35 Burst results for "Pullman"

Pulmonologist testifies George Floyd died of 'low level of oxygen'

Sean Hannity

00:34 sec | 5 d ago

Pulmonologist testifies George Floyd died of 'low level of oxygen'

"In Pullman, ology and breathing testify that there Floyd died from a low level of oxygen and this Caused damage to his brain that we see and it also caused a PE, a aerate man that caused his heart to stop based on video evidence. He's seen Dr Tobin side of the handcuffs, Floyd's prone position in the street and the officers, knees on Floyd's back and neck as factors in his inability to breathe. Over three million Covert 19 shots have been administered in Minnesota combination of

Ology Floyd Pullman Dr Tobin Minnesota
$20K reward offered for information in Chicago shooting of  11 year old girl

WGN Programming

00:55 sec | Last month

$20K reward offered for information in Chicago shooting of 11 year old girl

"In last night's Gunfight between 2 19 year olds on Chicago's South Side and and 11 11 year year Old Old Girl Girl remains remains hospitalized hospitalized in in critical critical Condition. Condition. WGN's WGN's Julien Julien Cruz, Cruz, the the 11 11 year year old old hit hit in in the the face face with with one one of of the the bullets, bullets, the the bullet bullet traveling traveling to to her lungs, according to the family, leaving her paralyzed while the gunman fled the scene community activist Andrew Holmes to the shooter. It might not be long before you are apprehended. Already Know two detectives have that put it already. But I'm gonna ask you turn yourself in. It happened 127th Street outside a gas station in the city's west Pullman neighborhood. Mother's asking that her name be withheld. My Aniston daughter, 11 years old was shot in cold blood. One of the shooters his hospitalized it advocate Christ with a gunshot wound. Anyone with information is asked to submit it at CPD tip dot com. The city of

WGN Julien Julien Cruz Andrew Holmes Cruz Chicago Aniston Cold Blood
Chicago gas station shooting injures 11-year-old girl, 19-year-old man

John Williams

00:37 sec | Last month

Chicago gas station shooting injures 11-year-old girl, 19-year-old man

"Has been hospitalized after she was shot in the face at a West Pullman gas station. Last night, the Andrea Dyer was sitting in the back seat of a car gas station on West 127 straight around 11 o'clock when the shooting began, Police say a 19 year old man was leaving the gas station store one another man started firing. In his direction. The 19 year old man was shot in the groin, then returned fire. The suspect also hit the Andrea in the face. She was taken to Comber Children's Hospital in extremely critical condition. Her family is asking anyone with information to come forward.

West Pullman Gas Station Andrea Dyer Gas Station Store Comber Children's Hospital Andrea
11-Year-Old Girl Shot at Chicago Area Gas Station

WGN Programming

01:38 min | Last month

11-Year-Old Girl Shot at Chicago Area Gas Station

"Year old girl and a man was shot at a gas station in the West Pullman neighborhood. On the south side. Glenn Marshall is live and Comer Children's Hospital with the latest Glenn Good morning now, right now that family is just asking for prayers from the community and also asking for anyone to turn in any information that could lead to an arrest. This little girl was shot in the face last night and she was caught in the crossfire at a gas station shooting here is with this shooting actually took place last night. It was on 100 West 127 Street just before 11 p.m. last night. 90 year old man was exiting out of the gas station store when another man fired shots in his direction. That 90 year old man was shot in the groin area, and then he returned fire. The suspect also shot the 11 year old. Her name is nine. Andrea dire. She was shot in the face while she was sitting in the back seat of a parked car. At that gas station. She was taken to comer Children's Hospital in extremely critical condition. Now we did speak to her family outside the hospital. They are demanding answers for this baby being shot. Your 11 year and the year old left the sooner since list. No mother should be how you crying? Nobody big around here, but a baby way gonna be praying. Just pray. We did look at hers. She opened and, uh he's just keep praying for us, please. Way also know that the other victim was transported to Christ Hospital in serious condition. We do know that there was no relation between both victims. But again, I entry is family is just asking for prayers and demanding answers to why she was shot in this gas station shooting last night

Comer Children's Hospital Glenn Marshall Glenn Good Gas Station Store Andrea Christ Hospital
New Zealand Records Suspected COVID-19 Community Case

BBC World Service

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

New Zealand Records Suspected COVID-19 Community Case

"In New Zealand have confirmed the first case of community transmission of the coronavirus in months. Contact tracing is underway after the woman and her husband traveled around the north of the country. New Zealand's Health Minister Chris Hip kins gave more details at a news conference. The case is a 56 year old woman who has recently been through isolation at the Pullman hotel in Auckland After returning from Europe. She tested negative twice during her stay. And was released Following this, we don't yet know the origin or the strain off the infection. New Zealand has been one of the most effective countries in the world at managing the pandemic.

Chris Hip New Zealand Pullman Hotel Auckland Europe
Chicago Weekend Violence: 5 Killed, 45 Wounded In Weekend Shootings

John Williams

00:19 sec | 5 months ago

Chicago Weekend Violence: 5 Killed, 45 Wounded In Weekend Shootings

"The weekend. In the latest fatal attack, a man was killed late Saturday night in a shooting near south Chicago on the south side of the city. Just hours earlier on them was shot and killed and another wounded in West Pullman on the far South side. The story just coming into the newsroom. Two people are dead. Multiple

West Pullman Chicago
Man killed, another wounded in West Pullman shooting: Chicago police

WGN Showcase

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Man killed, another wounded in West Pullman shooting: Chicago police

"A man was killed. Another woman wounded Saturday evening of the West Pullman neighborhood, Police say the member in a vehicle at about 7 P.m. in the 12,200 block of South Eggleston. That's when someone walked up and started shooting. 32 year old man was pronounced dead at Roseland Community Hospital. Police say the other man, 34 was taken to the same hospital. Yeah, gunshot wounds to his arm, neck and hand. He was listed in serious condition

South Eggleston Roseland Community Hospital
Chicago Boy, 12, Struck By Bullet In Pullman Neighborhood When Gun Discharges While 13-Year-Old Boy Is Handling It

WGN Showcase

00:19 sec | 5 months ago

Chicago Boy, 12, Struck By Bullet In Pullman Neighborhood When Gun Discharges While 13-Year-Old Boy Is Handling It

"Year old boy was shot on the Far South side. It happened in a home on the 700 block of East 105th place in the Pullman neighborhood just before eight. Chicago police say a 13 year old boy was handling a gun when it went off hitting the 12 year old boy in the chest. The boy was taken to the hospital in serious condition. Police confiscated the gun that 13 year old was taken in for questioning.

Far South Side Pullman Chicago
Several college football games postponed amid new COVID-19 outbreaks

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

01:05 min | 5 months ago

Several college football games postponed amid new COVID-19 outbreaks

"In America, including college football programs. Saturday's Ohio State of Maryland game has been canceled and the SEC now has four contests postponed. Including Georgia at Missouri. The Washington Huskies have moved on from their season opening cancellation in Cal, Berkeley. U Dub tight end Kate Hutton. It was pretty tough to take. I think that those case for everyone involved I know Cal wanted to play, too. The only thing we could do is go on organ sake, Khun Khun drawn that. So Saturday night at Montlake. It's the dogs against the Beavers. Eight o'clock on Fox Sports one Washington State at home in Pullman, Saturday afternoon, a 10 Point underdog against Oregon Seahawks returned to the practice field today, prepping for another NFC West clash with the Rams Sunday in Los Angeles. But it will be the first time they tangle in that new $2.5. Billion so Fi Stadium Cleveland Indians right hander Shane Bieber, a unanimous winner of the American League Cy Young Award. Cincinnati REDS Trevor Bauer takes home the NL Cy Young Trophy Sports A 10 and 40 after the hour.

Kate Hutton Khun Khun Washington Huskies Oregon Seahawks SEC Maryland Montlake CAL Ohio Missouri Berkeley Football Georgia America Fox Sports Beavers Pullman Shane Bieber
Man sitting at kitchen table in Chicago hit by stray bullet, dies

John Williams

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

Man sitting at kitchen table in Chicago hit by stray bullet, dies

"A man died early today after being hit by a stray bullet while sitting at a kitchen table in a home on the forest South side. Police say shots were fired outside the home around 1:45 A.m.. A 41 year old man was struck in the chest by a bullet that passed through a window in the home in the West Pullman neighborhood. No arrests have been made, and the shooting remains under

Seattle - University of Washington reports 'significant' coronavirus outbreak on Greek Row

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Seattle - University of Washington reports 'significant' coronavirus outbreak on Greek Row

"Continues to spread on the University of Washington's campus on Greek row now 158 positive cases. In the off campus community in comas. Cara Constant reports. Washington State University is also having the same problem. Junior Mary Ginther says she learned her lesson. After attending this recent party. I was the one out of those 10 to 15 people that tested negative for co but everyone else tested positive. Pullman police air now society people under the city's new since party violation. So far, they've issued 20 for infractions at 20 parties. I haven't seen much change personally, because I still see all these parties of over 10 5 10 people, and then you hear of all these breakouts back on Greek row, You'd up houses air, working closely with public health and many more toe end. This outbreak Doubles Cara continents

Cara Constant University Of Washington Mary Ginther Washington State University Pullman
Germany marks low-key 30th anniversary of reunification

BBC World Service

08:08 min | 6 months ago

Germany marks low-key 30th anniversary of reunification

"Go to Germany. Now. Today marks a special anniversary for the country 30 years since the reunification of Eastern West Although the commemorations will be muted inevitably because of Corona virus, three decades as a single nation marks an important moment for Europe's biggest economy. GDP per inhabitant across Germany has risen fourfold since 1990. But the rising living standards hasn't been felt equally across East and West. East Germans, on average, still earn less than their West German counterparts and satisfaction with the political cars Indeed, with democracy as a form of government is lower in the east than it is in the West. That's according to a report by the government ombudsman for the former communist East Germany. Well, Dr Ulrich, A garage is a professor of European policy and the study of democracy. Don't know University crims in Austria and joins us Rekha. Welcome. Good morning. Good morning. How significant a day is this? Well, I think it is a very significant day for years. It's quite I mean, it's three decades on DH. I remember quite well the 25 years ceremonies, a Sze Yu said. Now the pandemic avoids that We have big celebrations, but indifference to 25 years and 30 years unification celebration. And I would say it's very important. But for the first time, there is also a sort ofthe reflection about what has been really happening. Yeah, you know, In the past celebrations we watch just celebrating and now there is a sort of deeper meditation about what did they do to the country politically, economically and so forth. That's interesting, and presumably, also, that's influenced to a degree by the fact that you've now got A lot of young adults who have never known Germany any different. Yes, there is. This sort of young generation was born after who never experienced the country divided And there's a lot of study that those don't feel The difference is that elder generation's would still sort of detect. But as I said, for the first time with these 30 years celebration it it seems to me that if you're listening to all these radio features that were obviously having in Germany today in the past weeks. So for the first time, you have a lot of critiques above the process that has been managed in 89, for instance, the toy hunt taking over the rotten industries and former JD and all these things. So there is a sort ofthe former GDR feeling that comes up sort off this heavenly being override it. Let me bring my guest him who may have some thoughts or questions to you, Rachel Shabby. What comes to mind for you? I think this is a fascinating subject and discussion. And I just wonder when you say Professor garrote when you say that there is deep in meditation about what it did to the country politically and economically. What sort of things are coming up in that conversation? For instance, just this morning when I was waking up with my German radio, and there will Ah, somebody saying who is a former media intellectual, but also sport a person. And who would say? Obviously, there was this What we call a regime so dictatorship regime? Yeah. But for the first time we tried to see it in a more saythe electrical way. Which is? Yes, it was ah dictatorship regime, But people were not all oppressed or did not in general field all oppressed. So there is this little sort of shades of gray in how you discuss that people actually could have been happy. And we do not want to be destroy biographies, you know? And you have for the first time people listening to former GDR sort ofthe personalities and and biographies, which say there was a life in Judea. It was not just dictatorship. Rachel was not the answer. You were expecting. Yeah, I wondered if it would be along those lines. Whether people would actually be able to articulate on a personal level. It wasn't all horrible, Andi. There are sort of that There are nuances to that conversation, and I wondered also, if there would be Ah, discussion about the inequalities that still persists. Germany. I'll come to you on that. In a moment we bring Bobby and then by all means, come back. The question I have is that the sense ofthe off unity that Germans now face Expedience. How much of that is influenced by the fact that for half off thes 30 years, Germany has been run by someone from the East. Someone from the GDR Angela Merkel. Not only has Germany been run by her, she's popular at home abroad, widely regarded as the great statesman off are off our time. I mean, To what degree does that help in this reunification? It's very interesting that you posed this question. And the interesting thing about Mrs Merkel is that she is a sod off. How can I say this? Let's say neutral. If you read the There is something interesting about her that she is not checked. She's not tacked East and she's not even tend women. Yeah, you have a lot of discussions, whether the fact very fact that we had for now, 16 years of German Female chancellor did something to the gender question in Germany. But the thing is that these things you do not really associate with Mrs backup. Neither the East West divide nor the gender thing because she tends to be if you read German newspapers. Often she's characterized as mut mother on, and that is interesting that the East thing doesn't take on her. It's not an obvious thing. So probably it has influence. Probably there's something beneath the surface is, but I would not come to it as an obvious sort of because she has been an East Europe, East German women that now 30 years after some of the country unification is OK. I would not make that link was not the answer. You were expecting. No, no, it was from the album. From the outside. It seems striking to me that she is from the East. But But now that I think of it, she doesn't really make a big deal of it herself. So I suppose it makes sense to pick up on the point that Rachel made about inequalities and how much they still exist on are talked about in the context of what went before. Inequalities. Rachel many thanks for the question. Yes, A lot of inequalities between East and West are still existant and on many layers of society. The thing is that the quality question is not really an East Western. You also have the prophet ear's off the benefit of unification. All the people who were basically trained and skilled and mobile by them in 89, you have those who were more say residual. And you know what? And More the countryside. He, um, so it's not only an East West divide. It's also a rule. Urban defied. If you go like say, for instance, or the recent prison is not as performance performing as likely, But life is a very good example for urban cluster that really has risen out of nothing. And you could also point to HINA, for instance, which always have this, you know, making watches and little eye tech industries and the little clusters there. But then you go to the mall rule areas in save the Arctic Sea making book for Pullman, and then you have a roomful of divide, And this is all about equality. And then one important thing is what is seldom told. But obviously we had a brain dying. We had 16 million people. Informer, Julia today there 11 Million, so five million left. But because there's no counting between East and West Germany about sort of leaving the country, it's not really in the statistics. You need to accept in a way that the brains and the mobile people left somewhere really rapidly after 89 movie

Germany East Germany Rachel Shabby West Germany Angela Merkel East Europe Europe Austria Rekha Dr Ulrich Arctic Sea Sze Yu Professor Professor Garrote Judea Julia Bobby Chancellor Pullman
15-year-old boy critically injured in Far South Side shooting, Chicago police say

Dave Plier

00:18 sec | 7 months ago

15-year-old boy critically injured in Far South Side shooting, Chicago police say

"A 15 year old boy was shot in the head last night on the Far South side. He's in critical condition at Christ Medical Center right now, Chicago police say the shooting happened about 9 20 in the 110 block 100 block of South Perry Avenue in the Wes Pullman neighborhood. No arrests have been made. The shooting is under

Wes Pullman Neighborhood Christ Medical Center Chicago
Two Chicago Police Officers Shot; Offender Also Wounded Near Polk St and Spaulding Ave

Great Outdoors with Charlie Potter

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Two Chicago Police Officers Shot; Offender Also Wounded Near Polk St and Spaulding Ave

"Fire were telling you about earlier this morning Thunder Control now but it collapsed the roof of a factory out in Pullman factory on 103rd Street down the road from Corless High School. The Chicago Fire Department responded to the fire around 12 30. It's as crews had the fire under control A couple hours later. See FD says. There were no injuries.

Corless High School Chicago Fire Department FD Pullman
Parties around WSU’s Greek Row linked to ‘substantial increase’ in COVID-19 cases

News, Traffic and Weather

01:07 min | 8 months ago

Parties around WSU’s Greek Row linked to ‘substantial increase’ in COVID-19 cases

"In Washington State University officials warning of a substantial increase in the number of covert 19 cases among students. The Whitman County health profit reporting 30 new cases. But it's not clear how many are tied to the campus go most. Cole Miller was student reaction ahead of virtual classes starting at Washington State University Monday. Officials there are now working to contain a covert 19 outbreak, with at least one case tied to either a fraternity or sorority. I do know a lot of the Greek houses. They're trying to take it as seriously as possible, but College kids are college kids. Unfortunately, Mary get there is a junior involved with Greek life there, she says. Some houses are taking this more seriously than others. He's set up a rule lead outs aren't allowed to go to the house. But the girls who are living in have to stay quarantined for two weeks. Some staff at the Pullman campus are now being trained in contact tracing. The university, releasing a statement that region part quote students who failed to follow state mandates, whether on or off campus not only risk potential law enforcement action but can face disciplinary hearings under W S use Community standards

Washington State University Cole Miller Whitman County Pullman Mary
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 9 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Tim Burgess, Snowpiercer on Netflix, cult movie Adam & Paul

Bigmouth

06:47 min | 11 months ago

Tim Burgess, Snowpiercer on Netflix, cult movie Adam & Paul

"Welcome back to big mouth. The media strip of pop culture podcasts. Were time has become an infinite loop and yet still managed to stay yes. We're happy not going anywhere at World Zoom again and I can spot sean pattern of those inboxes. Hello Charlene how are you well? I'm alright I'm all right. Thank you and you have you not bad busy week. He said rhetorically weirdly. Busying notice that we're very shows of pop news in the pop firmament in the in the endless paralysis of now but a party. Boy George has written six or seven albums. Lockdown is a good thing. I think that's amazing and I think he should release every single track. Nothing should go in the volt and we should hear the unexpurgated unagitated boy George knockdown albums. They should be locked with boy. George Yeah definitely I think he needs an added support says Dasa. He's he says I'm not saying every single thing is good so I'm saying if you wanted it down to eight tracks the eight best trucks or George Comeback while we're speaking of albums. What did you think of Lana del Rey announcing that she's GonNa Call Hanyu Album Chem trails? Washington up fantastic. Hasn't she going to Matt a bit? She's GonNa little bit crazy. Maybe she just needs opposite town and I loved her last album. That MS billions. What could change US stick Allen because she her whole sorts of I've analysis to trip to myself everybody complains? She goes rage. Tweeting about them and yet it's such a malady created thing that she is She's a whole load of contradiction subsequently gigantea all of pop string anyway special. This week route settings a big mouth. It's Telegraph TV critic. Guardian Culture writer on Kane. Doug owner start Newington. Michael Hogan how you doing Michael. Hi I'm goodson. Y'All at your window shows you. Baked Ham did buy books on both sides which look at the trash compactor and saw was easily crushed by Philip pullman Sexy behind you can go see broken. Greek by people fetus a great book reviewed all the PODCAST. And I think Ed just a selection of you know obviously improving. What's literature as a homeworking Journo? Since time you finding the as all families bucky getting pushed further and further back into your own little kind of messed in the cold. The top left corner of the House. The I'M GONNA share. You said I'm not GonNa shut at the moment Boca kind of a golden office. It was actually very blessed. But it's a show is it now. It's become become sort of with with the kids staying home schooled and increasingly valuable. The ship and in fact I might move in the living. The dream you've what tell Telia's part your job is. How is it coping with broadcasting from kitchens? Now that we just go with the old famous is just like us. Yeah it's interesting obviously about TV so in a way that hasn't stopped but what always they've run out of TV. They outlandish leaving. Eastenders runs out in a week's time I think and the ultras run out already. I is about to start doing special coronavirus episodes so yeah. It's very old and we've seen a lot of people on zoom looking awkward a bit like this bomb. The tally which is most modern family did this before anybody didn't they? Would that brilliant episode? Where class took an apple. She can only interact with the family. Five watt up to face time twitter because she's one of the girls off and got married to a radio boyfriend. The entire upset takes place on the screen and it was genius. Unfortunately old tally is like not now what I mean now. I think things like I got news for you can of quite painful but then you know Johnny Burqas and John Nova shows actually really. I mean if the trouble is they're doing all these dramas playlets now and I think we'll get tied of looking at that very quick. Have you start looking at? These seem screens? You're not gonNA spend evening looking at Bonday as a way of kind of golden era moment like you know what like would ruin acoustic mate and it was basis. They've zillow about the song that performance in studio trickery may physically like that no Michael Hogan hideous say one. Tv In this in this is who's been the best. Use Been Champion lockdown champion. Joe Wicks probably Tim Burgess Yeah to budgets will be coming in to save a little bit later. Jarvis Don domestic disco. His saved my Saturdays and he's not do Spanish. She's soon yeah she's yeah. She wolves the hot. Doesn't she shop trash compactor pulp? We can see how we can see her name. It's Nadia Serene author illustrator and pop music. Devotee hello how are you can confirm the shame the unknown in front of a book? Shel- let you guys know. This is why the Best Wifi is and if I turn around he just throwing house you've been playing against this ruining that's only what my office is like as well but yeah. I have lots of books on stuff and they were really impressed. Fit Range high coach low culture. You'd love it. Wonderful has not done treating you. She knows what I'm really lucky because I also hermit anyway. I work from home anyway. So it hasn't impacted me in the same way as I guess impacting people who announced I have space. I have two cats and I had a small human Is Pretty Calm? So yeah tonight about wonderful. What you've been binging on while in this. You know what the knowing thing. Is that the anointing is my small child. Because of lockdown all retains so. He's now away from most of the same house. I'm way which is bad news because it means I'm Kinda stuck watching her. Hit stuff that set. He loves the Teen Titans. Joe which is great the now so we will and just important days ago. He saw Simpson's for the first time and so a win are starting not from uptight. The decision to stay. Open season because the animation. Wades out just. Oh yes doesn't quite. That's not quite ready to seize. What's so we've started to every episode and it's proven wonderful but a great yet. It's a joy because I forgotten so much. So your fashion. How brilliant will be to watch the simpsons of the very first time with a clean

Boy George Michael Hogan George Yeah Joe Wicks Lana Del Rey George Comeback Charlene Teen Titans United States Tv Critic Philip Pullman Twitter Zillow Matt Telia Washington Newington ED
Are We Living In A Dystopian World? Find Out NOW!

Talk, Tales and Trivia

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Are We Living In A Dystopian World? Find Out NOW!

"Hello this is Stephanie. And this is talk tales and Trivia. The show where. I talk about pop culture trivia. Listen I love researching pop culture trivia so that you can stump your family and friends with Great Trivia on today's episode. I thought I would talk about the content the entertainment that we watch and read and listen to at home. That's right it could be a movie. A book or podcast. Well it is all double or triple the entertainment and content. And you'll understand what I'm talking about in a few minutes. Listen I love dystopia anything? And if you've been listening to this podcast you know it. Well to stop in is so popular right now and to stop anything is popular but did you know that it is a sub genre that is under the huge science fiction genre and it is very popular. Well think of all the movies and books that you've read and other entertainment that you've watched that is using the scare factor or the desperation factor that brings in misery or discomfort. Or just something that you are not comfortable with well. That is a distortion emotion. Right it brings in something that is just foreign to you. And that would also be a change to the human condition This is perfect for living environment of social unrest including social distancing and working remotely and we are certainly doing a lot of that so there are so many people much more than. Let's just say your ago that have taken to a distortion entertainment to still be in anything. It could be a book like. I said it could be a movie or it could be a podcast and that is all under the distortion genre. Now if we're gonNA have a dystopia genre we'll guess what we have to have the opposite and that is a utopian genre and there is that no. What is the difference? Well of course you know the difference. I'm going to give you a definition right now. Well what does dystopia mean and I will tell you right now? Dictionary Dot Com has a great definition. Here a society characterized by human misery as squalor oppression disease and overcrowding. That's right and now I will give you the definition for utopia or utopian. Well of course it means the exact opposite of distortion it. Means of relating to or just having to do with idealized perfection given too impractical or unrealistic schemes of such perfection. It's an idealized perfection. And that's something that we don't really see very often so we tend to go towards the dystopia N- types things well. This is perfect for living in an environment of social unrest including social distancing and working remotely that we have had to get used to in the recent past. But I want to tell you about a couple of movies that are wonderful and then you can also read the books. And sometimes and one of the instances you can also get a podcast is a really good thing as well. Well the first thing I want to talk about is the most dangerous game. Well what is that? Well I read the Schwartz story when I was probably very young in the nineteen seventies and it is a short story that came out in nineteen twenty four by Richard Connell and it is a wonderful short story Nelson for the nineteen thirty eight film adaptation. You can see the most interest game and it is so cool. Well the most dangerous game about hunt but this is a different kind of hunt and you will find it very interesting. Read the Short Story and see the movie and guess what it is. Just become a series on qube DOT com. Now qube is very interesting and I want to mention this because I just discovered it is shorter episodes but the same kind of story. They just cut out a little bit of the excess things that they didn't need and the short story or the movie but this is very interesting so on Qube it is an episodic short series thirteen episodes with Liam Hemsworth and they are really easy and Benge worthy. So do that next. I WanNa talk about a book that I read in Maimi junior high school and that is nineteen eighty-four. Well George Orwell wrote the book in Nineteen Forty nine and he can kind of see the future. It is a warning of what is to come. The story takes place in an imagined. Future the year well nineteen eighty-four when much of the world has fallen victim to perpetual war? Omnipresent government surveillance and propaganda. Well it is not a fun place to live and it is not a fun time to be alive in nineteen eighty. Four is a great book. You don't WanNa miss it? Read the book. See the movie and the concept of the book and the movie was used to record a super bowl ad in nineteen eighty four now on youtube and that will be in the show notes. It represents the control of technology and how it's taking over and the ad big brother is represented by IBM Somewhat and the takeaway from the ad is the world is going to change because of computers That did happen next. I love this and it is the center. Well the first season starring Jessica Biel was great but they have three seasons. And what is going on is why a murder was committed and keeps you guessing. Well it stars. Bill Pullman as well as the investigator in all three seasons I know it's not distortion but it's worth a watch. It's a mystery thriller psychological thriller psychological fiction and it is on net flicks three seasons. You don't WanNa miss it? It is Binge Worthy Watch the series and read the book now. Next is a funny kind of situation. I came across this and I wasn't planning on it. I was just had a little bit of free time and is the stranger. Well what is that about? The Stranger is a British mystery thriller series written by Danny Brocklehurst and based on the two Thousand Fifteen Harlem copen novel of the same title. Try to get that at Amazon. And you won't be able to the mini series premiered on net flex in January of twenty twenty just a couple months ago and it stars Richard Armey Taj. Who is best known for the Hobbit Oceans Eight and Captain America and it starts one of my favorites. And I know some people won't recognize the name Jennifer Saunders and she was an absolutely fabulous a British comedy so watch the series the stranger. It's so interesting. Okay now. We're going to go back into a DYSTOPIA and type of deal and this is really fun. Try to get all these friends and people to watch and not everybody gets it but I know that you will. It is called Black Mirror and there's five seasons it is a British distillery and science fiction and Black Mirror was inspired by the twilight zone. That's right dealing with controversial contemporary topics with less fear of censorship than other more realistic programs. It highlights topics related to humanity's relationship with technology and the stories that feature the way we live now and the scary and Weird Way. We might be living in the future.

Qube Stephanie Jennifer Saunders Jessica Biel George Orwell Bill Pullman Richard Connell Liam Hemsworth Maimi Junior High School Danny Brocklehurst IBM Captain America Richard Armey Youtube Murder Schwartz Benge Investigator Amazon
"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Be a really I've had so many transformational experiences. You know and spread in kind of pattern. That really is it. Thank God it's not a virus because you never know where it came from but I think of like the fact that I did This version of a fellow in Norway live and editor about four years ago. With this guy that I had worked with twenty eight years before and I wanted to work with them and we spoke Norwegian at for fifteen percent of it then listened to about sixty percent of what was said to me was in Norwegian and wise. You know these kind of experiences. I think I am. I GONNA lift an a lizard of all and somehow made it trades. The other side is a very Very Rewarding I. I just had a couple of years of really good run so I'm feeling like I do wild thing. I haven't had bad the repeat of center. You know. First Time I've ever done a recurring part and I would live in fear of it. I just thought this is GonNa kill me if I get into something ended and I see everybody just showing up in plug like you said constantly clockers news and I get that would kill me and then and still be doing it and listening to people justify why they're doing it because the money or something like that would really but instead I get something I can't believe is so engrossing in part is so much collaboration with the writer in the able to make it so autobiographical the whole second series Amazon went back to his hometown. Western New York state which is basically built on my all autobiography from being from there things in my best self I guess. I'm pretty pretty glad that it's all a I don't know if anybody else would want it for a career but I love it and you also like I know you've written plays as well. I was reading about Expedition Six. And it's a fascinating idea for a play. I don't think I ever would have like. How do you do that as a hobby? Because it's basically about the it's about people essentially trapped in space basically is trained as a theatre director you know and I made a lot of plays with documentary materials. So that was one that I made from a true story at Columbia. Blew up on active F Third Two thousand and two. There were three astronauts space station essentially stranded because they couldn't bring them down in another shuttle. And just what it would be like to be in space looking down on earth in that kind of bottleneck of history that we get it all with low flying trapeze. Oh my gosh. That's incredible so you're you're you're so you had you had you had to fold in wire work at the same time with everything else. This was While it was the low flying the single point so it's on one act access and not like the to the Chinese style trapeze but Yeah it was. I worked with a nine actors that were trained in this. Yeah so I do a Lotta things said Really Right now. I'm making a play about This artist Charlie Russell and I'm working with my son makes puppets have middle son makes competent tastic. Though you know I keep going. What amuses me whether anybody else gets the theater not sir. Do you mind if I just run down to the next room and grab this. Baseball's helmet really fast short speed with you. I it'll take me thirty seconds. I'll be right back and almost doesn't spend door all my gosh. I'll wow that is amazing. I tend to jump. Fitch over your shoulders if you yeah. It's pretty perfectly problem. I'm so glad that I got mazing saw. I really can't thank you enough. This is I hope this was okay for you and I. It was totally. It felt totally normal to me. Like you really helped make this sort of feel not weird in these weird times. I appreciate year so interested in movies than I am. When you said that about torch with I have to say that gave me Warner heart because the you said that doctor who torchwood are like in the category of white light. Don't you know that absolutely absolutely? I mean it was you know. I'm just such a huge doctor. Who Fan and you know. I'm sure you know that torchwood an Anagram for doctor who and I and I do think that the people who know torchwood in who knows that world. It's not a casual love affair. They have with those things. I mean like like the fans of our super fans so just you should be. You should feel good knowing that the people that did get to see fucking love it son. It's that that should that should be of some That should that should get some mileage for you. That every other reference you made you know so much about. We'll be so I'm really glad we got a chance to do it. Tyrod to and then sort of lastly for people just one quick thing like what's your sort of joy space like. What do you do outside? Is there anything outside of acting that sort of you know like just like a hobby? Anything that makes you joyful anything you do just for you. Is there anything outside of that? Wow it being back here. I have an orchard here and So spending time with trees right this time years really great to very good joyful time to be in California it's pleasant weather. It's unbelievable You know temperatures in the sixties as the highest than the birds are singing in the gun. Prebble Monitor fruit this year. Because I got my gray water system going on the road of twenty two trees that I now zero Ryan Given crazy amount of citrus at four different kinds of mandarins in lines and then some other exotic fruit tree. So that's given me a Lotta good keeping me occupied you. I hope you have a great rest of the day. Please stay safe and healthy and yeah I'm hopefully. We'll we'll talk again sometime. Great Great Pleasure. Thanks cheers take care. Take care. I D scanning complete enjoy overeat..

Norway Charlie Russell Baseball editor Amazon California Fitch director writer New York Columbia Ryan
"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

15:07 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Podcast. Which now we glide gently back into. Do you do you ever? Are you ever able to just sort of shake it off like like because obviously when you become empathetic you you do feel things you know? You feel things for these characters. Even though it's pretend you feel things for them and so are you know. Do you have any kind of a ritual that sort of like sorta shakes off the last role in moves onto the next role. You know or you. Are you able to sort of clock in and clock out that way? I think you know I was just was shooting this Netflix series about hall. Senate play David Mahoney. Whose was the Corporate Ed Norton. Simon in Jackson won WAC licensing at division that e good writing someone like Halston this wild renegade designer Indu Beri corporate structure in making flourish in so there was a guy who His book is called the Something like confessions of a street savvy corporate head or something and you know just that kind of certainty self-assurance Everything was great kind of Shakai Ambrose and get into a whole different breathing pattern and you know shaving. Beard changed everything in so I was really getting into that a lot in them. We got shut down so I will have that to go back to. I'm glad that yes. Yes hopefully yes. I'm glad that you'll be able to go back to that. Because it I would imagine you probably like you said everything you want to be different and so do you ever. Sorta SADIE representatives like. Just bring me something weird. I just WanNa do something. That's so far out there. Some sort of really crazy character piece do you. Are there different sides to your creative mind that you feel like you still WanNa scratch or that you just sort of you know get caught up in sometimes that you WANNA do. I think there are other. I remember there was a period where I felt like I was not getting enough as I call him salty. Dogs you mean like like the like the military general or the like you guys need to watch our ass and get me. It isn't like that guy. We're marginally a you know just You know having attitude not being sympathetic you know being a somewhat of a dramatic gin you know and I even put together. I A little file pictures of myself that I said these are these are salty. Dogs pullman as kind of walk through an anticipated remind myself of the salty dog a wing of the gallery of interest. In that you're trying to convince you look. I know you think I'm a nice guy but I can be an asshole. Okay can you please? Just make me and they're like no. I'm sorry bill you're just a nice. You're nice guy where do you want? You're a nice guy. Well US Jeff Bin Laden not nice guys recently. Desperately Ambrose Not Nice Guy Right. You're very isolated very caught in a very not to fluid at all disappointing people's antisocial. Although theories I landed abuse salty dogs. Well that's good. That's good. I mean I even just even like you're in the movie singles if you remember for like five minutes but you have such but there's even such a humanity with that character where he just like. There's a turn where you just go see. I just don't know how to have fun. And it's so endearing and I'm curious how you're able to take like five minutes of screen time and do something magical with it like that which you know that could have been someone else who just sort of like did you know like whatever. He was a doctor and he was a breast augmentation doctor. He's in and out in five minutes and it's fine you know but are you like is that conscious or are you working. Do you say to camera ground like why have an idea here so I kinda WanNa do this or do you just sort of do kind of make the note before then? Just run with it. When you're on the day I you know I just always told that when I get there and start doing the thing that I want to be the the space that WANNA be in that. It's going to be something that director expels like his good inappropriate for the movie and that. I did Dark waters hit. Not that easy department kicked West Really. I knew this guy on the It would operate and Todd. Haynes being director is just let let it fly and gave great permission in great encouragement -ment and so I didn't get mocked West. You know in terms of I got sported. God good notes in everything but I didn't Those basic conception of character that was that was great. So I'm a you know the secret about singles. I got caught hugely what? Yeah because in Cameron you know was great. Directory don't break on an percent in everything in so invested in all the characters but if you remember Dr Jameson Jameson. He doesn't come into the story. Until one an Anon- Sambo picture in bridges character was really flowering later. And it's really kind of midway through the movie that she goes Have this boob job. And that's when Jim said you know really. I don't think you need this. And I. I read the part and turned down and Bridget Fonda and sent word through and said pullman. You've got to expect. This just talked to Cameron. You'll see I talked to cameron. And he said what's wrong. Why don't you kick this part? And I said why just my father was still alive at the time. And he was a blood and guts doctor and he always if there were a few times where I felt a little short of patients in disgust and disrespect. It was for plastic surgeons. Ho Interesting and I said Cameron. I don't want my father to see me. Playing plastic surgeon in his life. That's amazing how did they convince you to do it? She said I WANNA put that in the movie. And so we had this whole thing that I can remember This part is in there or not. But it's where he says. Look I'm not I think it's instill in this exam GonNa be. I'm doing this plastic surgery but I don't even believe in it. I don't think I'm going to be doing it. Much more And it was short references. Something we did see you later. But in that moments she decides we decided we are not Likely pair to see each other but Why don't why don't we try? It's we have an attempt at a relationship and I then I have this This kind of awakening that I'm I'm really Just recently divorced and not great In a in a position to really feel comfortable with someone younger than a little younger than myself and that I didn't understand the music.

Cameron Shakai Ambrose director Netflix David Mahoney Ed Norton Jeff Bin Laden Senate Dr Jameson Jameson West Really Bridget Fonda Beard Haynes Indu Beri Halston WAC Todd Simon
"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Listen than I felt a little bit insane that it wasn't getting traction yet but I would imagine you know at a certain point. You probably just have to go. You know what though but I showed up. I got to be a part of this thing. I did what I did. And that sort of the process of that is is the reward. I mean how much you know like I. It obviously feels great to be validated externally. But I think the people you know that have like a strong. You seem to me like you have a good center like you seem like a grounded guy and I'm wondering where does that come from. Did you learn to be that or is it someone in your life or were you raised that way or is it a nate like what has allowed you to continue to sort of just move ahead? Focus keep working all these years in. Keep your head on your shoulders thinking a lot about my family because there most of them are medicine. Type another this during this period. Where you're seeing caregiver. Really push the limit and rather than Dr Monica at my parents I think in my bought one. My mother was nurse. My father doctor and I think hit their acceptance of every type of humanity that walk in their office. There was something about that ethic that never spoke disparagingly about any of their patients in there does it in small town and every one of them was interesting to him deserve to slowest attention. And I think there was a great embrace of humanness that he had in my mother's well that said whether things are going poorly or not. There's always somebody who was suffering a little bit more than you are and you should be aware of them. And if someone's getting excluded you can always draw a circle a little larger. Keep them inside keenum and so. Maybe that's In this times I think a lot about Kinda teachings that you get when you're growing up that's invaluable. That's really interesting to hear. Because I it as you're saying that it makes me realize that one of the things that I think you're so amazing at his just playing human like real human people just like a Like a guy going through some shit and you are able to ground that in a way by the way I think just playing like a regular person is so much harder than a crazy character. Who has a lot of? Ticks are a lot of you know something to really hook onto because that to me sort of feels like. Oh Yeah you know. That's you have that dimension to jump into when you don't know what else to do but just to play a person to play a guy going through stuff that to me seems really hard because who is that guy what are they latch onto and it sounds like because of the way you were brought up. It's just finding their humanity. It's like how do you unpack them and just find that sort of like? How do you empathetical connect with their humanity? Is there a process that you go through to sort of do that? When you're cracking into stuff or does it just second nature must be Rabia because part of it is ill like One of the great joys of working on sinner is this kind of Quality that he has which is in script and it. Kinda COMES ABOUT A. Maybe that's why they're found me was something The uric believes in about a radical entity. I never heard that term or night by it he may have but that sense of radical being Like and being empathetic. Put yourself really in. Somebody's shoes in a way to really not just feel sorry for somebody which really tried to try to understand and accept the way they are taking you know and And I think that's somewhat of a favor ambrose it becomes a little bit of. Mason Vulnerable Somebody like Matt longer character right where Rees really really sensing. There is a genuine conflict within this person. And this person wants help sometimes and then other times doesn't end his dangerous and When how do you keep your bow? Bows ship ship going on flow of Japan? Over when you're next to that when you're signed that China radical empathy and now we're gonNA pause to tip of the hat to our sponsor for this episode of the PODCAST squarespace squarespace. Hey maybe now's the time to build the digital thing that you always wanted to have whatever kind of online presence you WANNA have. That's not social media based but your own thing that you can craft the way you want whether it's a blog or a presentation or some type of product that you want to sell you know squarespace has incredible ECOMMERCE. Software can help you do that as well. Any kind of business you WANNA PROMOTE. But now what's really exciting is that they have email campaigns. They're going to help you with your email campaign. It's going to be simple. It's going to be powerful editing tools. To make it your own you can customize layouts and you can do mobile editing so you can send anytime anywhere so squarespace top to bottom. Has you.

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"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

12:08 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Wade Davis and meet him and he's a consultant on the movie and he was the one who had gone down there embedded himself in the stomach and learned this exact recipe that they were using to make this. You know essentially that could render human With no body functions but still be alive than they and that was a big adventure women down to Haiti Chata in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. That was my third movie and I thought they were all going to be that way. I don't think I ever got a repeat of some. I mean for you is it. Does it feel like do does it? How does the job part of it not get in the way of the sort of artistic part of it you know what I mean like? There's a lot of job stuff you know you. GotTa do press. You have to like like you said it's not always go into Haiti. You know there is sort of a clock in element to it in so for you. What is the balance between still being able to infuse the artistic part when it feels like the work side of the business is like eighty percent of it and the art side really only get to do for like ten or twenty percent of the time? Yeah I think the things when you have to do crafts for something before you shot it in their starting to do that. More and more made the sequel At a junket for it in Albuquerque. And I don't think I jot more one or two days and we're already talking about how we did the role of you know this stuff grown and it was a little uncomfortable but I know especially because at that point doesn't matter what you say you know what I mean because you know there's so much media and there's so much press if you say something that doesn't happen the movies anyone you know by the time it comes out. Is Anyone GonNa Remember our notice? It's just like we're sell you infiltrate media at all at all. Your life is probably significantly more peaceful as a result but it it just. There's so much you know we're just inundated so much with everything all the time that I'm sure it was fine but independence day. Was I remember that being like the sort of return of the real summer blockbuster when that movie came out in I didn't know much about it before it came out and then all of a sudden it was just this massive massive international hit with was there any sense of that when you guys were making the first Independence Day like? We're making a blockbuster guys. There was just like you know. It's kind of a weird alien movie. We'll see how it goes. Yeah I really was not expected to be that big. A movie. I think are most For most people I think In January of that year that it came out There was a list of twenty will be laborde. Do in the summer wasn't on the list. Oh Wow yeah that Then they started done it started to creep in and it started to pick up a little bit but it was once they got that image of the White House blowing up. There is something about that in the whole logo of July two. They came July three attack. Joi- fourth day. We bought back right and that was a real like do this is it. S had so many also so many great elements like the actual concern president and the snarky Military you know like will Smith. Who's still like you know? Drop in one liners in the middle of an attack. And they're like you know you got Jeff Goldblum and Jeff Goldblum form and also. Let's just talk about uploading a virus from a Mac book in the nineties to alien spacecraft. Which not you know. This was. The there wasn't why fire anything at the time that now. Of course we understand how networks work but at the time that was a very revolutionary idea to use a powerbook accident back. Look I think it was a powerbook like the original Mac. Laptop to upload onto that thing so I just think it did have a lot of elements that were very fresh that we hadn't really seen in a movie at in addition to the special effects. Why yes that have. It was fun to revisit all of that. Like when you when you heard there was going to be a second one where you like what we did it the first time or was it like. Oh my God this'll be. This'll be fun. It's been you know twenty some years. Yeah it was really great gate a love all those guys you know. The role endemic is such a really wonderful wonderful movie maker. I just being kind of refresh live this way. There's always some moments where he would say It's not mu. Come through and it would be really cool if you and we're GONNA Effect over here. It's really cool. You know he just has such a thrill of making things kind of his cartridges. Like Sean yet. But there's also you know you you must have a sense. You must have some sort of a spider sense when it comes to picking movies because you do such great examples of each type of genre like Wyatt. Urp is a really great movie. Independence Day is Great. Lost highway is a whole other thing. You Know Lake placid is a movie another movie where I think people are just like a big alligator. Maybe whenever all the sudden it's huge in the movies amazing. You know it's like you must what. What is your selection process? Are you using runes or are you? Do you have some type of psychic ability? What is it that is what speaks to you about a project when you read? It makes it feel special to you know I. I don't know I Adjust some of them. Don't do as well as I think they are. Just again about the 'cause I went to get a cup of tea in this mug which is of Welsh lag civil and it was given to me by Russell t davies. Who is the guy who wrote? Torchwood Torchwood Ajo He is the revamp of Doctor. Who and then the spinoff torchwood than we did. The miracle which was a ten part series about ill this phenomena that when I play Murdering Pow trying trying to kill me with a lethal injection at the top movie and it doesn't work and then they realized that someone else is expected to die. Didn't die right after that they realized from me on no one is dying and they thought it was a miracle but quickly if began big Clear that no one's getting better. So they're all hovering in sickness. So the whole amount of wes. Where are we going to get the resources to take care of these people? And I've been waiting for somebody to draw an analogy to enact torchwood and this and it just below the radar enough. I guess that it hasn't struck but I I keep thinking that was one of the great promises and really great allegory. To for planet Earth will. Yeah I mean. I'm a huge fan. Of course you know Torchwood and John Barrowman and you know I mean. It's it's such a great universe in Russell was so good at sort of tackling lot of a lot of these kind of like philosophical life questions about about us but through the Lens of you know like aliens in the universe and we Sifi in. Its I to me those doctor. Who LIKE DOCTOR WHO and Torchwood? I put them in the same category as like you know the original Rod serling twilight zone. Where it's like. There's there's such such great commentary and very progressive commentary on our culture. But you know like done in a way that is you know through this other kind of sci-fi land so I completely understand but when that happens for you was it like when you go. I think it's going to be amazing and it doesn't you know and it's not as big as you had hoped it would be do you. Do you have sort of a mantra? Like wealth onto the next thing or. Do you have two more that for a second or do you. Are you just sort of like a? You know. It's just part of the business guests? I am I live in luge social media so I don't see a lot of references through out disastrous and I live with the thought that it was so much fun to make it in the end that I those that I had talked to that liked. It liked it a lot and I'm gonNA live with that in a kind of gotten a little bit Hardened to the fact that jump days get reject rejected well but I also think that it's you know it's such an interesting idea especially one that I think. A lot of people are really coming to understand especially now but the idea that you know we don't really control anything and we sort of build these bubbles of security where we kinda we're able to trick ourselves into thinking we have some sense of control either through routine or whatever it is that we do we have stability and security and something like this happens and we realize. Oh we really. Don't you know we can sort of control how you react to things but being an actor you have about the lease control in the entertainment business right because you get hired but you still have no control over you know? They didn't hire you. Because you're not six to your only six one or they needed someone with this color hair and then when you get the job you don't know what they're going to use third light it how it's going to be at ended. I mean you really have to be comfortable not having any control just showing up and doing what you do. I guess hoping for the best is that sort of how it works and some is is like psychological in my crazy here. You know like if you don't get validated for your What you understand. Humans should be interested in what went wins. Their intelligence wins. They're all that then. Then it becomes a little bit of a scary Sense of being way outside the curve of what most people think and I. You know it's interesting I do. Large are small parts in dark waters was a. I have a small part in that but a good part and with Mark Ruffalo and that will be I think it was so even though I didn't I didn't have the hugest investment in it time wise. The story was so good at Todd. He's such a great though major in the movies so found challenging about relationships in a lot of things beyond just the social justice issue of it and if fact that I was realizing with the academy I wasn't seeing any traction nobody talking about. Nobody including on their top ten..

Haiti Russell t Jeff Goldblum Wade Davis Mark Ruffalo Albuquerque Dominican Republic consultant Rod serling Mac White House John Barrowman Lake placid Joi president Urp Wyatt Sean wes
"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Employment if you ever write a book just consider Shit Storm of pullman. Just consider it because I feel like if I saw that on a shopping like I don't know what I need to read that whatever it is. I need to read that but you know even going back to was ruthless. People your first movie. I mean what an amazing first movie. It's legitimately one of the best comedy like the best comedies that came out of that decade ruthless people. And were you doing a lot of theater at that? Point is that were is. Is that where you were making bread and butter and then just sort of transition over just gold digging? I came out to La to do a play. And I was called. It was about Russians in Afghanistan in eighty five. Wow Americans were in Afghanistan and was really but I had the dyed my hair blonde to be Russia. Take commander and it was a wild experience Never dyed my hair before in. Iwa Out here. It started audition and the soccer brothers. Jim Abrams you're directors. I was in for a very small part of lucky to be there. They were laughing on kind of on painlessly immaculate conception laps you know not born of something. I can put my finger on nothing. I was saying or anything. It wasn't Respondent turns out later. They said they loved my hair. Me cred this far night ended up getting the part of you know Garra lightness and then I had to recover my hair in three two months later when we went to shoot it but it was a wild time to transition from theater in their into doing the movies and I was thinking okay. I'll get this money which I really needed it at the time in the I'll head back to New York But then you know things happened than the that didn't happen and now Brooks in. Ambon crop came to see me in a play at L. A. T. C. Another play that I was in so it really is a big start of. My career was That's really interesting. Because I I was just talking to Kerry Ellis Few weeks ago and he said Mel came to see Princess. I think it was Princess Bride. Maybe and then put him in. Robin Hood. Men In tights Mel seems like the kind of guy that he would just go out because he loved comedy. He loves and he would go. I want to work with that person. And then he would find something for you. Well I I think he saw something ruthless people he liked but the plan was doing was a was a medieval pageant. Play above Arabas now. Instead of no comedy that we came and they you know got his he just he was. He used to make a joke. That does he Advocate Tom Hanks Tom Cruise but he couldn't get a trump so we got a bill. He's built with out of the blue man. I just ducked one little part ruthless people in there. I was walking down the into the Fox commissary nine now ruction meeting Jane. I'm dead Arnold Schwarzenegger. It was It was a bill following along now the jam but was it. Had you done a lot of comedy in theater or was it was it? I mean I two movies. Were really hard core comedies. And two totally different types of comedies. At the same time so was that was comedy kind of in your on your radar at that pointer. It's like oh I'm getting cast as I guess I'll just do it. I think I just had done Theater and toured with a theater company in outdoors. And we did a Lotta Moliere. A lot of comedian play and so there was some Shakespeare comedy. So maybe that was. The most concentrated did learn from some pretty good theater One guy in particular was very influential in these theater. Companies end up with one heavyset guy who plays all the rustic Shakespeare Moran was like. I'm so much about what was funny. Especially what was funny outdoors? What you do to get focused You know get laugh on earns Shakespearean stuff. But that's the other thing too. Is that comedy in. Theater is very different from comedy on film. You know where there's look there are no reactions and you also. I would imagine you have to play everything a lot smaller because there's a camera in your face but was did it. Take a minute to sort of get Mel's like to get Mel's wavelength in that movie because it's Mel. Just kind of has his own genre basically. He is sort of a sub-genre comedy. So going into that. Did you know that I assume you've probably seen young Frankenstein blazing saddles history of the world? And all that or did he did. He was there like a a learning carbon. It's like okay. I guess this is sort of the vibe of this with now. It'll so much of it is really deep rooted in catskill And those in Ronny. Berg and commerce The writer they all were shared a lot of those kind of that kind of style. And Joe I really learned because I had already kind of had a version of what I thought the acting was. Which was you know not repeat myself and looked get if it was funny line to see if I could milk milk at Nalanda Different Ways. You Know No. That's what's from what you know what I was GonNa do in a week. Go in there for rehearsals only daffy. I would submit the rehearsals in much. Can't you Rick Basically was so priceless. I'm so glad now made me do A. I learned so much right away and basically he would do the line you know and he would do. Daphne's line and I just saw what genius it was for him to and he just wanted me to hit the mark every time we do a rehearsal. He couldn't see the same thing enough. Yano that same delivery that you did yesterday. That made me that. I said I liked that one and I just really okay. This is what okay. I'll just keep hitting this. You know and I don't know whether it was just the hit him What what did he? He was very very helpful. That that way you know at the time we went to shoot it You know I don't know if it was the most favorite way that I've worked in comedies. I for me it's not you know Probably as it was great to do it in that context but I I didn't feel like it was something that needed to do for the rest of my life. So much of you know of it now. Comedy is is Deadpan Reactions those kinds of things which are really born from being in circumstances in the moment is intensely as you can be you know. Yeah I it's I didn't realize I might go grab it in a second. It's downstairs but actually bought at auction. My wife and I have a lot of weird movie props and stuff I have rick. Moranis helmet his the actual helmet from the movie and he got him to sign it and I got meld assign it and so if we had been in person there would have been a bill pullman signature on there as well how did you get it. Just you know the the the sort of the movie prop auction seen right. Now is big because literally everyone can bid on stuff in the world so it's just these sort of like online entertainment auctions and it came up and And I bought it and I haven't and it's amazing. It is absolutely amazing. It's flimsy but it's you know it's fucking held before before we wrap this up at some point I'll run down and get it too so you can see it but it. It really was like I was so excited to get that thing. I mean that that movie. It's just it's a piece of comedy history so when you're working on stuff and you sort of move on and then years later some nerd like me. He's like hey remember the part in space Bazi like. I haven't thought about the movie and link thirty like do you sort of like do the job and then just kind of move on. Wow Yeah you know when we did that it was so long ago it was before. Vhs So you know it was probably about seven or eight years later that I at the at the House. We're having my wife's cousins over the kids Cousin just comes into L. A. Hat and somehow in the conversation I mentioned something at some reference to space balls. He goes wait a minute. Can We talk about baseball? And he knew all my dialogue and I listened to him and I go. I don't really know if that's what I said. But member debt and I betcha that's exactly what I said so act like it so so you watched it. Did you watch it again? I watched the Dan when it came out on VHS. That was probably in the nineties mid nineties. I love by the way that someone like. He was probably just waiting for you to give him the green light like yes we can talk about. Oh my God. I didn't know that was on the table here. You know I mean that type of I duNno I mean that type of fandom. It's now it's so common to be able to communicate with people that you see because of social media but certainly in the eighties and nineties. You didn't really like people just didn't have access to people that they saw stuff being able to communicate or talk to them or send out messages all the time so. I'm sure it was greatly. I'm sure he was like one of the highlights for that for that guy. That was nice that you appreciated that. Definitely got some goosebumps. Well I also remember that you did another movie after space balls which was totally different. Like you said which I loved which was serpent and the rainbow which was such a great creepy the trailer for that movie when I was in high school. Just freak the shit. I mean it's just being buried alive and don't let them bury me not dead yet. I mean that that movie was such a great. It was so visceral did you. Were you offered other comedies? Afterwards people in space balls did you actively the way in search of like darker kind of a thematic almost psychological horror movies. You know I think it just came up In the course of events. Oh I later. Get other comedies. Did shortly after they're done Simply sibling rivalry with Carl. Reiner the Rainbow came up with where like wooden this the amazing adventure to check this real life story of this ethnobotanist..

Mel Rick Basically Afghanistan pullman Iwa commander Robin Hood Arnold Schwarzenegger La Kerry Ellis soccer New York Tom Hanks Russia Jim Abrams Nalanda Different Ways Ambon Fox commissary Frankenstein Reiner
"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Can join the email list and we'll keep you updated and then we'll send you some positive messages every so often too and then just kind of like weird stuff we're making and that kind of thing it's not too invasive in your inbox and of course you can unsubscribe at any time. So I tend dot com slash sign. Up would be great. But let's talk about you. The community like Roman. Who writes love? Your podcast been a long time listener from back in the day on so long as I back in the day. I'm running late. You know I've got would yes. I'M A NERD. Who has would? But we made Seriously mayday thing while locked up in Corona Madison. We figured we loved them so much. We try to sell them to the masses to make some corona scratch and who knows beyond so please check out our would and Geeks with would dot net. We're making art for Geeks by Geeks and pretty excited about sharing it with the world. It's I'm looking at right now. It is really cool like woodcraft. That are very Relevant to your pop culture interests the homepage right. There has some great star. Wars WOOD CRAFTING ON IT. So geeks with would dot net thank you. Roman now this episode is Bill Pullman. Who's awesome now? This is the first time that I don't yeah. I mentioned that I hadn't done an internet based podcast since. Oh my gosh. It's been like seven or eight years and we tried skype and the the quality is okay because we did it via video chat because I thought Ovidio be good because we can see each other and then it'll be you know it'll just make the conversation that much simpler but what it actually did was compromised the audio quality. So you know while we're exploring other options for that in zoom or whatever going forward we're GonNa just do audio. I recorded a podcast. Today with just skype audio and think actually sounded really good. So this This will this one today with bill will send a little bit like a phone call. I'M NOT GONNA lie was funded video chat with bill pullman. Which is a fun sentence? I never thought I would get to say my life but He was great and just really sweet and affable and really embraced a lot of the stuff that we talked about just like iconic things that he did. He's done in his career. And you know maybe I'm maybe or maybe not pulled out the dark helmet from space balls So and and he loved it so anyway it was really fun. Also I think he may have had his his email program open because I did hear the the Apple. Email alert day occasionally. I'm only telling you that because if you hear it you might go. Oh my God am I getting an email? It's probably coming. It's inside the podcast. The alerts are coming from inside the podcast. So I just wanted to let you know by the way a bill pullman is promoting seasoned three of the center which is on USA. The season finale airs the day that this is posting which is Thursday march twenty. Sixth all episodes are available. Usa NETWORK DOT COM so as always. I hope you're staying safe. I hope you were staying healthy. I hope you are staying home. I appreciate you for listening and I hope that our little digital offerings can offer you as I said last week. An escape from all the stuff. So here you go. The Ten podcast number ten fifty four with Bill PULLMAN INITIATING PROTOCOL. I literally just I. Do you live television show on Sunday nights and we just have been doing skype version of it How y'all doing gut? Yeah I'm just figuring this out the skype I used to skype a lot more and then all of a sudden the base time in Europe and things like that shifted and it was easy to Texan facetime so dropped. Outta skype but now it's good to be back because it's really hard to. I mean I've had a bunch of meetings via skype resume and it does feel like some bizarre dystopia and future movie or it's like Oh people. This is how people communicate. Now we all look at each other on a screen and someday maybe we'll get to see each other in person but that doesn't seem like it's going to be seven so this is the new normal daughter leaves choir. And they're now downstairs getting on Zoom so the twenty three people can all be there and they're trying to figure out. Can they hear each other? And I don't think they'll ever worked it out the delve. Nabil's sing together on right but she mutes them and and hope for the best. This must be very surreal to be promoting senator. Like I would imagine a lot of the publicists all of a sudden. Oh Shit cowry going to promote all these things that people worked so hard on. So are you doing a series of skype chats to promote that? What your day to day is now a lot of the old style just audio on conversations than the radio junket which was all. That's just waking up early in the morning and out of different cities That's always been that way but But this is the first time on skype. So you're pushing the envelope I rem- I appreciate that. I appreciate that you wanted to do video because I've never. I don't think in ten years of doing these podcasts. I always insisted like what we have to be in person because there's so much to communication that's about body language and I need to know like if people are comfortable talking about different things and where they're shifting their seat or and so being able to read all that is so important. I started hearing like people. WanNa do audio only on like Oh my God. It's going to be like the eighties when we just used to call people on the phone and be like what's up you know. This is good but I do get a context for you get the Itar over there. We see it looks a lot like our library littlest gothic though. I think there's some is not a job bone as soon. Let's there's a taxidermy. There's a vintage taxidermy. Alligator had there behind him is a giant like bird. Eating spider is just one of those giant sort of Tarantula. Spiders birds then. There's a yeah there's a guitar and then. I just have a bunch of weird oil paintings and in my office in my wife and I like a lot of weird goth with. It's like if you came to our house. He would sort of feel like Like a weird Victorian Museum in a in a strange kind of way. So yeah. We're in that weird stuff. What what is your what's your. What's your Dobbin anesthetic has it? It's no we have. I think are dominant aesthetic was connected to the fact that this use of be close either close by or somewhere goes to a pineapple grove in nineteen. Oh Wow house bill. Nineteen seventeen so we that whole idea of agriculture in California in Nineteen. Gen is probably the biggest Grass painted are two graphs house. And then I have the orchard outside so visit it's got a little bit of agricultural over the California agriculture. So you feel isn't a comfortable place to be holed up indefinitely. Yes yeah it's really It's a very Atmosphere but he says this is the Best House for holidays. 'cause it's got a very traditional additional side to a good while I was. I'm so I was so blown away that you agree to the podcast just because listen you've literally been in some of the greatest films in the history of Film and You. Your career spanned so many different. Like there's not one type of bill polar movie. It's just like I imagined was your theater background. I've never seen someone's career so much. Sort of Mir. What must be like a film version of their background? Where it's like you play any kind of character in any kind of production and that's just it. I know I I think if I I live in denial of it but then there's certain kinds of perfect storms where a bunch of product. That's been kind of in the works kind of gotten clogged up. The all kind of as it was in February in February where he had done this wild movie in Poland last a year. Two years ago called the coldest game. Okay a Chess player in nineteen sixty two. Who's in a chess match in Warsaw? And he's on the spectrum. So as Little Bobby Fisher Esq and wild crazy. Bits everything and At the same time that I was in the play that I had done last year. All my sons was recorded by National Theatre live and we performed in front of six hundred thousand people live. Oh my gosh except for the US where it was held because there was a production in New York so that got released in cinemas in Orland. They're kind of like Little Collated Art House Release Wearing in Art House movie and that was in February Then a couple things came out on Netflix Got Access to the ballot lefty Brown which is me as kind of the sidekick limping sidekick and that that that is this time Jenner started the air so it was like a shit storm.

skype Bill Pullman US California Corona Madison Warsaw Chess Europe senator Bobby Fisher Esq Best House Apple Art House Nabil Ovidio Poland USA. Netflix
"pullman" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This is the New Yorker Radio Hour. I'm David Ramnik for eight years. Game of thrones was is a critical darling and a huge ratings bonanza for HBO and by the time it ended in May it was the most talked about Sean Television or certainly seemed that way not even six months later. HBO has just launched a new show based on a series of beloved fantasy novels. But this one it's got a lot less nudity and not quite as much beheading show is called his dark materials and it's based on a trilogy of books. Young adult novels by the writer. Philip pullman the world it over in the privilege of scholastic sanctuary among the many fans of those books is the New Yorkers Katy Waldman his materials was first published in the mid nineties And that leads to an easy comparison with J. K.. Rowling Harry Potter books. But Philip pullman concerns are very different from hers. His dark materials is sat in a world parallel to ours and actually occasionally blends into our own world. It stars ars a sprightly spunky heroine named Lyra she has mysterious and unknowable parents. the universe is a patchwork of different fantastical Toco locations and settings. There's kind of a northern sublime worlds that is populated by armored bears. They're are witches. There's steam punk team of scientists It's really wonderful so while. Hbo Is Releasing Series based on his dark materials. Phillip Pullman has just put out a new book set an Lara's World Gerald and that's called the secret Commonwealth so this is the second book of his second trilogy. So if you're counting that's five bucks sat in this universe what's of now Katy Waldman spoke recently with Philip pullman. who was at home in Oxford so to start off the? HBO BBC adaptation of his dark materials. Just started airing You're an executive producer on that show and back in two thousand seven There was a film adaptation of the same book of the Golden Compass. The first spoke of his dark materials. I wonder whether you think that there are any aspects of your work that TV is a medium is particularly well-suited to capture. Well well I think the human drama is GonNa come out well partly because the quality of the actors who are going to have to present it TV A little better in class up. I think than the big movie screen does harm. So the human drama that That works pretty. Well while I'm happy with the story will be told fully in this form whereas it couldn't have been told fully on the stage on the movie screen They're actually will be listeners though. Who are not familiar with The universe of the dark materials and so just to back up a little bit at Sutton a parallel harlow universe to ours. The biggest difference is that everyone soul is manifested. An animal that they can talk with everyone else can see And those animals are called Demons Simmons by on the pronunciation. That's right. Yeah yes in Liars. Will Larry is the main protagonist. She's a girl of about eleven or twelve in liars will everybody has a demon. which is the? I'm part of an aspect of their own self When she's in the form of an animal and it's outside them so that they can they demon can talk to them can look around corners when they wait in the shadows that sort of thing and the relationship between between the human and the demon is is a very and it can't be broken unless by exceptional fossil cruelty or something like that is the whole story that the author of the whole story is really I suppose in one simple sentence about the change from innocence to experience all the change from childhood to growing up and the the demon symbolizes because children's demons can change shape all the time according to what they are feeling the mood it is or are excited they are or whatever whereas in adolescence the power to change gradually fades away and they find one fixed form which they the rest of the human companions life I it was a very it was a very good idea probably the best idea yeah a person's demand there opposite gender right Well most of them are. They seem to be A few exceptions. But they're also things I haven't yet discovered about deems teams. I often get asked for example. Often get us. How demons a bone and by officers will? I haven't had to describe a scene in which that happens. Get better yet demon. Gynecology Mr Jimmy Can you imagine a world of sort of gender fluidity where Demons Change According onto their partners tender. Yeah I can imagine but I haven't had to. Maybe maybe that'll happen in the third book. Maybe you give me an idea on which the whole story will turn so low. Lyra is what in the states. We would call a middle school age age students and I think you taught that age group before you became a professional novelist right. Yeah I taught for twelve years and it was children of that age children between nine thirteen eleven twelve thirteen year olds is a very interesting age because They are just on the cusp of becoming Enter the adolescence and all sorts of things opening out for them. And it's wonderful to see that happening to young children. My my my grandchildren are going through that stage at the moment and again it's very exciting to see your father was a pilot cracked on and he right. Yeah you grew up thinking that he had died in battle. Yeah when I was about seven years old in nineteen fifty not thrill four the British fighting an insurgency as they called it in Kenya The Mamo insurgency and the roots of that lay deepen colonialist history. And it's it's a thing which we certainly now in Britain cannot look back with pride but my father was a pilot and he was involved in The that whole distasteful business. Suddenly his plane crashed and he died. I was very young at the time I said I was six or seven and I was either led to believe came to believe or misunderstood but I ah I thought he'd been shot down in battles e And so to me. He was a great hero. And I it was wasn't until much much later that I realised what he'd really been doing which was effectively dropping bombs on people who had spears. We'll let that complicated the whole thing. And then then I discovered other things about his life and about His relations with my mother which I didn't know about and it was. I am caused me to revise my ideas about a lot of things. Yeah would you characterize that as an innocence lost innocent so I suppose it wasn't a sense because yeah my eyes were opened this the reason I ask It just seems that Lyra. It has a similar experience in the bucks where she starts out in trance by her father and also her mother even though they've kept their distance from her and then over the course of the story she discovers various aspects of them that are less savory she decides to strike her own path. That's right yeah the this is a classic trope. If that's the word I won't in literature. Children read because first thing you have to do. If you're writing a story is to get the parents out of the way They can be the adventure in the story of the parents saying that. Come on Dad's bedtime so you have to. You have to get rid of the parents pretty quickly And that's what happens in this one and of course is in treasure island as in all sorts of classic children's books. Yeah I'd love to actually turn to the secret Commonwealth Commonwealth's first of all what drove you to continue the story. I mean you you actually place the first volume of the book of dust In the passed up before the events of his dark materials but the second one is after. What drew you back to? The World said enough. At least I haven't discovered enough in his materials about dust dust through the capital d.. This mysterious substance essence. Whatever it it is? That seems to pervade the universe which in in the story in our universities cold dark matter dot matters. There is a phrase that fits very well with the line I took from paradise lost how he gave me his dark materials dark matter. Is this invisible Intangible something that's holds the universe from together from flying apart it's grabbing. Its mass is such such that gravity count doesn't let us escape from it but we don't know what it is when I was writing his materials. Oh twenty five years.

Philip pullman HBO Katy Waldman Lyra David Ramnik writer BBC Toco Commonwealth Commonwealth Sean Television Rowling Kenya J. K Oxford Golden Compass executive producer Sutton
"pullman" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"pullman" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Consciousnesses the normal property of matter just like mass or electric charge and it's not something that's restricted to human beings some of the zealots who believe that it is even even maintain that we're not really conscious tool we only think will which is the stupidest thing and if you extend the notion of consciousness to inanimate objects and things like that does that bring with it all kinds of complicated moral problems then for how we interact with the world yes it might. I usually Martin I mean if you start thinking plus conscious you hundred apologize to every potato. You have well. I was reading about a scientist who is exploring the concept of consciousness and and suffering in insects which is obviously problematic for all sorts of reasons or troubling all sorts of reasons especially if insects are. GonNa provide us with a source of protein when food becomes scarce the trouble. Darwin actually uses an example. This ghastly wasp lays its eggs in of some of the species I think he was in the question of whether gone exist isn't how could a muscle. God allow that kind of thing to happen but it's a big puzzle nation must be full of AH extraordinary amounts of suffering. So how do we rationalize it then. We assume that there's some sort of hierarchy of suffering and we I. I don't know I would just block it out. I don't know it's one of the things I'm rushing this book to find out which book the book of Dust yes well. Let me off the final not well not actually rushing it. I've been thinking about yeah off to finishing your book. You're not rushing so much chisolm administering the consequences of having written when you go on a book tour and this enormous books to sign interviews and all this other stuff which go on joy but it's a long way from the world of literature looked like when I was on that where it looks as if you wrote a book it was published. Your publisher took you out for rather nice lunch at his club and then on Sunday you looked at the reviews in the Sunday Times The Observer and that was it but now that's a fragment of all the activity that goes on especially in the genre you inhabit which which is not one specific genre really crosses over with so many others and you can go to highbrow literary festivals and you can be invited to not that they are necessarily low browbeat sci fi conventions. Yes I tend to be very careful about what invitations aetna simply because time what's your criteria and then for an invitation nation that you will accept one. That's happens in Oxford practical. It's five miles down the road yeah. And how long have you lived. In Oxford. I studied at Oxford went to live in London for about four years. Then we came to accept a job teaching when I was about twenty five and and we've been not living in Oxford itself so much as in villages nearby yes dogs. Let's do it so I have a trade part of the ritual time much good now. Let's go and sit some little comfortable. Would you like a cup of tea or coffee. Oh love a cup of tea right. It makes uh yeah doc. How'd you take your team milk and sugar just a bit of milk. It'd be great. You can do this on the way this is. How I spend my days now organizing manufacturing these pages title pages for the Book of Dusk Ask and you signed those and then they stick them in the Book Saves Transporting Several Thousand Take Office of the Book Costs Country. you take your tea milk and sugar just a bit of milk. It'd be great if you're casing this side. You go over that you are within easy. Reach Your Guitar. I'M NOT GONNA play a com on star serenading hi Dave. What would you play well if I could. I play something Bluesy. Oh yeah well. Actually I'm not sure take what I really liked to play is the sort of style listening a soukous do that so no. What's that Latin America lease the Congolese yeah in the sixties. I spent little time my parents in Uganda because my father set followed by then had become a pilot in the Uganda. Police Air Wing flew idiom in about I think really anyway I spent a couple of months. They're doing very little but listening to music on the music. In the in the clubs on the Radio was Congolese music style coats which is particularly distinctive guitar sound very high a lot of interweaving of melodies from different Plas S. and anyway now that Youtube exists you can look up anything you can confide any kind of music. You like even find people. It's showing you how to play of course guitar or any other kind of guitar. It's most extraordinary now. I can't reach the T. if you would you mind pouring I think that is the least I can do all kinds of tea we looking at here well. That's a pullman blend three teaspoons Kasama and one of things which on oh too much lap saying is not to my taste but when you mix it with mostly. SMU could strong strong tea with a slight hint of smoke innocent. That's good thank you. How many books have you written now about thirty. I think to be sure because some forgotten every time somebody else who how many to count them up again is about thirty different sources of books different sorts of lengths. Does it get easier gets harder because the more experience you have the more choices you see there ought to be made and each choice is full of a new branching line of possibility so they're trying to have ignored all that. I'm keep your mind on the story of trying to tell all all I know now. After fifty years ago I know how to finish a book. I know how to bright three four five hundred pages and bring it to a conclusion univer. Show her that start with you. Talkin Demon voices about the concept of phase space yeah. I if I came across twenty years ago the the idea is is a scientific term for all the possibilities that are inherent in a situation and if you look at a story like Cinderella for example at the moment when the invitation to the bowl comes they're also supposed abilities inherent in that so she could turn it down haltingly and say. I don't want to go meet stupid. Prince all sorts of things that happened in fact one thing happens and when you're the Russia you have to choose the thing that happens because that seems to you the richest first of all these possibilities and instantly all has other possibilities vanish. It's a bit like the idea of shredding has or cat which has been the subject of seventy metaphors I four that it must be sick to dissipate brought to life and killed again. Both things possible the next minute possibility collapses anyone on things left eye face base is if you like the wood in which the path of the story threads its way and you talk about just being intimidated by all those possibilities at the beginning of the process of writing a book and then being haunted by the lines that you didn't write every every sentence you write his surrounded by the ghosts of the ones you didn't right which is one reason for writing on paper as I do and rather than on the computer because if you just deletes hit somewhere but it's fiddly process. If you just put a line through it right on you can you can see what it was. You can get back to it. You can return return to that fork in the path. Take the other one and you were saying as well. Writing is despotism but reading is democracy so perhaps apps that ties into what you're saying. You'll you'll the autocrat within your storytelling world. When you're telling your story you all the ultimate ruler you have power of life and death author every comma every full stop every character every storyline yes so it should be that's right and proper so that's the totalitarian part of it the despotism but as soon as it's written published out there in the marketplace in the bookshops you'll power vanishes and it becomes democratic. Anybody can choose to read it. They didn't have due to the don't have to read. All of it. Don't have to read it quickly. They don't have to think it means what you think. It means because what you think it means is irrelevant now. This is why I don't like Russia's telling people how to read the books apparently William Goldens to do this really won't tell you but he was very firm about what this meant and if he thought people got hit Rohe's rolling it doesn't mean that totally means this and was he in general agreement with most people's theories about the flies. I remember that day show L. From John Kerry's biography William guilty. I'm just look it up again and say if I got it right but I would never do that because the price had as a democratic one. If you think you've if discovered something that's might have been hidden well and you couldn't do all usual literary critical things you can explain you can say look. I found this. This book comes anybody woody agree. What do you think about it and people can say oh it's interesting. I didn't see that but on the other hand you miss oh which kind of contradicts it you know it's it's a democratic process is a to to and fro and arguing a talking about it which is exactly what should happen. This is the way children should be able to read and encouraged or he didn't show that read in schools instead of which we've got a process of fitting this passage for the adverbs and constructing a lot of clumsy sentences assays beginning with fronted advocate bills because that's what the syllabus tells us. That's the national curriculum tells us to do despite the fact that no writer no teacher teacher no expert in language had any idea what affronted adversarial was before about twenty years ago when some busybody discovered it and put it in the curriculum jhelum the proper way of learning from books to read the book she won't talk about them with someone who knows them and disagree or agree and and then read them again or read another book in a different way because you learned something reading that one so I don't know what happens now in the sixth forms but in six my school in North Wales Dell's first year six was to delight because we read what we wanted to and we did the syllabus books and the second six but I just six absolute exit joy. I learned so much and I read so much read William Blink. I read the Beats Allen Ginsberg's. howl yeah is that best minds of our generation starving historical naked that's right yeah entering through the Negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix or something like that and you responded immediately to that those great? That's what I want to do yeah yeah. The discovery GINSBURG was a mind expanding thing what year was that. There would have been nineteen sixty three okay. Did you ever see live no off the coast of North Wells Hollick Alec in particular quite a long way from centers of BEATNIK activity. Stop for the beating rumors of such things came to to us like rumors of Bob Dylan and I would you know take my guitar them Busk. What was the Bob Dylan Song. I used to do when the ship comes in Crete song to do but we never saw them live but you ended up playing in folk clubs though right playing amusing not exactly exactly now I was I did play the guitar and play that sort of strumming thing. You'll did you had you off. A dozen codes gene gene. That's right and then the incredible string band came along and they were a bit more ingenious we will they did..

Oxford Bob Dylan Russia Uganda scientist SMU Sunday Times Allen Ginsberg Latin America London Youtube publisher GINSBURG Dave pullman Plas S. John Kerry William Blink Prince
"pullman" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on Overdue

"You've been being to read. My name's Andrew. My name is Craig my resolute, my first resolution was to do that. To take it from you. Okay. Rarely and keep it for myself. Okay. Give it back next week. Probably the my second resolution is to be less sick than I've been so far funny night. Sure. Yes. Get better. That's a good resolution. I think you're delivering on it. You're better than I saw you the other day. I'm working on it. Yeah. That's good. I think that some some snot in my honcker. That's where that's where you should keep it. Getting rid of it before we talk about the first book of this year. Philip Pullman, the golden compass I'll say that my resolution is to look at all of the stuff that I hoped to do in twenty eighteen and see if I can do like half of it in twenty nineteen. Did you get done twenty eighteen there's a well some of it? But there's a bunch of things that I didn't do. And if I could do like half of them this year, if you do half of the things that you didn't do. Yeah. So what are we talking like a third of the things that you'd plan to do just last year that something like that? If I have anything new to I'm working two years behind on my life. Maybe is oh God sounds like a real bummer on like, I don't like big projects run behind all the time. Yeah. It's my life bills ability project. Yeah. Yeah. Or like implementing laws and things like it just takes time takes a lot of time. Well, thank you for your support because it's come along. But we need we need some need some time to get this. The other your other resolution, I guess should be to describe the show for new listeners you might their resolution might be to listen to the show. So every week one of us reads a book that we've never had before. And describes it to the others. I'm just telling like in the future. This is how you might do it. Because as we just discussed you have like pretty serious follow-through through issues. Okay. Thank you for straightening for. So Andrew you did not you have never read this book. I've never read this week's book who. That's the golden compass aka in the Northern Lights or northern surf, sir. Philip Pullman, sir, Philip Pullman, this was recommended to us by one of our patron listeners. Thank you Austin for your recommendation and also by my wife, my other resolutions to do that more. Great good. She wanted me read the book. And then I did. And then there's two more. What you probably also wants to read which I haven't agreed to refer the show, but maybe I'll just read them. Anyway, what is that? That's just called living and reading good good start to this year. So far, really good. I'm sick still. Okay. Well, you're working on it. We talked about that. Yeah. Phil, Phillip Pullman, sir. Philip Pullman, Philip seen your see Seymour Pullman. Yup. Is that his name? You don't know that? Born in nineteen forty six. His dad, I believe was a. Like a bomber pilot. And his family moved around little bit. And then his dad died when he was pretty young. And then his mom remarried in the move to like Austrailia or Bob way or something. He's move around. Very different yet countries. And then he ultimately moved back to Wales and then studied at Exeter. It'll come up a little bit later, but he had a teacher who instilled in him a love for Milton's paradise lost probably a book, we should read some time. But don't tell us because it'll take forever. And that is actually where the title of this book comes from. So we'll talk about that the American title, the golden compass or the original title the Northern Lights. I was both of oh the American the mirror the overarching title his dark materials Z, American, title and the overarching trilogy title..

Philip Pullman Seymour Pullman Craig Philip Austrailia Exeter Austin Wales Bob Andrew Milton Phil two years
"pullman" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on Overdue

"You've been being to read. My name's Andrew. My name is Craig my resolute, my first resolution was to do that. To take it from you. Okay. Rarely and keep it for myself. Okay. Give it back next week. Probably the my second resolution is to be less sick than I've been so far funny night. Sure. Yes. Get better. That's a good resolution. I think you're delivering on it. You're better than I saw you the other day. I'm working on it. Yeah. That's good. I think that some some snot in my honcker. That's where that's where you should keep it. Getting rid of it before we talk about the first book of this year. Philip Pullman, the golden compass I'll say that my resolution is to look at all of the stuff that I hoped to do in twenty eighteen and see if I can do like half of it in twenty nineteen. Did you get done twenty eighteen there's a well some of it? But there's a bunch of things that I didn't do. And if I could do like half of them this year, if you do half of the things that you didn't do. Yeah. So what are we talking like a third of the things that you'd plan to do just last year that something like that? If I have anything new to I'm working two years behind on my life. Maybe is oh God sounds like a real bummer on like, I don't like big projects run behind all the time. Yeah. It's my life bills ability project. Yeah. Yeah. Or like implementing laws and things like it just takes time takes a lot of time. Well, thank you for your support because it's come along. But we need we need some need some time to get this. The other your other resolution, I guess should be to describe the show for new listeners you might their resolution might be to listen to the show. So every week one of us reads a book that we've never had before. And describes it to the others. I'm just telling like in the future. This is how you might do it. Because as we just discussed you have like pretty serious follow-through through issues. Okay. Thank you for straightening for. So Andrew you did not you have never read this book. I've never read this week's book who. That's the golden compass aka in the Northern Lights or northern surf, sir. Philip Pullman, sir, Philip Pullman, this was recommended to us by one of our patron listeners. Thank you Austin for your recommendation and also by my wife, my other resolutions to do that more. Great good. She wanted me read the book. And then I did. And then there's two more. What you probably also wants to read which I haven't agreed to refer the show, but maybe I'll just read them. Anyway, what is that? That's just called living and reading good good start to this year. So far, really good. I'm sick still. Okay. Well, you're working on it. We talked about that. Yeah. Phil, Phillip Pullman, sir. Philip Pullman, Philip seen your see Seymour Pullman. Yup. Is that his name? You don't know that? Born in nineteen forty six. His dad, I believe was a. Like a bomber pilot. And his family moved around little bit. And then his dad died when he was pretty young. And then his mom remarried in the move to like Austrailia or Bob way or something. He's move around. Very different yet countries. And then he ultimately moved back to Wales and then studied at Exeter. It'll come up a little bit later, but he had a teacher who instilled in him a love for Milton's paradise lost probably a book, we should read some time. But don't tell us because it'll take forever. And that is actually where the title of this book comes from. So we'll talk about that the American title, the golden compass or the original title the Northern Lights. I was both of oh the American the mirror the overarching title his dark materials Z, American, title and the overarching trilogy title..

Philip Pullman Seymour Pullman Craig Philip Austrailia Exeter Austin Wales Bob Andrew Milton Phil two years
"pullman" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"So just keep it locked right here on my offense. Los Angeles, one four three FM. Cosc- rattling sat on the stairs. Leave the cabinets. That we got into this castle aggressive. We. So pullman. I don't. Saw. Do the kids. Did we get into this, man? Good. Glows? pour now to God is Jackson. Oh. More music or for right? For three my FM..

Los Angeles pullman Jackson Cosc
"pullman" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"So pullman. Hey. Do the kids. Dishes. Did we do this, man? Eight. Why not? Again, just poor now. God is. Oh. Spain..

pullman Spain
"pullman" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Breaking news as, it happens you're listening to Kevin McCullough radio So glad you're with us and very interesting I mean what what, we try to. Do is breaking news and what it means why it, matters that's kind of a simple format of Kevin McCullough radio and it's something that you obviously entertain because you have made us consistently the one of the most listened to, broadcasts of the entire day right here where. You finding us and we're. Glad to be here with you We've got a very interesting piece. Being developed, out of the federalist today the executive editor their joy Pullman has authored, a profound piece. Titled kids who had ten government preschool learned lesson misbehave, more and I know that in the good sensibilities of people that live in the northeast this is a shock to the system so I thought I'd have on to discuss, joy Pullman welcome back to Kevin McCullough radio Thank you Why did you want to write? About this Well to be, on well I mean education is my field but I also have five little kids and a little less one. Is a baby a toddler and a preschooler And the other two I'm guessing already in school so was preschool part of your two oldest kids programs Well we did a once a week enrichment and program. That, involve, me. Being there with my son, but so writing depends on whether you would label that, preschool right right right because in the McCullough house we've gone round and round and we try Christian preschool and then it turned. Out that one of my kids is a little too hyper, for that and they didn't have the resources so we ended, up going into the local school district preschool and it turned out to be a good experience for him but. I read and here a lot of questionable things about this, in your piece today really. Caught my attention so what what did you basically argue What about you just discussing, and explaining the results of the of the only the second high quality randomized controlled trial study of a government preschool program that has ever been conducted and what. That means is the only difference between you know. The kid studied in kids who are the control group is that the kids. Who, were study went preschool so it's pretty reliable kind of study in it found overall you know, that the kids who attended the government preschool program in Tennessee. By, the, time. They reach third grade after, some initial gains rate in the preschool kindergarten year by, the time the kids reach third grade if they had gone to preschool they were behind in math and science and they were. More likely to be labeled special needs then where the kids, who had mostly stayed at home with their parents instead of, going to the program now this is government preschool that you're talking about so obviously they didn't test kids that. Were in private or parochial preschool programs The kids that, were studied who had not gone to the government eat run preschool program about I think it was fifteen percent of them did go to a private preschool and..

Kevin McCullough joy Pullman Pullman executive editor Tennessee fifteen percent
"pullman" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"So pullman do the kids dishes do bro do no just poor now too oh i've got another shot.

pullman
"pullman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Payday more than you can handle escape upturn in the pan perth i cullman kid lips like this employee pullman timorese pace one camera come pitcher please do you girls louis pullman what's the pain without a plea didn't see come nod even my while to come in into awesome but in your girl tell me what you will you tell me will you won't let's tools to the two good turn you'll.

perth louis pullman
"pullman" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on Channel 955

"So pullman do the kids and flows dishes do do we do this man you just pour now too god is jackson oh.

pullman
"pullman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"pullman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Now i i been so lucky to be at this stage the games so being invited to do challenging character swimming you're pretty good at it i think that's it's fair to them not like they went up more bill pullman let's see if you're an air and you're off we go planned out of us sort of a subtler power call yet bad guy but you deserve a subtler bad guy jack kramer battle of the sex sex zia and other good part here yeah led was ill you know a chance did do somebody who euro really is like the the obstacle character leo nancy in serb in i know that people love to have oh he's a bad guy he's a good guy in others for some people it's always going to be the world of them would i really with the director's job in dayton valerie fares in oath just so so considered as people wanting to tell this humanist tale in which everybody's meono flawed and everybody's got some good side and mirrored you try and and we we shaped its although we didn't it wasn't as is a mustache twirling as an hour's how he water i had a villa white he as you say he you set it very well he's the obstacle an yeah yeah yeah but he he doesn't think of himself is doing anything wrong no no way vis and i prieto he's he read is oh bits in every way said the room lit up when jack kramer came in and do so important tennyson he you know he did things for people he'd be led the strike at wimbledon 73 that was met that he lost his bbc commentator position he lost his and i think just billie jean king was a bridge too far.

bill pullman leo nancy director jack kramer tennyson dayton billie jean king