19 Burst results for "Pulp Magazine"

"pulp magazine" Discussed on Tipsy Tales

Tipsy Tales

04:21 min | 9 months ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on Tipsy Tales

"We have a story like this. Yeah i mean the one. I did last. Time is a lot like this one. Yeah and that's where we were like. We should just go ahead. And do the bermuda triangle. Yeah 'cause we have come across it so much anyways. So for decades. Bermuda triangle has captured the human imagination with unexplained disappearances of ships planes and people and other phenomena located off the southeastern coast of the us in the atlantic ocean between bermuda. Florida and puerto rico. The region has become. It's known as a region of unexplained mysteries but the area seems a stretch as far as the magic nation will allow. also. The devil's triangle has been blamed for the disappearance of thousands of people in the past decades. The term bermuda triangle was first used by vincent gaddis in nineteen sixty four in an article published in argosy magazine but the earliest mention of the area was in nineteen fifty and nineteen fifty article published in the miami herald by edward van. Winkle jones edward vending winkle jones. Okay that's tongue-twister tears later. Fate magazine published see mystery at our back a short article by george sand covering the loss of several planes and ships including the loss of flight. Nineteen a group of five. Us navy gunman tbn avenger torpedo bombers on a trainee. mitch mission. Sands article was the first to lay out the now familiar triangle area where the last took place as well as the first to suggest a supernatural element to the flight nineteen incident. So and i'm gonna get into flight. Nineteen a little bit later on. Nineteen alone would be covered again in the april. Nineteen sixty two issue of american legion magazine. All right and then in february nineteen sixty. Four vincent gaddis wrote an article called the deadly. Bermuda triangle in the pulp magazine are saying flight. Nineteen and other disappearances were part of a pattern of strange events in the region. The next year gaddis expanded this article into a book invisible horizons. So this is when the whole legend of the Mita triangle really start to take off explanations. Okay you can both talk about this Explanations for occurrences in the bermuda triangle. Run the gamut from a scale of scientific to aliens. Yeah do you wanna talk about those now or you wanna wait until the end after. We've discussed all the weirdness Wanting to talk about the scientific ones first and then we can talk about the weird ones later. Okay so one of the things that people talk about or as an explanation as to what's going on is comfort competent comp- grew we're definitely drinking today. Folks all right compass variations compass. Problems are one of the cited phrases and many tr- triangle at incidents while some have theorized that unusual local magnetic anomalies may exist in the area. Such anomalies have not been found. Compasses have natural. Magnetic variations in relation to the magnetic poles a fact which navigators have known for centuries magnetic north and geographic. True north are exactly the same only for small number of places for example as of two thousand and the united states. Only those places on a line running from wisconsin to the gulf of mexico. There is some evidence to suggest. The bermuda triangle is a place where magnetic compass sometimes points towards true north as opposed to magnetic north. So that's one explanation and then another one. Did you run into this one. The gulfstream No i don't know you'll have to talk about because it may be under something different than what you have. Okay and other is the gulfstream. The gulfstream is a major service current primarily driven by thermo. Hey circulation that originates in the gulf of mexico and then it flows through the straits of florida into the north into the north atlantic..

vincent gaddis Bermuda triangle argosy magazine miami herald edward van Winkle jones edward winkle jones Fate magazine american legion magazine atlantic ocean bermuda puerto rico pulp magazine Us navy gaddis mitch Sands Florida bermuda triangle united states
"pulp magazine" Discussed on Pulp

Pulp

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on Pulp

"Welcome to episode fourteen of pulp I'm Jonathan Pepsi. Your host, and this is a show where we take a journey through the literary underground of pulp. Fiction, one story at a time. We are breaking ground once again into a new genre with today's episode. The Tales of adventure told in the pulp magazines of the early and Mid twentieth century come in many forms. And today we are diving into the first of our. C- Stories. You would think that this genre would focus itself mainly on pirates and buccaneers and many did. But tails exploring humanity's romance with the oceans and the intrepid sailors that answer the call to brave their myriad dangers can't be overlooked. It's easy to forget how mysterious our was only a short time ago. If today we want to see what a tribal warrior from the inland of Papua new, Guinea looks like it's only a Google search away. And if you WANNA visit. Twenty twenty not included. It's as easy as booking a flight, a hotel and tour guide. But for the original readers of pulp fiction, the mysteries of the natural world and the adventure promised by the far shores and distant horizons could only be seen by those willing to risk life and limb on the seas. Our story today is the mystery of the derelict by William Hope, Hodgson and it was first published in the British pulp magazine. The storyteller in July Nineteen O seven William Hope Hodgson was a prolific writer whose life was ended far too short during World War One battle of the Psalm. He is often remembered for his contributions to supernatural horror many of the stories nautical themed. Hodgson unlike many of the other authors who wrote in the Spent more than six years at sea and this experience allowed his stories to immerse the reader in the vivid detail only capable by those who experienced life at. Sea Firsthand. Now, before we jump into the story I'll take a second to explain a little of the nautical terminology used in this tale bear with me. The two main ships in the story are four masted sailing ships called Barks. Each mast carried three or four square rigged sails that hung from cross beams referred to his booms. Lord was the left of the ship and starboard was the right. The main deck of these ships had a cabin built it both ends the front or bow and the back or stern. The bow cabin was called, the foxhole referred to most of the time has foxhole. And at the stern was the. Cabin which often had windows known as galleries facing the rear of the ship and on the roof of which is where most officers stood during the day, and it was called the poop deck from the Latin term pubis meaning rear. Now I promise it's not as complicated as it sounds. So without further delay, sit back turn out the lights.

William Hope Hodgson British pulp magazine Jonathan Pepsi Twenty twenty Guinea writer William Hope Google Lord
Byte The Elder Sign Podcast

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Byte The Elder Sign Podcast

"Glenn Written Brandon Buddha host. The elder signed podcast. Who came up with the idea of doing this type of podcast? Well that's a fantastic question. And I. I think that answer might change depending on on on the setting but I think like like so many good ideas this one was was born in a bar and I think we dared to to do it and and no one blinked and so so the show is show is now happening and I urge everybody to listen to the first introductory episodes really explains what you guys. You're going to be covering and you talk about the new weird Gr- you guys talk about it at length and have a great definition and I just hope people listened to that but what I really found interesting was talking about the twenties and thirties and HP lovecraft and so many great authors Robert Howard got their start writing for essentially what was called. I guess the old pulp magazines talk about that. That was probably the beginnings of of horror and science fiction. Maybe starting to get a foothold. The little bit yeah. A lot of these guys were just writing for money. They wrote a draft and mailed it out and hope to cop published then could buy can a can of meat in love grass case or whenever they needed to live on they were writing to live and they invented a lot of tropes that we now associate with weird fiction and horror and science fiction and it was all kind of one thing. It was just coming out of these magazines. That were that. Were just on racks. That people bought read on the train and so many of these writers. Just that's what they had. That's what they did. Lovecraft is notorious for kind of living a poppers life and mailing out these stories one after the other just writing prolifically and it was a kind of lifestyle and it was the big form of entertainment for a lot of people in the in the nineteen twenties and Nineteen Thirties. He I mean what lovecraft did you know really inspired so many authors after them and even screenwriters and directors frankly they they just took up the mantle that he started came up with so much interesting stuff and developed his own mythology to that we all know in love so yeah he was he was great. I gotta ask you guys about the The selection of the different stories that you cover and we'll go into some details but you have you know stories from Robert Block where it is or the moon remorse of course lovecraft and even a know Howard of course and and even some Some more recent writers as well talk about the selection process. Because there's a lot to choose from. Yeah we're really intent on covering the whole gamut of of Weird Fiction really broadly conceived of really from the beginning of modern literature modern publishing around the eighteen hundred or so up until today and one of our real interests is in charting the way that a different people in different societies and different ages and also around the globe have responded to the the tensions and even the the traumas of their historical contexts by writing weird fiction or horror fiction or science fiction to to be airing out the things about their own world their rapidly changing world many cases that they find unsettling and to do this as kind of a real comparison that I think will will really shed a lot of light on the way that this fiction can actually be used to tell us things about their societies and by contrast in people from one hundred fifty years ago with people who are writing today and the interim period and all the way in between I think will really shed some light on that.

Lovecraft Robert Howard Glenn Robert Block Brandon Buddha HP
"pulp magazine" Discussed on G&Q Review

G&Q Review

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on G&Q Review

"Q. View what's going on not much Quinn. What is wrong with you? Not Not a lot really not alive. Because I've been in my house all day every day as I've been making an effort to go outside in work outside for bid and like my lunch hours like I haven't been real. You just work you just launch. Most of the time so I try to like all right. You GotTa have thirty minutes no work outside or I might start doing lunch yoga. I've been doing yoga after work by my start doing it during my lunch break. Revitalize sound like those people online on twitter and instagram. I don't know if you've seen this shit. Where they you know. They post like their their daily quarantine schedule. Like from twelve. To one is for the heart. You know you'll you'll meditate. And then from one to read a book like for the brain revitalize the Brain. But these people don't have jobs. I don't know what the hell they do. But the people parodied them and posted their own shit so they post like a paragraph like. Hey guys this is really helping me through my mental state. Here's my schedule. I hope this can help. You know. Be like wake up. Ten o'clock from ten to twelve like call duty bores twelve thirty start drinking one o'clock more wars. It's just such a I. I'm I'm happy I know we should dive into it. Endure movie hand. I'm happy I have work because to be off and beyond employed one you have anxiety probably because you don't have a And then you're just sitting there and allowing yourself to like through in your anxiety all day really like hit. Hit THE GROUND RUNNING. Hit the pavement. I'M GONNA go out on find a new job now. Everything's closed Yeah Yeah that sucks. You're just you're just stuck so that's that's shady but we can get into that a little bit later grant what are we? What are we talking about today? We are talking about e classic. Some say the best movie of all time. A lot of people say the this is gone. Girls directors masterpiece. And we're talking about Quentin Tarantino's pulp fiction. And what is this movie about? Grant Paul Fiction I don't even know the lives. Read it before it was a bad description. There's no real way to describe this film. Lissi nineteen ninety four American crime film written directed by Quentin Tarantino. Who conceived it with Roger Avery? So Stars Sean. Travolta Samuel Jackson Bruce Willis Tim Roth ving rhames. And Houma Thurman Mattel Several Stories of criminal Los Angeles and the title refers to pulp magazines and hardboiled crime novels popular during the Mid Twentieth Century. Known for their graphic violence and punchy dialogue them and I right off the bat. If you are here in any audio issues it may be too are. Maybe due to our quarantined state. You know we're not in the normal state of things. So if there's a little hiccup or a little blip we apologize for the bottom of our hearts but anyways back to the movie were progress. It's always a work in progress. You've seen this movie before grant. I'm guessing yes I'm alive ago. Probably for years ago maybe okay. I think I've seen this movie once before. I think I actually watched it either. I think probably it was two years ago and I completely forgot everything that happened. I mean I was convinced going in pretty much like I don't. There are some pretty notable and memorable and iconic scenes but the story as a whole really I did not. I didn't remember thing. I remembered her. Snorting heroin overdose. I knew that was going the whole time. That's the only thing I remember the WHO yeah. I think I remembered that they took her to the that guy's house. I guess it's a no no. That's the drug dealer. I'm confusing the drug with actually Quentin Lance or Vance or something. Whatever his name was yeah so what do you think grant I think it was good. It's it's a good film It's hard to talk about this film without all the hype surrounding it So it's hard to remove it from its reputation. It's got a it's got a lot riding on it. It's all riding on heavy weight. Its reputation precedes it in a lot of ways and I think as a film watching it now I wasn't completely blown away. That doesn't mean I didn't think it was entertaining throughout that doesn't mean I don't think he was a great film. I did in thoroughly enjoy it. I just wasn't blown away and then reading more about it through an analysis and stuff like that I was more a grow me more and more and the fact that it was made in nineteen ninety. Four to me is crazy. This did not seem. This seems like a film that could come out dinner tomorrow. I think it was pretty head of its time. I'm with you there I was. I don't know I don't WanNa zero is board Stephanie. A little underwhelming. It's very dialogue. Focus Right. It's very dialogue focused. There's the the the story doesn't really matter and I think what turned tuna was trying to do is do the opposite or add depth to pulp fiction's and Paul magazines that it's the film's about so taking these Archetypes of the mobster the mobster's boss wife right the mobster boss the mobster boss's wife you have the actual mobsters with John Travolta Jackson you have like this crazy drug dealer kind of white Guy Hippie You GotTa boxer which butch all these archetypes and he did a great job of adding depth each one so they didn't feel like cookie cutter at all. They felt like they all were very unique characters. And besides maybe the mobster boss rallies didn't seem like he had that much depth. But you know what I'm saying like they through dialogue you Kinda got to understand the nuances of all the characters. Which is something. That's not brought out in any pulp magazine. And I think that's what his project was with his film right. It seems taken for granted today because it's been copied to death but that's the reason why the the royale with cheese line comes up so often is that you really never expect some mobsters talking about McDonald's in France or in Europe so it adds a twist to it that I guess wasn't wasn't around at that time I think we were talking about rocky wild back and I don't think we were. I liked the movie just doesn't movie but I don't think you were that impressed with it because it's hard to put yourself there like at the release of the movie and to compare it to what was being released at the impact it had to Following film did you notice. I thought this was a reference to rocky rocky was the boxers name girlfriend's name was Fabian. And he kept on saying like like he was yelling at Adrian in rocky. I didn't even notice that. That's yeah I was like. That's definitely homage to like when he was on the chopper the motorcycle. And he's calling her out and he's saying it like in a slurred like kind of like not his normal voice like Sylvester. Stallone's Voice Damn. I didn't even think about that. Yeah no I'll definitely put that clip in. That's that's kind of cool. Yeah and I think in terms of the dialogue I would.

Quentin Tarantino Paul Fiction John Travolta twitter rocky rocky Quinn Roger Avery Quentin Lance pulp magazine heroin Los Angeles Stallone Sylvester Adrian Mid Twentieth Century Europe Fabian Stephanie Tim Roth Samuel Jackson
"pulp magazine" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on KGO 810

"Had read the early edition of secret cipher of the U. for lots and they immediately recognize the name Kerry wrist because attacked as an appendix on the book which mostly explains how to use the site for and how it was discovered and so forth attacked the interview with Terry on to the end of that so they got the name and then that led them to me and since Greg Newkirk was one of the I hate the term friends okay on Facebook but he was he's one of my five thousand Facebook friends I don't think it's three rounds but you know who that's just it's a holdover from the social network days in Mr Zuckerberg's vast empire of whatever it is in any case I consider Greg a friend now I mean that that was but they got in touch with me and say where's this Terry guidance I haven't seen him since nineteen ninety five he made off with my Richard Shaver nineteen forties pulp magazines he didn't steal them they were loaned to him I went down to Augusta to write my book when I got back it is gonna be heard Fuhrman said this year okay basics throw and I'm inclined to think so she was a sell on hold I'm worth a break already will come back and talk more about the the hell your project in the occult and all these other scary things your websites are linked up and coast to coast.

Terry Greg Newkirk Facebook Mr Zuckerberg Augusta Fuhrman Kerry Richard Shaver
"pulp magazine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"They were contacted by this guy who they have not been able to locate it all you realized they haven't found him now they have not found it interesting his house which they decide is burned down and the guy nobody locally in hell year seems to have ever heard of and course he he said he was not a local that he had moved in it was a mine on his property and he was I mean I don't know if that part of the story is true but the point is that their interest if that's the word because first of all it mentioned this is Terry wrist person as having said suggested that they go to that that this person go to the hell your group will call on that for convenience I think they call their their organization planet weird and it's well named but in any case it was to an old email address from an old website that they head back when they were teenagers so the site still existed the let's face it on the internet nothing ever really disappears at if you can't find it elsewhere you can go to the Wayback machine and you'll probably find stuff that I wrote back in the sixties when I couldn't write very well at all the they had read the early edition of secret site for the U. for lots and they immediately recognize the name Kerry wrist because I tacked as an appendix on the book which mostly explains how to use the site for and how it was discovered and so forth attacked the interview with Terry on to the end of that so they got the name and then that led them to me and since Greg Newkirk was one of the I hate the term okay on Facebook but he would he's one of my five thousand Facebook friends I don't think three but you know who that is and that's just it's a holdover from the social network days in Mr Zuckerberg's vast empire of whatever it is in any case I consider Greg a friend now I mean that that was but they got in touch with me and say where's this Terry guidance I haven't seen him since nineteen ninety five he made off with my Richard Shaver nineteen forties pulp magazines he didn't steal them they were loaned to him I went down to Augusta to write my book when I got back it was gone you know heard Fuhrman said this year okay basics throw and I'm inclined to think so she was a sell on hold I'm worth a break already will come back and talk more about the the hell your project in the occult and all these other scary things your websites are linked.

Terry Greg Newkirk Facebook Mr Zuckerberg Augusta Fuhrman Kerry Richard Shaver
"pulp magazine" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Newspaper comic strips in nineteen thirty five forty five year old former U. S. army major and prolific pulp magazine writer named Malcolm Wheeler Nicholson is inspired to put out his own comic book but unlike the others he will feature original comic material created by freelance cartoonists January eleventh nineteen thirty five to go to newsstands New York can you find on them fun comics number one the very first major Malcolm Wheeler Nicholson had a sense not just that this is filler but that new material might find its own audience the major needs business partners and don and filled in legal weights need less racy material to publish in nineteen thirty seven the three men enter into a partnership in Detective Comics comic that would give DC it's name hits the stands as the title promises Detective Comics differs from comic strips and books humor is giving way to crime fighting at the same time in Cleveland Ohio two high school students sons of Jewish immigrants are skipping the struggles of their everyday lives into a fantasy world of their own making Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster are shy and unpopular in school unsuccessful with the girls in in secure about the bespectacled appearance and physical abilities they lose themselves in science fiction magazines miniature fantasies of power and success use comic illustrator Arlen Schumer and comic book historian Danny finger off I think it was the year nineteen thirty four it was a hot summer night in Jerry Siegel the teenage writer couldn't sleep at night.

writer Malcolm Wheeler Nicholson New York Detective Comics Cleveland Ohio Jerry Siegel Joe Shuster Arlen Schumer Danny finger pulp magazine
"pulp magazine" Discussed on Full Cast And Crew

Full Cast And Crew

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on Full Cast And Crew

"He says well. Yeah that's that's the game the legend. Let's talk print. What was said? Yes yes my cake. On the runny shoe sit abandoned script which was shopped around and didn't find any studio willing to take it except Roger Cormon studio because really these guys thought of it as a B picture. A Roger Corman level picture where I did not think of it as something that would have the artistic doc and commercial legacy that alien has gone on to have that alway right one of running shoe sits friends was friends with Walter Hill and David Guiler the revisions that Walter Hill and David Guiler made our what allowed alien on paper to have a chance at becoming what it became much more so than what Dan o'bannon and running shoes had submitted on paper the characterizations were not there. The dialogue was not there. It was a b picture picture as written it. Was You know what it reminded me of reading. It was a pulp. Fiction sorely literally kept picturing like pulp magazine. Yeah I was reading it. Did you know that Walter Hill Did rename all the characters in the scrub. Yes and did you know that some of them are named after athletes. I didn't I didn't know that little threat who is played by Harry. Dean Stanton was named for George Brett. Parker was named for Dave Parker of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Lambert was named named after Jack. Lambert of the steelers. Wow Walter Hill also named Ripley Ripley and also Walter Hill and David guidelines. Were the two people who pushed for Ripley and and Lambert to be female. Because in o'bannon and SHUSTER's original script everybody was male however they did on and and Xu said very proud of this they did on the cover of their screenplay. Say by the way anyone can be Unisex is intended to be Unisex however when you read it it's clear everybody's man. It's literally no women in in in the movie at all. In fact the Walter Hill and David guiler script character. Descriptions and dialogue actually reminds me a lot of John on Carpenter's character descriptions and dialogue from film. That would come out a few years later in the thing which is obviously baby so influenced by this moving yes us and is similarly genre picture treated with serious intent. Yes and I by the way weirdly. You're talking about a perfect movie before weirdly the three movies that I would consider very close to perfect. Are All man vs monster movies. They're alien the thing and Joss right there. Those are those are all pretty damn perfect. You know what I mean. I think they are all I think. What helps they all had a very lean tight? There's really not much else. Besides we gotta survive. You know. We're here wasted shots. Nothing we had this conversation when we did jaws on the POD. It's jarring to watch some of the deleted scenes you can see from jaws. You're almost retroactively freaked out that that might have ended up in the movie. There's a scene with acquaint a music store like scaring child closed. Ranks high schools have gone the number twelve shirt for those fish. Do eat stuff choke it and it's so jarring because there is not one wasted frame and jaws. There's not one wasted frame and alien and there really isn't an wasted frame in the thing. Neither I agree with you. I would say jaws over all of them is such a titanic thing no pun intended. Because you could not be into science fiction. I'm not into monsters and you could still have gone and seen jaws one hundred percent. Jaws was like a Megaton bomb. Going off right these movies movies while successful at their time. Although the thing was not successful at all in fact it ruined John. Carpenter's career for a number ruined his life. What uh-huh alien was phenomenal alien? Rode the wave of Star Wars into yes round the block. Seeing it over and over again a crossover it made a ton the money. It was a thing Walter Hill and David Geisler rewrite the script a few times and they do so in such a fashion that Alan ladd junior says yes we will make this movie. Walter Hill petitioned the writers guild for Sole Writing Credit. Which I think is right however I think that an equitable thing would and have been for them all to have shared screenplay credit right now every by not story by and now the the credit was awarded solely to Dan o'bannon abandoned in the in the arbitration process which I think really gives short shrift to the contribution that Walter Hill and David Guiler made to the script but hey I did alright themselves later on the Twentieth Century Fox twice for profits because alien famously was one of the examples of Hollywood accounting where it had done so well yet twentieth? A Century Fox was saying we still haven't recoup our initial investment in the fall. And so we go through. The rewrite process released got finally becomes attached. I think Walter Hill was approached to direct the movie and then was too busy busy with some project. I say Ridley Scott was the fifth director of fifth choice after everyone they had one director. I don't recall his name but he had directed you know some seventies avenue sixties pretty pretty decent movies and he came in. He said the meeting was very short. They asked him how he would do. The face hugger and he just sort of offhandedly said. I'll just get some like the cheap intestines on their face cares. Nobody's nobody's GonNa care and they were like thank. You know that's not gonNA work for us. Let's jump into the movie a little. So we mentioned truckers in space which was sort of one of the great innovations of alien as opposed to star wars which had sort of swashbuckling kind of fantasy. Hennessy characters in alien all of a sudden you've got kind of these working class people thrust into space and spaces not a pristine environment. It say I can't remember the term that was coined to you like a a a yeast. Future everything is is heavily used. The beginning of alien is beautiful. The okay this is another thing that that Walter Hill and David Geisler contributed to the screenplay is the efficiency of the opening scenes where we're just seeing the Uninhabited corridors and rooms of the spaceship. I'LL CO-CHAIRMAN FREYRE that is in the first screenplay that is in there in there but in a much different way okay. That's an in a much different who I remember reading. I was like Oh that was there. From from the first group I was shocked that have somewhat however the sickness with which Walter Hill and David Guiler kind of trimmed that down added to this sense of foreboding and mystery whereas the way it was written in abandoned intrusive script is like these guys were nerds. These guys were geeks they're like drawings in the screenplay guys here by the way is a hand-drawn picture of how we see this solar solar system. I would have done that as an interesting Walter. Hill David Guy. There were like boom shot shot shot shot and that's really what we get released version. And they're professionals. They did a gated. Eighty eight yes a great draft. They did a great cleanup of an okay script. Exactly so here is after they wake from their hibernation chambers we come to find out the ship has waked them and they gathered to hear the reason. Why well some of you may have figured out when at home yet? Only halfway halfway their mothers intercepted the course program to do that. You'd sit in from dishes. Arise they have breath seems she has intercepted transmission of unknown origin. She got us up to check it out. Transmission out here yeah. It's kind of a transmission critical beacon repeated intervals of twelve seconds. So as I don't know human I know we're obligated. I'm the section head to bring this up but this is a commercial ship not a rescue ship right right not my contract kind of duty and what about the money. WanNa give me the money to do. I'd be. Let's go with a bullet situation. Images can I say. There is a clause in the contract specifically states any systematized tons mission indicating a possible. Intelligent origin must be investigated. Until moment. Party hackery you. Just listen to the man penalty. Total forfeiture Tura shares. You've got that going in..

Walter Hill David Guiler Dan o'bannon David Geisler Roger Corman Roger Cormon pulp magazine Carpenter Lambert Pittsburgh Pirates Ripley Ripley David Guy Harry Ridley Scott Joss Dave Parker POD Alan ladd Dean Stanton section head
The History of Women in Science Fiction

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:21 min | 3 years ago

The History of Women in Science Fiction

"Science fiction has often been represented as a boys club but you have in particular studied and written extensively about history of women running science fiction if women have always been present in his own room why do people don't know about this why do we just think about the men who have written science fiction right i mean i think we we do think about women in the shocker but only like at certain periods of time right like everyone willing to admit that mary shelley is is one of the founders of the genre certainly one of the i think the first authored a write a commercially successful science fiction story and then you know you get fast forward to the nineteen seventies add a the revival of feminism an all of a sudden you at authors like her glennon joanna raw in margaret atwood and then people are like oh wow women right science fiction fiction and of course just this past year n k jemison right became the first author of of any gender race to win three she goes in award so now we see women in the john ross but there's a huge gap between like eighteen eighteen as they nineteen seventy they add i don't really understand where all the women were so i started looking around at turns out sure enough there they were there we've always had women in the sean raw on from the very beginning women constituted about fifteen percent of all science fiction producer third an we know that by the time they started doing reader's poll in the nineteen forties and fifties that women counted for at least forty percent of the readership as well an today i'm not sure where we are in readership but i know that the numbers of women science fiction have doubled so worried about thirty thirty five percent now but i think the reason that we forget that there were so many women in between shelly an a the revival of feminism in that the the growth of science fiction is because women were sometimes writing we were looking at the kinds of fiction they were writing and then we also can't find it because it didn't always get anthology eyes right it's it's really hard the early science fiction community were all magazine science fiction and add those magazines often got thrown away or they didn't laugh they weren't preserved so if you don't have access to a university with a huge science fiction collection like i do it's really hard to find these women and then you know it's exacerbated by the fact that even even if you have anthologies a lot of early anthologies were written by people who didn't necessarily include women in those anthologies for one reason or another yeah i mean it's it's interesting because obviously you have the the men who were writing in this pulp magazines same guy that didn't disappear people still about that and it's like it's just frustrating but then i mean i don't know if there's anything in it but things like james chip tree you know perhaps people don't necessarily know that that this is a pseudonym right right i i think james kept tree right that was probably a pretty well now one interesting thing i've found is that most women did not you nailed it and then most women went by willie decidedly feminine name an and usually their own name although sometimes they would also take other names like willis lorraine which is a lovely name she was born mary mod done you could see why she switched her name but really what i found is most women did not match courageous men an austin women pictures were printed printed in the magazine in the very early magazines author had catches of themselves with their draw with their with their stories so an even if somehow you missed that'd be editor were quick to correct a reader who missed took female writers from el writer but what did happen and that one very early in the shot like in the twenties and thirties right so white after universal suffrage and the first wave of feminism and i think a lot of people were really sort of on board with thinking about how the future my female as well is mel an but then in the late thirties and forties you the backlash against feminism in that time when the first science fiction anthologies are being put together and those were put together by a younger group of men who really did you find participated in that that minutes backlash rhetoric right john campbell who wore that no woman could write science fiction even though he'd been publishing in magazines women did you know he had it that's how to the male got her start in her career he told her no woman could write a story and she said yeah i bet i can write a story you'll like it so much you'll you'll back me from warren and that's exactly what happened actually but as anthology forgetting put together women we know they're anecdote on an app that that women have told that they were cut out of the magazine so luckily i've known her with one of the pioneering science fiction authors she gold lingers back and a was really popular with people's you're looking big creating space opera often she had been invited to be to include a story in one of the first big client fiction anthologies andover supposed to be a party for everyone who's gonna be on thala g and she was sick and she couldn't go so she sent her husband an editor said oh you must be likely stone he said no no that's my white i'm just here for her as a place called her and they're like oh that's very interesting and then within two weeks you had a letter saying yeah we decided to drop their story from anthology i'd really hard not to put to ensure together on that

Thirty Thirty Five Percent Fifteen Percent Forty Percent Two Weeks
"pulp magazine" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

15:24 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Green Beckley has been chasing strange mysteries and odd stories all over the world for decades. He's turned his attention. And that of his writing team to the subject of our hollow earth. An inner world paradise regained way to hell. Welcome back to the program him. George the nice to be on again. Explained right off the top that we're talking about several different concepts. When we talk about the Holloway or the inner earth mystery it's thought that the, the earth is actually multi layered, and that there is a heaven inside the earth, paradise and two others is a, a real living in the hell that exists below blower feet. Now this includes the shaver mystery Admiral Byrd, and the hollow earth, and even the UFO crash at Roswell SARS, I'm concerned, even a possible Kennedy assassination link. So there's a quite a tidy global here to uncover. Oh, yeah, I'm a we're going to try to cover all of it. I it was a lot to chew on here. I, I enjoyed the book you know, there's a lot of this gushing about flat earth, which I have trouble with earth. Yeah. I always thought that the flat. Even back in the days where supposedly people thought that the are was flat was a hoax that it was created by these explorers, and the, the different kings and queens, Sunday, explores out, in search of golden spices and other riches, because they wanted to it to tell the other explorers to keep away that they would fall off the side of the earth, when they knew all well, and good that the earth really was not a flat end, there's no, no evidence that one can actually point to. I mean, all you have to do is look through a telescope at the other planets in the solar system, and you could see they're not they're not flat. I mean, it's just there's pasta theory. Now, some people might say that, about the Halloween is well, but it's a little bit easier for me to, to swallow because we might also be dealing with the parallel universes here. Everything that we talk about tonight, may not be in the physical plane. Oh, that's interesting. So, but I you know, I put it in a different category than flat. Earth were pretty sure, in fact, we're absolutely positive that the earth is not flat. But the hollower earth is big. There are a lot of really deep holes. And I'm interested in, in some of the angles that you pursued in this Admiral Byrd and others who are serious, people who have looked into this in a serious way. Let's start with it as sort of a mythological and religious eleven. I though the story about people living underground, I mean it's a fictional story. It's novels, it's in movies, but it's been around with Uman's for a long, long time on one level or another, my goodness. Yes. You know, in fact, the fellow who I guess you could say discovered Haley's comet, Mr. Haley, I have a photo are up not photo, but a painting of him portrait, Ed my office, which shows him holding a illustration of the Halloween he was a big. Believer in, in the planet being hollow, and that there was a essential son in globe civilization, possibly existing inside the planet also around eighteen I think twenty five or so there was another fellow by the name Simmons who actually tried to get the US congress to put up a to fund an expedition into the hollow earth, and did take him seriously. But they died before his proposal, could take a route. Now, Admiral Byrd, mainly the south and the North Pole for military purposes. He said, you know, later on when, when interviewed, but the concept of, of the earth, being a hollow, as you point out goes back many, many years, in fact, part of this book are Halloween. We found the manuscript that goes back. Oh, I think about one hundred fifty years before the one that drills Verne wrote, it was written by a Danish university professor, who claim that he actually fell inside a cave and inside the cave. He was led to this world inside of our own planet. And he encountered, he says, a very strange beings and some very strange plants. And so the book has been translated, but it was never really widely distributed, and we came across the copy, and polish it up a little and included as part of this our Halloween the book. So it has become a part of the legend, and lore, of course, I would suppose that the Jules Verne a book and the, the movies, which is start the movie star, Pat, Boone was in the way, right? You know, probably did a lot to, to fluster this idea. But there have been other a authors including HP lovecraft, the quest wrote about the a lot of things that went inside happened inside the earth, and in the oceans and so forth and probably most famous of all Edgar rice Burroughs about it in somewhat of a serious. Notion. So people ask me well, when did the concept of a start. Well, I you know, I try to do some research on this, and I was not really able to find out, it seems to go back as a is long as there's a recorded them literature. Yeah. I mean, you've got examples in the book from Greek mythology of the three headed hound of hell that guarded, the underworld. Contribute to a Hercules, Invictus is a great scholar when it comes to a Greek mythology. In fact, he claims that the Greek gods actually live in caverns the beneath now, limpest and that they still exist to this very day. And from time to time they actually depart, the cabin dwellings and go go visit the local islands there in Greece. Of course, Christianity has a hell a literal hell where people go and pay for their sins through all eternity. Who and paper was being rationed anyway. One day while Ray Palmer was out of the office. Big Manila, envelope arrived, and it was opened by his assistant editor fell by Bob Brown. I believe, and he read the first page of the manuscript it purported to be from a Richard. Well, it was from Richard shaver, who supposedly was hearing voices and said that there was a, an ancient civilization that was living inside the earth, and he took the manuscript and he tossed it in the waste basket, because first of all amazing stories was supposed to be a science fiction. Publication list was sent in as a legitimate story about archaeology and supposedly with a scientific bent, although that would highly placed in that category. Well wouldn't Ray Palmer came into the office. I guess he noticed the thick evola sitting on top of the wastepaper basket, and he picked it up. And he read the first couple of pages, and he saw something in it, and he decided to rewrite the west shaeber was not a very good writer, the fatal east because I know I headed this stuff from time to time but Palmer so that there was a something with the manuscript that just. Well, it was something that he believed in, there was something there that held some truth. And he decided to have it rewritten and published it in the magazine, as I remember lem urea. Now, the, the manuscript was about a race of beings called the titans who had come from another planet, and they had inhabited or doing trade with the people that live here on this planet back in the days of a la- Muria in Atlanta. Some ten if you wanna accept those as being existing continents, but they, they were their lifespan was being decreased. Because there was radiation coming from the sun. So, in fact, according to biblical scholars, there was once a canopy that existed over the Arthur protected us from this solar radiation and. Anyway, the titans. Some of them decided to go back to the planet that the came from and others board inside the earth. Apparently, there was even a tunnel system that existed below that went back before they had even arrived. I, I don't know how many eons are thousands of years, and they set up a headquarters there, but being out of the rays of the sun, they went a little bit, shall we say they became mutants, and what a little bit mad to say the least and shaver claims that he heard voices and these voices were coming from this cavern world, and that he believes that the, the Darrow, he called this race of beings or responsible for all sorts of woes through the man humanity that they fill their minds with the murders thoughts caused wars disasters such as. Plane crashes train wrecks and death via some ancient laser like weapons that they had the captured from the titans or are kept their from the titans. And, and of course now, people thought that he was a little bit ah bankers, of course, but Palmer published his stories a series of them and mazing stories started getting letters from readers all over the United States saying that they had hurt the same voices, and we're getting the same information and Palmer was able to increase the circulation of the magazine amazing stories by well over fifty thousand which was unheard of for pulp magazine, and it ran for about five or six years, I guess, at amazing stories until a Ziff Davis started to get some flack from the regular science fiction readers because they threatened to cancel their subscriptions and. And they just thought that it was just the hogwash. And, and so if they've is finally told Palmer to, to cool and not the publish any of these stories anymore, but I guess Palmer sort of got even because he went out on his own and started his own little publishing empire and the first magazine he put out in nineteen forty six fake. Wow. It's still, which is still published a not very frequently. But it still comes out to this to this day and he continued with the shaver mystery. And then later on. He started a magazine called flying saucers from other worlds, and as far as I can recall. He was the first to actually talk about this the halls at the north and the south pole. In fact, he had, I guess, a collected information from a number of polar explorers who said that as they reached the north of the south pole. They had actually run into a green valleys and animals that were supposed to have been the, you know, extinct on on the planet for thousands of years. And he, he took these stories seriously. And he published it in his magazine. And I guess this was his magazine was probably the first that I, I read on a regular basis back in the I guess, maybe around nineteen sixty three nineteen sixty four and I later wrote a column for the magazine that lasted. I don't know about maybe seven or eight years. So the magazine father went out of business, it was called on the trail of the flying saucers. So I, I guess to some extent, I was influenced by his. Editorials and his penmanship. In this book, the hollower are hollow earth. There's a description of rape Palmer. It says by Connick publisher editor and offbeat author promoted, some curious, sometimes extreme ideas, that sounds like he's like your role model. I mean you you've you've explored, I guess it would have been Ray Palmer and later on the late great gray Barker, who wrote the first book on the men in black called. They knew too much about flying saucers. And of course, we've just seen the release of the fourth men in black movie, which really has nothing to do with the men in black. Of course of, of UFO infamy. You know it's become I wasn't too crazy about it. It's just a little too fanciful for ripe rape Palmer. I mean doing amazing stories and then fate magazine he's he really made an impact in..

Ray Palmer Admiral Byrd Richard shaver US titans Green Beckley Jules Verne Holloway rape George editor Uman fate magazine Kennedy Greece North Pole gray Barker
"pulp magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And he decided to rewrite the shape was not a very good writer, the fate of lease. Because I know I headed this stuff from time to time but Palmer. So that there was a something with the manuscript that just. What was something that he believed in, there was something there that held some truth? And he decided to have it rewritten and published in the magazine as I remember la- Muria. Now, the, the manuscript was about a race of beings called the titans who had come from another planet, and they had inhabited or doing trade with the people that live here on this planet back in the days of alum Uria in Atlantis and tan. If you wanna accept those being existing continents, but they, they were their lifespan was being decreased because there was radiation coming from the sun. So, in fact, according to the biblical scholars, there was once a canopy that existed over the Arthur protected us from this feller radiation. And anyway, the titans. Some of them decides to go back to the planet that the came from and others board inside the earth. Apparently, there was even a tunnel system that existed below that went back before they had even arrived. I, I don't know how many eons are thousands of years, and they set up a headquarters there, but being out of the rays of the sun, they went to a little bit shall we say they became mutants and went a little bit mad to say the least and shaver claims that he heard voices and these voices were coming from the this cavern world, and that he believes that the, the euro, he called the this race of being or responsible for all sorts of woes through the man humanity that they fill their minds with the murders thoughts caused wars disasters. Such as plane crashes train wrecks and death via some ancient laser like weapons that they had the captured from the titans are kept their from the titans. And, and of course now, people thought that he was a little bit ah bankers, of course. But. Palmer published his stories a series of them. And they've mazing stories started getting letters from readers all over the United States saying that they hurt the same voices and we're getting the same information and Palmer was able to increase the circulation of the magazine amazing stories by well over fifty thousand which was unheard of for pulp magazine, and it ran for about five or six years, I guess, at amazing stories until as if David started to get some flack from the regular science fiction readers because they threatened to cancel their subscriptions. And they just thought that it was just the hogwash. And, and so if they've is finally told Palmer to, to cool it and not to publish any of these stories anymore, but I guess Palmer sort of got even because he went out on his own and started his own little publishing empire and the first magazine put. Out in nineteen forty six was fake. Wow. Still, which is still published the not very frequently but it still comes out to this to this day and he continued with the shaver mystery. And then later on. He started a magazine called the flying saucers from other worlds, and.

Palmer titans Arthur writer pulp magazine la- Muria shaver United States David six years
"pulp magazine" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

06:35 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"Richard festival. Welcome. It's a it's nice that you're taken the plunge and send some audio sorts in join several people who've donate, which is which is really great. And I thank you for doing your question about the great felt I'm not sure whether it was from me or kind of pose to everybody out there. But I saw that speak about briefly because I have been read. Nope. I'm watching some videos about the filter, and obviously I think they crystallize it into a few short sentences in the episode, which is great because that's what we need to understand in order to incorporate into this. When you look at it as a whole and the amount of stuff out there about it is a fascinating subject and one that I haven't quite got my head around yet. You know, I watched a medieval Elliott about not only the great failed existing but where on. On the line of filter. All we we might be at the beginning of it. We might actually be at the end of it. And depending on where we are as how hopeful situation that is does it spell out doom and so on. Man, blows your mind really does. So I don't know the answer that question, but it sadly one that's really worth digging into and another contributor Andrew who will hear from an a moment sent me the name of a podcast that looks at this in one of the episodes, and it's called the end of the world with Josh clock. So I'm going to check that out haven't checked out yet. But if anyone wants some enlightenment on the great filter, and what it is. And so on maybe that's a good place to start. So thanks for writing in. Tom. This is Andrew from Los Angeles for the most part. I really liked this episode. I think they did the dramatic tension. Really, well, especially for the shuttle launch scene, and when the solar flare was about to hit the ship. I don't know about you, Tom. But I think this was the most stressed out. I've ever felt law watching twilight zone episode. I think they pulled it off. Really well that was on the edge of my seat, not knowing if the guy was going to get the whole ship destroyed or if the simulation was going to suddenly end. There was a really great seen. It felt really slow between the shuttle launch and the solar flare seed, but it did give me time to think about what kind of twist might be coming up and did seem suspicious that they couldn't look through the windows. So I was totally thinking the same thing as the Pearson character that it was all simulation to train, astronauts if that had been the. Case I think that would've been cool nod to the first episode of twilight zone, whereas everybody said this time it would be with a group of astronauts instead of just one guy. I notice a couple cross-references with this episode the Whipple company, of course, which we've seen in the earlier episodes. And then also one of the crew members had a toy plane that was the plane from nightmare three hundred thousand feet when I saw the trailer for this episode. They make it pretty clear that the earth has been destroyed somehow, and I was really thinking, oh, maybe this is when they're going to say the reason why the earth is destroyed is because president Oliver Foley was person to launch the first nukes. So a little disappointed. They didn't do that. I think it would have been a fun way to tie the episodes together. I guess with all these references between the episodes. I'm hoping it will build up to something more important by the time the seasons. Guess we'll see anyways. Thanks for the good work. Tom looking forward to the next episode. I'm not the answer rounded here. I think this was one of it not the best of the new series writing acting directing everything he worked for me. If there was a moment when the plot slowdown. I thought the direction kept things visually interesting when the story had slowed down and be told the actors all their marks mere minutes in this episode. I could feel the weight of the story the weight of the moment just based on their reactions. I thought they all just knocked out of the park the writing what more can I say it just had that classic Sifi touch. You know, that's stuff. We talk about on the show the twilight zone, the pulp magazine dimension x feeling but still felt new and fresh, and I thought it was just perfect. I am a little biased. You know, the checks a lot of boxes for me. It's post-apocalyptic. It's a bottle episode kind of you know, although very expensive one. It's character-driven. These are all things that I. I seek out whenever I read or watch deci stuff this headed all from compared to other episodes. I felt a lot of them have run a long. I'm always thinking, you know, maybe this could used more draft or a little bit more editing. The all seem to me Anderson times, but this one felt like it thrived off a little bit of roughness felts raw in a good way. Six degrees of freedom. It just allowed us live with the characters in allowed us to. Just sit with happening to them. What was happening in the story in you know, I'll certainly be coming back to it again for a second viewing. But I thought that. Everything came together to just make it. A a great episode other things I love naming the machine after bradberry not really twilight zone east Reagan's much as just general Sifi one especially because the the Martian chronicles, and it was a mission to Mars if you've ever read it in your fantasy fi even if you aren't fantasize fi envy listeners I highly recommend that book of short stories at all kind of center around Myers. Beyond that not much else. Except that. I think this was as good a start to the second half a season as anybody could hope for I can't wait for the rest, and I can't was your episode. Thanks. It's

Tom Andrew Richard festival Elliott Sifi Josh clock Pearson president pulp magazine Reagan Oliver Foley Los Angeles Anderson Myers three hundred thousand feet Six degrees
"pulp magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

13:34 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Let's start with this though. Amy today, of course is tax day. Taxes? Don't worry about it. You you don't really have to. If you haven't happy tax day. I don't know if there's such a thing, but you can file an extension form forty eight sixty eight that'll cover an extension for your federal tax returns. And this year. There's a lot more people choosing to do that one in ten taxpayers will go that route this year, which is the most ever I think it just because things are a little more complicated. This year. Haven't necessarily a lot of some people haven't figured that out yet with tax reform that went into effect at the end of two thousand seventeen for most of us, right? This is the first time we'll all of us. First time we filed stints that tax reform. And I think for a lot of people you get used to kind of getting the same amount back every year. And so there was a wakeup call this year because either you didn't get that amount back or far less got it, and in some cases, people owed. And so I think I've mentioned this TV four, but actually some people had to go through like tax repairs. How'd you go through training on like empathy training because upset about the changes in what that meant? And of course, the people who are the ones who wait until the last minute. You can definitely file an extension. Did you just have to be ready to pay? If you owe me I did a deep dive, and I talked to every friend of mine, every friend. I have everybody, I know. Well, they both said. Refunds this year. And almost to the man or woman, it's like, I know more people getting refunds that aren't getting refunds. And so usually when the first return started coming back, and we heard the horror stories about the the Trump tax cuts, and what occurred was people are going to keep more of their money all year, but you may wind up getting less refund or God forbid you have to money at the end of the year. And of course, like three months ago. This was a huge news story talking about it people upset pissed off. And I said, well, if you're keeping more money in a year, you're not going to get a refund because you're using your money in real time as opposed to waiting for months or a year to to get that money back from the federal government, which I think is a good good thing. But here we are now in everyone's still getting a refund. So we're the story celebrating that. Well, I think truly on average the refund is about the same as it's been the past few years. So the average refund isn't hasn't changed much? I know we talked about at the beginning of tax season. When people it was down substantially. It's the same your informal poll might show that more people are this even more people are getting money back. But the numbers bear that a lot of people actually aren't right. Far fewer are getting returns this year. Because like you said more of us have more money in our paycheck. But here's the difference. Loading. You have say twenty-six pay periods over the course of the year. So if you're getting a little more and each paycheck. You're not feeling that so much you do feel when you get three grand back all at one time people aren't necessarily seeing you're actually winning if it's fifty bucks one hundred bucks, or whatever it is over the course of the year, you have control over what you do with that. If you invest it, and you make interest, you earn money on that you're far better off than giving it to the government and letting them re gift it to you are so many people feel like such winners when they get so much money from the government. Gaming the system. They're not giving you money. The government doesn't like you. You didn't do something really cool this year. You didn't find the best tax preparer? No, you they gave you your money back. You gave them too much money to hold for you this year giving change their re gifting your money back. Here's your change months. Money you spent last years later, but people feel like it's found money, right? No, no, no, look at it the right way. Because if you do get a return the decision that you make to do is we'll probably change substantially if it's not, you know, money that fell out of the sky like you're treating it. Yeah. I know and everyone goes out like to get it calls me to getting a lot of money back in and do. With that tax reform things changed for a lot of our W4. form, the WTO W4. that you fill out on the first day. When you're starting a lot of you probably haven't revisited that in five ten fifteen years, if you bet on the same job for a long time, you know with the tax reform. Now's the time to go back. If you got a lot of money back, or if you own a lot of money, go in and change, the withholding. There's online calculators all over the place that can help you figure out. Exactly how to do that you want to be as close as possible. Now, we're not saying you wanna oh money. Nobody wants to do that. If you're getting two hundred bucks back. You are a winner. Go to dinner go. Right, right. Yeah. You're have good time. But I noticed too that did I dream this see it as a figment of my imagination with. Well. It's twenty nine hundred the government is actually loving us. Use your credit card to pay taxes. Can but you also have to think through this because it's a third party processor. And there is a fee and it's anywhere close to two percent. And so a lot of people like to use a credit card because you like to get your point. Right. Do the math and figure out points wise. Are you getting enough of an incentive they are that it's going to be higher than the processing charge that you would be paying anyway and needle for those people who own money, you know, a lot of people would just do it on a credit card. Not be able to pay it off. Don't do that. If at all possible, the IRS does have a payment plan. And if you owe less than fifty thousand dollars, which hopefully most individuals, do you can go onto their website, and you have to call. You don't have to go in and you can do that all online, and it's five percents that you're going to pay some taxes and fees on that versus I think the average APR a credit card right now is about nineteen and a half percent. So you put your taxes on layaway? Yeah. Well, if you're gonna put it on your credit card. Absolutely. And then you'll be paying, you know, you pay taxes this time next year when you more money because you haven't changed or withholding taxes. So what happens if I mailed my taxes tomorrow how much in the penalty? I don't know questions. So what if I'm late like a day? Yeah. I mean there is a penalty. And then. No money. It's it goes up like five percent every month until. Yeah. So I mean, that's you know, that's a penalty on stupidity. That's a tax on stupidity. You knew the day. It didn't catch you off guard. You should have had them in the mail already tax. What does that say about our tax system? Our government. We'll say. One thing that we're huge proponents of is, you know, all the forms that you're getting from your employer from your Bank accounts from wherever you have money invested the government, the IRS is actually getting those same forms too. So what you're mailing them? And what you go through to fill out isn't a surprise to them. In fact, our government could actually send us pre populated forms that we could just look at it. And and check it off. That's right. That's right. Yes. That's how much I made this year and slowly signs it and sends it back, but there's a really powerful lobby with a lot of these big tax repairs. These big box tax prepares amusement six point six million dollars lobbying in two thousand eighteen they do not want this to be easy for us and powerful lobbies tend to unfortunately, have more power even than the average citizens voluntary. Involuntary taxes that leads to a lot of confusion so tax day today. Hopefully, you broke even if not a little bit of a refund would be a good thing. Thing if you have to pay a lot of money, I know sucks to be you. I'm sorry to hear that. I mentioned Disney. They new streaming protocol called Disney, plus. What's interesting about this is you know, you can get nickel and dime to the poor house when it comes to third party purchases, you're laughing, but especially with kids. Right you go. Well, it's it's like six nine. All right. Six ninety three ninety all this stuff up. That's that's real money. You have just an apps on your phone that you may or may not use. Well, I mean, I think it was about a year and a half two years ago anytime I talked to someone they were asking me about cutting the court everyone was talking about getting rid of cable because you could save so much money by using streaming services. But here's the problem. Now, you've got Netflix. You've got Hello. You've got Amazon prime. You've got Disney. You know, Apple's coming out with one, and you know, you have to watch game of thrones on this one and you have to watch house of cards. Blah, blah, blah, by the time you actually pay for all the streaming services. And you look back at maybe what you're paying for cable, there truly isn't much of a difference. But the thing I think that makes sense about Disney is for families for young families net. Flicks hasn't always had the best library of of stuff for kids. They just have it. And of course, Disney has so many archives. And so the Disney content. They're going to be able to get through this as Pixar movies marvel movies Star Wars, the whole Disney catalogue Disney channel shows apparently the Simpsons, which you know, my kids, but that's not necessarily kids stuff. At least in my mind. National Geographic shows in the price for it. At least starting out six ninety nine a month or five dollars and eighty three cents a month. If you're going to pay that annually doesn't sound bad. You know, if this is truly content that you're going to be using. But just keep in mind, if you've got seventeen other streaming services, and you're adding this one into the mix, maybe you can look at is there something else that you can. Dump you know, as these streaming wars heat up. What makes the most sense that? I think what happens with a lot of us as we put these on auto charge on our credit card in. So we don't go through every month and say am I really using this really using this, you know, and so you're paying for things that aren't necessary. So as you're looking at, you know, at this Disney one, the interesting thing about this to Disney, of course, by the same parent company or Disney owns ESPN and ABC. Yes, you're not going to get any of that content with a Disney app. So no sports here for you. Okay. Know, no, ESPN ABC ABC, the Simpsons Disney. They purchased it from FOX not too long ago own. Yeah. I hadn't been aware of that too. Until I was doing some research on this. You know, and I truly you know, if you go back like I hadn't watched Simpson's in ears. I it's funny. But like. I don't know that I want my nine year old son necessarily watching on you're not one of those a little bit. I we television. Raise your kids. We did. All cartoons aren't necessarily kids content. But I mean full disclosure my kids also allowed to watch SpongeBob. Don't judge me slimy? What's what's sponge about violent? It's just weird. You just. Hold on. Let's stop the segment a second. Now, this is no longer simply money. Okay. Okay. I'm trying to think what what what do. You mean? It's weird. It's it's you don't believe that there's a pineapple under the sea. I don't really. Like, truly like the Disney shows like a sweet little takeaway that the kids can learn something from if mindless drivel I'm going to I'm going to be no one did have to be a lesson in everything. But it's also I feel like sometimes you watch something. And you're like, I feel like I lost him brain cells. Not better for it. Plenty of people. Listen to my well. Okay. A few people listen to my show, and they're not better for it. But the same time I say, it doesn't have to be everything doesn't have to be enlightening enlightening truly feel stupider come on. Like, you know, there are sometimes when you've watched a movie or something or showing your truly can't get back that time, and I lost brain cells by actually engaging conflict with Mr. crabs. And then they resolve into there's conflict resolution. Nerve. I. Spun out at all. Everything doesn't have to have a purpose in a meeting. Sometimes. I mean, I'm sure you as a smart adult have guilty pleasures like Cozma, pulp magazine, or whatever it might be. There you go. Friends like Ross and Rachel or amazing still thirty five years later, however long you have turned into your parents you old goat. You. Oh my God. Nothing redeeming about that. Man. Yes there. Right ear, Amy Wagner. I'm in for it now way. Right. You won't let your kids. Watch spongebob. You're sorry that Jimmy get four to one kids on the line. It's actually is it to four one four. Not the one I call. I got a different. I got I got the hotline. If you're looking to save money, then the real quick to you know, what for a while when Nelson Nelson Pels started the takeover man, if PNG goes away in Cincinnati. It is going to crater the economy here. Now, we have withstood a lot of recessions, and and downturns in the economy companies coming and going, you know, she to brands other things like that in my lifetime have come and gone in Cincinnati. But but P and G if they were to dissolve would really wreak havoc on Cincinnati and our local economy in so many ways, but there's good news now coming out of g eight with Nelson peltz. There was concerned about breaking up the company right right with the headquarters here ten thousand employees, this is kind of the centerpiece of a lot of ways..

Disney Amy Wagner IRS federal government Cincinnati WTO Netflix Nelson peltz Amazon Nelson Nelson Pels Apple pulp magazine ESPN Jimmy Pixar Flicks
"pulp magazine" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

The gamingfixx1's Podcast

10:59 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

"And. I've a lot of their games. They have some pretty cool games One of them is Can you think of it even Off the top of my head. I can't think of either and I have. I have one. I just can't think anyway UBISOFT. Ucse distribution a name VR by Paskov Virtuous Holdings Volante designed voltage VP Expo. Sports Warner Brothers. Ex rocker exceed X. Sola and Youtube Gaming. I I didn't know you to pad to actual gaining thing. They have this morning. Yeah they've gaming site but it's it's kind of weird They they kind of vastly off on if they're gonNA use it or not so that's all the cool things that are going to be at e three and it'll be cool. We'll try to to see if we can cover that in just two. We're going to discuss since we're talking about all the cool creepy kind of not creepy. But like you know Conspiracy Conspiracy Colts type things. Then of course we've got to talk about through because clue as a major part of gaming in Just it's just always has been And it started out Indian D. Did you know that really? I didn't know that yes. There is a very popular book called. Dvd's and demigods. That was a dance team. D supplement that had Catholic means in it or had cut through. Lieutenant how you Lou all that as well as all of the stuff from JR token all those gods and it turns out that a company called Well no actually. I think it was the Hp lovecraft estate said Hey. This is a cease and desist letter. You can't sell this you haven't given us money so they were like okay. Cool we'll We'll have the squids and thanks them for him and they put a little. Thank you in there. And there's like hey the thank you isn't GonNa do it either. So then. They had to reprint again. They had to take the thank you. They took out the squids and they left the thank you letter. And then they were actually told they had to take the thank you letter out. So there's like three versions of the book. Oh Wow and some of the books will come in like the ones with all the monsters will command about one hundred bucks And if not then they're like you know maybe twenty if somebody really wants it right right so yeah and obviously The big company that does all of the Kasulu is Calcium and They have a lot of different books of their last book that they were see killer. Mythos is a shared fictional universe It's from the works of the American horror writer. Hp lovecraft and it was coined by August dirt with a contemporary correspondent protege lovecraft to identify the settings tropes and Lord that were employed by lovecraft and his literary successors the name derives from the central creature in lovecraft seminals. Short-story the caller He was first published in pulp magazine. Weird Tales in nineteen twenty eight. So can you believe that that was actually the self was written in? Nineteen Twenty eight. Wow so some pretty pretty amazing stuff. So what have you actually read of of? Tulu anything I have read some of. Hp lovecraft vessel Ms. Look what have you read? I read some of his aunt some of his anthologies but I didn't actually read the part about cassoulet read like part one Kasulu. But not the whole. I wanted to read the whole thing but I I just got. I got busy with other stuff. Sure have you read like silver key? I don't think read silver key. I think was that the one where he meets a man and the man takes them to his home or to home where it's all drab industy. He's showing him book in. The book is got like different. Murders in it and The man's describing how how murder basically titillating to him and interesting to to hear about or read about no. This one was about fairies. But when you're talking about sounds really good I just haven't read it. I've read an I actually performed this one in high not high school but in college Here actually it's Rita and that was She was called the Mir were basically he he? He's like all in darkness and then he finds this really like busted out mirror and he saints like this this insane creature. That's got like the just looks terrifying and like I'm scared to my bones and everything and then I realize I'm looking at a mere. Oh Wow so. It was pretty cool like that. I think I remember reading that one. Yeah that was good only really creepy and then my friend my brother he loves. He loves rats in the walls. Choose a really creepy one. Two and all of them like basically they're talking about just kind of like these other worldly tales in like all the different basically X. files House of Secrets Twilight zone all of those you know probably wouldn't exist without HP lovecraft right right and so and then the HP lovecraft story basically as far as there's a couple of different there's a there's a board game there's Arkham horror yes. I had that game at the house at the house who pleaded. I haven't played it yet. I wanted to play with my family and I don't think they really WANNA play. I think they're a little scared off by the by the title. And then there's Arkham Oaktree Arkham horror and there's also Arkham. Oh Sorry L. Detour there's Arkham horror an elder tour elder tours at in around the world and you're solving problems you're not in the house and then there's there's mansion the madness oddly enough. I have a lot of these titles. I'm not sure why ended up collecting these glue stuff but I did. I just started collecting them. I don't have any clue role playing but I do have a lot of Khufu Boardgames interesting I have yellow sign which is like a small mini game. So Dean D. is the whole reason why? Khufu is worshipped in loved as much as he is right. Now are the whole reason. Why Call Kasulu is a no? I wouldn't say that but I would say that. Basically that was the first time it was published in. Kasey was working on Khufu. A lot of people enjoy pathologist because they enjoy Khufu and they enjoyed the game put out by kiss him A lot of that game I played once and you know I hate to say this was horrible so only time I've ever played and the EM For whatever reason decided to get smashed everybody? There thought that it was great that he was smashed. Because it's funny but I didn't think it was funny because I actually wanted to play a game and wanted somebody who is coherent to talk to me. You know it was. It was not a good time. And so I. I've never played a key. Sem a game but It started out. We went out in the mountains. We found this thing. We're checking out and I was sitting there and I'm like okay. We check this out. And then he repeated the scene exactly and I'm like. Oh Oh this is good. This is good. This is really crazy. This is cool and then like we realized he was just drunk. He wasn't it wasn't it wasn't a script. Thank you just forgot that he had said No. It was not a good time. Not a good time But I really I. I enjoyed that I think a really good Khufu story if you're looking for Lulu and you're not looking for casting. Well I guess we'll give you a little bit of calcium information for calcium the newest books. I'm looking it up right now. Just to see what their books are. Here call a coup RPG right now they have mansions of madness classic through they have the seventh edition scenarios. Akaka through vaults. Let's see just your standard rules like if you WANNA get into it. I'm trying to see what your prices are. Seventh addition slip case slip cases. Roy Moore money investigator her hand. Book keeper rulebook. So I'm guessing that beekeeper and rule book I'm guessing this is a guess. I'm guessing that basically to start just like any of your normal deemed the books you're going to need your you know your players and your and your DM's guide and I'm guessing that the keeper rule book keepers probably like St. So all in you're talking about one hundred bucks.

Hp Arkham Khufu lovecraft Paskov Virtuous Holdings Volan Warner Brothers X. Sola murder VP pulp magazine Lou Akaka writer Rita Roy Moore Dean D. investigator
"pulp magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"About a topic. Where for years years? I've talked about these topics when people aren't yeah. Sure, quite you're crazy. Clyde. Yeah. I love you, man. But I actually had the other day. I was talking to a good friend of mine, I've known forever since the days zeros on ninety five. I was talking to him about the show, and it was making a pitch. And I said, hey, man, we're number six right now on talk stream live, and they put out the thing on radio Inc. And is such a big deal. Now, I said. And he's known me forever. Right. And he says to me, so what are you doing? And it's different. I said nothing I says it's it's called being today. She is like continuing and doing a great job and doing your best. And he says. Really? This is. Yeah, we're not just a conspiracy theory show. Now, we're pop culture show. We talk about things that push the envelope work. We're just cool. We're cool show. It's awesome. Everything I've talked about a long time ago where people thought I was crazy. They don't think I'm so crazy anymore, and he just kind of wet. Yeah. Sure quite. What ben? He says to me he's well the other night. I heard something that I thought was just a little bit much. Okay. You go ahead to your little meeting. I'll just continue to be the crazy guy. Gandhi that said that first they ignore you. Then they laugh at you. Then they fight you. And then you win. And we're winning. We're winning many decades ago. We did it seem the conspiracy theory speculation about corruption was in its outta lessons for the United States. There was always a paranoid notion that from the times of the Russian satellites Sputnik until now. There was always this unproven idea or this notion that somebody or some alien intelligence was out there watching us from a distance. There were pulp magazines of the time. Remember, fate magazine. Amazing stories. Yeah. The pulp magazines fates still around I believe, maybe not. But give is congratulations. You're one of the longest running pulp magazines about UFO's aliens for some time. I remember reading UFO magazine. I remember reading paranoia magazine the magazine of ground zero. Now, they published by books. So yeah, I remember reading paranoia. There are a lot of great UFO magazines and came out of England. And I used to have a whole box of these things, I collected them. I don't know whatever happened to them. They're gone now. They're lost forever. But yeah, I had all these. I think I just basically said I I'm not doing anything with these other get rid of them. But I was a collector of all these really esoteric magazines of the time I'm not gonna let go of these because he'd be great research in the in the past. No, I let him go. There are plenty of pulp magazines back. Then there are pushing strange stories about lights in the sky strange encounters with spacemen another anomalies who are unexplained. The era of the flying saucer, we go to one thousand nine hundred forty s and flying saucer was a term that was coined by the media and Kenneth Arnold described. What he saw when he was flying his plane between mount rainier mount Adams in the Pacific northwest. I always say, it's the it's the Pacific northwest where it all got started. And one of the one of the other stories that I love is the Mari island affair and not very many people know that I've done two shows on Mario island. Mario island. Is it shows that I've that I've actually done that. I did I did about Mary island. They've gotten some people who are skeptical about turning their heads and saying maybe we should reinvestigate this. There's a lot of evidence that it's just been ignored for some time. And since I live here, and since my wife is from the area where the b twenty five crash that was carrying the UFO material from Puget Sound. I was privy to a lot of information about the crash. And so I know a lot about Mary island. And then, of course, Kenneth Arnold nine saucers are very called them, you know, wedges, but. It was the media that used the term flying saucer. But what this was it was the first wave of stories dealing with visitors from other planets. In the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties the US air force secretly investigated. More than twelve thousand.

Kenneth Arnold Mary island United States Mario island Pacific northwest UFO magazine paranoia magazine ben fate magazine Mari island radio Inc Puget Sound Gandhi mount rainier mount Adams England
"pulp magazine" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Listen to me, if you down what I asked you to come in my room before the show, you know, that you weren't supposed to come out here until I introduced Jack I tried to get into your dressing robot didn't have a nickel. I understand you pretty funny comedies are kind of hobby. Reader's Digest is considering publishing to my. From Hollywood it's time now for. Hello, everyone Carl Amari, and this is Hollywood three sixty the radio show that presents the best in classic radio. This time we'll hear from the detective whose ability at solving crime is unequaled in all of detective fiction. Nick Carter master detective with a case of the unwritten letter from nineteen Forty-five, then it's part one of a comedy episode of the red Skelton show from one thousand nine hundred forty eight but first let me say Hello to my co host, Lisa wolf, what's up five Acis? Lisa Carl Hawaii good over there. Mike. Our executive producer extraordinaire and the man responsible for making these shows sound. So that's Mike Vick. You right, Mike? Well, we're going to start things off with Nick Carter master detective Nick Carter was first seen in street and Smith dime novels, and pulp magazines and like Sherlock Holmes next solve cases too tough for police in earned the moniker master detective Lon Clark played Nick Carter the entire run of the series from nineteen forty three all the way to nineteen fifty five show was sponsored for.

Nick Carter Mike Vick Hollywood Lisa Carl Hawaii Carl Amari Lisa wolf Lon Clark executive producer Sherlock Holmes Skelton Smith
"pulp magazine" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Man responsible for making these shows sound so good. That's mike. Thank all, right, Mike. Well, we're going to start things off with Nick Carter master detective Nick Carter was first seen in street and Smith dime novels and pulp magazines and like Sherlock, Holmes. Next solved. Cases too tough for police in the I'm the moniker master detective Lon. Clark played Nick Carter the entire run of the series nineteen forty three all the way to nineteen fifty five. The show was sponsored for most of its run by old Dutch cleanser is that. What you use old Dutch cleanser at your house? That's exactly what I use grubbing bubbles. I get a hands and knees a nice. You do that. Patsy. Bowen. Knicks assistance was played by Helen showed later by Charlotte. Manson and Scottie Wilson, the demon reporter was played by John. Kane sergeant Madison the head of the police was at Latimer thirteen years and Walter Pidgeon played Nick harder in a series of MGM films. But we have a radio episode for you now from July twenty nine th nineteen Forty-five called the case of the written letter this stars Lon Clark part one of Nick Carter master detective. Well, the next show starring Nick Carter master detective resented by acme, America's great producer of fine quality pace. This is the story of a man known the world.

Nick Carter Lon Clark Mike Kane sergeant Madison Knicks Scottie Wilson Patsy Walter Pidgeon Sherlock MGM Smith Charlotte America Helen Manson producer reporter Holmes Latimer John
"pulp magazine" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on KCRW

"Starring Christopher Abbott and Mia Vasyukov. Ska victim has to be a prostitute. Thank you. The first step is to get tied up. Should probably try to run and scream. Everything. Everything's fun. Is it at least really? Fine. This is directed by nNcholas past couple of years ago, gave us the eyes of my mother, which was a really haunting black and white horror film in that movie could say that he was very inspired by classic film directors like Alfred Hitchcock, and he he does it again this time with Italian geology directors. So it's a lot of Dario Gento inspired, visions, and and also the colors and the music as well, he bars the music cues directly from much films. So it feels very stylish is about this guy who decides to get rid of his mattress intent by murdering a coal gal played by may of Ashikaga, and she is stronger than he may expect her to be FEMA Mavis is all about the style of styles. Really cool the story not so much. He does wear his influences on his sleeve. He's very happy to announce his influences from all of those are Gento films. He uses the deep red female over and over and over again and. Like a lot of those old Italian jealous. This one doesn't make any sense whatsoever. It jello geology translated directly is the color yellow. It refers to the yellow pages of a pulp magazine. So it's very pulpy. They tend to be serial killer films and. They're usually done. So you don't know who the killer. Is there a very particular brand of Italian slasher movies? They're usually filmed with very over saturated colors, which piercing does the characters are very broad. And don't have very clear motivations which piercing does. And. They conclude in ways that don't make any sense which period. You're sounding so intriguing. Well, it's not so intriguing. It's really interesting to see him work through his cinematic influences. But at the same time, he's working through some pretty dark impulses where he feels the need to like a lot of the old Jlo's puts the women on trial and go after the women and murder the women. And while we have Oshurkov Scott's character does have some agency. She's also a little bit off as it's revealed later in the film, and her agency might not be all that healthy. So he's not actually satirizing the cliche of the slasher movie killing prostitutes. Just indulging in it. Yeah. And it's very gory. I I I'm squeamish. I was hiding the. Speaking of gory. Let's move onto miss Bala. Starring Gina Rodriguez of Jane, the virgin fame..

Alfred Hitchcock Dario Gento Oshurkov Scott Christopher Abbott miss Bala Mia Vasyukov Ashikaga nNcholas Gina Rodriguez FEMA murder virgin fame Jane
"pulp magazine" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

This Week In Marvel

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"pulp magazine" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

"Copies ten times the original print run as wild. But it was still even still now finding a copy as rare. Yeah. Fortunately, we have marvel unlimited where anyone could go read it right now. Well, let's dive into with the cover which is by Frank r Paul features a guy shooting the human torch. Who's melting his way through a metal wall for some stupid reason. I always imagined that the wall was a submarine wall, which doesn't make any sense, but in my head I thought the human torch was coming in like reading down like. That doesn't make that also because the Samaras in the book. So you figured maybe it was like an undersea. Yes. So now like, I look at it better context and all that stuff, but Paul Frank r Paul not a name well known to most moral guys who drew these issue really aren't will know now we'll get into some of them. But Paul very influential Saifi and pulp magazine illustrator from what I saw. But I think this is the only thing he did for marvel puree which really wild like he comes in. Does this cover drops the Mike leaves because it's so influential we've nail Majd it so many times of little monocytes. Yeah. Yeah. So the first thing inside was page of gag panels. Which was when you go back and read it now, even back, then when I think I read the first I made kind of no sense in the context of where we are in this day and age, but back, then must have been hilarious. It's done by Fred Schwab. Who did a ton of humor features and cartoon strips for marvel for pretty much every publisher that did very prolific. Even if he's not one of those names, we know very well. It's conch fans. The issue has six stores, I human torch by Carl Burgos, and this is the Android human torch, who we know is Jim Hammond. But here he doesn't have namely converted different things. The fireman won't..

Frank r Paul Jim Hammond Paul Frank Fred Schwab Samaras Carl Burgos pulp magazine publisher