35 Burst results for "Pulitzer Prizes"

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

Doug Miles Media

03:12 min | 3 d ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

"Than now to be telling you about that topic now. I but i'm i'm not just talking about the current of crisis in meltdown. I'm really trying to take the long view. Mean we've had a great year some great times. I mean i covered several rights. I covered in the girl in law. Coming down the winning the oregon's the russians and some great great periods in american politics back in the sixties and seventies themselves when we been following some hard times particularly the middle class and it isn't just the meltdown i mean things were not good Even before that happens so. I'm trying to look at what happened. And and how we got where we are in and As a country and particularly the american middle class want to be on your program profiles of situations that have gone. happened but you also get solutions. That's something missing in journalism. Would you agree with them. Yeah i well. I got to an awful lot of opinion journalism and they might call it blog journalism. It isn't just the blogs time that network everybody's mouthing off And there's not as much good reporting going on. I mean i'm i'm always looking to. I'm a customer now as well as a producer. And i'm always looking to the news media to inform me i can. I can too much turn off the news route missing anything of opinions. I think that's it's not just a. I don't think it's our job necessarily come up with solutions and happens to be something that i think is important but but at least we ought to be dealing more in facts and not just as much so much opinion. I i think we're suffering that way but of course we're suffering. Economically role of the media has changed a lot and public gotten disaffected with us With i think we're pretty good reason And of course the electronic media the internet and the blogs and the tweets and all different things that come up. I mean there are cutting into our audience and people. Fragmenting gone different ways. We're going to ask you. What do you make of all the. It's only teams since i've been in the last. Few years has gone from Satellite radio because of the boom for a little bit of santa fall apart. And now you have internet delivery and eventually everything's gonna be delivered over the internet whether it's previa radio but it will come through the computer i want it and i think there's no question that's that's here to stay but i hope and i believe as that that news organizations.

Holocaust Survivor, Scholar Awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last week

Holocaust Survivor, Scholar Awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

"An Israeli French American Holocaust survivor and historian and a U. S. scientist specializing in got bacteria are among the recipients of this year's battles and crises recognizing scholarly and scientific achievements Seoul Friedlander was awarded the prize for Holocaust and genocide studies the Pulitzer Prize winner and macarthur fellow eighty eight year old Friedlander has taught widely in the U. S. took Telavi view diversity he was recognized for examining the persecution of all Jews in Europe then beyond the country focus studies that had preceded him I'm for making postal documents acceptable in scholarly practice while Jeffrey Goldman from Washington university in St Louis who's to wilted about St for founding the field of human microbiome research I'm Charles to this month

Seoul Friedlander Telavi Pulitzer Prize Friedlander Macarthur U. Jeffrey Goldman Europe Washington University St Louis Field Of Human Microbiome Rese Charles
Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

"Cambridge before roe v wade and so i know what it was like when women didn't have this choice we couldn't control our own bodies our own destinies here. We are fifty years later fighting the same battle again. It's incredible to think that we would be going backwards. It's the women of limited means women of color women in rural parts of texas who do not have access. This is just devastating. Big no options whatsoever the texas law virtually banning abortion that went into effect today could have an impact on women far outside that state opponents were banking on the supreme court stepping in and stopping the measure from taking effect. But that didn't happen as political sums it up the court's decision to not act on an emergency petition from texas abortion. Clinics comes as the justices. Prepare to more. Broadly reconsider the right to an abortion. It established almost fifty years ago. Back with us tonight. Eugene robinson pulitzer prize winning columnist for the washington. Post and susan dell persio of veteran political strategist boast are msnbc analysts. Thanks to both of you for being with us susan. Let's start with you. There are a lot of people who fully know that. Republicans at a state level have been attempting things that are either faints or real attempts to to place restrictions on abortion for some years now but this has surprised a lot of the fact that something that feels very much like a total ban on abortion could actually get past the supreme court. Absolutely i ate it. Is it's sending shockwaves especially to a lot of the republicans who may instead like yes. I'm pro-life but you know roe v. wade's the lay the law of the land and they also believed in Exceptions to incest rape which this law does not have this is the harshest law that i think republicans could ever see coming and at this point i think even some republicans are going to have a hard time getting behind it. Come twenty twenty two

Roe V Wade Texas Susan Dell Cambridge Supreme Court Eugene Robinson Msnbc Susan Washington Wade
Threats Persist as the U.S. Plans to Continue Evacuations From Kabul

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Threats Persist as the U.S. Plans to Continue Evacuations From Kabul

"Joe biden says the us airlift from kabul wilkinson you despite yesterday's jihadist attack which killed more than ninety people including thirty in. Us troops more than one hundred thousand people have so far being evacuated from afghanistan. Bassem many more want to leave ahead of next week's withdrawal deadline. Well one of those who managed to make it out of afghanistan in recent weeks is regular monocle twenty four contribution lynn o'donnell limits columnist for foreign policy magazine and former ap and af bureau chief in afghanistan and. I say that she joins me in the studio here in london. Welcome lynn how. Thanks joey i recap how you have made. Its to london now you to leave afghanistan. Almost two weeks ago on the fifteenth. Yes i was on the last commercial flight to leave kabul around about nine. Am i think we will wheels up around around about ten past nine on the fifteenth and I was traveling with my friend and colleague massoud husseini who's a pulitzer prize winning photographer and we had spent three months covering the The roll out of the war and it was while we were in herat probably a week or so earlier We watched herat falling and we were there. We meant to stay for just two days. We were trapped in herat four or five days. The taliban were back and forth and taking the airport taking the airport road and we sat there and we sent to each other. Massoud had a had a dutch visa that expired on the city. I it's time for us to go once rat falls. It's just a matter of time and so we back to kabul and we bought our tickets and a couple of days later Massoud was in the same ticket office and there were a thousand people lining up clamoring for tickets so we felt incredibly lucky when we touched down in east ambuhl Five hours after takeoff. It was in that we found out that the city had fallen the signs. Were there for days ahead and we were shocked but not surprised

Afghanistan Kabul Wilkinson Bassem Lynn O'donnell Foreign Policy Magazine Af Bureau Herat Joe Biden Massoud Husseini London Kabul United States AP Joey Lynn Massoud Pulitzer Prize Taliban East Ambuhl
Eugene Robinson Fails to Mention the Denominator of These Afghan Evacuations

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Eugene Robinson Fails to Mention the Denominator of These Afghan Evacuations

"Don't worry, ladies and gentlemen. Eugene Robinson, a favorite of Joe Scarborough, Washington Post Pulitzer Prize committee. He's on the job. He's on the morning Schmo show. Cut. Six Go. So you know, we will. We will look back on this period and I know we will remember those chaotic scenes at the at the beginning and the the sense that nobody knew what was going on and the Taliban. Swept in, and the United States clearly seemed caught flat footed. Um, but I think we will also remember what could be the biggest and ultimately most successful airlift in history. So stop. This is one of the guys who is now going to try and Push the propaganda in the narrative. So this is this is that the the most successful airlift in the history of people as opposed to something else, I guess. Which is why they keep throwing the numbers out there without the denominator. Now what it is, is the most massive. Hostage situation the world has ever

Washington Post Pulitzer Prize Eugene Robinson Joe Scarborough Taliban United States
Afghan Photojournalist Flees to Athens

Monocle 24: The Stack

01:38 min | Last month

Afghan Photojournalist Flees to Athens

"The images and stories. That are coming out of. Afghanistan are not only shocking. There've been taking by local african journalists and photographers. Many of whom are currently risking their lives and have been doing so for the last few months. One of them is the photo journalist. Masoud saini born in afghanistan masud has been chief photographer at the associated. Press and a photojournalist at funds oppress his won the pulitzer prize for his work in the country and a couple of days ago he and his colleague. Lena donna were in afghanistan covering the taliban takeover of the country fearing for their safety they flew out of kabul last sunday just hours before militants entered the african capco. He's safe in the netherlands. Now and he spoke to monaco's emma nelson who spoke to he. Now new show the globalist earlier in the week. Let's welcome to monaco. twenty four. it is good to know that you are alive and well and safe. Just tell us what happened to you. Well unfortunately i am experienced immediate trustful week when i was in kabul awhile before that we were Me and my colleague over covering Herald war and I so i feel that the war was really really a clothing to people. Our life and the government was completely disabled and already was broken and failed from inside. They couldn't fight and resist with taliban and we were witnessing a lot. And a lot of the things.

Masoud Saini Masud Lena Donna Afghanistan Emma Nelson Monaco Kabul Pulitzer Prize Taliban The Netherlands
Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:05 min | Last month

Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

"Let's sally. Takeover of afghanistan has post more questions than it has on stirred the insurgency groups. Promise that the country would no longer be a violent basil filtering hollow. As at least three people were short and killed at a protest in jalalabad. Senior taliban leaders also say afghanistan under their watch will not be a democracy. Mas will be ruled by sharia law will earlier. Today monaco's georgina godwin spoke to helene o'donnell a columnist for foreign policy magazine who witnessed to the changes in the country firsthand. She and tour photographer. Who recently left kabul for the netherlands. Let seventy seven. I was in herat the west and a couple of weeks ago. And i was there to cover what seemed to be at the taliban is sold it was actually taliban incursion into The western city of herat. It's very big important. Wealthy part of the country. I spent time on the front lines with a called ishmael. Khan who since given oak And he was working at the time with his militia alongside Soldiers on the national security directed afghanistan's who do how do we know a former perhaps secret service. And i watched them really losing and i thought i tried to get out up to two days. My plan had been forty eight hours. I was there for five days. Because the taliban taking the road to the airport the airport was causing. It was very difficult. And i decided dan event as was watching the reality of herat full. That tyrod was a big step towards kabul and that it was time to make arrangements to leave an i. I can't tell you how lucky. I was in my tiny because via flight that i took out We've my friend and colleague westwood hosseini the pulitzer prize winning photographer from afghanistan. Who i've been working with for a decade It was the last commercial flight wheels up on sunday morning.

Taliban Afghanistan Georgina Godwin Helene O'donnell Foreign Policy Magazine Herat Jalalabad Kabul Monaco The Netherlands Tyrod Khan Westwood Hosseini DAN Pulitzer Prize
How The Mighty Cuomo Dynasty Has Fallen

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:41 min | Last month

How The Mighty Cuomo Dynasty Has Fallen

"Wonder how new yorkers who have adored andrew cuomo are feeling now how about new yorkers who supported the cuomo dynasty. i mean there's you know he's part of a dynasty. You got. Mario cuomo his famous father. You got the famous brother on cnn. I mean the cuomo's wow they're they're lefty royalty they're just democrat royalty. Aren't they wonder. What what mario cuomo would be shane. The great michael goodwin had some thoughts about that. The pulitzer prize winning columnist. Curtis does as well here on line. Three hey curtis welcome how you doing. Hey mark how you doing good. Good prayers go out to your son. Trevor thank you very much curtis. We all appreciate that our family. Thanks you very very much. I grew up in new york. Mario was the best governor state ever had on. Always talked about him. Said how good he was to the state of new york. But how can he the nipple piercing governor legs so stupid. How can you be so stupid to do that. You're telling it's it's arrogance why you know it's a good question and let's focus on that for a minute. How do these famous people think they can get away with those things. Maybe it's because they always have and they think they always will. But you know i. I don't know. I don't know how famous people get away with what they get away with.

Mario Cuomo Cuomo Michael Goodwin Andrew Cuomo Curtis Pulitzer Prize CNN Shane Trevor New York Mario
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:38 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Anthony visas died unexpectedly. Last december our book critic. Maureen corrigan says these nine stories mostly about first generation cambodian-americans navigating differences with their parents generation of education sexuality and possibility are a bittersweet triumph. It's impossible to talk about after parties. The much-heralded short story collection by anthony. Business so without first talking about it's back story so died this past december of a drug overdose. He was only twenty eight. Most readers who pick up this collection will already know about sows death and yet i'm guessing that like me. A fair number of those readers will be in denial as they're reading these short stories. His voice is so alive. Smart flip funny. Rude sexually explicit and compassionate. come on. it doesn't make sense. That upon its introduction to the larger literary world such a fresh voice has already been stilled. That freshness is derived not only from so's style as a writer but from the nuance perspective of his ultra intersectional identity so was a queer first-generation cambodian american who graduated from stanford and the mfa program at syracuse university. He grew up in stockton california where his working class parents along with many other cambodian refugees settled after fleeing the genocidal regime of the kamerhe. Rouge almost all of the nine stories and after parties are set in stockton a place. We're told that some. Us government official deemed worthy of a bunch of ptsd doubt refugees. That's the teenage narrator of a story called mai li mei li mei li. He's a young gay man who can't wait to escape this landscape of dollar tree stores and cheap sushi joints but toby the slightly older gay narrator of another story called the shop has a more wistful view. In fact toby has gone home to stockton after graduating college in the midwest to work at his father's auto shop there. Most of the men are like his father survivors of the killing fields. Here's toby's view of the place..

Maureen corrigan Anthony stockton anthony syracuse university mai li mei li mei li mfa stanford toby california Us midwest
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:46 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I had There was always a dancer who was a writer and so we not only did. I have like all of that research but to have somebody in their room. Who was kind of like. are you know. Stir club culture truth. Barometer i think was always super important but on the other side of that people who have never even stepped into a strip club before they brought the experience of having struggled with domestic abuse or they they had complicated relationships with their moms or you know they grew up in abject poverty or they came from really you know whole families but you know still struggled with i would say Body image issues like all of my writers. Different experiences have been funneled through every single one of those characters you know. Oftentimes we are dealing with issues. That are very specific to the lgbtq community. And i would say ours. Interesting are less rhetoric is like. Oh my gosh over. Half of us are queer. This is so cool. How often does that happen. You know and the fact that our show really feels responsible to make sure that you know black. Queer folks get presented in a way that is loving and respectful. Why did it feel important of the directing staff be composed of women. You know. it's so interesting. I will say i was actually open to having men be. Directors is just that once. I went through my interviewing process. They were not the best ones for the job and it was because when i interviewed folks i'd be like what is your idea of the female gaze and i just think that the women who ended up getting those jobs they had a clarity. They have been dealing with it in their own work. They really understood how their choices. Whether it was framing was camera movement was going to feed into..

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:20 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I do not come from a broken home. I was taking the pole fitness class. And i was like this fun. And i love my body and I think i have my sprays. And so i want to go show them off at this. You know a audition and then that ended up getting a job. The stories are so different. The women are so different the whys of why they are doing. This is so different. And whether you know it was on the main floor or in The locker room or in a women's home. I was really given Just an entry into These private spaces and oftentimes into these women's hearts. And i think had a lot to do with the fact that i asked questions with so much respect. It was never a thing of like me being judgy or judgment. And i'm not i'm just not that way. Anyway as a human being and so all of that kind of lined up for me in order to help me for over six years interview over forty women in over forty clubs all across this nation. And i took all of the stories all of the mistakes the dreams that these women kinda poured into my ear and create it all of these different care in the world of valley and i understand you also took pole dancing lessons yourself. I did my geiger okay. So how did those go day did not go. Well that not at all. I mean atkins work. Talk a little bit i could. I could get better. Could be better than this. But this is where am and i accept but with the with the classes i was like yeah. Let me see if i can climb up on the pole. Can i hold my own weight. Can i spin and my first class. I literally ran out of the room. Because i was about to vomit. Because it's the dizziness. That occurred like i wish is really bad and it it obviously made me respect them so much more..

atkins
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:26 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I was at columbia at the time and we were taking an acting class and our teacher gave us an assignment. She was like go. You and your partner go to the library and find the play. That has the scene for you. And you're seeing partners type so as we all know type it could be physical. Could be racial whatever but you know my my scene partner ended up being another young black woman and our members trudging to the library. We're like pulling all of these plays off the shelf and we literally cannot find a play that had a scene for two young women in it. So we're like okay okay. Maybe our teacher who's been teaching for. Twenty years has a suggestion. So i remember. We went back to class the next day and we were just like. Do you have Any any recommendations for us where we are looking for a play that has seen for two young black women. Ten seconds went by twenty seconds. Went by forty seconds went by and our professor could not think of a single play that had a scene for two young black women and in that moment i was like well. I guess i have to write those plays then. I want to ask a little bit about another award winning. Play of yours. The mountaintop what was just so many of them What was the central theme or truth. You wanted to explore in that play. Which imagines the last night of martin luther king's life set at the lorraine motel. I think the most important truth. I wanted to explore in the play. Was that even an hour. Extraordinariness were quite ordinary as human beings. You know you walked until my big mama's living room and you see you know three pictures. It would be dr king jesus. Nfl life obama. But but you know it. Was this exercise in showing how we put people up on these pedestals and yet they're so human..

columbia lorraine motel martin luther king dr king jesus Nfl obama
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:44 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Sometimes trotted out in ways that you know. She's talked about being harmful Having struggled with it's interesting. I felt that the icon part oddly was easy because i feel like. That's the part that we see. That's the part that's been replicated for us. It's always the human part. That's the hardest part. Because it's reliant. On how truthful a subject wants you to be about their life and so i was lucky in that because she was used to being truthful you know. The there was kind of an easy access to her her humanity. Even though it's hard to articulate because you do have to lean into the imperfections of the human being. And i would say that of the entire journey figuring out which imperfections of her to highlight and making sure that you know an in interesting it was really about trying to find the things that made her human i e for example. You know the fact that i would say that. She struggled and had a lot of guilt. Like a lotta mama's do with having to leave her. Her kid does behind at certain points and and the fact that she had to kind of sacrifice that and not be as good of a mom in terms of or how other people define that right. I don't necessarily subscribe to that. But the fact that she had to choose career sometimes over family she had to choose the music over her her son's sometimes and that was that hurt. Her and i was really happy that she was able to be honest about that particular struggle and how that imperfection of her life kind of settled her soul in the way that she still dealing with some of those regrets so in addition to having tina now back on the west though you also just wanna pulitzer for the hot wayne king. Congratulations my god. It was so crazy. Because you know. I think because the world was shut down in theater will shut down right. You just kind of forgot about the award cycle..

wayne king tina
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:24 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"She's a superwoman. Mike i think of like the black superwoman. Myth ride that there's nothing can bring us down and it's like oh my god the amount of things that bring us down and continue to bring us down so Anytime i get an opportunity to lay my hands on a black woman story. I just wanna make sure that she is fully rendered and she feels so real and that she's not actually perfect. I always feel like you know. There's always this kind of onus on on black folks to have these images of perfection out there. But i always feel as though you have to allow me access to my mediocrity to my mistakes in order to understand my humanity right and so i was just so happy that that's exactly what she wanted. She did not wanna sanitized version. This show it was like yeah you go. You've all along. But you gotta understand the pay behind every note every wale and be complicit you know as i would say a consumer was in effect in a weird way. Many of us have been consuming. Her black pain heard her trauma. How involved with tina and the original writing process extremely and you know for her. She felt that there was a kind of cultural sensitivity and of regional specificity. That she felt was just you know. Meet it in order for it to come across as authentic portrayal of her life. I was lucky in that. I come from the same soil as her like i knew about growing up in the south. I grew up at totally different times. But you know sadly the south hasn't changed very much and so i was kind of able to use my own lived experience my own struggles being a black woman in the entertainment industry to kind of fuel. the story and so To be able to fly to switzerland and hang out with her for hours and hours on end and for her to tell me her story. And it's interesting because often times you know people who who we think we know. Their story has been told so many times. It's like oh there's nothing new to add to the story. But i really felt like She led me into some new cracks and crevices of life The fact that. I got an opportunity to really talk to her about her mother. Which i don't think has really been addressed in previous interviews or or you know the movie or the autobiography Which talking to her about her very complicated and often. I would say toxic relationship with her. Mother was really the doorway that i walked into act something new to her story. Now the musical begins with tina played by adrienne warren. Centering herself with a buddhist chant. What made you wanna start there. And what role does spirituality play throughout the production..

wale Mike tina switzerland adrienne warren
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:00 min | Last month

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm terry gross. Our guest could hall is nominated for two tony awards. Best musical and best book of a musical as a producer and the writer of the broadway. Show tina the tina turner musical. The show just reopened in london and scheduled to return to broadway. This fall hall also received this years pulitzer prize for drama for her play. The hot wing king said in memphis where hall grew up. It's a comedy and drama about a man prepping a recipe for a spicy chicken wing contest. The play is an exploration of family ties sexuality and black masculinity hall received the olivier. Livy award for her earlier. Play the mountaintop which imagines the last night of martin luther king's life hall is also the show runner and executive producer of p valley. A breakout show on stars about the women working in fictional mississippi strip club. The series is based on her play of a similar but more explicit name. The show is currently filming. Its second season. Katori hall spoke with our guest interviewer. Hana georges hanna is a staff writer at the atlantic where she writes about culture. Let's start with the song from tina. The tina turner musical. This is a track from the original. London cast recording adrienne. Warren originated the role in london. Before moving to the broadway production. She's nominated for a tony to good evening. Ladies and gentlemen. You're on for quite a treat tonight. We haven't seen this incredible woman performing the big apple. So please put your hands together province. Tina turner offs hard to to win. Those due to our is as a name. Plays that abba do wop.

Tina turner terry gross king's life hall tony awards p valley tina mississippi strip club pulitzer prize Katori hall Hana georges hanna memphis london martin luther king atlantic adrienne Warren London apple
Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist Killed in Afghanistan

The Paul W. Smith Show

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist Killed in Afghanistan

"Journalist has been killed in Afghanistan. Foxes Simon Owen has more live. Dave news agency Reuters says one of its photographers has been killed while covering a battle between Afghan security forces and Taliban militants. Spanish Siddiqui was a Pulitzer Prize winner. He had been traveling with Afghan special forces in the southern province of Kandahar when both he and the senior Afghan officer were killed, reportedly in Taliban crossfire. Reuters called Siddiqi, an outstanding journalist and a devoted husband and

Simon Owen Spanish Siddiqui Reuters Afghanistan Taliban Dave Pulitzer Prize Kandahar Siddiqi
Nikole Hannah-Jones Declines UNC Tenure Position and Will Join Howard University

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Declines UNC Tenure Position and Will Join Howard University

"On and off the University of North Carolina at Capitol Hill at Chapel Hill, the school boards the school's board of trustees voted to grant tenure two Pulitzer Prize winner Nicole Hannah Jones. She's the author behind the 16 19 Project for The New York Times. At first, the University board declined to hold a vote on the issue. Hannah Jones spoke exclusively to CBS this morning about how the decision has impacted her life. It was embarrassing to be the first person Should be denied tenure. It was embarrassing, and I didn't want this to become a public scandal. I didn't want to drag my university through the pages of newspapers because I was the first and the only black person in that position to be denied tenure. In the end, Hannah Jones has chosen to come here to D. C S. Howard University to teach instead, Dave Preston

Nicole Hannah Jones Hannah Jones University Board University Of North Carolina Capitol Hill Chapel Hill Pulitzer Prize Board Of Trustees The New York Times CBS D. C S. Howard Dave Preston
Ty Seidule Went From Revering Robert E. Lee to Being One of His Fiercest Detractors

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Ty Seidule Went From Revering Robert E. Lee to Being One of His Fiercest Detractors

"Ties julie. Thank you so much for. Coming to the podcast. Oh jonathan my absolute pleasure to be here. Thank you for inviting me. I found out about your book. Your book has been out for more than a year. Now right no. It came out the end of january this year. Oh the end of january. This year. Because i got an email from rancher now who is the pulitzer prize winning author of biographies on alexander. Hamilton george washington. The latest one grant and He sent me an email and he said you must read. You must read robert e lee and me by ties egeli. You have to read it It is right up your alley. And i'm so glad he recommended it and i'm so glad i read it because it truly is something i've been dying to read and that is a white southerner taking on race racism but most importantly the myth of the lost cause And so how about we. Just start right at the beginning. Who were you when you were a young kid. Growing up in virginia. Who did you want to model your life after jonathan i. It's crazy to say it. But i wanted to be like robert e lee and i did. My first. chapter book was about robert e lee. My dad taught at a school in northern virginia. Where the descendants of robert e lee were He was the ultimate virginia. Gentlemen and educated christian gentleman and everything in my life in alexandria led me to believe that he was that he was this great person. If it's like that old movie Spinal tap on a scale of one to ten. I would have said lee was in eleven you know and even though i was a good episcopalian went to church every sunday. I was ahead. Acolyte later in high school i would have jesus in the four five six range so it wasn't as though is that i saw lee as good i it was reverential.

Robert E Lee Hamilton George Washington Jonathan Pulitzer Prize Julie Alexander Virginia Northern Virginia Alexandria LEE Acolyte
Dawn Staley and Tara VanDerveer Push for Equity in NCAA Sports

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Dawn Staley and Tara VanDerveer Push for Equity in NCAA Sports

"It is a really great to reconnect with you. And you've been down this road. We're talking about so often right now as you were gathering information for your talking to so many of the key players that have played a role in all this afternoon. And how are you Paul it's always a pleasure. Thanks for africa for a weeks for college sports. It has been really remarkable. And i want to talk about the aspect that you wrote about this this week in the post because i thought i was reading about myself even though i was a little bit outdated for for your piece because we all start as young reporters college college sports scandal was the ticket and we finally reached a point as you write about. We're the whole thing got turned upside down. Tell us about what you learned in. In some of the people that you spoke and the conclusion that you reached. Yeah for sure. I this story i did was sort of like we all understand. You know where we are with the supreme court and obviously you know gin ta you know. Really changing sort of undermining his roles doing a complete one eighty But it's done in the past fifty years. At least out i wrote about the media angle And i think that that that's the way to sorta queue this amateurism story because you know a very long time uncovering college sports scandals you know always a really important job for a sports writer for a journalists. They gave out pulitzer prizes in nineteen eighties. When a small medium sized papers and kentucky arizona uncovered Casting given to players from

Africa Paul Supreme Court Pulitzer Kentucky Arizona
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Yeah like how do i do. I bloom the small idea or these small loves in my family or my community before. I jumped too far outside. I love it. Yeah well we'll be thinking about that. And i want to say congratulations again to the winners of the poll. Surprise as well as the finalists. Thanks so much to our guest today. Natalie as tommy orange mardi tables also thanks to mark trae hint for giving us a call. We're back tomorrow. Was the conversation about the fourth of july. Do you celebrate it as a holiday. We want to hear why you do or you don't. I'm senior producer monica.

tommy orange mark trae Natalie monica
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:47 min | 2 months ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Know it. I sold the book in the wake of standing rock and trump getting in so like some people were like wanting to really be against what that meant with. That version of america was gonna mean And my book was you know kind of like on this other side and so it felt like you know it was related to what was going on politically in And so the the prize to me felt like Acknowledging from this other areas acknowledgement that It meant something. They had a little more weight to it. Been like the book doing well and the book being popular this kind of thing..

america
Latest First Nations discovery reveals 182 unmarked graves at Canada school

Native America Calling

01:20 min | 2 months ago

Latest First Nations discovery reveals 182 unmarked graves at Canada school

"Another grim discovery in british columbia the remains of one hundred and eighty two bodies near a former indian residential school. As dan carpenter reports the find was made using ground penetrating radar. The lower kootenai band says the remains were found in unmarked graves near the site of the former saint. Eugene's mission school near cranbrook. The school run by the catholic church operated from nineteen twelve to the nineteen seventies about one hundred members of the kootenai band attended the school. Chief jason lewis says. The ben's leaders met with survivors of the school in the community before making the announcement and louis added his voice to the growing calls for the catholic church to be held accountable for running the schools. The nazis were held accountable for their war crimes. And i see no difference in locating the priests and and the brothers that are responsible to be held accountable for their arts. In this attempt of genocide on indigenous people the announcement comes just a month after another british columbia. First nation found the remains of two hundred and fifteen children buried on the site of a former residential school near kamloops and the remains of seven hundred fifty. One bodies were found near a former residential school in saskatchewan. Other native leaders. Say the need for mental. Health services for survivors will increase as more graves discovered near former residential schools across canada for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Dan Carpenter Chief Jason Lewis Catholic Church British Columbia Cranbrook Eugene BEN Louis Kamloops Saskatchewan Canada
University Trustees to Vote on Nikole Hannah-Jones Tenure

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

University Trustees to Vote on Nikole Hannah-Jones Tenure

"It became a national controversy and now you NC Chapel Hill trustees could vote today on whether or not to approve tenure for Nicole Hannah Jones the journalist behind the new York times sixteen nineteen project on slavery and racism university leaders had said had a Jones's tenure application was halted because she did not come from a quote traditional academic background and a trustee wanted more time to consider her a prominent donor revealed he had emailed university leaders challenging her work as highly contentious and controversial which others have said as well the black journalists one a Pulitzer Prize for her work on the sixteen nineteen project and said she would not start work in July at UNC Chapel Hill with out tenure black faculty staff and students have said the university does not value them I'm Julie Walker

Nc Chapel Hill Trustees Nicole Hannah Jones The New York Times Jones Unc Chapel Hill Pulitzer Prize Julie Walker
Joy Reid Is a Propagandist and a Bigot, Pushing Her Ideology on Others

Mark Levin

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Joy Reid Is a Propagandist and a Bigot, Pushing Her Ideology on Others

"Propaganda is in a bigot. You want to debate it? That's debated joy. Here she goes, and she has Nicole Hannah Jones on Who is not a historian. She was writing for The New York Times, and she pushed this 16 19 project and she's pushed it into your schools. And the 16 19 project is an offshoot of critical race theory. Just so, you know. And one Pulitzer Prize winning legitimate historian after another, not right wing left wing or anyway Has condemned her phony scholarship. All out there for anyone to read, and by the way. I take her on in the book, too. And the 16 19 project. I told you Two rather comprehensive book Cut. Nine Go. You're you're seeing these things enacted at the same time that some of the same voices are attacking black lives matter. Which a lot of what's amazing about this. Troy Reed. She'll never come on a show like mine. So she talks to herself she brings on guests. Who are who are Puppets. Basically, she bounces off her own ideology. That's it, That's all she does. Go ahead. People have joined a movement of young white people who joined which their maybe their parents and grandparents don't like and when you're also seeing this national security What You're seeing these things enacted at the same time that some of the same voices are attacking black lives matter which a lot of young white people have joined white people are joined. Maybe their parents and grandparents don't like you're seeing this national security threat of white nationalism. Go ahead. Of white nationalism that is actually threatening the lives of people in state capital. We saw a lot of riots in the streets from black lives matter and teeth and other thugs. Which was really threatening the lives of people in the streets, including black lives. Did you miss that joy? Where were you? Were you with the other joy from the view?

Nicole Hannah Jones Troy Reed Pulitzer Prize The New York Times
Pulitzer Board Honors Teen Who Filmed George Floyd’s Murder

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:49 min | 3 months ago

Pulitzer Board Honors Teen Who Filmed George Floyd’s Murder

"On the afternoon of may twenty fifth twenty twenty. She was taking her nine year old cousin to buy snacks at an unremarkable corner. Store in minneapolis called cup foods quite literally the definition of minding her own business when she made a quick decision. That would change. The course of history shook out her phone. She started recording. What became the murder of a man in the street. In broad daylight under the knee of a police officer she chronicled the departure of life from the body of the man. We now know. As george floyd today. Darnell frazier was recognized with a special citation from the board that awards the pulitzer prize as reuters. Reported it today quote the citation at the twenty twenty one. Pulitzer prize ceremony is a rare instance of the board recognizing the journalistic achievement of someone with no professional experience in the field. A striking distinction in the genre sometimes known as citizen journalism frazier. Eighteen was recognized for recording quote a transformative video that jolted viewers spurred protests against police brutality around the world and no it is not hyperbole to say that darnell frazier's decision in that moment changed the world people marched around the world. George floyd's name has been spoken in remembrance in the oval office. It's the title of a proposed act of congress. Indeed what darnell frazier did in that. Moment was the definition of electronic journalism as ugly and stomach-turning as the video is to watch the question remains. Would we be saying the name. George floyd were it not for the bravery and presence of mind of a young woman named dr nella frazier

George Floyd Darnell Frazier Minneapolis Pulitzer Prize Reuters Frazier Oval Office Congress Dr Nella Frazier
Teen Who Recorded George Floyd's Murder Awarded Pulitzer Special Citation

Mark Levin

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Teen Who Recorded George Floyd's Murder Awarded Pulitzer Special Citation

"The teen who filmed the death of George Floyd has received a special journalism on Earth Pulitzer Prizes Awards a special citation to Darnell A. Fraser, the teen who pulled out her cell phone and began filming last year, Police arresting George Floyd video that was used in the murder conviction of former officer Derek Shobin. The Minneapolis Star Tribune also wins the breaking news Pulitzer for its reporting following Floyd's, killing the Pulitzer Prizes in journalism, first awarded in 1917 and are considered the fields most prestigious honor in the U. S.

George Floyd Earth Pulitzer Prizes Awards Darnell A. Fraser Derek Shobin Minneapolis Star Tribune Pulitzer Pulitzer Prizes Floyd U.
Teen Who Filmed George Floyd's Murder Awarded Honorary Pulitzer Prize

Rick Roberts

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Teen Who Filmed George Floyd's Murder Awarded Honorary Pulitzer Prize

Pulitzers Give Special Award to Darnella Frazier, Who Filmed George Floyd's Murder

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Pulitzers Give Special Award to Darnella Frazier, Who Filmed George Floyd's Murder

"Teenager who pulled out her cell phone and recorded the police restraint and death of George Floyd was awarded a special citation by the Pulitzer prizes during Ella Frazier was cited for courageously recording the murder of George Floyd and highlighting the crucial role of citizens in journalist's quest for truth and justice Rachel was seventeen when she recorded Floyd's death in may of last year at the hands of Minneapolis police and later posted it on Facebook she testified at the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin about what she saw a man terrified and scared big difference

George Floyd Ella Frazier Pulitzer Prizes Rachel Floyd Minneapolis Derek Chauvin Facebook
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

03:26 min | 7 months ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"You feel like there's a way to reach those people because i feel there's gotta be a way you know while you're asking for hope. I'm not good comedian. Like i. I don't think i was surprised to see the flag there because i'd had a very active facebook page in the fall of two thousand twenty with like ninety three thousand people following it and a lot of them were beaten me and i got into so many fights with Really needs and beating means american trump supporters yup And so i already knew that. There was a very strong support for for trump in in vietnam and here in the united states. And they're they're very They're very angry very angry. And they're they're very prone to using you know violent foul language and so of course. It was a disappointment to sue the vietnamese flag lying there but not a surprise and i think that that. Can you know there are a whole bunch of plants lying there. A lot of american flags a lot of you know confederate flags and lot of like flags who symbols. I didn't really understand what which apparently you know. Signs of white supremacy and then there are a lot of other countries lives there too so the vietnamese were not the only non white people there. But i think we like the largest contingent as far as i could. Maybe i'm just looking at the right. Facebook feeds where maybe van loads of vietnamese people are. Very proud and happy win flag. And there's a lot of reasons for that. I think the vietnamese american community was was caught up in trump berber. Just like fifty percent of the country was kind of in all the various noodles that we know about. And that's compounded by lee at least two things one is that You know trump support is sort of inevitably tied up with racism and white supremacy and anti blackness and Unfortunately i think there's a lot of of racists and the vietnamese american community. that's what i heard growing up. You know yep still hear it and oftentimes said beaten amis rather than english right less. It's out there. And then the last thing is that the i think a lot of vietnamese americans who are refugees are deeply patriotic about south vietnam. That's why they wear the military uniforms. That's why they they sing. The national anthem wave the the yellow flag. All the means events. there's a lot of nostalgia for that loss country and the that that war. Which has i think a little similarity to how some americans feel a lot of nostalgia for the confederacy and feel like they. They lost Adjust 'cause and why they can still wave the confederate flag and so there's that to that sense of A sense of of of of defeat and anger and pride and desire to take things back right right. Damn dude do we do. How what do you think. Are we almost done here. Yeah i think we're done. We were supposed to funny game. And then mike brought up over the sad thing at the end so.

vietnam fifty percent south vietnam ninety three thousand people trump Facebook two thousand vietnamese united states facebook one english two things vietnamese american trump berber twenty mike confederate american americans
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

The Al Franken Podcast

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

"David Farren whole as a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist For The Washington Post he won. The bolts are Because of his really painstaking thorough reporting on trump's foundation which turns out was kind of a scam and Has now been shut down by the state of New York so Thank you David for joining us. Hey great to be here and thank you for all the reporting you've done on on trump's finances and Just curiously let me ask you. What corrupt schemes of trump's are you currently investigating the big priority for this year is to find out how much money the federal government is paying trump's businesses? We that it is. We know that it's a lot of you know we've found four hundred seventy one thousand dollars in payments already. And but I think we've only seen tip of the iceberg mar-a-lago. This is Scotland. This is all these things right. Yeah well we've just looked at one government agency so far which is the secret service to follow him wherever he goes and then there's sort of captive customers for him. He gets the choose whatever he wants to charge them and the service can pay. Whatever it's charged so we are looking at what he charges them to come with him. Tomorrow law go to come with into Bedminster. He's an ren things at Bedminster when he's not even there So yeah I think there's more than just the secret service but that's the part that we're looking at first so this is obviously His His golf courses or resorts. Or whatever these are and The Secret Service has to stay there. for security reasons and he can pretty much was he charged him as he charged above What normal people pay? Not The normal people go to any of these well the ones we've looked at so far bedminster and mar-a-lago and they both have a few guest rooms. They're not really hotels but they have a few rooms and they don't publish the rates they don't even if you're a member you have to call and get the rate for tonight. So they don't they don't say what regular people pay The only rip. That's a great Great out right but the but the good thing for us is that last year. Eric trump president son actually gave a really definitive answer about what his Co. is is company was charging the government he says when government officials come with my father to our properties which are just you know he says I. He said it was free and then he wasn't. He's not totally free. We just charge them the cost of housekeeping. So just the cost of cleaning their rooms by the way everyone If you go to a hotel Tip Your housekeeper yes You know please. So that'd be like a ten dollar charge. A figure he gave was fifty bucks and we've talked to a sort of hotel industry experts about you. Know what does it cost? Just a cleanroom and it's like for a luxury hotel. It's like fifty to seventy bucks so that's about. I see because they pay the housekeeper scores. And you get and how many of them are are legal or well. How the ones at mar-a-lago are all They're all guests. Workers Imports guestworkers their legal. But they're not okay. Well that's good. Yeah with for him. But the thing is we haven't found a single instance and I've I've been looking for any instance at all where I can see that Eric actually did what he said where the trump were actually charged the government fifty bucks. We've found rates four hundred dollars. Five hundred and sixty dollars six hundred fifty dollars a nine man. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa WHOA are you saying that Eric may have been misleading people? I don't want to prejudge it. Maybe there's some examples out there that I haven't found yet. I'm just saying that every single example that I found any history of that and your research of them be misleading. Let's go back to the first thing. Which is the that you did. Which is the trump foundation and There are some pretty hilarious stories there. You're probably better telling these than I am well just to give a couple So the trump foundation was this little charity. That trump is set up in the eighties. Donald Trump and set up in the eighties and basically it for the last. You know five or ten years before he ran for office. It had been giving away other people's money for some reason. Other people gave him money which he then gave away under the name of the Donald Trump Foundation. So people thought they were getting his money but it wasn't and the the weird thing about it one of the weird things about it was what he bought with this charities money including A couple of different very large portraits of himself So he would go to this charity auctions at mar-a-lago people would bring a painting of him. I think figuring we will. He's you know he's got to buy it would blow to him if a painting of him goes unsold in his house so he bought one painting for ten thousand dollars. You but one painting for twenty thousand dollars which scrape that's fine. There's an auction for charity. But then he used his charities money to pay for it so the foundation pays for his portrait's exactly and Basically there's no justification for that all right. No one of the basic rules about charity is it even if your name is on the charity. It's not your money. It's the charity is a separate pot of money that's meant for the public good and Foundation Foundation. Let's tax exempt. Yeah so you can't use it to buy decorations for your house. You can't use it to buy anything for yourself So we wanted to know okay. Well now that these paintings wait a minute. Wait a minute decorations. He's I know that he's hung. The portrait's have been hung at Some of the hotels maybe Ed mar-a-lago and one zero So they're all that's the G. Seven g seven exactly so they could see the portrait so yeah they had said they wouldn't tell us where it was but one of our readers founded on the wallet at Durrell Decorating The sports bar there. So that's pretty much. The definition of what? You should not do with charities. Assets wasn't wasn't barral actually doing a service which was storing it. Right that was that was the The argument with trump campaign was well. Yeah looks bad. It looks like the trump charity did a favor for the trump business by buying art for the businesses walls. But you have it all wrong really. The business is doing the charity a favor by storing its art collection for free our journalist. We gotta check these things out. It's like man. I call it a tax expert and said you know. Does this hold water could you? And the GUY said you know. It's it's not easy to make an irs auditor laugh. But this would do it. I actually had an auditor once audit me and Tom. Davis via the corporation This is the weirdest thing he was there for in my business. Manager's Office for a week I don't know why I'm telling the story but here's the thing. He sees a receipt for dinner that I had with Lorne Michaels and Paul McCartney and Tom in London and he said You had dinner with Paul McCartney and I said yes and he goes okay arts over. Isn't that funny? I was fine. It's good all right. Okay keep going. I thought that was a good story so that was one of the many things in the end. The trump the New York attorney general sued the trump foundation for that and a variety of other things. He used this charity to help his political campaign. He used it to pay off legal debts for his businesses and they sued the trump foundation. Saying that none of that stuff is what you're supposed to do with charities money and so the end. The trump foundation gets dissolved and trump had to pay two million dollar. Fine personally give an example of the legal debt that the foundation paid because he legally owed some money. And what was that about though the one case? There's a charity golf tournament at one of trump's golf courses in New York and they have this prize hit a whole hit a hole in one. When a million dollars okay. They're out there and with some whole a guy. One of the contestants from New York Hits a hole in one hour a big deal to take his picture. You know he's back in the clubhouse buying drinks that says you know these GonNa want a million dollars and they sort of tapped him on the shoulder and say actually if you read the fine print of the win a million dollars sweepstakes it says that the ball has to travel a certain number of yards before it goes in the hole for be eligible and trump's course just happened to have set it up so that the t the whole were not far enough apart that that we not exceed that limit so yes even hit the hole in one. You don't win the Homeland Prize because you hit it far enough. It was just The Pin was just far enough Close enough that you couldn't they couldn't win so food and They settled or something and the trump foundation paid for their exactly but he he sued the trump golf course because obviously the trump golf course is the one at fault and the trump golf course settled with the guy but then the trump foundation again in legal legally separate tax exempt charity with nothing to do with this Gulf hole in one thing. They trump foundation patient. Okay so this is just sleaze. Sleaze sleaze there's a couple of stories there they really like one one. You got into this because He he did this thing when He was feuding with Fox. Instead of doing the Fox debate he did this Vanderbilt zone and said he was giving like a million dollars. Sir. Several million dollars to vets right. Yeah a million dollars out of his own pocket. That's right and million dollars out of his own pocket and you just wanted to. You were curious right. We wanted to. I mean that's a claim that matters because both that shows you. Trump cares about veterans. And it shows you is really rich like those are two key parts of his appeal in two thousand sixteen so we want to just check and make sure that he did the thing that he said he did. And I thought this is like a simple story. We'll call it and they'll say yeah of course but he gave this money to this charity. You can call them in check but of course it was not like that. Instead we got was a call from Corey. Lewandowski was trump's campaign manager. Then great guy. Great thank you. I'm sort of set me off on on this path by telling me. Susie lied to wonder wonderfully life-changing line. And so he said well. I can tell you for sure that Donald Trump is giving away that million dollars to veterans. But I can't tell you who he gave it to our win..

Donald Trump trump trump foundation Eric trump Donald Trump Foundation Bedminster golf New York Foundation Foundation Pulitzer Prize federal government David Farren Scotland Ed mar-a-lago auditor Fox Corey Susie Paul McCartney
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

The Al Franken Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

"In just a minute. It's going to be a great one. You know those of you listen to the podcast by definition you. You are You know that we often have a great guests who are doing great things For example Maria trae Sukumar the founder and president of Voto Latino Did a wonderful show on immigration and voter suppression an after hearing her interview. A listener gave Voto Latino one hundred thousand dollars because voter. Latino is in the trenches Registering Latinos across America to vote and and Fighting Republican efforts to suppress The Latino vote. Now I'm not asking you for one hundred thousand dollars unless you've you've got that kind of money but please consider giving to this unbelievably great organization at www dot voto Latino dot org. That's Voto Latino Dot Org and by the way they didn't pay for this. I just wanted to do this and That way you don't have to do backslash Al David Farren whole as a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist For The Washington Post he won. The bolts are.

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Okay. And the. Pulitzer prize winning that. How does that change your life? What is what is that? What's it feel like what's the process, actually? Is it something that you submit for consideration or is it something that's found by them? I I'm sure it's all on their website, but it'd be nice for people to understand. It's a submission thing, and I have to say, I we were so lucky the journal sentinel had won a Pulitzer prize the year before, and we were so lucky that they had really built up a, a team of people who, who knew what it took to do the application and to do the, the right kind of story that the year that we won. We had a lot of digital components to our story. And we told it in a lot of different ways online, you know, Mark, and I worked very closely with there were five of us who want and, you know, the other three did a lot of the video and photography, and such a big team on those well and that year they had added to the. Rules, kind of. Not a category. But a, a suggestion that you try and tell the story in unique ways and use digital and, and we really did that well, so I think that helped us so you, you really have to have a can't credit, the management, George Stanley, the editor of journal sentinel, and all of the people who work with him on this. You have to have that kind of team to, to turn. We had a really good story that we, you know, we Mark, and I said, from the beginning, if, if, if we can't take this story somewhere, it's our fault because all the elements were there, but then we needed that team around us to take it to the next level to be cliche. Did you ever worry about whether you'd be able to get it there, Mark? And I realized very early on that the story had that potential and we made a pact not to talk about it. And so we just did not talk about it. So it was actually funny. What happens is. We knew that they submitted it for the Pulitzer. And we we just talk about it, and so someone in we agreed. We tell each other when we heard anything. So one of the other reporters came up to me they get announced in April in one of the other reporters came up to me, I don't maybe in March and said, so how you feeling you know heard you're on the shortlist was, like, what are you talking about? He's like you know what I'm talking about. I don't know what you're talking about. We're not talking about it, and he told me that there were rumors in the industry that, you know, we were. In the top kind of stories that were being considered in our category. And I went told Mark and I like she, we had an agreement that we tell each other. And he was kinda mad at me because we just didn't wanna talk about it. So then the, the day they were announced, you know, we knew that we had a shot, and I walked in that morning and I had an interview to do, but I saw I, so I did my interview, and it was driving Mark crazy. I mean he couldn't even sit there any longer and he I got off my injuries like let's get out here. And so we just laughed and we went, we actually went to a used bookstore downtown and looked at DNA books, so marred mired in it at that point. And then we went and had lunch and already writing the book at the palm, we had, we had an agent at that point. I think, but we, we had contract with the agent, but we hadn't won the Pulitzer. The giant was pretty happy after it happened. But. We came walking back into the building. And we saw a local TV reporter sitting in the lobby, and then we were really nervous than we thought all something. But what you're fables are turned. Well, yeah, and I hate to even admit this. But what you're really nervous about is that you're going to be a finalist. You know, and that 'cause they have a tradition in the journal sentinel newsroom. You have to stand up in front of the whole news room, and everybody watches for it to come across the wire, and, you know what you don't want is to be standing there and here you're finalist, and you have to act happy and you are happy, but, you know, you're hoping you win. So so draft day, almost. Yeah. Right. So we, it was funny. We walked back into the newsroom and Raquel Rutledge who had won the Pulitzer fabulous reporter who won the Pulitzer the year before. Kind of called us over, and she pulled up Brown bag out of her desk drawer with some kind of alcohol bottle of alcohol in it and said here, take a drink and then go up there. Switch shot. And we went walking up there. And what would you say your member? I don't even remember. I mean you know, then we won and. You know, it was just a blur. It ended up it. We, it was such a blur in, you're, you're just walking around the newsroom and slowly everyone's getting back to do in. There's champagne and everyone's getting back to doing the work. They have to do that day. And you're just kind of walking around, like I don't even know what to do. And because it's like winning the Oscar. Right. I mean in. I don't know. I never won the Oscar. Okay. Okay, magin that you want the Oscar for bridges of Madison. Laugh at someone someone got in touch with me, sometimes it, what happens to your ear, inbox your emails, flooded. Your we ended up like the New York Times called us and we didn't see it and we didn't call him back. I mean it was just chaos. But someone after that day called me up and said like, okay, you know you won the Nobel, but you still don't know. And I said, I said, well, I didn't win the Nobel. I won the Pulitzer and he said, Nobel poets are. What's the difference? I'm mad at you. So a lot of ways. So what happens is after you win. There is a like an award ceremony at the law library at Columbia college in New York. And there were a couple interesting things about that. But to me, the most interesting, you walk in, you know all the editors go with you, and you walk in, and they're all these steps you walk up, and then there's this grand lobby and you walk over new when you win. You get like a little Tiffany kind of paperweight, that's engraved with, you know, your information and even more valuable to me. You get a book of all the previous Pulitzer winners that was. I thought really neat. But as I was walking across this long, large fancy lobby, I realized this isn't even about us. It was a first of all, you realize it's not it's it was about Milwaukee, and it was about Wisconsin. You know, everybody shared with us, winning the pulsar. So you kind of realized that, that, it's, it's not just yours, it's ever, but then walking cross this lobby, I realized it's a lunch. It's not a very fancy ceremony and it's, it's about the editors you realize these editors show up hopefully often, and they're showing off their latest reporters. Right. And so they all know each other and you don't know anybody 'cause you've never been there before the only ones they continue to go all the time. It's their sort of. Yeah. It's their thing like this is, you know, they're the ones who like they're bringing their latest winners. So and, you know, the big lake Wall Street Journal was like up in front. New York Times it's the whole that also placement another. So we so there's a little reception and then there's a launch, and, you know, Mark, and I stood and, and the rest of our team. But Mark, and I happened to Stanton. Whether we're pretty tied at the hip at that point. And. Who are you gonna talk to all the editors are talking to each other? And so we ended up talking to the poet who won that year and the nonfiction. I remember this book the history of cancer book, I'm blanking on the name of it. I'll think anyway, can't come up with it. It's a great book. We both brought books and got him sign it. But we ended up kind of just standing and talking to them because you don't know anybody. So it was really interesting from that in, and it was funny. I walked up to there's a, a high up editor at the Wall Street Journal, who's from Green Bay, where I'm from his name's Paul zhigo. And sure, yeah, I saw him over at the Wall Street Journal table. I went to high school with his sister. So I walked up, thinking, oh to say hi to him. And I walked up to the table, and they all looked up at me. Like, what are you doing over at our table? Right. 'cause they're the Wall Street Journal. And I said, oh, Well, Paul, I just want to say hi went ice school, Julie. And then he stood up. He was real nice. But it was really funny walking to the table. So you said when we were first getting started that you always wanted to do something. Big was this. It. Well that it was maybe one of it. Yeah. Okay. So now, you know, I've left the turtle sentinel, and I'm running them walkie institute, which is a nonprofit started in two thousand seven by John burns who ran the private equity group, ebonite Bank, and then spun it out into Mason wells, which has been very successful private equity firm rusher. It's the biggest in Wisconsin, and, you know, I've known John for longtime actually will tell you a secret that won't be a secret anymore once tell to you, but John was the person who gave me my Pulitzer tip. So he's and delare in my John. Yeah. Right. He was on the board of the Medical College. And the what the reason we were talking that day he was, you know, kind of berating me about all the great things going on there. And, you know, and I just wasn't sure if he slipped and told me something he wasn't supposed to or he was trying to tell it to me, but it doesn't matter turned out. Yeah. So can I ask just before? Before we get more into the mock institute. So you. You win. You Mark win. You're right, the book, you're sort of, at the top of can I say something? Yeah. That book that I was trying to remember, the name of, oh, yes. The emperor of all maladies. There you go. Get it on Amazon. But the one you really wanna buy one in a billion. Yes. Of course. The story of knickebocker Don McMahon. That's also on him. Exactly. The so you're sort of at the top. Whether you still about Oscar whatever Pulitzer Nobel. And that. Yeah. Six one. And then and then you leave journalism. Yeah. How come? Well, the journal sentinel was a fabulous place and still is in some ways, but we got bought by going at, and I just have to tell you that the day they all walked into, you know, I was a business reporter. I mean, I covered this stuff all the time, like I talked to a lot of CEO's about walking into a company and what you do when the day they walked into the newsroom, I just thought is a work for me. And it was partly because, you know, they're not real focused on business news. The kind of business news. I like they're focused on maybe a softer type of business news than I like so I, you know, I mean I that's not to say the journal sentinel, isn't still doing some good business news. But I just felt like I was going to be frustrated there. And John had started the Milwaukee institute in two thousand seven. He started it as a he had a cluster of cloud. As it were. And they were doing high-performance computing and offering services helping companies in academics around.

Pulitzer Mark Wall Street Journal editor Pulitzer prize reporter Oscar John burns New York Times Wisconsin Paul zhigo Pulitzer Nobel George Stanley Raquel Rutledge Milwaukee Don McMahon New York Amazon
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"You know, I'm not interested in writing actually political things incorrectly, but I want to change people the way they interact with each other. And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, the book includes a side by side translation of every poem in Spanish. The other poem we'd love you to read from his depopulation blues, which talks about the broader obligations. We have people around the world even if there happened to be of a different nationality country. Oh, absolutely. But also many people don't realize this, but we actually had a depopulation order that was concocted by Kissinger and Nixon. And so we are actually people color, especially in danger of being depopulated here in this country as well as in other countries. And I know it feels really shocking, but they can research this evil can be brilliant though. Speaking of depopulation. Of people. It will find a way we are not fools completely to be seduced by it. For Nixon Carter Reagan, perhaps all the others knew we were counting on them to be as human as we are, but why eight hundred thousand Rwandans died while we watched a televised presidential sex scandal might have told us something that politicians who smiled at us and kissed our babies, blue eyes shining with triumph. Well, knew we were falling into our graves kicked by them as they counted our votes. Why do you think we tell so many stories about ourselves about America that don't always match up with the ugly realities because we can't face the reality. It's a terrible history and until we face it, we can go nowhere. We can expect to grow. You have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year, and I want to play for you something from one of his songs and a video that echoes your work. Take a look. Chips like. Humming. If God got us, we're going to be all right. Have you have you heard him quote you before the now? You've never seen that now and he's big. He's not Alice Walker big, but he's big, I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people who call her in this country, we've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other across generations prizes are a funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize the Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes. No, so whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. Did it change your status because there's your work that stands on its own, and then there's the. Reach of your work. And so I wonder whether the prize is in the prestige that you've amassed did make a difference in the reach. I mean, we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast in a film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work in hasn't really come from the prize. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're going to do, but I'll play you one clip of President Trump..

Pulitzer prize Alice Walker Kendrick Nixon Carter Reagan president President Trump America Kissinger Oprah Whoopi Lamar
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, you have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year and I wanna play for you something from one of his songs and video that echoes your work. Take a look. Night. Chips like. Have you heard him quote you before, but now you've never seen that? No, and he's big. He's not Alice Walker, big big. I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people to call in this country. We've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other cross generations prizes are funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes, you know? So whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. And we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work doesn't really come from the price. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're gonna do play you. One clip of President Trump. I went to an Ivy league school. I'm very highly educated. I know words I had the best. Words, what does it tell you that it's important to him to be perceived as so smart. It tells me that he knows he probably is not, and he has an inferiority complex and that's very sad, but it's even sadder that we elected him to lead. We definitely need a very different kind of leader. And in fact, we actually need to lead ourselves and until we do, we probably won't get very far. You're saying fury already. I mean, there's a feeling of inferiority or lack of self. Affirmation love. Does that in your view, make people more more dangerous when they come in contact with power money? Yes, because there's always in the, there's always the feeling of need to measure up, you know? And I mean, even see that between him and Barack Obama, I think n. b. there was just so blatant that Donald Trump envied Iraq Obama his even though he started out with much more than Barack, oh, of course. That's part of the problem that he had everything in Barack as a black man was supposed to have nothing and said, look, what happened is all of the things that this. Isn't isn't in this very hard to take. But the answer is not to make us all suffer is to go and improve yourself. Alice Walker for me, it's an honor to have you here, so I really appreciate you coming by. Thank you. Thank you. Hey, it's Chris from MSNBC every day. I come to the office and we make television show every day. I think to myself, there's so much more I want to talk about. And so this is our podcast it's called, why is this happening? And the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see out every day. They're driven by big ideas each week. I sit down with the person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening. New episodes of Weiss. This happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

Alice Walker President Trump Pulitzer prize Barack Obama Nobel Pulitzer president Ivy league school MSNBC Weiss Oprah Lamar Chris Whoopi
"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prizes" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Is she windsor pulitzer prize and bingo she used to sit right next to me by the way i come in one morning in her entire desk is literally empty i mean the cubicle is stripped bare i mean it is an empty desk empty drawers no pictures everything has gone and that's when we discovered that janet made up the whole thing that there was never any jimmy she made it up and at that point everyone on that squad got called in all their stories were reviewed i'd done a story about a guy who sold guns two teenagers i literally had to pull his record and come in and show showa tome and say look right here he's been arrested for this and that was disbanded and uh several of my fellow members were suggested that they find jobs elsewhere and i ended up being assigned to what was called the federal report page which no longer exist but i had the wonderful job which i hated every day for three years which was covering osha m shah all the alphabet agencies and the federal government and i'm a people person and i'm not really big on reading thousand page documents about minor safety you know and so it was bad fit i switched over to the magazine because it it's the washington post that was looked down on the magazine was kind of a stepchild nobody cared about and i scored the first interview with arthur walker arthur walker was brother john walker john walker in 1980 six was the equivalent of the rosen birds he was the first major american spy since two rosenberg and he got his brother his best friend jerry whitworth and michael walker his son and they sold secrets to be got caught eighty six he'd been solemn since sixty nine to the soviets more than eighteen years of of betraying his country so i got permission.

pulitzer prize janet federal government washington post arthur walker john walker rosenberg jerry whitworth jimmy michael walker eighteen years three years