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36 Burst results for "Pulitzer prize"

Snapchat removes Juneteenth filter that asked users to smile to break chains

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Snapchat removes Juneteenth filter that asked users to smile to break chains

"Snapchat has removed its Juneteenth filter after critics slammed it as tone deaf and offensive it shows chains appearing and then breaking when the user is prompted to smile the pan African flag is also in the background the online firestorm started after digital strategists and Pulitzer Prize finalist mark as lucky posted a video of himself trying out the filler filter with a sarcastic caption saying interesting this comes as Snapchat CEO says he will not release the company's diversity report because releasing the data would reinforce the idea that minorities aren't properly represented in the tech

Snapchat CEO Pulitzer Prize
Fresh update on "pulitzer prize" discussed on Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts

00:17 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pulitzer prize" discussed on Selected Shorts

"Live on stage at Symphony space in New York City. One of America's most important writers, Toni Morrison, died in August of 2019. Her novels, including Beloved Jazz and Song of Solomon, have become an indelible part of the American canon. Her fierce poetic visions earned her the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize and the presidential Medal of Freedom. And this list of accolades only hints at what Morrison accomplished as a writer and editor, a teacher advocate and mother of two Selected shorts produced the live show at Symphony space to celebrate her and the legacy she left behind. Friends, colleagues and admirers performed pieces of Morrison's work. Some shared memories of Morrison from the stage. It was a heartfelt and thrilling evening and one that I myself at the pleasure of hosting. In the next hour. We'll hear essays, stories and novels. Excerpts in tributes from that night. As much. As Morrison wrote about the troubles facing black women in America she ultimately wrote to inspire to move beyond the trauma in our history toward a higher truth. Our first piece, An essay, Morrison wrote in 1985 is just such an inspiration, and I got to read it. Here's a knowing so deep.

Toni Morrison Symphony Space America Pulitzer Prize Nobel Prize New York City Writer And Editor Solomon Canon
Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

Solvable

05:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

"Were excited to share with you. A new season of conversations with leaders and change makers about how to solve the world's biggest problems. This is an extraordinary moment. We're living through global pandemic, and in the United. States were experiencing the most powerful protest movement of my lifetime against police, brutality and racial injustice. It's a time of great possibility. Our Society seems to be open to the kinds of moral and social transformations that were much harder to imagine before the virus, and before the killing of George. Floyd! For this are second season I'll be joined again by by Pushkin. co-founder Malcolm well and journalist and friend and Applebaum a Pulitzer Prize winning historian and staff writer at the Atlantic. To start this season, we're focusing on two problems racial injustice and the twenty twenty election. We can have an election that is participatory. With robust. In twenty twenty justice isn't blind. We have to be far more critical and thoughtful and have that Lens. On today's episode, we hear from an international expert on non violent protests. Let's saw this one big issue. Let's more racial equality. Great to look at our narcissism of small differences later. When the outcry went up over George Fluids, killing peaceful demonstrators took to the streets in Minneapolis then in other cities across the country and across the globe, and a problem arose. It's a problem. We've seen elsewhere. Bad actors outliers with destructive agendas overtaking the news coverage by engaging in retaliatory violence. This isn't a new issue. It's one peaceful. Protesters have long faced in south. Africa Egypt Ukraine Tunisia and during occupy Wall Street. Of Popovich is a Serbian activist and scholar, social movements, organizers from around the world have turned to him for advice about how to strengthen and propel their movements. Popovich, as the Executive Director of the Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and strategies or canvas. He literally wrote a user's manual for successful. Social Change. Our host and Applebaum lives in Poland. She spoke to Popovich from his home in Belgrade Serbia. Here's their conversation. My Solo bill is to create social change through the successful strategic nonviolent movement so surgeon. Why is this your solvable? In other words? What makes this issue personal to you? While first of all I started getting better young on my freshman year on the university, we were faced with a with a crazy regime in Belgrade their nineties any kind of choices, you can fight three concisely. I guess I was stubborn. Police stadiums fight together. Together with a group of France who launched the movement, called out four, which is a Serbian for resistance, and then built from eleven people to seventy thousand people, eventually getting rid of the best guy lawsuits, and I kind of addicted to the idea of the social change. Group People Power movements since you originally began odd for you and your friends without any experience. You had run protests before you had an organized movement before. And now you're able to advise people. So how did you begin thinking through the problem in the beginning was just spontaneous, or did you plan first of all? We started by doing it without planning. Which is why it took us nine years to actually do it so ninety two. We did a little bit of the of locking ourselves in the campuses, seeing east kind of stop. It didn't work because it didn't enroll the rural. Deny, six seven lot of people were mobilized. To smaller places, we protested for one hundred days day by day by day. This refigure out that everyday protest is probably not the best way to do it because it's very exhausting, so we figured out that it is unity thing that we are message. Most of the protesters were getting wall in the protest in, and they say we are too busy to plan so a learning by doing and making mistakes is actually the best way to do stop, but it's very slow so strongly. Advocate to the people start reading books and learn from other people's mistakes, rather than learning from there on. How did you break it down into solvable pieces How should people who WANNA create? Change think. Think about that for a successful protest. You need so much more than the protests. You need an idea what should be different with the cold vision of tomorrow. Then you need to share this vision with different groups. Then you need to work with people. You're not normally alike and probably disagree on many other stuff to really get to the change, so need to take a really sober. Look at the groups you need. And then then we dealt politicizing indulging groups, and then you try to figure out how you work together for the change that benefits everybody because we talked to stand. Social change is a very kind of selfish of for matinee, people and the trick indistinct stinks is. A unifying proposition, which is the smallest common denominator from the groups you want to mobilize and very orchid. You want to agree on what you agree. Also went to read what you disagree, so this is not about the things that that are different among us. We leave this thing for layer, but let's solve this one big issue. Let's get rid of of communism. Let's get rid of luxury L.. Let's make more racial equality, and so on and so forth, and then we are going to look at our narcissism of small differences later.

Popovich George Fluids Applebaum Belgrade Floyd Center For Applied Nonviolent Pulitzer Prize Atlantic Minneapolis Serbia Poland France Co-Founder Pushkin. Malcolm Well Tunisia Executive Director Staff Writer Africa
COVID-19 data sharing with law enforcement sparks concern

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

COVID-19 data sharing with law enforcement sparks concern

"A personal celebrity information caught up in the me about too tens scandalous of thousands lashing of coronavirus out at a journalist patients who is has being done a shared lot of with work first on that responders subject even though that former information today show should host Matt be kept Lauer's confidential accusing author Roman Farrell a review by the of Associated inaccurate Press and biased buys at journalist least two thirds as presented of U. S. in states Farrow's book a releasing catch and addresses kill among of people the things that who Lauer tested says positive that Farrow for Kobe got nineteen wrong is an with accusation police firefighters that the fired host and EMTs ripped a co worker nearly Farrell says a dozen it is Lauer states who is also wrong provide on this court their patients cara one names a Pulitzer Prize more for his than eleven work on accusations million Americans against Hollywood have been tested producer for Harvey covert Weinstein nineteen but and the new York we're short times has their suggested private medical an information investigation would not and it be disclosed did show that Farrell first was less responders than thorough are you the in information vetting his is work needed meanwhile for them Farrow's to take publisher safety precautions says the book was fully but civil vetted liberties groups and that worry it supports some minority the author patients I'm could Oscar be profiled wells Gabriel or information could be sent to immigration authorities the U. S. department of health and Human Services says this is not a violation of Baruchel privacy laws Jackie Quinn Washington

Weinstein Jackie Quinn Washington U. S. Department Of Health And Oscar Publisher Harvey Associated Inaccurate Press Gabriel New York Matt Producer Hollywood Pulitzer Prize Kobe Farrow Roman Farrell Lauer
Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

"A celebrity caught up in the me too scandalous lashing out at a journalist who has done a lot of work on that subject former today show host Matt Lauer's accusing author Roman Farrell of inaccurate and biased journalist as presented in Farrow's book catch and kill among the things that Lauer says that Farrow got wrong is an accusation that the fired host ripped a co worker Farrell says it is Lauer who is wrong on this court cara one a Pulitzer Prize for his work on accusations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein but the new York times has suggested an investigation and it did show that Farrell was less than thorough in vetting his work meanwhile Farrow's publisher says the book was fully vetted and that it supports the author I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Matt Lauer Roman Farrell Farrow Pulitzer Prize Harvey Weinstein New York Times Publisher Hollywood Producer Oscar Wells Gabriel
Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

"A celebrity caught up in the me too scandalous lashing out at a journalist who has done a lot of work on that subject former today show host Matt Lauer's accusing author Roman Farrell of inaccurate and biased journalist as presented in Farrow's book catch and kill among the things that Lauer says that Farrow got wrong is an accusation that the fired host ripped a co worker Farrell says it is Lauer who is wrong on this court cara one a Pulitzer Prize for his work on accusations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein but the new York times has suggested an investigation and it did show that Farrell was less than thorough in vetting his work meanwhile Farrow's publisher says the book was fully vetted and that it supports the author I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Matt Lauer Roman Farrell Farrow Pulitzer Prize Harvey Weinstein New York Times Publisher Hollywood Producer Oscar Wells Gabriel
Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

"A celebrity caught up in the me too scandalous lashing out at a journalist who has done a lot of work on that subject former today show host Matt Lauer's accusing author Roman Farrell of inaccurate and biased journalist as presented in Farrow's book catch and kill among the things that Lauer says that Farrow got wrong is an accusation that the fired host ripped a co worker Farrell says it is Lauer who is wrong on this court cara one a Pulitzer Prize for his work on accusations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein but the new York times has suggested an investigation and it did show that Farrell was less than thorough in vetting his work meanwhile Farrow's publisher says the book was fully vetted and that it supports the author I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Matt Lauer Roman Farrell Farrow Pulitzer Prize Harvey Weinstein New York Times Publisher Hollywood Producer Oscar Wells Gabriel
This American Life wins first Pulitzer Prize for audio reporting

podnews

03:11 min | 2 months ago

This American Life wins first Pulitzer Prize for audio reporting

"The latest from our newsletter and Pod News Dot net maximize radio stations by PR ads. And it's one the first ever Pulitzer Prize for reporting a journalism award founded in one thousand nine seventeen. The award was for their episode. The out crowd with Malia tool if the Los Angeles Times and Emily Green a freelance with vice news the judges described it as revelatory intimate journalism. The finalists were ear hustle and NPR's white lies. What is today's most popular android? Podcast APP with seventy four percent of mobile phones running android in the world. Which podcast APP should you be linking to? We looked at the downloads. Ratings data to find out whether there's a clear clear was leader and there is you'll find it links from our show notes and newsletter today try digital has released its report for the four weeks ending April twelfth by average weekly downloads. The number three is immense Shapiro. This is the Ben Shapiro. Show Ben Shapiro. Show and number

Ben Shapiro Pulitzer Prize Los Angeles Times Malia NPR Emily Green
The Latest: 1st audio Pulitzer prize goes to 'The Out Crowd'

All Things Considered

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

The Latest: 1st audio Pulitzer prize goes to 'The Out Crowd'

"The Pulitzer prizes were announced today a month later than usual due to the pandemic and as NPR's neda Ulaby tells us the prizes for journalism fiction and music we're joined by new category audio we raise a glass to our colleagues at this American life who went to Mexico to talk to people stuck in camps because of the trump administration's immigration policy single vehicle not their story the out crowd from last November was reported with Molly tool of the Los Angeles Times vice news freelancer and Lee green and of course

NPR Neda Ulaby Mexico Los Angeles Times Lee Green
AP wins feature photography Pulitzer for Kashmir coverage

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

AP wins feature photography Pulitzer for Kashmir coverage

"The Associated Press has won the Pulitzer Prize in feature photography for images made during India's clampdown on cashmere India's unprecedented lockdown of Kashmir last August was difficult to show the world Associated Press photographers dar Yasin Mukhtar Khan and Shani Aanand stink around roadblocks to cover in strangers homes and hid cameras in vegetable bags to capture images of protests police and paramilitary action in daily life during the crackdown in making the images wasn't the only obstacle with a communications blackout that shut down phone and internet service yes in Khan and Aanand also had to persuade travelers to carry their photo files out of the region to the office in New Delhi I'm Ben Thomas

The Associated Press Pulitzer Prize India Kashmir Shani Aanand New Delhi Ben Thomas Dar Yasin Mukhtar Khan
Coverage of Alaska policing, Kashmir crackdown win Pulitzers

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Coverage of Alaska policing, Kashmir crackdown win Pulitzers

"The twenty twenty Pulitzer prizes have been announced the anchorage Daily News and ProPublica won the Pulitzer Prize in public service for a series of reports that revealed a third of Alaska's villages had no police protection those reports which the Pulitzer board describes as riveting have spurred legislative changes an influx of spending on public safety in the state The New York Times won the investigative reporting prize for an expose on predatory lending in the New York City taxi industry and the international reporting award for what judges called in throwing stories reported at great risk about Russian president Vladimir Putin's government the Washington post's work on the environmental effects of extreme temperatures was recognized for explanatory reporting and the Associated Press when the feature photography price for images made during India's clamp down on cashmere on Ben Thomas

Anchorage Daily News Propublica Pulitzer Prize Alaska The New York Times President Trump Vladimir Putin Washington Post Associated Press India Ben Thomas Pulitzer New York City
Robert Caro on How He Does It

The Book Review

09:47 min | 3 months ago

Robert Caro on How He Does It

"Robert Carroll joins us now he is the Pulitzer Prize. Winning author of many books. New Book is called working researching interviewing and writing. He's also the author of the years of Lyndon Johnson four volumes of them thus far and the powerbroker Robert Moses and the fall of New York Bob. Thanks so much for being here. Pleasure to be here all right so everyone has been greatly anticipating a volume five of the years of Johnson. But instead you have written this other book working researching interviewing writing. Why did you decide to do this? Ever since the powerbroker I kept myself out of the book. I don't think the word I appears in there many times. If soon as the book came out people started asking me. What was it like ten of you Robert Moses and I realized that I should have put in something to tell people what that was like so for like forty five years. I've been hearing that question and people ask me what it's like to work in presidential libraries were. Can you find out from interviews? This isn't the adviced anybody but it's sort of. I said we'll I WANNA give people some glimpses into how I work so. I took time out to do this book now. I'm back doing the volume. I mean it's an interesting question about interviewing Robert Moses because you had read five sessions which women seven sessions with him. Which was very different from the Johnson. Biography where he was dead already for several years. Before you could get started and I'm curious you write about it a bit in working what the difference was like for you. Writing the book writing a biography of a person who was still alive versus writing a biography of someone who was already gone in one sense. It's great to write about someone who's still alive because you get to meet Moses. Didn't talk to me for the first couple of years of the book. Then we had seven interviews. Soon as I started asking questions. Pamela the interviews were over but they will long sessions and I really got to look at him with Johnson. You felt okay. I came along just too late. He had died just three years before was great about him was that he died so young he would have been only sixty seven when I started. He darted sixty four that everyone was still alive. He had I think twelve people in Johnson City High School. When he was there they were all there to be viewed. But you can't make up for not meeting and talking to the person writing about you just can't do feel that absence and working on the Johnson. Yes you do everything you can to overcome that you know you interview the people closest to him over and over and over again constantly asking them what was he like. If I was standing next to you what would I see him doing? So you try to get a feeling of him now. We have these telephone transcripts where you hear him talking hundreds and hundreds of hours you can listen to him talking and see how he deals with people and how he gets what he wants from people. That's always amazing to me. Has that changed the way that you've been doing your research having access to those types a change the writing of history in general like on the Gulf of Tonkin incident which has been sort of mystery. What really happened there. How many attacks were there? On our destroyers. You know that led Johnson to launch these launch bombing attacks on North Vietnam. Now you actually hear the communications between Robert McNamara. The Secretary of Defense Cincpac the admiral at Honolulu and the commander of the fleet. That's an in Viet Nam. You hear this and what was really going on in real time the other aspect of your interviewing that. I thought was so interesting that you write about in this new book working is the delicacy of interviews and especially when you get to touchy subjects. And they'll you didn't interview Johnson for the book did Interview Lady Bird and tell the story about how you and when you approached the subject of Johnson's longtime affair with Alice Marsh. Well when Johnson is in the Pacific during World War. Two year allowed easing Australia. You're allowed one telephone. Call the senator from Texas. Just Johnson has to decide whether to run again for the House of Representatives or to run for senator. I'm going through all the correspondents and suddenly in the middle of it. There is a telegram from someone sewing. Alice I've never heard of Alice. She appears in no book and it says Lyndon everyone else that happened to me in the White House. Everyone else thinks you should run for the Senate. I think you should run for the house. Please try to cool love Alice. I said WHO is Alice. Who was the person that he makes the only one telephone call? And who's giving political advice which he follows shortly after that? So that's you know. An example of going through the papers by luck her sister and best friend show up at the Johnson Library and ask to see me and I go down to see them and they say you know we wanna tell you about a woman named Alice Marsh. We don't want to portray to some Bimbo. She was really very important in Johnson's life. And they told me the whole story of this Lauren and significant relationship and his life. So how do you then? Ask Lady Bird. You know panel. That's the only interview I ever had in my life where I couldn't bring myself to look at the person I was interviewing. Alice was a small town girl. She turned herself into the brilliant Washington. Hostess Brilliant Brilliant Salons and she came from a little town called Morlin. Now no one would go to the mall. And unless they were looking for inflammation analysis a little town in the middle of nowhere and I never know I went up there and we learned about her. And how remarkable she was but all of a sudden we have a mutual friend. Who lived in Morlin? Who calls me in a panic and says the bird in Texas? Everybody Calls Lady Bird Bird. Bird and always. You've been in Marlin. So she knows you know about Al. Assad said well that had to be if it doesn't concern me but her secretary then shows up at my desk in the reading room says Mrs Johnson would like to see you out at the ranch this weekend. We had been meeting in her office so we sit down at the dining table. She's at the head of the table. I might her right. Hand my stenographer's notebook like like the one you use is is down on my right hand taking notes and without preamble. She starts to talk about Alice Quiz. How elegance she was how sophisticated she was how she taught. Linden things and everything that she taught him. He followed the rest of his life. You don't hear these lawn when she met him. He was this new congressman very awkward with Lorne Gang Leo Arms. She said turn them into an asset. Always wear shirts with French. Cuffs and very nice cufflinks. So when people's attention is cool to them it's called in in a in a good way. She told him. We're kind of Necktie to favor. Countess Myers Tie. But most of all at crucial elements in life. It was her advice that he followed an in a number of cases one in particular. It's not exaggerating. Very much to say she saved. His career is takes a moment to tell. But it's it's interesting his early careers financed by a very fierce huge Texas contractor. Herman Brown Brown and Root and Herman was prepared to keep financing his Roy and in return Johnson was getting huge contracts for Brown and root when all of a sudden they had a falling out Lyndon Johnson was getting them authorization to build a dam which they wanted but Linden wandered low. Rent Housing Project built in Boston in what was a very poor Mexican American neighborhood. The houses in that neighborhood were owned by Herman Brown. The tenants were paying rent to him. They were very profitable and he was enraged at Linden wanted to condemn them for his housing project and his chief lobbyist and his chief lawyer talked. Instead you know Herman was about to turn on Linden and when Herman turned on you he never turned back when Alice here is about this and invites them both down to Greatest Stadium Virginia. She sits down at her table. And says why don't you just compromise give Herman the damaging winds and the land and all of a sudden everything was okay. So Lady Bird starts talking not only about her elegance. She says the quotes are in the book. She was so sophisticated so beautiful. I remember her neck succession of wonderful beautiful dresses and me in well not so wonderful. And and then she said you know Lyndon Basically Linden always followed Alice's vice during that whole interview I have to say my head. Just stay down and I took notes. I couldn't look at her so that was done. The next week we went back to ordinary interview she just launched into it without you. Even though I you know I sometimes think I know something about politics. I'm really glad I don't have to write about. Women never understood why she did

Lyndon Johnson Alice Marsh Lady Bird Robert Moses Texas Johnson City High School Herman Brown Brown Johnson Library Pulitzer Prize Robert Carroll Robert Mcnamara Secretary Brilliant Brilliant Salons Gulf Of Tonkin Australia Linden New York Viet Nam
Re-Thinking Church Missions

5 Minutes in Church History

04:24 min | 3 months ago

Re-Thinking Church Missions

"All through the history of the Church of Christ. There has been a ceaseless struggle to maintain the truth that is a quote from Alan McRae Twentieth Century Presbyterian Churchmen and Biblical scholar. He learned that quote firsthand. He was with J Gresham Machen as a student at Princeton Seminary in the late nineteen twenty s and when Mason left Princeton in one across the Delaware River over to Philadelphia to found Westminster Theological Seminary. Mcrae went along with them and a few years later in one thousand nine thirty six when Mason. Who was ousted from the Presbyterian church U S and he formed a new church the Orthodox Presbyterian church well McRae went along with him again. So what was the issue in the Nineteen Thirties and specifically in nineteen thirty six mccray is about this ceaseless struggle to maintain the truth. Will broadly speaking. The issue was liberalism and cultural progressivism This had been at work in the Presbyterian Church USA and many other denominations as well at the time from the eighteen nineties on through the roaring twenties. Mason battled it at Princeton and he was battling it. Within the denomination narrowly. Speaking the issue was missions in nineteen thirty to the fall of nineteen thirty two. A report was issued entitled Rethinking Missions. This report was then published fully in nineteen thirty three no fewer than seven volumes published by Harper again under the title rethinking missions. This project was all funded by John. D Rockefeller it had representatives from seven key positions on mission boards. In seven denominations participated. This document had two major parts. One was based on a fact finding mission and just spoke of the state of missions and the conditions of places three places in particular China and India. Japan were studied the second part raised new ways. That mission should be done and challenge the old ways that missions was being done in a nutshell. What this document wanted to promote was to advance spiritual idealism social brotherhood Economic Welfare and Cultural Unity. The rethinking part means that to think of missions as simply the Great Commission the Proclamation of the Gospel to every tribe to every nation that is too narrow and in fact has been wrong headed we need a different mission. Different approach that represents the realities of the twentieth century so missions needs to be rethought well. This deeply troubled J. Gresham mation. He saw in this and denial of the Gospel and he couldn't believe that not only did his own mission board of the Presbyterian Church U s not only did it not refute this document but it had key representatives. Who are part of it and were promoting it. This was also the time of the missionary. Pearl Buck in nineteen thirty two. She had just won the Pulitzer Prize. She was a very significant figure in American culture and she was a Presbyterian missionary. Who denied the Atonement of Christ the Deity of Christ the authority of Scripture and all of this just perplexed Mason and so he challenged his denomination. He wrote a one hundred and ten page pamphlet to go along with an overture that he introduced in his presbytery and he wanted the Presbyterian Church to refute this document. They didn't and so. In one thousand nine hundred thirty three he formed the independent board of Presbyterian foreign missions that eventually led to his ouster from his denomination and so in Nineteen ninety-six once he was defrocked he just formed a new denomination the Orthodox Presbyterian church six months later January one nineteen thirty seven. Mason died but his commitment to the church and his commitment to the Gospel was evident there in that action of standing against the tide of his denomination and standing for the Gospel. He did not want to rethink missions but rather in the twentieth century he wanted to reaffirm the mission of the Church and the Great Commission. Well that was mentioned in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. And I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for joining us. For Five minutes purchased

Alan Mcrae Twentieth Century P Mason Nineteen Thirties Presbyterian Church U Orthodox Presbyterian Church Presbyterian Church Usa Presbyterian Church Gospel Church Of Christ J Gresham Machen Princeton Princeton Seminary Westminster Theological Semina Brotherhood Economic Welfare A Mcrae Pearl Buck Delaware River Great Commission J. Gresham Mation Steve Nichols
Emily Nussbaum: What I Wore When I Interviewed at New York Magazine

What I Wore When

09:34 min | 4 months ago

Emily Nussbaum: What I Wore When I Interviewed at New York Magazine

"For the most part all the women on this podcast were handpicked by me. On behalf of Glamour Women we find fascinating or nostalgic or brilliant or just women. We Wanna get to know a little bit better emily. Nussbaum was at the top of the list. Emily is the television critic for the New Yorker where she's worked since two thousand eleven and in two thousand sixteen. She won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism. Her voice is authentic and accessible and she's been described as a singular writer in two thousand nineteen. She released her first book. I like to watch arguing my way through the TV revolution. The book examines the changing landscape of television while effectively defending it as a medium with taking seriously it includes essays on everything from buffy. The Vampire slayer a show. That's been pivotal emily's life as well as the Sopranos Vanna Pump. Rules scandal true detective and sex in the city. Emily also tackles the question of whether a viewer can separate art from the actions of problematic creators in a timely me to ask a when I asked if she'd be willing to be a guest on the podcast. She seemed genuinely surprised saying she doesn't really consider herself a stylish person. I explained that the goal isn't to only feature quote fashion. He says that would be so boring. I'm so glad she agreed because our conversation was good so good in fact that we ran out of time and had to wrap it up just as we were digging into one of my favorite topics. Carrie Bradshaw not to worry. Though she still had plenty to say. I also asked emily to give her professional opinion on whether my mother and father were absolutely terrible parents for letting me watch twin peaks at nine years old which he happily did. Here's our conversation so I want to start by asking you. Which is what everybody that comes on this podcast. Which is what are you wearing right now? Oh I hadn't thought about this I I'm wearing black pants That fit well. Which is the difficult thing for me with pants. and I'm wearing some sort of gray tank top in a black sweater and a necklace that I really like that. I bought it a museum shop. That is where I generally buy jewelry And I don't remember where I got these things but they're kind of distinctive simple silver earnings during your earrings a lot. Yeah I like the erase striking. So I'm wearing good jewelry but I'm wearing completely neutral. What you wear to New York office kind of thing which is a black sweater and black pants. Oem Wearing kind of Nice sneakers wearing these these sort of Weird Green Corduroy Sneakers Love Them. And because the name of the PODCAST is what? You're going to talk about what you were when you interviewed for Your Job at New York magazine so I think this was around Two Thousand and three or two thousand four and at the time I was working as a freelance writer and I was writing for places like The New York Times magazine and doing both short pieces and long pieces. But I mainly thought of myself as a writer and Adam Moss who had worked at the Times was the new head of New York magazine and he was hiring new staffers and he called me to see whether come in and I thought they were gonNA call me to be a writer there which frankly and tells a different kind of clothing. 'cause writers are often shrubs But he actually wanted me to come in to interview to be the editor of the culture section. It wasn't something that I was sure I wanted to do. I was very ambivalent about it so I sort of winged it when I went in for my interview in a way that I don't normally for things and I'm convinced I got the job because of the clothes I wore which is true of almost nothing else in my life but I somehow put together an outfit. That was stylish showed my genuine uncaring about whether I got the job which is often the right combination for a situation like this and it was more stylish than I actually am so what I wore is dark blue jeans that fit right in for the period were sort of the right style gene because at the time they were kind of they had that sort of low weight but for for whatever reason I was actually pulling it off. Because I don't really have a body that works that great and that kind of jeans but I had good ones but the main thing is I wore. I had a a blue crushed velvet sort of waistcoat jacket that I had bought vintage that had silver buttons and my mom had given me these actually quite nice low ankle boots that were kind of a brownish yellow alligator skin or something that had stacked heels wouldn't stacked heels those two items actually looked good like they were distinctive. Strange Somewhat Bohemian. Downtown things and wearing pants always gives me a stronger sense of authority in a situation like this. I think I normally would have gone to a job interview honestly wearing an alien skirt a simple top jacket to try to look professional. But I think partially because I genuinely kind of didn't want to get the job or at least was doing it. I know that sounds almost disrespectful. 'cause it was such a good job but I was ambivalent embitterment about becoming an editor instead of a writer. So there's this part of me that was just like whatever like I didn't really rally right so I so I sort of magically managed to hit on this outfit. That kind of looked made me look way more downtown selective idiosyncratic and actively stylish and a young woman way and it went in and I have to say and like The other thing is Adam. My old boss and Hugo Lindgren. Who was also interviewing me They are guys who actually care about fashion in different ways and I walked in and I actually saw that they liked my clothes like this sounds stupid but the dumb way in which I was like. I've hacked this because so many things are stupid first impressions and there was this way in which because I looked kind of free wheeling and like I'm matched the part or something that helped anyway. I did get the job and initially said that I would take it for three months because we were just putting together the prospectus of the magazine and then ended up staying there for many years and Adam is an incredible boss. It all worked out. I never dressed like that again. I was GONNA say if he was hiring me in any way as you know perhaps delusional suspected that I was just sort of acting a role that worked for the job interview after that. I did not wear good clothes to the office. I did try to dress up a little bit. I went on a shopping trip with my I think he was. We were dating. I married my husband who's very stylish and has great taste and we were living in the West village and we went for this walk down. I think Greenwich Avenue had a couple of different shops and so I went out and I sort of went on a shopping trip to try to buy a few items. That seems like an editor at New York magazine would wear these items. When did you buy do any of the things were because I don't know brands but I bought some things that were kind of medium pricey and seemed like statement things I was never able to use them or put them together? But I do remember the first day I went in the office. I mean my entire impression of an office like that was like thirteen going on thirty hundred percent. I so I was trying to. I was trying to raise my game to ROM COM level which remind notion of medium also. Yes exactly the truth is I mean. People dressed in black in New York and a lot of people who are in fashion dress very neutral and the one time I ever wrote about fashion. I was really struck by the fact that I was like wait. This is not made up of butterflies like this is a lot of thirty to fifty year old women wearing black and like simple expensive chunky statement hearings or something. It's not a situation in which people are trying to stand out. Visually so are wearing off the runway necessarily says gallons and no. I think that's what people think of fashion back. I'm trying to remember what else I bought. And then at one point when I early in having that job I also attempted to have power lunch as a sort of a joke with a friend at Michael's and midtown because he's like a fun thing to do and on the way to that. I bought some bought some clip on earrings. That had on the way to the line. Yeah on the way to the lunch. I literally was like I'm GonNa like it but again it was sort of as a joke because my friend and I were like. We're now like media. People are power lunch area. They they were like strange. Chunky rhinestone earrings with red and blue stones in them that were round clip bonds rather than dangling or they were sort of you know punch in the face upper east side ish food jewelry of some kind so I remember. I stopped at the store. So those were my power. Close is basically what I'm saying for New York magazine. Are you somebody? Now that considers yourself AH shopper. No I actually don't like to shop. My husband likes to shop though so I often will go shopping with him and he will pick out things that are good and he's responsible actually for some of the best things that they own because I mean we'll go to a vintage store and he'll pick out something that I personally wouldn't have picked out because I'm just a highly pragmatic shopper. I just I find it boring. I don't like going through the racks. I don't like spending money and I also don't like searching for bargains so I'm like the worst combination of ten no India and I and I don't really enjoy changing and changing rooms and trying various things on and all of that kind of thing but I do like having some nice clothes so I go either with hammer or with my son. It's actually fun. I used to shop with my son when he was a little younger and then he would read things one to ten so that was fun. That's does he do that now? Yeah I mean he's he's we haven't gone shopping in a while I mean and also he's he's about twelve now so I don't think when he was eight he actually he's. He's much more interested individuals than I am so he he had a lot of opinions but he's also very enthusiastic so pretty much. No matter what I tried on. It was from eight to ten. So that's a good person to shop

Writer New York Magazine Emily Adam Moss Editor New York The Times Pulitzer Prize Glamour Women Nussbaum Hugo Lindgren The New York Times Magazine Carrie Bradshaw India Vanna Pump Michael
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:05 min | 4 months ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country

Louise Welcome National Book Award Congress Guy Dylan Myers Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band DC National Book Critics Circle A Thomas Washington Minnesota Pulitzer Prize Tehran Dillon S Myer Menominee Louis Surgery Arthur Commissioner President Trump Watkins
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

The Al Franken Podcast

14:24 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

"David Farren whole as a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist For The Washington Post he won. The bolts are Because of his really painstaking thorough reporting on trump's foundation which turns out was kind of a scam and Has now been shut down by the state of New York so Thank you David for joining us. Hey great to be here and thank you for all the reporting you've done on on trump's finances and Just curiously let me ask you. What corrupt schemes of trump's are you currently investigating the big priority for this year is to find out how much money the federal government is paying trump's businesses? We that it is. We know that it's a lot of you know we've found four hundred seventy one thousand dollars in payments already. And but I think we've only seen tip of the iceberg mar-a-lago. This is Scotland. This is all these things right. Yeah well we've just looked at one government agency so far which is the secret service to follow him wherever he goes and then there's sort of captive customers for him. He gets the choose whatever he wants to charge them and the service can pay. Whatever it's charged so we are looking at what he charges them to come with him. Tomorrow law go to come with into Bedminster. He's an ren things at Bedminster when he's not even there So yeah I think there's more than just the secret service but that's the part that we're looking at first so this is obviously His His golf courses or resorts. Or whatever these are and The Secret Service has to stay there. for security reasons and he can pretty much was he charged him as he charged above What normal people pay? Not The normal people go to any of these well the ones we've looked at so far bedminster and mar-a-lago and they both have a few guest rooms. They're not really hotels but they have a few rooms and they don't publish the rates they don't even if you're a member you have to call and get the rate for tonight. So they don't they don't say what regular people pay The only rip. That's a great Great out right but the but the good thing for us is that last year. Eric trump president son actually gave a really definitive answer about what his Co. is is company was charging the government he says when government officials come with my father to our properties which are just you know he says I. He said it was free and then he wasn't. He's not totally free. We just charge them the cost of housekeeping. So just the cost of cleaning their rooms by the way everyone If you go to a hotel Tip Your housekeeper yes You know please. So that'd be like a ten dollar charge. A figure he gave was fifty bucks and we've talked to a sort of hotel industry experts about you. Know what does it cost? Just a cleanroom and it's like for a luxury hotel. It's like fifty to seventy bucks so that's about. I see because they pay the housekeeper scores. And you get and how many of them are are legal or well. How the ones at mar-a-lago are all They're all guests. Workers Imports guestworkers their legal. But they're not okay. Well that's good. Yeah with for him. But the thing is we haven't found a single instance and I've I've been looking for any instance at all where I can see that Eric actually did what he said where the trump were actually charged the government fifty bucks. We've found rates four hundred dollars. Five hundred and sixty dollars six hundred fifty dollars a nine man. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa WHOA are you saying that Eric may have been misleading people? I don't want to prejudge it. Maybe there's some examples out there that I haven't found yet. I'm just saying that every single example that I found any history of that and your research of them be misleading. Let's go back to the first thing. Which is the that you did. Which is the trump foundation and There are some pretty hilarious stories there. You're probably better telling these than I am well just to give a couple So the trump foundation was this little charity. That trump is set up in the eighties. Donald Trump and set up in the eighties and basically it for the last. You know five or ten years before he ran for office. It had been giving away other people's money for some reason. Other people gave him money which he then gave away under the name of the Donald Trump Foundation. So people thought they were getting his money but it wasn't and the the weird thing about it one of the weird things about it was what he bought with this charities money including A couple of different very large portraits of himself So he would go to this charity auctions at mar-a-lago people would bring a painting of him. I think figuring we will. He's you know he's got to buy it would blow to him if a painting of him goes unsold in his house so he bought one painting for ten thousand dollars. You but one painting for twenty thousand dollars which scrape that's fine. There's an auction for charity. But then he used his charities money to pay for it so the foundation pays for his portrait's exactly and Basically there's no justification for that all right. No one of the basic rules about charity is it even if your name is on the charity. It's not your money. It's the charity is a separate pot of money that's meant for the public good and Foundation Foundation. Let's tax exempt. Yeah so you can't use it to buy decorations for your house. You can't use it to buy anything for yourself So we wanted to know okay. Well now that these paintings wait a minute. Wait a minute decorations. He's I know that he's hung. The portrait's have been hung at Some of the hotels maybe Ed mar-a-lago and one zero So they're all that's the G. Seven g seven exactly so they could see the portrait so yeah they had said they wouldn't tell us where it was but one of our readers founded on the wallet at Durrell Decorating The sports bar there. So that's pretty much. The definition of what? You should not do with charities. Assets wasn't wasn't barral actually doing a service which was storing it. Right that was that was the The argument with trump campaign was well. Yeah looks bad. It looks like the trump charity did a favor for the trump business by buying art for the businesses walls. But you have it all wrong really. The business is doing the charity a favor by storing its art collection for free our journalist. We gotta check these things out. It's like man. I call it a tax expert and said you know. Does this hold water could you? And the GUY said you know. It's it's not easy to make an irs auditor laugh. But this would do it. I actually had an auditor once audit me and Tom. Davis via the corporation This is the weirdest thing he was there for in my business. Manager's Office for a week I don't know why I'm telling the story but here's the thing. He sees a receipt for dinner that I had with Lorne Michaels and Paul McCartney and Tom in London and he said You had dinner with Paul McCartney and I said yes and he goes okay arts over. Isn't that funny? I was fine. It's good all right. Okay keep going. I thought that was a good story so that was one of the many things in the end. The trump the New York attorney general sued the trump foundation for that and a variety of other things. He used this charity to help his political campaign. He used it to pay off legal debts for his businesses and they sued the trump foundation. Saying that none of that stuff is what you're supposed to do with charities money and so the end. The trump foundation gets dissolved and trump had to pay two million dollar. Fine personally give an example of the legal debt that the foundation paid because he legally owed some money. And what was that about though the one case? There's a charity golf tournament at one of trump's golf courses in New York and they have this prize hit a whole hit a hole in one. When a million dollars okay. They're out there and with some whole a guy. One of the contestants from New York Hits a hole in one hour a big deal to take his picture. You know he's back in the clubhouse buying drinks that says you know these GonNa want a million dollars and they sort of tapped him on the shoulder and say actually if you read the fine print of the win a million dollars sweepstakes it says that the ball has to travel a certain number of yards before it goes in the hole for be eligible and trump's course just happened to have set it up so that the t the whole were not far enough apart that that we not exceed that limit so yes even hit the hole in one. You don't win the Homeland Prize because you hit it far enough. It was just The Pin was just far enough Close enough that you couldn't they couldn't win so food and They settled or something and the trump foundation paid for their exactly but he he sued the trump golf course because obviously the trump golf course is the one at fault and the trump golf course settled with the guy but then the trump foundation again in legal legally separate tax exempt charity with nothing to do with this Gulf hole in one thing. They trump foundation patient. Okay so this is just sleaze. Sleaze sleaze there's a couple of stories there they really like one one. You got into this because He he did this thing when He was feuding with Fox. Instead of doing the Fox debate he did this Vanderbilt zone and said he was giving like a million dollars. Sir. Several million dollars to vets right. Yeah a million dollars out of his own pocket. That's right and million dollars out of his own pocket and you just wanted to. You were curious right. We wanted to. I mean that's a claim that matters because both that shows you. Trump cares about veterans. And it shows you is really rich like those are two key parts of his appeal in two thousand sixteen so we want to just check and make sure that he did the thing that he said he did. And I thought this is like a simple story. We'll call it and they'll say yeah of course but he gave this money to this charity. You can call them in check but of course it was not like that. Instead we got was a call from Corey. Lewandowski was trump's campaign manager. Then great guy. Great thank you. I'm sort of set me off on on this path by telling me. Susie lied to wonder wonderfully life-changing line. And so he said well. I can tell you for sure that Donald Trump is giving away that million dollars to veterans. But I can't tell you who he gave it to our win..

Donald Trump trump trump foundation Eric trump Donald Trump Foundation Bedminster golf New York Foundation Foundation Pulitzer Prize federal government David Farren Scotland Ed mar-a-lago auditor Fox Corey Susie Paul McCartney
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

The Al Franken Podcast

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

"In just a minute. It's going to be a great one. You know those of you listen to the podcast by definition you. You are You know that we often have a great guests who are doing great things For example Maria trae Sukumar the founder and president of Voto Latino Did a wonderful show on immigration and voter suppression an after hearing her interview. A listener gave Voto Latino one hundred thousand dollars because voter. Latino is in the trenches Registering Latinos across America to vote and and Fighting Republican efforts to suppress The Latino vote. Now I'm not asking you for one hundred thousand dollars unless you've you've got that kind of money but please consider giving to this unbelievably great organization at www dot voto Latino dot org. That's Voto Latino Dot Org and by the way they didn't pay for this. I just wanted to do this and That way you don't have to do backslash Al David Farren whole as a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist For The Washington Post he won. The bolts are.

The Ghost of Eva York

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:00 min | 4 months ago

The Ghost of Eva York

"Continuing the investigation into the paranormal metaphysical world. Last week. I interviewed internationally known Psychic Medium Sharon our week before a psychic and clairvoyant. From right here in Ashland Oregon. These people talk to people who are deceased and on the other side of the Vale so to speak so I thought it only appropriate today so talk about a haunted hospital. In the state of Oregon. The Oregon State Hospital took two years to build and was completed. Eighteen eighty three and opened as the Oregon State insane asylum but by eighteen. Ninety one it house. Four hundred seventy eight male and two hundred twelve female patients and two additional ways were constructed to accommodate the influx at the time the most common cause of insanity was in temperance masturbation religious paranoia by nine thousand nine hundred. According to hospital documents over five thousand patients had been admitted census opening while two additional women's wards and four new. Men's wards were added to the main building miles of tunnels connecting that more being constructed beneath a narrow gauge railroad was established that allowed the hospital transport patients between buildings without the public observing as note the state capital and associated. Buildings also have a tunnel system to this day but they have never been connected to the State Hospital by one thousand nine hundred seventy five with the opening of the dommage and eastern Oregon state hospitals and patient. Transfers to these facilities the residency had been lower significantly and the superintendent allow shooting of the movie. One flew over the CUCKOO's nest entirely inside Oregon State Mental Hospital known to only a few a small law in the basement that contain thousands of copper urns filled with the cremated remains of inmates. It was Oregonian newspaper that I brought the room of forgotten souls to light in October. Two thousand three and two thousand six newspaper won the Pulitzer Prize for the story. While Oregon State legislators debated what to do with the airlines between nineteen thirteen in one? Thousand Nine hundred. Seventy one over five thousand. Inmates were cremated quite a problem. In two thousand five hospital records were found indicating that in eighteen eighty nine inmate. Either York was found in a bathtub. Dead even was thirty six year old. Marion County woman. Who probably wasn't even mentally ill. According to old newspaper clipping from the era she was an epileptic confined to the hospitals asylum era epileptic ward five years before her death in those days malady like depression. Alcoholism was viewed as Kintu Insanity. Eva died between two and three. Pm on Tuesday Past Day in the epileptic ward while left unattended in a tub. She had a seizure died from it. A corner ruled that it was natural and accidental. He found no evidence so drowning. An inquest jury declared the hospital to be in no way responsible. The news account went on to say that the Hospital Telegraph. Word of Asia's death to brother. Residing near Hubbard her remains however we're never claimed on the hospitals West Plaza in an area hard packed dirt surrounded by a ten foot fence topped with razor wire. It was once used as an outdoor recreational site for inmates locals at drive past that portion of the hospital facility staff say they often see the image of a young woman barefoot wearing a bathrobe standing in the middle of the yard? Speculation is the ghost of a

Oregon State Mental Hospital Oregon State Hospital Oregon Hospital Telegraph Ashland Pulitzer Prize EVA Asia Oregonian Superintendent Marion County York Hubbard
Weinstein case could influence other sex crime prosecutions

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:29 min | 4 months ago

Weinstein case could influence other sex crime prosecutions

"Are talking this hour about the verdict handed down yesterday in the case against Harvey Weinstein. And what if any work remains to be done in the metoo movement and whether or not yesterday's verdict was a watershed moment in the metoo movement? I'm joined by a team. Goss graves. She's president and CEO of the National Women's Law Center and co-founder of Times Up Legal Defense Fund and joining us. Now from New York is Jodi Kantor. Jody along with her colleague. Megan twohey both from the New York. Times they are Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporters who first broke the story about Harvey Weinstein and his sexual harassment behavior to say the least Jodie and Megan are co authors of the two thousand eighteen book. She said breaking the sexual harassment story. That helped ignite a movement. Jodi Kantor welcome to on point. Glad to be with you so first of all I. Have you been in touch with many of the women who even speaking to over the years in the in the wake of the Weinstein verdict yesterday and if so what have they told you I had? I actually delivered the news. Tash Lee Judd. Yesterday I called her Emmy told her. I just really a few minutes after the guilty verdict. What had happened and she took a second and he just said this is the way it's supposed to be. This is the way it's supposed to be. And then what did? What did she mean by that? What more does she tell you? I think what team anticipated. Harvey Weinstein signature is lack of accountability. This is a man who manipulated people. Who PRESSURED THEM TO SIGN? Nondisclosure AGREEMENTS PAID PEOPLE OFF Often intimidated and threatened people according to numerous sources and former employees and the idea that he is finally facing accountability. I think meant a tremendous amount to different people. Some people felt closer people. Some people felt Satisfaction. But I think when you look at the power of me too. It's really accountability. That's driven the whole thing. The idea that there are consequences for this kind of behavior is what caused other people to come forward in the first place. Jodi you've been following this story for so long now. I wonder what you make. Of the fact that he was found guilty on those on those two counts against him but but not but not all of them. What's what is the the the implications of that. It was a mixed verdict. Which I think is actually pretty symbolic of me to that. It is very hard to resolve these issues in society and remember that the jury was charged with interpreting a lot of complicated questions about consent. This was by no means You know a sort of Straightforward set of allegations. And so. I think I think we as the Society of the lot of these jurors we ask them to go into a room and resolve things that the rest of us have not really worked out And the U. and Megan wrote a story just yesterday for the Times Following the the the verdict. And it you point out your remind us of the two thousand eighteen verdict against bill cosby the Cosby and the Weinstein verdicts taken together. Do you think that we're we're seeing a change in terms of as you're making put it end of story people's acceptance of the quote messy -ness of these kinds of cases and what it takes to prove? What happened in a court of law? That's the question I mean either. To very high profile cases but especially in the Weinstein trial part of the significance of the verdict comes from the fact that this was a really long shot case in a lot of ways. It was risky for the prosecutors. Some fellow prosecutors didn't even think the New York Attorney New York. Da was right to miss soured And so then the fact that they won this victory means that they may have done something to shift andries of sex crimes prosecutions and whose stories get hurt annoy only heavy for another minute or two more. Jodi because I imagine you're still very busy but there is no problem. I just WanNa ask you one last question. I mean as I'm just wondering if I could ask you to step just a hair outside your role as a as a reporter for a moment and just reflect with me on what this moment meant to you and to Megan in terms of all the work that you put in to do the investigations that drove this issue into the public mind. What does the verdict mean to you? Well thank you for asking. That mean when I would say is that the meaning of this work was clear to me from within the very first phone calls to the very first braves women who told us their stories and we did this work without knowing what we would find what we are others would uncover. What the extent of the allegations are now we can see crimes would turn out to be and we hit the way. Yeah whether Weinstein would be prosecuted or not and and and what would result from that prosecution? You do the story just to find the truth. Knowing the journalism may be the only form of count ability that he faces or knowing that it could lead to something more we'll Jodi cantor is the Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporter for The New York Times Co author with Megan. Twohey of she said breaking the sexual harassment story. That helped ignite a movement. Jodi thank you very much. Thank you take care.

Harvey Weinstein Megan Twohey Jodi Kantor Jodi Harassment New York Pulitzer Prize President And Ceo Investigative Reporter Jodi Cantor New York Attorney New York Jody Tash Lee Judd Emmy National Women's Law Center Bill Cosby Legal Defense Fund Co-Founder Braves
The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

Casefile True Crime

04:39 min | 4 months ago

The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

"The Californian city of Stanford laws in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County just under an hour drive from San Francisco covering any land area of two point. Eight Square Miles Stanford is adjacent to Palo Alto one of the principal cities of the affluent and progressive Silicon Valley which is served as an incubator for many prominent and influential technological enterprises. Over the years including Apple Google facebook and Tesla Stanford is home to the prestigious eight thousand Dak- Stanford University a private co educational and Non Denominational College and Research Institution. Many of the city's residents students faculty members who live on or Iran campus in a range of accommodations including Goma. Trees Co ops. Row Houses Fraternities sororities single family homes and condominiums established in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The university was founded by railroad magnate and California Senator Leland Stanford and his wife Jane. In memory of their only child Leyland junior he died of typhoid fever. At Age Fifteen. The land began as the stock farm with OAK dotted fields and soon developed into one of the largest university campuses in the United States despite sustaining heavy damage from two separate earthquakes in nineteen. I seek since and nine hundred ninety nine. The university has managed to maintain its original California mission architecture from the light. Eighteen hundreds characterized by embellished yellow sandstone long low and wide colonnades open arches and two red terra cotta tiled roofs at the heart of the campus is the main quadrangle the university's oldest structure stretching. Iva seventeen acres. The main quad is raised Vira Mile Long Palm Tree lined road and has an inherent data section. Both of which feature sprawling lawns courtyards and interconnected buildings housing. Various departments classrooms and administration offices regarded as a national center for Research Stanford Phages More Than One hundred and twenty research. Institutes exploring a range of topics from particle physics to International Studies Given it's proximity to silicon valley and it's impressive academic and athletic performance records. It is renowned as one of the top universities of the world. Many students go on to have a lustrous careers in their field of expertise with past alumni including noble laureates Pulitzer Prize winners and Presidential Medal of freedom recipients. One hundred and fifty thousand visit as drawn to the faint grants annually to explore it too many features including apiaries shops and gardens as well as a stadium. Golf course satellite dish and church liking trials around the campus outskirts off of use of the rolling countryside and attract by more than fifty thousand visitors a year in the early nineteen seventies. Just over eleven thousand students were enrolled at Stanford University and the Kanta coach in these men that had started in the mid nineteen sixties was still a major aspect of college lawf- students fighting for social and political change would often stage protests scenes and formed community action groups for issues such as racism. Women's liberation and gay rods. Leslie Marie Po love graduated from Stanford in nineteen seventy two with a bachelors degree in history by the beginning of the following year. The twenty one year old was working as a clerk at the north. Santa Clara Canny Low Library in Palo Alto. Leslie hoped to become a lawyer and recently been accepted into law school at the University of Pennsylvania though classes had yet to begin at three. Pm on Tuesday. February. Thirteen Leslie left work. For the day driving off in her seventy-two Orange Chevrolet Nova the coworkers presumed. She was heading directly to her time in the Los. Altos hills where she lived with her widowed mother Florence. But Leslie never arrived

Dak- Stanford University Leslie Marie Po Stanford Palo Alto Senator Leland Stanford Tesla Stanford Santa Clara County California Santa Clara Canny Low Library Goma Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Row Houses Fraternities Principal Typhoid Iran Apple United States Non Denominational College Leyland
Disney to Bring 'Hamilton' to Movie Theaters

Newsradio 830 Programming

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

Disney to Bring 'Hamilton' to Movie Theaters

"You still have a shot to see the original Broadway cast of Hamilton several performances filmed in twenty sixteen are being turned into a movie version of the Pulitzer Prize and Tony winning musical creator Lin Manuel Miranda announced on Twitter Hamilton the film will debut in theaters October fifteenth twenty twenty

Pulitzer Prize Tony Lin Manuel Miranda Hamilton Twitter
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I think it's the mules he's yeah hello this is great well you're free to grow Faye was and today he's he's pretty much exclusively known as the composer of the rankings he but he was a really highly regarded jazz musician who was a fine jazz pianist this is kind of a very programmatic pieces you noticed it's like it's the mules if the animals something around the canyon for better or for worse when people talk about music on the Grand Canyon that's what they think of I have to tell you we have never played the Grand Canyon sweet and thirty six years of the Clinton music why not well in part because it's symphonic work and we are really chamber music I think at one time or another we thought wouldn't it be kind of fun to kind of arrange one or two movements to do it but there's just so much other stuff that we that's taken a priority really no we've had Pulitzer Prize winning composer is joining us and commissioning new works of music inspired by the Grand Canyon having our native American composer precious projects students from the Navajo and Hopi nations writing new music so you know it's it's a fun piece and maybe someday will transmit of it okay well let's listen to another thing that is on your agenda this is one of many that the Grand Canyon music festival has commissioned over the years this is called the guardians of the Grand Canyon composed by Brent Michael it's got the same idea behind it sounds like to me which is that you know it's it's peaceful and yet it's so grand that you never.

Faye Grand Canyon Pulitzer Prize Brent Michael Clinton thirty six years
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WRVA

"A. a Pulitzer Prize winning historian has now name Donald Trump the most racist president of all time but he's tied he's tied with an with another president so who is fighting Donald Trump for that coveted crown of the most racist president ever will tell you it in sixty seconds is the Glenn Beck program this is this only helps Donald Trump this only helps him maybe that's their goal they act like it's their goal I know they just they don't get how far out of touch they are which is that we're not Americans not buying into your definition of racism this is not because it's I got news for you a new definition of racism we all knew what racist were for a very long time you can spot a million miles away and now you've changed it anyway we'll get into in the second person to tell you about simply safes simply safe is reminding you that just ten percent of break ins are planned beforehand most break ins ninety percent are all the all revolve around one thing somebody seeing a house that doesn't have an alarm system or has an alarm system but doesn't have engaged that's when they break into your house ninety percent of the time so what do you do about it well you can get an alarm system and you can pay a **** load of money every single month have a monitored and you you don't on the system and the system you know is hard wired into your house and it's just it's crap it's crap it's old school it's it's it's nineteen fifties really leave it to beaver stuff now you want the Jetsons you want something that is way forward thinking how about a system that calls police and has the police arrive three point five times faster than anybody else's alarm system how about one that is so high tech that it has high definition cameras so it's not just like a black and white blob that you're looking for you can see the definition of the people who broke into the house and that's why police come three point five times faster than any other security system that you can buy how about you get one that's really an expensive and only because here fifteen Bucks a month they have the twenty four seven.

Pulitzer Prize Donald Trump president Glenn Beck ninety percent sixty seconds ten percent
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Okay. And the. Pulitzer prize winning that. How does that change your life? What is what is that? What's it feel like what's the process, actually? Is it something that you submit for consideration or is it something that's found by them? I I'm sure it's all on their website, but it'd be nice for people to understand. It's a submission thing, and I have to say, I we were so lucky the journal sentinel had won a Pulitzer prize the year before, and we were so lucky that they had really built up a, a team of people who, who knew what it took to do the application and to do the, the right kind of story that the year that we won. We had a lot of digital components to our story. And we told it in a lot of different ways online, you know, Mark, and I worked very closely with there were five of us who want and, you know, the other three did a lot of the video and photography, and such a big team on those well and that year they had added to the. Rules, kind of. Not a category. But a, a suggestion that you try and tell the story in unique ways and use digital and, and we really did that well, so I think that helped us so you, you really have to have a can't credit, the management, George Stanley, the editor of journal sentinel, and all of the people who work with him on this. You have to have that kind of team to, to turn. We had a really good story that we, you know, we Mark, and I said, from the beginning, if, if, if we can't take this story somewhere, it's our fault because all the elements were there, but then we needed that team around us to take it to the next level to be cliche. Did you ever worry about whether you'd be able to get it there, Mark? And I realized very early on that the story had that potential and we made a pact not to talk about it. And so we just did not talk about it. So it was actually funny. What happens is. We knew that they submitted it for the Pulitzer. And we we just talk about it, and so someone in we agreed. We tell each other when we heard anything. So one of the other reporters came up to me they get announced in April in one of the other reporters came up to me, I don't maybe in March and said, so how you feeling you know heard you're on the shortlist was, like, what are you talking about? He's like you know what I'm talking about. I don't know what you're talking about. We're not talking about it, and he told me that there were rumors in the industry that, you know, we were. In the top kind of stories that were being considered in our category. And I went told Mark and I like she, we had an agreement that we tell each other. And he was kinda mad at me because we just didn't wanna talk about it. So then the, the day they were announced, you know, we knew that we had a shot, and I walked in that morning and I had an interview to do, but I saw I, so I did my interview, and it was driving Mark crazy. I mean he couldn't even sit there any longer and he I got off my injuries like let's get out here. And so we just laughed and we went, we actually went to a used bookstore downtown and looked at DNA books, so marred mired in it at that point. And then we went and had lunch and already writing the book at the palm, we had, we had an agent at that point. I think, but we, we had contract with the agent, but we hadn't won the Pulitzer. The giant was pretty happy after it happened. But. We came walking back into the building. And we saw a local TV reporter sitting in the lobby, and then we were really nervous than we thought all something. But what you're fables are turned. Well, yeah, and I hate to even admit this. But what you're really nervous about is that you're going to be a finalist. You know, and that 'cause they have a tradition in the journal sentinel newsroom. You have to stand up in front of the whole news room, and everybody watches for it to come across the wire, and, you know what you don't want is to be standing there and here you're finalist, and you have to act happy and you are happy, but, you know, you're hoping you win. So so draft day, almost. Yeah. Right. So we, it was funny. We walked back into the newsroom and Raquel Rutledge who had won the Pulitzer fabulous reporter who won the Pulitzer the year before. Kind of called us over, and she pulled up Brown bag out of her desk drawer with some kind of alcohol bottle of alcohol in it and said here, take a drink and then go up there. Switch shot. And we went walking up there. And what would you say your member? I don't even remember. I mean you know, then we won and. You know, it was just a blur. It ended up it. We, it was such a blur in, you're, you're just walking around the newsroom and slowly everyone's getting back to do in. There's champagne and everyone's getting back to doing the work. They have to do that day. And you're just kind of walking around, like I don't even know what to do. And because it's like winning the Oscar. Right. I mean in. I don't know. I never won the Oscar. Okay. Okay, magin that you want the Oscar for bridges of Madison. Laugh at someone someone got in touch with me, sometimes it, what happens to your ear, inbox your emails, flooded. Your we ended up like the New York Times called us and we didn't see it and we didn't call him back. I mean it was just chaos. But someone after that day called me up and said like, okay, you know you won the Nobel, but you still don't know. And I said, I said, well, I didn't win the Nobel. I won the Pulitzer and he said, Nobel poets are. What's the difference? I'm mad at you. So a lot of ways. So what happens is after you win. There is a like an award ceremony at the law library at Columbia college in New York. And there were a couple interesting things about that. But to me, the most interesting, you walk in, you know all the editors go with you, and you walk in, and they're all these steps you walk up, and then there's this grand lobby and you walk over new when you win. You get like a little Tiffany kind of paperweight, that's engraved with, you know, your information and even more valuable to me. You get a book of all the previous Pulitzer winners that was. I thought really neat. But as I was walking across this long, large fancy lobby, I realized this isn't even about us. It was a first of all, you realize it's not it's it was about Milwaukee, and it was about Wisconsin. You know, everybody shared with us, winning the pulsar. So you kind of realized that, that, it's, it's not just yours, it's ever, but then walking cross this lobby, I realized it's a lunch. It's not a very fancy ceremony and it's, it's about the editors you realize these editors show up hopefully often, and they're showing off their latest reporters. Right. And so they all know each other and you don't know anybody 'cause you've never been there before the only ones they continue to go all the time. It's their sort of. Yeah. It's their thing like this is, you know, they're the ones who like they're bringing their latest winners. So and, you know, the big lake Wall Street Journal was like up in front. New York Times it's the whole that also placement another. So we so there's a little reception and then there's a launch, and, you know, Mark, and I stood and, and the rest of our team. But Mark, and I happened to Stanton. Whether we're pretty tied at the hip at that point. And. Who are you gonna talk to all the editors are talking to each other? And so we ended up talking to the poet who won that year and the nonfiction. I remember this book the history of cancer book, I'm blanking on the name of it. I'll think anyway, can't come up with it. It's a great book. We both brought books and got him sign it. But we ended up kind of just standing and talking to them because you don't know anybody. So it was really interesting from that in, and it was funny. I walked up to there's a, a high up editor at the Wall Street Journal, who's from Green Bay, where I'm from his name's Paul zhigo. And sure, yeah, I saw him over at the Wall Street Journal table. I went to high school with his sister. So I walked up, thinking, oh to say hi to him. And I walked up to the table, and they all looked up at me. Like, what are you doing over at our table? Right. 'cause they're the Wall Street Journal. And I said, oh, Well, Paul, I just want to say hi went ice school, Julie. And then he stood up. He was real nice. But it was really funny walking to the table. So you said when we were first getting started that you always wanted to do something. Big was this. It. Well that it was maybe one of it. Yeah. Okay. So now, you know, I've left the turtle sentinel, and I'm running them walkie institute, which is a nonprofit started in two thousand seven by John burns who ran the private equity group, ebonite Bank, and then spun it out into Mason wells, which has been very successful private equity firm rusher. It's the biggest in Wisconsin, and, you know, I've known John for longtime actually will tell you a secret that won't be a secret anymore once tell to you, but John was the person who gave me my Pulitzer tip. So he's and delare in my John. Yeah. Right. He was on the board of the Medical College. And the what the reason we were talking that day he was, you know, kind of berating me about all the great things going on there. And, you know, and I just wasn't sure if he slipped and told me something he wasn't supposed to or he was trying to tell it to me, but it doesn't matter turned out. Yeah. So can I ask just before? Before we get more into the mock institute. So you. You win. You Mark win. You're right, the book, you're sort of, at the top of can I say something? Yeah. That book that I was trying to remember, the name of, oh, yes. The emperor of all maladies. There you go. Get it on Amazon. But the one you really wanna buy one in a billion. Yes. Of course. The story of knickebocker Don McMahon. That's also on him. Exactly. The so you're sort of at the top. Whether you still about Oscar whatever Pulitzer Nobel. And that. Yeah. Six one. And then and then you leave journalism. Yeah. How come? Well, the journal sentinel was a fabulous place and still is in some ways, but we got bought by going at, and I just have to tell you that the day they all walked into, you know, I was a business reporter. I mean, I covered this stuff all the time, like I talked to a lot of CEO's about walking into a company and what you do when the day they walked into the newsroom, I just thought is a work for me. And it was partly because, you know, they're not real focused on business news. The kind of business news. I like they're focused on maybe a softer type of business news than I like so I, you know, I mean I that's not to say the journal sentinel, isn't still doing some good business news. But I just felt like I was going to be frustrated there. And John had started the Milwaukee institute in two thousand seven. He started it as a he had a cluster of cloud. As it were. And they were doing high-performance computing and offering services helping companies in academics around.

Pulitzer Mark Wall Street Journal editor Pulitzer prize reporter Oscar John burns New York Times Wisconsin Paul zhigo Pulitzer Nobel George Stanley Raquel Rutledge Milwaukee Don McMahon New York Amazon
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"You know, I'm not interested in writing actually political things incorrectly, but I want to change people the way they interact with each other. And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, the book includes a side by side translation of every poem in Spanish. The other poem we'd love you to read from his depopulation blues, which talks about the broader obligations. We have people around the world even if there happened to be of a different nationality country. Oh, absolutely. But also many people don't realize this, but we actually had a depopulation order that was concocted by Kissinger and Nixon. And so we are actually people color, especially in danger of being depopulated here in this country as well as in other countries. And I know it feels really shocking, but they can research this evil can be brilliant though. Speaking of depopulation. Of people. It will find a way we are not fools completely to be seduced by it. For Nixon Carter Reagan, perhaps all the others knew we were counting on them to be as human as we are, but why eight hundred thousand Rwandans died while we watched a televised presidential sex scandal might have told us something that politicians who smiled at us and kissed our babies, blue eyes shining with triumph. Well, knew we were falling into our graves kicked by them as they counted our votes. Why do you think we tell so many stories about ourselves about America that don't always match up with the ugly realities because we can't face the reality. It's a terrible history and until we face it, we can go nowhere. We can expect to grow. You have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year, and I want to play for you something from one of his songs and a video that echoes your work. Take a look. Chips like. Humming. If God got us, we're going to be all right. Have you have you heard him quote you before the now? You've never seen that now and he's big. He's not Alice Walker big, but he's big, I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people who call her in this country, we've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other across generations prizes are a funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize the Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes. No, so whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. Did it change your status because there's your work that stands on its own, and then there's the. Reach of your work. And so I wonder whether the prize is in the prestige that you've amassed did make a difference in the reach. I mean, we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast in a film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work in hasn't really come from the prize. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're going to do, but I'll play you one clip of President Trump..

Pulitzer prize Alice Walker Kendrick Nixon Carter Reagan president President Trump America Kissinger Oprah Whoopi Lamar
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, you have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year and I wanna play for you something from one of his songs and video that echoes your work. Take a look. Night. Chips like. Have you heard him quote you before, but now you've never seen that? No, and he's big. He's not Alice Walker, big big. I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people to call in this country. We've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other cross generations prizes are funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes, you know? So whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. And we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work doesn't really come from the price. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're gonna do play you. One clip of President Trump. I went to an Ivy league school. I'm very highly educated. I know words I had the best. Words, what does it tell you that it's important to him to be perceived as so smart. It tells me that he knows he probably is not, and he has an inferiority complex and that's very sad, but it's even sadder that we elected him to lead. We definitely need a very different kind of leader. And in fact, we actually need to lead ourselves and until we do, we probably won't get very far. You're saying fury already. I mean, there's a feeling of inferiority or lack of self. Affirmation love. Does that in your view, make people more more dangerous when they come in contact with power money? Yes, because there's always in the, there's always the feeling of need to measure up, you know? And I mean, even see that between him and Barack Obama, I think n. b. there was just so blatant that Donald Trump envied Iraq Obama his even though he started out with much more than Barack, oh, of course. That's part of the problem that he had everything in Barack as a black man was supposed to have nothing and said, look, what happened is all of the things that this. Isn't isn't in this very hard to take. But the answer is not to make us all suffer is to go and improve yourself. Alice Walker for me, it's an honor to have you here, so I really appreciate you coming by. Thank you. Thank you. Hey, it's Chris from MSNBC every day. I come to the office and we make television show every day. I think to myself, there's so much more I want to talk about. And so this is our podcast it's called, why is this happening? And the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see out every day. They're driven by big ideas each week. I sit down with the person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening. New episodes of Weiss. This happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

Alice Walker President Trump Pulitzer prize Barack Obama Nobel Pulitzer president Ivy league school MSNBC Weiss Oprah Lamar Chris Whoopi
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WGTK

"Robert deniro deserves a pulitzer prize because of his two word the first word was an f word the second word was trump so it's brilliant writing putting those two words together only genius could have thought of that what yeah she says this this is her tweet i can't stop thinking about that swift incisive editorial last night to monosyllables underscoring the presidency's baseline indecency she spelled indecency wrong by the way with a violation of decency the satire of norms i'd say robert deniro deserved a pulitzer prize for it if he didn't deserve a tony you crazy i understand she doesn't really want to award him the pulitzer but still what is brilliant about expressing this particular sentiment let's go to net in augusta georgia ned you're on the medved show i'm michael will the economy might be roaring but i believe it would be in similar shape under any other republican president and likely even better without the drag of trump's chaos policy or a decision or something that has been a full out disaster so i am i on okay sorry so he has laid waste a crucial norms he has not and will not provide his tax returns he has not and will not put his business interests in a blind trust he has been a gusher of lies both trivial and serious laying waste to an expectation of basic truth telling okay look what you keep coming back to is personal conduct personal standards personal behavior you don't like it i get it what i'm talking about here is policy and the direction of the country and decisions that actually impact the way americans live not talking about future impact on our civilization we'll be right back the most important retirement event of the year is almost here and you're invited and you know what absolutely free the.

Robert deniro pulitzer prize georgia president augusta medved michael
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Coming out right that and i'm gonna come out in the middle of the show and do that and who's listening right now nobody is like it's going to be at the show stop it i'm not thinking pulitzer prize for most people there who cares it's also just me yeah because there are some things are going to have them people be like when i come out it'll be like we've been watching him hostal show the whole time ears my inner ear monitors and i gotta writer app to this you better get on it like this just throw in like nursery rhymes but just different nursery rhyme so it'll be like hickory dick john block the plex funny because hickory degree doc was what was in my head right started singing maybe i should i thought you're gonna marry had a little lamb but that's good i'll be hardcore with that one mary lamb it's new hardcore yeah legit but it's like nobody's gonna clap special guests they finish up there saw you me glue amazing i can't miss that well yeah i gotta write the route that so how do nursery good about it now that like i know the b what are some other nursery rhyme bitsy spider lunchbox no dizzy busy spot on the water spout year down a lot of him want yeah they all empty come on give me a hard on humpty dumpty yeah yep humpty dumpty he had a great fall yeah humpty dumpty.

pulitzer prize writer
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Yeah this by the way this is a pulitzer prize winning book and they're rumors over the weekend that he was addicted to opioids or that he said nobody was there for me when i was dictated to opioids and that's why he was hospitalized or you know head to cut that tower short which would mean that he doesn't get like i guess he had insurance for the rest of the tour in case something happened which you know it was sort of a medical condition that cut the tour short so he got a bunch of his money back but now that company who paid for that is basically saying if it was a drug thing you don't you don't get it well insurance companies that really known for being i will always side with connie over the insure we're always looking for his yeah and also who knows way keven knows what he's saying yeah and then we just wanna do check in with there was a special election in arizona last night janae to go arizona is deep red country started a little bit yes it's changing so i guess in this district it mean politically you go there and you're like oh everybody wanted to have plastic surgery but like the science wasn't here yet about face i'll tell jokes cities kooky town people khimki tone wasn't there yet review of the medical board and everything so yet this district that was up for grabs yesterday went between debbie lesko and this other woman herald tipper nitty in so debbie lesko one and she is now just said oh i'm going to be joining the freedom caucus which shouldn't be a surprise because this district is just deep trump country like he won the district by twenty one points they love joe are pile there like this was never going to be won by the democrat so everyone's saying look if the democrat somehow in holy shit but really what.

pulitzer prize connie keven arizona debbie lesko joe
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"It is we didn't win a pulitzer prize honey but it went to kendrick it went to yes i'm of ours i'm of our powell's at new york magazine look am i am i salty that we didn't win yes is it going to be hard to see the pulitzer panel now when we go hang out with them on the weekends yes it's going to be very difficult for they'll be like greg how could you how could you have given alice monroe an award and not us i'm just saying we we wrote a sterling piece on antony for vulture and it was we were told roundly rejected we were told it could win a pulitzer and to be rejected is very hopeful it's it's a comment on really them i it's not about us it's about that look at speaking of award shows oh my god we missed guys man i were supposed to go to the shorty awards we couldn't make it because we had we had this emergency come up but we were supposed to go and we missed all this crazy stuff happening like fucking the queer eye guys working red carpet as we could have interacted with them we had a red carpet slot we were supposed to go i'm sorry that til carpet it's he'll carpet and then we missed this whole adam pally non okay yeah apparently adam pally read the shorty awards for filth and was like fired mid presentations escorted off to bring the girls in on this but also we just want to say we are preparing to go to the shorty awards because we had full intend to go until a conflict happened conflict happen we have nothing to wear and we are also too little cinderella faggots cinderella faggot cinderella faggot title of your book we didn't have anything new to where to where to the ball so listen what we're saying is we not hang send us stuff but we're saying like let's have a conversation about you sending us like i dunno bonobos something somebody because guy tell you something it's hard out there on instagram when you see how some of these comedians are looking and they're putting forward lurks and then brings me to our gases as episode on my.

powell new york magazine greg alice monroe pulitzer prize kendrick adam pally
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"It's just some my experiences a physician so i've had some real moments in in medicine itself i know said the big one was the black hole principle so pulitzer prize for that or nobel prize or something you're journalists to we were talking last hour about evil and and i'm convinced it exists it's out there why do you think it's there so incident of experiences we can't even get to the grips just how amazing maria and just experiencing lots of things in the is is what we would call easil you know so it's it's learning from that and i think at this point in in humanity.

pulitzer prize maria nobel prize
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Now america's number one show one pop culture and politics this is bob michael medved show and another great day in the greatest nation on dawn's green earth still the greatest nation on god's mean earth though the element of race seems to creep into every conversation in this country and right now the element of race and alleged racism has not just crept in but leapt into the conversation in the aftermath of the whole rift hideous shooting headstone men douglas high school in parkland floor there's a pulitzer prize winner uh she's won a pulitzer prize for reporting back in two thousand nine she is a columnist for the detroit free press who has written a provocative column her name is rachelle riley we've invited her to join us on the show she right now is touring of four her book so she's unable to join us her new book is called the burden african americans and the enduring impact of slavery she is a very prominent much respected uh american journalist and she writes concerning the shootings in florida as we watch the heartbreaking aftermath of america's latest mass shooting what we must acknowledge is what they have in common and she buoys out first in most of the shootings assault weapons okay we've heard that which you may not have heard is this she then rights second most of the culprits of the worst mass shootings since the massacre at columbine high school in 1999 have been white males and for all of you who just set your hair on fire or ran to pick up your phone to call in scream at me that i'm a racist i do not contend that these boys and men shot up schools were shot of a movie theater or a church because they're white but i do content that america continues to allow it because they are white one.

america pulitzer prize detroit free press rachelle riley florida assault columbine high school bob michael medved douglas high school
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the site central show why each episode presents an indepth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gay powered and co host vincent m wales the laura wanted welcome to this week's episode of the sykes central show podcast my name is game howard in with me as always is vincent m wales and we are snow here talking to pulitzer prize finalised pete earley pete thank you for talking to us last week and welcome back this week thanks for being here with us again pete i understand that you recently co authored a book with jesse close is that correct a trite what i wanted to do it after i hook admit three months with the homeless and i couldn't get a publisher interrupted so i start my blog and then i thought you know right now memoir to really hot and everybody's reading memoirs and you've got to remember there about sixty five percent of all books are bought by women men tend to read a nonfiction and read for information women read for both entertainment and and i are her jesse speak in chicago and i thought wow you know why why don't i help her and let's do a book about her life and that would be a way than the tell the broader mental health story and uh so yeah we had a great time we did a book she has an amazing story in the thing that i like about jesse story this not only mental health and she has some incredible stories that she tells about when she was in the manic stage and how uh her five husband all 'luctor when choose mannix age because she owes you wanted to do is have sex and party and everything else and then when she was in the depressed age in the closet crime they didn't want anything to do with her but it also is a wonderful coal currying story were you see how alcoholism and drugs really prey on people with mental illness and the combination and how people look down on her because they just figured she was using drugs all the time and you know it's uh i i think so in many ways drug addiction.

sykes howard vincent m wales publisher chicago pulitzer prize jesse mannix sixty five percent three months
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"The the next told him last time when he came in the show is not allowed to do it again as i'm not a big fan of political i don't know how this guy gets to do this but he did it and he deserves a pulitzer prize he does or they comes on my show or not weather's banned from my shower or not the story is not getting the attention it deserves because no story that reveals obama for selling out america as he did in so many instances ever gets fulsome coverage by the pretoria guard media i can't read the whole thing if i printed it out of the almost sixty pages again it's part one but i wanna get into it a little bit in its determination to secure a nuclear deal with iran the obama administration since the first sentence derailed an ambitious law enforcement campaign targeting drug trafficking by the iranianbacked terrorist group hezbollah even as it was fumbling cocaine into the united states according to a political investigation so let's stop right there cocaine kills cocaine destroys hezbollah is fumbling cocaine into the united states and obama as you'll see put the brakes on pursuing hezbollah's activity in the united states and in our hemisphere and of course hezbollah uses his money turns out billions and billions of dollars to prepare for war against our allies including israel they are a militia for iran so as you listen to this understand not only was obama wear of this obama permitted therefore obama facilitated it because rda the drug enforcement administration was on the was on them who was closing in on them and the brakes were hit at the justice department and you see mr holder mr holder needs to be dragged before a congress he needs to be dragged before congress he needs to be held to account for once in his damn life.

pulitzer prize obama america obama administration drug trafficking hezbollah cocaine united states israel justice department pretoria iran law enforcement
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

"This is the bbc hello and welcome to book club we're having a visit from the goon squad this month in jennifer egan's novel of that name described accurately by one reviewer as an exhilarating bighearted three headed beast of a story it moves backwards and forwards in time in modern america circling the lives of beni salazar an ageing punk rock at an music producer and the troubled sasha who me employees and whom we first meet lying on her therapist's coach in new york the cast of characters includes actors and musicians a genocidal dictator the general a failed pr woman and a variety of friends who mostly in some kind of trouble each chapter is about a different person and can stand alone and each has its own style so that is an experimental feel to the novel but it's also a piece of delicately written traditional storytelling if won a pulitzer prize in 2011 and it remains one of jennifer egan's most popular books welcomed club thank you sell lattes i mentioned that a lot of these people have difficulties some of the end up quite happily but you do seem drawn to people whose lives at in a state of which we call it fragmentation do you think it's a an oval let's as funny as it is sad i mean how do you calibrate it in your own mind i'm not sure i certainly like to find the humor in everything i write about and in fact when things are not funny at all i feel like that's not a good sign because there should be the possibility of humor most of the time and life but if something is funny i would then expected to also be something very far from funny i'm always interested in trying to make seemingly incompatible states or moods coexist just as one example with my novel the keep which is a gothic thriller my question was consenting the funny and scary like actually both of those things at once so with guns glud certainly there is.

jennifer egan america beni salazar producer sasha new york pulitzer prize
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Citation Needed

"And the winner of the pulitzer prize for outstanding work in journalism goes to show sieve pulitzer thank you thank you eight years in a row what an incredible honor i want to thank the judges my family and my staff because they're all the same people good luck next year everybody hey folks just want to take a moment here in the middle of the show to thank our patrons oil will you will you will you make this show possible and without you we couldn't do what we do i need charts and graphs now many of you have inquired win is ally going to do is joan baneh ramsey episode and the answer is never heat where is my blonde wig no never never never never but as of this recording we are just three hundred and fifty dollars away from reaching our goal of a live show and well it will not be about john grenade ramsey we promise to tell ally that it will be no sorry john drivers them have you seen my fingernails samples they're in the filing cabinet today so if you want to see us live consider pledging as little as a dollar an episode of patriotic dot com slash citation pod to help make that happen or even going to let the patrons choose the location again that's patriarch dot com slash citation bod because we're pretty sure he'll wear a cost you where is my stage blood.

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