I with for example. The planning issues that we saw in twenty nine thousand basis is the tool that get used to move grain right north south east west and so as we keep an eye on. What basis does Route the twenty one twenty two crop marketing year. It's likely that we're going to be pulling grain. You know from the eastern corner belt maybe toward some needs more in the western. So that's an interesting point amazing. There's been a couple of times in recent years. Twenty fifteen come to mind and twenty nineteen comes to mind where the opposite was true basis levels in the eastern corn belt. Here in indiana in particular. Were stronger than elsewhere because of shortfalls in production in our part of the country. We were having a pull corinth west to east. This crop year is shaping up the opposite. Let's going to be. I think something. For producers particular eastern bill to keep in mind with respect to making sales we might not see as much strengthened basis this market year as we haven't some of those barriers because of the fact that we're looking at record yields were those other states are actually below tran particularly true minnesota. You'll minnesota's a very large corn soybean a producer and the fact that they're prop is as bad as it looks like it's going to big There's definitely a core have to move up toward minnesota.

indiana nathan nathan center for commercial agricult north dakota Corneille durance center for commercial agricult jamerson dan Kansas state university ford north south east kansas minnesota
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

07:54 min | 4 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Or my colleagues. Dr nathan thompson is associate professor in the department of agriculture economics. Michael langham buyer. Who's a professor. And the associate director with senator commercial agriculture revenue webinar today following. Usda's release of the office crop report. Our production report as well as updated world. Eggs supply-demand estimates and there was a tremendous amount of information most reports. So we're going to get right to it As corneal meant which everybody was anxiously awaiting came in at one hundred seventy four point. Six bushels prager on that was down. Roughly five From the estimate had published a month earlier enforce that was just based on trend. This one was actually based on some infield observations. So historically more accurate estimate of what's gonna take place although there's still a lot of variability if you look at the history must report of these reports of these forecasts of that does put the ohio last year but not a lot if you look at the data on a state by state basis. It's pretty interesting and michael. You've taken a closer look at this baby. Then i have. Those august estimates on each state by state basis are very interesting indiana eastern corn belt woods great northwest farther corn belt. Not much right iowa. Illinois and indiana or all all looking at yields that are substantially above last year And and illinois indiana record yields whereas minnesota south dakota north dakota yields are substantially. What they were last year given the crop conditions of their That's not real surprising Looking at the latest data a minnesota had had only thirty six percent of their corn rated good to excellent. North dakota only seventeen percent that's why the percentage decline is so large there. South dakota thirty percent Only thirty percent of their crops. is rated good to excellent so a conditions are not good up there You therefore some very large reductions in yield convert last year. And you know. I think a lot of people were expecting reductions. Obviously in that part of the world because of the weather conditions they experienced. But there's a surprise in those states. Maybe the biggest surprise at least for me was minnesota. We knew the third men's difficulties especially in southwest minnesota. But you know they're yield is down thirteen fourteen percent compared to last year. I wasn't expecting that big of a reduction for for minnesota. How 'bout you. I thought maybe it might be ten percent. I mean the competitions have not been good up. There with thirteen percent is larger than i thought it was going to be. That's a large reduction for a major numbers in state so if you look at the latest drought monitor which just came out yesterday. You can see that. They're still some question. Marks in terms of where these yields dome on got the drop monitor kind of divided up there with the mid in eastern corn belts a part of the market on the right hand side and then western corn belt and some of the plain states on the left hand side. You can see the dakotas still very dry based on the drought monitor Minnesota still very draw dry based on the drought monitor. Parts of iowa still pretty dry based on the drought monitor. So you think about it Especially on a soybean side there is definitely secure in terms of what's going to take place on going forward and mike you took a look at number percentage of the crop. That's in those states this a lot right. You look at that North dakota couldn't minnesota is close to nineteen percent of the corn crop with minnesota having close to nine percent. I just that state and so very large producers and in some unfairly low yields iowa. Even though iowa's up compared to last year remember they had that really bad storm. A windstorm last year so that that impacted yeltsin iowa throughout iowa particularly in certain places and so and so the end you to put that perspective to just get a little more context on the i will yield. Indiana is expected to have a higher yield than iowa at this napa very often. Typically iowa has stronger Average corneille than than indiana and went on indiana record. High yield specter indiana. One hundred ninety four bush's breaker also taking a look at those crop conditions. You kind of mentioned that a little bit earlier but you might wanna highlight those little more. Michael just to summarize briefly. I mean we if we if we take a look at this this chart and we see that indiana's well above their five-year average would seem why india's expecting record record corn yields rippers percentage of the crop ray of good dax is almost three fourths in indiana compared with sixty percent five year average on the us on the other hand The twenty twenty one. A percentage of the corner good to excellent is actually lower than the five year average. And so i. I think that helps to explain why indiana's expected to have such a high corneille and the us average being below trend. So we take a look at the corn. Production numbers look at the chart for just a second corn production number for. Us came in at fourteen point. Seven five billion bushels. That's up from fourteen point one eight but it's a lower the Day was forecasting a month ago and lower the what the trains expecting coming into the report. So you want to focus on the surprise for the from reports. Yesterday the big surprise really was on the corn yield and resulting lee on the corn a yield production number both of those coming in below the average and actually below most of the individual estimates as well on both of those If you look at the ending stocks estimates. Usda did raise the twenty twenty crop ending stock estimate in other words the quantity corn. We're going to carry over from the twenty twenty-five theory into the two thousand twenty one five year just slightly but if you look at the charred It's sorta humbling away to look at this chart because if you look at what. The number was projected to be this time of year ago. That number was projected to be almost two point. Eight billion bushels and so that projection wound up coming down by roughly one point seven billion bushels over the course of the marketing year as a huge change in the estimate overtime. And i guess the idea of how difficult it is to forecast ended stocks on michael. You planned out one of the reasons that was because of crop. Estimate will shrinking hard following the release of the august report in a part of that was the storm of a swept through so much of the corn available and midwest last year just religious year ago this week excellent if you look at the stocks projection for To twenty twenty one crocker going into the twenty twenty two crop year. Usda pulled that back. Roughly one hundred ninety million bushels on compared to our forecast just a month earlier. So that's number one point. Four billion bushels a month earlier was one point. Four three blink bushels so that's still a pretty tight ending stocks on number if you look at that ending stocks as a percentage of total usage The twenty twenty that came in at seven point four percent. That's the revised estimate on this month's report for next year for the twenty twenty one crop year. It's coming in now at eight point five percent and just remember a month ago. That was very very close to ten percent just under ten percent a month earlier. So i'm not gonna say that we're going to see a repeat of what we saw last year but we are seeing a little bit of evidence of some tightening and those stocks relative. What we're expecting earlier in the marketing year on.

indiana minnesota iowa Dr nathan thompson department of agriculture econ Michael langham Usda North dakota corneille north dakota south dakota dakotas
Colleges Are Going Big to Incentivize Student Vaccinations

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:43 min | 4 months ago

Colleges Are Going Big to Incentivize Student Vaccinations

"Colleges are trying to convince their students to get the covert vaccine with all kinds of incentives. Free parking free zip-lining even free tuition. Npr's listen adnia covers higher. Education has been looking into this morning. Good morning before. We start with the incentives. A lot of colleges are also saying. This is non-negotiable right. You have to be vaccinated. That's right more than six hundred colleges are requiring the vaccine for fall and once we get a full. Fda approval on one dot. Number will probably go up. I should just note that colleges have long required vaccine so it's not completely new. A few private colleges have announced fees for students who aren't vaccinated but for the most part schools are trying positive reinforcements with some pretty flashy incentives. One fund one is the college of charleston wants ninety percent of students vaccinated women happens. The school's president is going to sit in a dunk tank and let students take a shot at him. That is only an incentive for a certain type of what else did you find. College is doing well. The big one obviously is that you could win thousands of dollars in tuition costs. So that's happening. A number of places including including purdue where ten vaccinated students could win up to nine thousand dollars which is in state tuition for a year Our interns nee. Dave found around the country students could win football tickets free laptops at west virginia university. They're offering two hundred and fifty dollars gift. Cards to chick-fil-a. That's a lot of chicken but i think for free tuition. At ohio university students could win a photo. Shoot dinner with the men's basketball coach. Or and i love this. One have a drink named after them at an on. Campus coffee shop. Of course campuses are also hosting vaccine clinics at orientation and moving days to make that shot easy.

NPR College Of Charleston FDA Purdue West Virginia University Dave Ohio University Football Campus Coffee Shop Basketball
The GOP's Fear of Power Explained

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:26 min | 4 months ago

The GOP's Fear of Power Explained

"There is now new evidence to show and continuing evidence to show from just the news dot com that the georgia ballots rejected by machines were later altered by election workers to count records obtained by just the news provides an unprecedented glimpse into human adjudication of m- of thousands of ballots were marks for candidates like trump or sometimes removed so ballots could count for biden. I also want to go into this. That we're monitoring the mike lindell cyber symposium and we'll stream the entire thing on our rumble channel today and tomorrow just the news dot com day after the november election as donald trump and other republican candidates clung to evaporating leads georgia vote counters in atlanta. Were confronted by a paper ballot known by its anonymously number. Five one five zero two three two one eight. A dominion voting machine had rejected the ballot on election night because the voter had filled in boxes for both trump and his democratic opponent. Joe biden an area known as an over vote now. The image of the ballot obtained by just the news shows the voter messily scribbled a large blob at six ten on november fourth. Twenty four hours at the ballot was i scanned and rejected by machine. Fifty one fifty a panel of humans decided the vote should be rewarded to to biden. You could see the ballot on just the news dot com scores of additional ballots. That same day had checks manually removed next to trump's name so this is the arcane process known as adjudication were human judgment is substituted for machine scanning in cases where votes incorrectly filled out a paper ballot election officials and official observers have dealt with this for years put in two thousand and twenty adjudication played a massive role in all more than five thousand one hundred forty eight thousand absentee ballots cast or three percent of them required some sort of human intervention. Why does that matter. Those votes. just a couple thousand of them could have been the difference between david purdue getting a runoff not getting a runoff therefore us controlling the united states senate or not controlling the united states senate. So why won't republicans talk about what's happening in georgia. Because they're afraid

Mike Lindell Biden Georgia Donald Trump Joe Biden Atlanta David Purdue Senate United States
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

03:48 min | 4 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"From the purdue university center for commercial agriculture. I'm dr brady bruin. I'm an assistant. Professor in the department of agricultural economics and joining me today are members of produce farm transition team. We have dr maria. Marshall who is the director of purdue institute for family business and rene wyatt farm business management specialist here in the department of agricultural economics and dr julia valiant of indiana university down in bloomington and she was a research scientist with the ostrom workshop. Today's podcast is a another episode in our farm succession series and the topic of today's episode is transferring the farm to a non family. Member so julia. You are new to this podcast. I want to give a brief moment for you to introduce yourself and also to remind the listeners that sometimes purdue and indiana university do work together even though we're rivals on most of the sporting fields. We do do a lot of great collaboration. So jack to introduce yourself to the listeners. Yeah good morning and thank you so much for having me on today and brady. It's really nice to meet you. I remember being at the lenders workshop..

department of agricultural eco purdue university center for c dr brady bruin dr maria purdue institute for family bu rene wyatt dr julia valiant indiana university Marshall bloomington julia purdue jack brady
More States Agree to Settlement Plan for Opioid-Maker Purdue

Hugh Hewitt

00:17 sec | 5 months ago

More States Agree to Settlement Plan for Opioid-Maker Purdue

"Luther be more than a dozen states dropping their objections to OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma's reorganization plan entering the company closer to resolving its bankruptcy case they proposed settlement will transform Purdue into a new entity that helps combat the U. S opioid epidemic. Through its own

Purdue Pharma Luther Oxycontin Purdue U.
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

04:41 min | 5 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Produce center for commercial agriculture. In joining me today is michael. Langham are is a professor by economics. Here purdue going to review the results from the june purdue university me group egg economy barometer survey farmers from across the nation each month we survey four hundred farms across the us to learn more about their perspective. A mega economy. This month's economy barometer survey was conducted from the twenty first through the twenty fifth of june so the economy barometer declined pretty sharply this month michael declined to a reading of one thirty seven from one fifty eight so that was a a twenty one point drop and if you look underneath that was really driven mostly by decline in turn conditions the index occurring conditions fell from one. Seventy eight to one forty nine so that was a pretty big drop Twenty nine point drop. The index future expectations fell as well. But it didn't fall nearly as much itself reading one forty nine. Md once every two thousand seventeen point drop. What do you make of that coming in. I wasn't surprised at went down. But i was surprised. It went down is much as it did when he said that was definitely the case with me. I thought maybe it might weaken a little bit but not as near as much as it. Did you know given the strong prices. I thought that would hold. It will be index of current conditions up there little bit. But obviously i was wrong. I i think there's some i think there's some underlying concerns related uncertainty a crop prospects and some parts. Some parts of the corn belt and gray plains is probably entering people's mind Your prices have been extremely volatile And so i. I just think this this general notion of uncertainty and possible possible price inflation. I is concerning to respondents. You mentioned prices. I guess i'm going to disagree with you a little bit. If you think about our may survey versus the june survey prices were significantly weaker. Especially on corn. Soybeans and hawks You know if you think about the peak in soybean prices for example versus the prices the week that we conducted the survey..

Produce center for commercial purdue university Langham michael us
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

04:08 min | 5 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"I think people have to really take another look at think about you know the way the market moves dollar here a dollar there is seems like nothing these days You have to think about. Is this something that we want to take a a move on at least a portion of our and i think that that's especially for people have done nothing to be prudent to to take that pretty seriously. I mean the the magic moves in short periods of time is pretty amazing. I think if you were rip van winkle and fell asleep for a couple of weeks you'd think that much had happened but the the answer is a you know if you look at the chart a lot happened the last two weeks on both the downside and then the recovery today so very interesting with respect to what could happen. I guess we're gonna need to take a little vote here. What do you guys think over the next thirty days. What's what's going to take place. What's what's your what's your guests as to what we might see. I think I guess i'll start this off. Since i posed a question but to me it's we're we're looking at a market that's gonna trade weather every day We're going to be looking at weather forecasts every day We're gonna see market reactions to changes in precipitation amounts of we're going to see both on the forecast side and on what actually happens. So it's i think we're in for a period of volatility the only thing and if we have good weather the rest of for example the month of july probably gonna see some weaker prices relative to what we saw today. But it's going to be very it's gonna volatile can predict with high degree of accuracy. So i talk about you. Go ahead i i would add to that. I would apple your points. I think it's definitely gonna be whether that's leading the way. I think that what to add to your comment about volatility the the range in the amount of volatility because of where we're anna stocks to use when a view i think the volatility just higher than even normally would normally. This is a volatile time of year. But the the the range of those ups and downs i think is even bigger and i think that's what people need to be paying attention to is. We could see a lot higher highs and a lot lower lows in terms of the movements. We've already seen that. I think that michael. I think volatility is going to be is going to be Quite large corn soybeans. But i think particularly for soybeans given that the acreage did not increase from the march from the marsh perspective. Plannings report To this this. June judah estimate. Would that shocked a lot of us. The fact that acreage didn't increase with a tight stocks with the uncertainty related to where the pork market isn't china. Your we're paying a picture extremely volatile soybean prices and so and so i think producers really need to be watching the new crop futures and look for opportunities to get a decent price for soybeans..

van winkle anna apple michael china
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

04:53 min | 5 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Com et is online. And you can go look in your county. What a particular practice would be expected to sequester or there are other studies that kind of put all that information in one place is kind of a meta analysis but what i think is useful is. It's one thing to to think about prices. Being offered multiple by sequestrating rate is another thing to think about all right. Well what would we actually have to pay farmers to adopt these practices. And that's something that people have actually looked at from from aggie con research point of view. And so we actually some colleagues here at purdue that did a survey several years ago where they were looking again at that point in time the carbon thing was much more hypothetical but they were essentially wanting to see. How much would they have to pay farmers in order to get them to switch from conventional till to no till and so again. This was a survey of farmers in the state of indiana and they basically estimated that for the farmers and their survey that the on average you'd have to pay them forty dollars an acre to make that switch from conventional tillage to know till which is an interesting number to know just to have some context there but if you wanted to convert that to kind of a carbon payment scheme you have to say okay. Well what does that translate to in terms of a carbon price so again you gotta make an assumption about that carbon sequestration rate so here just for easy math. I said okay. Well what if you could sequester one half or one metric ton per acre per year so that one metric ton would be pretty pretty ambitious half ton would probably be more realistic so that translates to a carbon price of forty dollars for the one ton or eighty dollars for the half metric. Ton of sequestrating would need it be needed in order to to incentivize the producer to actually participate. And so compare that right. Forty two eighty dollars per metric metric-tonne to where we're currently at ten to twenty dollars per metric ton and you can see. There's there's a pretty big gap there in terms of where that price currently is is when you do that sort of you know. Just kind of back of the envelope math. It shouldn't be too surprising to see that. Most farmers in our survey price just wasn't enough to get excited to participate. So that's kind of how i look at the price story there. So maybe the corollary to that is also think We've seen some some analogies here with respect to some other issues in agriculture. Going back a number of years. Think about a hog contracting for example in the early stages many of those contracts from a producer perspective were terribly attractive right and from the company perspective they were putting contracts out there and trying to determine how much interest there wasn't the contracts right. I suspect we're probably at that. Stage in these carbon markets where the companies are just trying to figure out. What is it gonna take to attract significant amount of interest. And we're probably going to see these prices change. Sure i mean who knows right up down sideways. I think the other thing too. I've heard it said this way and you think about the audience here with current commodity prices. We're looking at at korn. Revenue eight.

purdue indiana
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

05:59 min | 5 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Welcome to produce commercial. Egg cast purdue university center for commercial. Agriculture is podcast featuring farm management news and information. I'm jim mentor. Director the producer center for commercial agriculture. And joining me today..

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

04:34 min | 6 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"There the us could become a major player there in the export market and that provides opportunities for some big places. Play later in the year As we look for. But again. I think the important thing to think about as we look at Basis situation and we think about opportunities out there is that those large plays in basis. That we've been talking about for a while now given the stock situation or less likely than they were at one point but still something i if you have some old crop and you haven't taken it you know they're out there but you know you need to calculate the risk there because there's a lot of risks and basis. I've we look into the summer months. The other thing here is again. This is the same kind of process. But just i i left out two thousand eleven and two thousand twelve copiers because those are horrible drought issue so supply problem. We didn't really have a supply in twenty twenty more driven by demand right a big jump in demand which gave us the stocks situation that we have now so when you look at just ten and thirteen kind of your comparison years you can see that were already well above that ten cent threshold there at the beginning of june based on those two historical years in really. We've about reached that thirty cents brussel. I think we're at about twenty five sen ositive bases on central indiana where we've about hit that threshold that's leader out in the summer. Months is again. That's just giving you some targets or some numbers to kind of quantify. What we've seen going on. I what you might be thinking about going forward but again realize the risk involved with that Especially what we've seen going on a future side of things and then also i would say that opportunities for those who are less likely than they were at one point in the marketing year. That's a good point nathan. I think the key here is could. Could we see a repeat of what happened some of those barriers later this summer. Sure we could. What's the probability that well it doesn't appear to be real high and so if you choose to hang on to try and capitalize on that it could be a case of high reward but high risk right and so it's not something you probably want to bet. Murray much year production on there is that possibility. And it's getting too. I mean the bottom line is we're not going to know until late july and august whether or not those are going to be realized and You know it could be driven by exports as you mentioned it could also be driven by some strength. maybe ethanol market Those are probably be the two drivers as as well as just crop conditions in here in the us but So you've also taken a look at an ethanol plant basis and that's an interesting story in and of itself it really is. It's interesting to kind.

us indiana nathan Murray
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

03:18 min | 6 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"So they're saying <Speech_Male> they're very concerned. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And truthfully if you had <Speech_Male> in the somewhat concern <Speech_Male> europe tomas <Speech_Male> artfully roughly ninety <Speech_Male> five percent of the people <Speech_Male> survey. So <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> what your <Speech_Male> michael. <Speech_Male> This is a <Speech_Male> real surprising <Speech_Male> because if you look under the <Speech_Male> hood a little bit and we did <Speech_Male> some questions look <Speech_Male> under the hood a little bit <Speech_Male> if you look under the hood <Speech_Male> a little bit. There's several <Speech_Male> things that are being discussed. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> would be very negative <Speech_Male> from an estate tax <Speech_Male> policy for <Speech_Male> performs and ranches. <Speech_Male> One of those <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> reduction or <Speech_Male> elimination of step <Speech_Male> up in basis for inherited <Speech_Male> property. <Speech_Male> That would have huge <Speech_Male> implications <Speech_Male> on taxes. <Speech_Male> Also a lowering <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Male> of the exclusion <Speech_Male> amount so <Speech_Male> smaller states <Speech_Male> would have to pay a state taxes. <Speech_Male> I and <Speech_Male> that's and that <Speech_Male> lowering could <Speech_Male> be substantial <Speech_Male> and so they're <Speech_Male> worried about that <Speech_Male> and also the <Speech_Male> possible increase <Speech_Male> in capital gains <Speech_Male> taxes. You combine <Speech_Male> all of those <Speech_Male> things and you're looking at <Speech_Male> a situation <Speech_Male> that's going to <Speech_Male> adversely impact. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> informs ranchers that. <Speech_Male> Wanna pass <SpeakerChange> on the farm <Silence> the next generation. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think one of the <Speech_Male> things. That <Speech_Male> policymakers needed <Speech_Male> understand. Is <Speech_Male> that this change. <Speech_Male> In policy <Speech_Male> and the state taxes <Speech_Male> could really have differential <Speech_Male> impact on <Speech_Male> agriculture. <Speech_Male> Agriculture <Speech_Male> is in industry. <Speech_Male> That's very asset <Speech_Male> heavy. The biggest <Speech_Male> class of assets <Speech_Male> for farms <Speech_Male> and ranches is <Speech_Male> land <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that capital <Speech_Male> intensive nature <Speech_Male> means by <Speech_Male> definition. If you change <Speech_Male> the way you taxes <Speech_Male> states it's going <Speech_Male> to be difficult much <Speech_Male> more difficult <Speech_Male> To <Speech_Male> to pass on state <Speech_Male> on and pass a farm <Speech_Male> operation <Speech_Male> onto the <Speech_Male> next generation <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> what continue to ask some questions <Speech_Male> on this going <Speech_Male> forward. But it's <Speech_Male> pretty clear. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> do things i think of <Speech_Male> one is people are aware <Speech_Male> of the discussions <Speech_Male> that are taking place <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> they're concerned <SpeakerChange> about <Speech_Male> it right <Speech_Male> and it has ramifications <Speech_Male> beyond <Speech_Male> just estate state taxes. <Speech_Male> Certainly <Speech_Male> if you have <Speech_Male> the state <Speech_Male> tax policy <Speech_Male> particularly substantially <Speech_Male> that also <Speech_Male> could impact land <Speech_Male> values and as you <Speech_Male> indicated you know land <Speech_Male> is by far and <Speech_Male> away the biggest asset <Speech_Male> on far balance <Speech_Male> sheet anything <Speech_Male> you do <Speech_Male> to impacted. Atlanta's <Speech_Male> particularly negatively <Speech_Male> does <Speech_Male> have an impact on <Speech_Male> the financial situation <Speech_Male> on the farm <Speech_Male> From a a solvency <Speech_Male> standpoint <Speech_Male> so there's <Speech_Male> ramifications even <Speech_Male> beyond estate tax <Speech_Male> policy <Speech_Male> only <SpeakerChange> under these changes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Good point <Speech_Male> well michael. <Speech_Male> Mecca wraps up <Speech_Male> our discussion of <Speech_Male> the economy <Speech_Male> barometer. So for <Speech_Male> more details you <Speech_Male> can go to the website. <Speech_Male> Purdue dot edu <Speech_Male> slash barometer. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'd encourage <Speech_Male> you to consider joining <Speech_Male> us for our next corn <Speech_Male> and soybean alek <Speech_Male> webinar. We mentioned <Speech_Male> the volatility. That's taken <Speech_Male> place there. We've been <Speech_Male> doing these webinars <Speech_Male> each month. Following <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> usda's release <Speech_Male> of the world act supply-demand <Speech_Male> estimates so <Speech_Male> that webinar will take place <Speech_Male> on monday. June <Speech_Male> fourteenth <Speech_Male> at twelve thirty pm <Speech_Male> and of course <Speech_Male> if you're registered for the webinar <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> can always watch it at your <Speech_Male> leisure. We <Speech_Male> court those and post <Speech_Male> them on youtube <Speech_Male> and our senators <Speech_Male> youtube channel as soon <Speech_Male> as we can within <Speech_Male> a few hours usually <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> you can register for the <Speech_Male> webinar at our website. <Speech_Male> Purdue dot edu <Speech_Male> slash commercial <Speech_Male> egg and so <Speech_Male> I encourage <Speech_Male> you to share the podcast <Speech_Male> with your friends and colleagues <Speech_Male> and on <Speech_Male> behalf of michael langham <Speech_Male> in the purdue university <Speech_Male> center commercial agriculture. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> jim entered. Thanks <Music> for

michael europe Atlanta youtube michael langham purdue university jim
"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

Purdue Commercial AgCast

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"purdue" Discussed on Purdue Commercial AgCast

"Welcome to produce commercial. Egg cast purdue university center for commercial agriculture podcast featuring farm management news and information. I'm your host. Jim mentor director of the center.