35 Burst results for "Pulitzer Prize"

Corey Lewandowski: Where's the Apology From the Media for Being Wrong?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | Last month

Corey Lewandowski: Where's the Apology From the Media for Being Wrong?

"So what is really justice? Michael, there's a lot of guys like clue and asking other people who've been part of team Trump that were vilified and chastised by the legacy media, told us we were liars and wrong, only to see them go back and change their headlines 7 years later, say, whoops, I guess the Hunter Biden laptop, oops, I guess the whole Russia collusion narrative was a falsehood. We'll keep the Pulitzer Prize that we got. And sorry for destroying your lives. When does that apology come? Well, in fact, funny, you mentioned that because I was just reading over the weekend, NBC News has now joined The New York Times, The Washington Post Politico in verifying the laptop dismissed as Russian disinformation in 2020. I mean, there I saw a report from Hallie Jackson on NBC the other day. I thought fell off my couch where she did the whole Hunter Biden story. She sounded like a talking head on newsmax. Because they've been shamed into

Hunter Biden Donald Trump The Washington Post Politico Pulitzer Prize Michael Russia Nbc News Hallie Jackson The New York Times NBC
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

02:33 min | Last month

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

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cuthbert Georgia Patsy rembert Erin Kelly
Media Research Center Gives Dan Bongino a Bulldog Award

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Media Research Center Gives Dan Bongino a Bulldog Award

"Hey before I get back to what I wanted to talk about how Biden is repeating the same mistakes of the past that are going to lead us to more mistakes in the future which are going to be mistakes that you are going to suffer the ramifications of Biden will be fine believe me Biden will be just fine He's taken care of in The White House I want to thank the media research center They gave me I have the award if you're watching here on Fox nation I found out about it last week but they the press release went out today Their first bulldog awards they're called the anti pulitzers of Pulitzer so I'm honored to be on the other side of the ridiculous Pulitzer prizes given to idiots in the media talk about the pee pee hoax So they gave me the bulldog award Here's the award right there It looks like Jim what do you think is in the shape of a liberal tier Looks like a big liberal tier right Yeah It's even blue kind of the color of water with the sky reflection So the MRC media research center those guys are awesome repose group and all those people Curtis Howe Dan came to all those folks MRC bulldog award recognizes Dan bongino for outstanding podcast 2022 Thank you Thank you You guys are fantastic I am honored I love my podcast I've been doing it for 8 years You can check it out folks I want to congratulate Steven gypsy and Mark Levin got the best radio show award I certainly can not dispute that I am a fan of the great one as you know as well He has been a warrior for as long as I've been alive on this cause on the radio But podcast that's really great So thank you very much media

Biden Mrc Media Research Center Pulitzer Prizes Curtis Howe Pulitzer White House Dan Bongino FOX Steven Gypsy JIM DAN Mark Levin
Pulitzer Prizes award Washington Post for Jan. 6 coverage

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Pulitzer Prizes award Washington Post for Jan. 6 coverage

"The The The The Washington Washington Washington Washington Post Post Post Post won won won won the the the the Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer Prize Prize Prize Prize in in in in public public public public service service service service journalism journalism journalism journalism the the the the post post post post was was was was honored honored honored honored for for for for its its its its coverage coverage coverage coverage of of of of the the the the capital capital capital capital this this this is is is Marjorie Marjorie Marjorie Miller Miller Miller says says says the the the post post post found found found numerous numerous numerous problems problems problems and and and failures failures failures and and and political political political systems systems systems and and and security security security before before before during during during and and and after after after the the the riots riots riots nineteen nineteen nineteen with with with thorough thorough thorough lynching lynching lynching one one one of of of the the the nation's nation's nation's darkest darkest darkest day day day five five five Getty Getty Getty images images images photographers photographers photographers were were were awarded awarded awarded one one one of of of two two two Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer prizes prizes prizes in in in breaking breaking breaking news news news photography photography photography for for for their their their coverage coverage coverage of of of the the the right right right the the the other other other went went went to to to Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Times Times Times correspondent correspondent correspondent and and and photographer photographer photographer Marcus Marcus Marcus yam yam yam for for for work work work related related related to to to the the the fall fall fall of of of Kabul Kabul Kabul in in in Afghanistan Afghanistan Afghanistan the the the Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer prizes prizes prizes also also also awarded awarded awarded a a a special special special citation citation citation to to to journalist journalist journalist of of of Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine acknowledging acknowledging acknowledging their their their courage courage courage endurance endurance endurance and and and commitment commitment commitment in in in covering covering covering the the the Russian Russian Russian invasion invasion invasion which which which is is is still still still ongoing ongoing ongoing I I I made made made Donahue Donahue Donahue

The Washington Washington Wash Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer Pul Post Post Post Post Marjorie Marjorie Marjorie Mil Miller Miller Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer Getty Getty Getty Los Los Los Angeles Angeles An Marcus Marcus Marcus Yam Yam Y Afghanistan Kabul Kabul Ukraine Kabul Donahue Donahue Donahue
American Greatness: Judge Acquits J6 Protester in First Defeat for DOJ

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 3 months ago

American Greatness: Judge Acquits J6 Protester in First Defeat for DOJ

"I spoke briefly the other day about a federal district judge in Washington D.C. by the name of Trevor mcfadden Who appears to be the only federal judge Who actually believes in the rule of law there And the Intrepid should be Pulitzer Prize winning but the Mark Levin award winning Julie Kelly An American greatness site Just posted the following D.C. district court judge Trevor mcfadden today delivered a major blow to the Justice Department's aggressive prosecution of January 6th protesters Following a bench trial this week from Matthew Martin in New Mexico man charged with the most common misdemeanors related to the capital protests Judge mcfadden found Martin not guilty on all counts It is literally the first acquittal in a January 6th case The first and only one Nearly 800 Americans have been arrested and charged mostly on petty offenses For their involvement in the four hour disturbance that day she writes

Trevor Mcfadden Washington D.C. Julie Kelly D.C. District Court Mark Levin Matthew Martin Pulitzer Prize Judge Mcfadden Justice Department New Mexico Martin
Pulitzer winner Walter Mears dies, AP's 'Boy on the Bus'

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Pulitzer winner Walter Mears dies, AP's 'Boy on the Bus'

"Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Walter Mears who was featured in the book the boys on the bus has died at age eighty seven died Thursday in North Carolina he had cancer according to his daughters he was the Associated Press Washington bureau chief and the wire services executive editor and VP over four decades Mears covered eleven presidential campaigns winning the Pulitzer for writing about Jimmy Carter defeating Gerald Ford in two thousand and three he wrote his memoir deadlines passed and in the boys on the bus Mears ability to find the essence of the story while it was still going on and get it out became a legend among peers with a catch phrase what's the lead Walter of his journalistic ability a colleague once said Mears writes faster than most people think I'm Julie Walker

Walter Mears Mears Pulitzer Prize Associated Press North Carolina Gerald Ford Pulitzer Jimmy Carter Cancer Washington Walter Julie Walker
Eric and James O'Keefe on What We Can Learn From 'Mr. Jones'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:36 min | 4 months ago

Eric and James O'Keefe on What We Can Learn From 'Mr. Jones'

"Welcome back folks. I'm talking to James O'Keefe founder of project veritas, author of the new book American muckraker rethinking journalism for the 21st century. So James, I was just referring to this film mister Jones, which talks about Gareth Jones, a Welsh journalist who sees in Soviet Russia in the Soviet Union in the early 30s. What Stalin is doing, which is evil with a capital E but the other journalists, most notably Walter duranty of The New York Times who won a Pulitzer Prize that's never been rescinded for effectively giving cover to Stalin's genocidal murderous regime. But I thought it's so incredible because what the story of the film shows is how one of these reporters, one of these journalists, Vanessa Kirby's character, initially she's basically said, I believe in this communist utopia. And I'm willing to look the other way for the greater good. She eventually changes. But it struck me that that's where Mary very many American journalists are today. They hate Trump so much or they hate something so much that they're willing to overlook the facts, the story. I mean, the most dramatic example for me was the Hunter Biden laptop. When that story got buried by everybody I thought I just feel like my country is dead. You don't have a country if you don't tell those stories. Well, that's true. And in this book, I write about this idea of in journalism. There's always been a tension between access and autonomy. So what I drew from the movie about Jones movie was a study of the potemkin village, so the guy had access to the Soviet Union, and he was being told these things. And these days, journalists, if not narrative Eric, they tend to relay what they're told by the powerful. They just relay it to you. Okay, here's what The Pentagon says. Here's what Putin is saying. Here's what this guy is saying. Well, that's not really journalism. That's more like public relations. So of course, I can't go to these fraudsters. Hi, I'm James O'Keefe. Tell me all the fraud you're committing. They'll never tell me the truth. So investigative journalism is what you really want. You want, okay, you're told X okay, I'm going to go try to disprove X by finding out why. That's not happening anymore. And the reason is not just politics and narrative, yes, that's some of it. It's also economics. It's expensive and it's difficult to challenge the company line or to challenge the government line. And you burn your access to the government. Right. The Biden administration will punish these

Project Veritas Mister Jones Walter Duranty James O'keefe Stalin Vanessa Kirby Gareth Jones Soviet Union Hunter Biden Soviet Russia Pulitzer Prize The New York Times James Donald Trump Mary Jones Putin Pentagon Eric Biden Administration
"Mocking Anti-Vaxxers’ COVID Deaths Is Ghoulish, Yes — but May Be Necessary"

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:29 min | 6 months ago

"Mocking Anti-Vaxxers’ COVID Deaths Is Ghoulish, Yes — but May Be Necessary"

"There's a Los Angeles Times columnist. Pulitzer Prize winner, no less named Michael hilt sick. Who wrote a column called mocking anti vaxxers and the column says mocking those who die who are unvaccinated is ghoulish, yes, but necessary. On the one hand he writes a hallmark of civilized thought is the sense that every life is precious. On the other, those who have deliberately flouted sober medical advice by refusing a vaccine known to reduce the risk of serious disease from the virus, including the risk to others and end up in the hospital or the grave can be viewed as receiving their just desserts. Can you imagine what a miserable person you have to be? To see or to read about the death of two elderly people holding hands and saying rotting hell, good riddance, see you later bye or this guy, a column, a Pulitzer, the Pulitzer committee gave this guy an award. Mocking the deaths of anti vaxxers is necessary. In order to create teachable moments

Michael Hilt Pulitzer Prize Los Angeles Times
Edward O. Wilson, biologist known as 'ant man,' dead at 92

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

Edward O. Wilson, biologist known as 'ant man,' dead at 92

"A a pioneering pioneering biologist biologist who who argued argued for for a a new new vision vision of of human human nature nature has has died died former former Harvard Harvard professor professor Edward Edward O. O. Wilson Wilson died died Sunday Sunday at at age age ninety ninety two two that's that's according according to to a a tribute tribute posted posted on on the the E. E. O. O. Wilson Wilson bio bio diversity diversity foundation's foundation's website website in in two two thousand thousand seven seven Wilson Wilson said said people people of of faith faith and and science science must must work work together together to to save save the the environment environment science science and and religion religion are are the the two two most most powerful powerful social social forces forces in in the the world world the the so so called called culture culture wars wars between between them them needlessly needlessly block block full full cooperation cooperation Wilson Wilson won won two two Pulitzer Pulitzer prizes prizes he he first first gained gained widespread widespread attention attention for for its its nineteen nineteen seventy seventy five five book book sociobiology sociobiology the the new new synthesis synthesis in in which which she she detailed detailed evidence evidence suggesting suggesting a a link link between between human human behavior behavior and and genetics genetics the the work work creating creating controversy controversy among among activists activists and and academics academics I'm I'm my my campaign campaign

Wilson Wilson Harvard Harvard Edward Edward O. O. Wilson Wil E. E. O. O. Wilson Wilson Bio Bio Diversity Diversity Fo Pulitzer Pulitzer
Brian Mudd: The 1619 Project Is the Catalyst of Critical Race Theory in Schools

Mark Levin

00:59 min | 7 months ago

Brian Mudd: The 1619 Project Is the Catalyst of Critical Race Theory in Schools

"In education Understanding where the battle is being fought Critical race theory has of course been an inflection point within this entire debate And it is very much a thing Critical race theory goes back many decades The first published work 1993 The actual book called critical race theory published in 2001 But what by and large has made its way into our schools And in some cases our classrooms has not been critical race theory by name And that's the way that far too many are addressing this particular issue The single greatest catalyst though you've got to be mindful of right now is the 1619 Project Course the work that goes back a few years ago put forward by a New York Times writer advanced by the Pulitzer center As it won a Pulitzer Prize which subsequently got it into our

Pulitzer Center New York Times Pulitzer Prize
Musical theater legend Stephen Sondheim dies at 91

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Musical theater legend Stephen Sondheim dies at 91

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting towering musical theater master Stephen Sondheim has died I comic songwriter Stephen Sondheim a giant in American musical theater has died attorney Rick Pappas told The New York Times Sondheim died Friday at his home in Roxbury Connecticut he was ninety one Sondheim who was taught by the legendary Oscar Hammerstein wrote the lyrics for nineteen fifties American stage classics West Side Story and gypsy early in his career six of Sondheim's musicals won Tony awards for best score he received the Pulitzer Prize for something in the park an academy award for the song sooner or later from the film Dick Tracy five Olivier awards and the presidential medal of honor hi

Stephen Sondheim Mike Rossi Sondheim American Musical Theater Rick Pappas Roxbury Oscar Hammerstein The New York Times Connecticut Tony Awards Pulitzer Prize Academy Award Olivier Awards Dick Tracy
Julie Kelly on the Whereabouts of Alleged 'Proud Boys'

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 8 months ago

Julie Kelly on the Whereabouts of Alleged 'Proud Boys'

"It's really Kelly If American greatness deserves a Pulitzer Prize I think the media that got Pulitzer prizes on the Russia collusion story should turn those in but they won't of course And Julie should get at least one of those And she wrote a piece Yesterday where are the neon headed Proud Boys Julie Kelly welcome back Where are they What's going on Mark thank you Thank you so much for that You're just overly kind I appreciate what you just said Yes that's a good question Where are all those alleged Proud Boys wearing orange neon caps on January 6th marching with alleged leaders of the Proud Boys who by the way Mark at least 5 of them are in pre trial detention have been held denied bail like so many January 6 defendants languishing riding in prison awaiting trials that won't start until next spring But yet you have all of these other strange characters behind them doing pretty much the same thing that they were but not only have they not been charged they haven't been identified They're not even on the FBI's most wanted list 1500 photographs not one has a neon hat on So it seems a little strange

Julie Kelly Pulitzer Prize Kelly Mark Julie Russia FBI
McAuliffe Hopes Joe Biden Can Spark Struggling Campaign

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:01 min | 9 months ago

McAuliffe Hopes Joe Biden Can Spark Struggling Campaign

"So America, Joe Biden, you go out there and vote for Terry mccaul and Joe Biden after last night's rally. There was a, quote, rally. Let me show you a couple of pictures, put up by our friend Mac. Here is the CBS picture of the rally that the president did with Terry mcauliffe in Virginia last night. If you're watching on YouTube, you can see that picture. I don't see it yet, so maybe it's stuck in the ether. But it looks like a good crowd. You don't even think, wow, wow, the president may have more hustle than we think. Maybe he's really good at it. Then you pan out. There's the first picture. That's the CBS News picture. Then you pan out, and they've taken over one corner of one tiny park in Virginia across the river from The White House. And they basically rounded up the locals and shuffled them into maybe 300 people there. That 300 people Dwayne, do you think that's 300 people? I'm not sure that that's 300 people. But the president, though, is simply out to lunch on this stuff. Here he is, last night, talking about blend young and who has clearly got the Democrat scared to death of winning an upset that would be an earthquake in America. Cut number 17. Jesse look how he's closing his campaign. He's gone from banning a woman's right to choose to banning books written by a Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Prize winning author. Toni Morrison. So if you talk about love, by the way, which I just finished recently and he's talking about not banning books, but about allowing parents to know which books are being read in what their messages are beloved as a fine book for teenagers to read and I'm sure glad you can would agree with that. But if you have to start what you're attacking opponent is saying, then you're responding to attacks two days before an election with a weak and unpopular president in a tiny park with nobody in it. And that means Terry mcauliffe is sucking air because people don't like Joe Biden

Joe Biden Terry Mccaul Terry Mcauliffe Virginia America CBS Cbs News Pulitzer Prize And Nobel Prize Dwayne Youtube White House Toni Morrison Earthquake Jesse
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

Doug Miles Media

03:12 min | 10 months ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

"Than now to be telling you about that topic now. I but i'm i'm not just talking about the current of crisis in meltdown. I'm really trying to take the long view. Mean we've had a great year some great times. I mean i covered several rights. I covered in the girl in law. Coming down the winning the oregon's the russians and some great great periods in american politics back in the sixties and seventies themselves when we been following some hard times particularly the middle class and it isn't just the meltdown i mean things were not good Even before that happens so. I'm trying to look at what happened. And and how we got where we are in and As a country and particularly the american middle class want to be on your program profiles of situations that have gone. happened but you also get solutions. That's something missing in journalism. Would you agree with them. Yeah i well. I got to an awful lot of opinion journalism and they might call it blog journalism. It isn't just the blogs time that network everybody's mouthing off And there's not as much good reporting going on. I mean i'm i'm always looking to. I'm a customer now as well as a producer. And i'm always looking to the news media to inform me i can. I can too much turn off the news route missing anything of opinions. I think that's it's not just a. I don't think it's our job necessarily come up with solutions and happens to be something that i think is important but but at least we ought to be dealing more in facts and not just as much so much opinion. I i think we're suffering that way but of course we're suffering. Economically role of the media has changed a lot and public gotten disaffected with us With i think we're pretty good reason And of course the electronic media the internet and the blogs and the tweets and all different things that come up. I mean there are cutting into our audience and people. Fragmenting gone different ways. We're going to ask you. What do you make of all the. It's only teams since i've been in the last. Few years has gone from Satellite radio because of the boom for a little bit of santa fall apart. And now you have internet delivery and eventually everything's gonna be delivered over the internet whether it's previa radio but it will come through the computer i want it and i think there's no question that's that's here to stay but i hope and i believe as that that news organizations.

Holocaust Survivor, Scholar Awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 10 months ago

Holocaust Survivor, Scholar Awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

"An Israeli French American Holocaust survivor and historian and a U. S. scientist specializing in got bacteria are among the recipients of this year's battles and crises recognizing scholarly and scientific achievements Seoul Friedlander was awarded the prize for Holocaust and genocide studies the Pulitzer Prize winner and macarthur fellow eighty eight year old Friedlander has taught widely in the U. S. took Telavi view diversity he was recognized for examining the persecution of all Jews in Europe then beyond the country focus studies that had preceded him I'm for making postal documents acceptable in scholarly practice while Jeffrey Goldman from Washington university in St Louis who's to wilted about St for founding the field of human microbiome research I'm Charles to this month

Seoul Friedlander Telavi Pulitzer Prize Friedlander Macarthur U. Jeffrey Goldman Europe Washington University St Louis Field Of Human Microbiome Rese Charles
Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:04 min | 11 months ago

Texas' Near-Total Abortion Ban Takes Effect

"Cambridge before roe v wade and so i know what it was like when women didn't have this choice we couldn't control our own bodies our own destinies here. We are fifty years later fighting the same battle again. It's incredible to think that we would be going backwards. It's the women of limited means women of color women in rural parts of texas who do not have access. This is just devastating. Big no options whatsoever the texas law virtually banning abortion that went into effect today could have an impact on women far outside that state opponents were banking on the supreme court stepping in and stopping the measure from taking effect. But that didn't happen as political sums it up the court's decision to not act on an emergency petition from texas abortion. Clinics comes as the justices. Prepare to more. Broadly reconsider the right to an abortion. It established almost fifty years ago. Back with us tonight. Eugene robinson pulitzer prize winning columnist for the washington. Post and susan dell persio of veteran political strategist boast are msnbc analysts. Thanks to both of you for being with us susan. Let's start with you. There are a lot of people who fully know that. Republicans at a state level have been attempting things that are either faints or real attempts to to place restrictions on abortion for some years now but this has surprised a lot of the fact that something that feels very much like a total ban on abortion could actually get past the supreme court. Absolutely i ate it. Is it's sending shockwaves especially to a lot of the republicans who may instead like yes. I'm pro-life but you know roe v. wade's the lay the law of the land and they also believed in Exceptions to incest rape which this law does not have this is the harshest law that i think republicans could ever see coming and at this point i think even some republicans are going to have a hard time getting behind it. Come twenty twenty two

Roe V Wade Texas Susan Dell Cambridge Supreme Court Eugene Robinson Msnbc Susan Washington Wade
Threats Persist as the U.S. Plans to Continue Evacuations From Kabul

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:01 min | 11 months ago

Threats Persist as the U.S. Plans to Continue Evacuations From Kabul

"Joe biden says the us airlift from kabul wilkinson you despite yesterday's jihadist attack which killed more than ninety people including thirty in. Us troops more than one hundred thousand people have so far being evacuated from afghanistan. Bassem many more want to leave ahead of next week's withdrawal deadline. Well one of those who managed to make it out of afghanistan in recent weeks is regular monocle twenty four contribution lynn o'donnell limits columnist for foreign policy magazine and former ap and af bureau chief in afghanistan and. I say that she joins me in the studio here in london. Welcome lynn how. Thanks joey i recap how you have made. Its to london now you to leave afghanistan. Almost two weeks ago on the fifteenth. Yes i was on the last commercial flight to leave kabul around about nine. Am i think we will wheels up around around about ten past nine on the fifteenth and I was traveling with my friend and colleague massoud husseini who's a pulitzer prize winning photographer and we had spent three months covering the The roll out of the war and it was while we were in herat probably a week or so earlier We watched herat falling and we were there. We meant to stay for just two days. We were trapped in herat four or five days. The taliban were back and forth and taking the airport taking the airport road and we sat there and we sent to each other. Massoud had a had a dutch visa that expired on the city. I it's time for us to go once rat falls. It's just a matter of time and so we back to kabul and we bought our tickets and a couple of days later Massoud was in the same ticket office and there were a thousand people lining up clamoring for tickets so we felt incredibly lucky when we touched down in east ambuhl Five hours after takeoff. It was in that we found out that the city had fallen the signs. Were there for days ahead and we were shocked but not surprised

Afghanistan Kabul Wilkinson Bassem Lynn O'donnell Foreign Policy Magazine Af Bureau Herat Joe Biden Massoud Husseini London Kabul United States AP Joey Lynn Massoud Pulitzer Prize Taliban East Ambuhl
Eugene Robinson Fails to Mention the Denominator of These Afghan Evacuations

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 11 months ago

Eugene Robinson Fails to Mention the Denominator of These Afghan Evacuations

"Don't worry, ladies and gentlemen. Eugene Robinson, a favorite of Joe Scarborough, Washington Post Pulitzer Prize committee. He's on the job. He's on the morning Schmo show. Cut. Six Go. So you know, we will. We will look back on this period and I know we will remember those chaotic scenes at the at the beginning and the the sense that nobody knew what was going on and the Taliban. Swept in, and the United States clearly seemed caught flat footed. Um, but I think we will also remember what could be the biggest and ultimately most successful airlift in history. So stop. This is one of the guys who is now going to try and Push the propaganda in the narrative. So this is this is that the the most successful airlift in the history of people as opposed to something else, I guess. Which is why they keep throwing the numbers out there without the denominator. Now what it is, is the most massive. Hostage situation the world has ever

Washington Post Pulitzer Prize Eugene Robinson Joe Scarborough Taliban United States
Afghan Photojournalist Flees to Athens

Monocle 24: The Stack

01:38 min | 11 months ago

Afghan Photojournalist Flees to Athens

"The images and stories. That are coming out of. Afghanistan are not only shocking. There've been taking by local african journalists and photographers. Many of whom are currently risking their lives and have been doing so for the last few months. One of them is the photo journalist. Masoud saini born in afghanistan masud has been chief photographer at the associated. Press and a photojournalist at funds oppress his won the pulitzer prize for his work in the country and a couple of days ago he and his colleague. Lena donna were in afghanistan covering the taliban takeover of the country fearing for their safety they flew out of kabul last sunday just hours before militants entered the african capco. He's safe in the netherlands. Now and he spoke to monaco's emma nelson who spoke to he. Now new show the globalist earlier in the week. Let's welcome to monaco. twenty four. it is good to know that you are alive and well and safe. Just tell us what happened to you. Well unfortunately i am experienced immediate trustful week when i was in kabul awhile before that we were Me and my colleague over covering Herald war and I so i feel that the war was really really a clothing to people. Our life and the government was completely disabled and already was broken and failed from inside. They couldn't fight and resist with taliban and we were witnessing a lot. And a lot of the things.

Masoud Saini Masud Lena Donna Afghanistan Emma Nelson Monaco Kabul Pulitzer Prize Taliban The Netherlands
Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:05 min | 11 months ago

Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

"Let's sally. Takeover of afghanistan has post more questions than it has on stirred the insurgency groups. Promise that the country would no longer be a violent basil filtering hollow. As at least three people were short and killed at a protest in jalalabad. Senior taliban leaders also say afghanistan under their watch will not be a democracy. Mas will be ruled by sharia law will earlier. Today monaco's georgina godwin spoke to helene o'donnell a columnist for foreign policy magazine who witnessed to the changes in the country firsthand. She and tour photographer. Who recently left kabul for the netherlands. Let seventy seven. I was in herat the west and a couple of weeks ago. And i was there to cover what seemed to be at the taliban is sold it was actually taliban incursion into The western city of herat. It's very big important. Wealthy part of the country. I spent time on the front lines with a called ishmael. Khan who since given oak And he was working at the time with his militia alongside Soldiers on the national security directed afghanistan's who do how do we know a former perhaps secret service. And i watched them really losing and i thought i tried to get out up to two days. My plan had been forty eight hours. I was there for five days. Because the taliban taking the road to the airport the airport was causing. It was very difficult. And i decided dan event as was watching the reality of herat full. That tyrod was a big step towards kabul and that it was time to make arrangements to leave an i. I can't tell you how lucky. I was in my tiny because via flight that i took out We've my friend and colleague westwood hosseini the pulitzer prize winning photographer from afghanistan. Who i've been working with for a decade It was the last commercial flight wheels up on sunday morning.

Taliban Afghanistan Georgina Godwin Helene O'donnell Foreign Policy Magazine Herat Jalalabad Kabul Monaco The Netherlands Tyrod Khan Westwood Hosseini DAN Pulitzer Prize
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Anthony visas died unexpectedly. Last december our book critic. Maureen corrigan says these nine stories mostly about first generation cambodian-americans navigating differences with their parents generation of education sexuality and possibility are a bittersweet triumph. It's impossible to talk about after parties. The much-heralded short story collection by anthony. Business so without first talking about it's back story so died this past december of a drug overdose. He was only twenty eight. Most readers who pick up this collection will already know about sows death and yet i'm guessing that like me. A fair number of those readers will be in denial as they're reading these short stories. His voice is so alive. Smart flip funny. Rude sexually explicit and compassionate. come on. it doesn't make sense. That upon its introduction to the larger literary world such a fresh voice has already been stilled. That freshness is derived not only from so's style as a writer but from the nuance perspective of his ultra intersectional identity so was a queer first-generation cambodian american who graduated from stanford and the mfa program at syracuse university. He grew up in stockton california where his working class parents along with many other cambodian refugees settled after fleeing the genocidal regime of the kamerhe. Rouge almost all of the nine stories and after parties are set in stockton a place. We're told that some. Us government official deemed worthy of a bunch of ptsd doubt refugees. That's the teenage narrator of a story called mai li mei li mei li. He's a young gay man who can't wait to escape this landscape of dollar tree stores and cheap sushi joints but toby the slightly older gay narrator of another story called the shop has a more wistful view. In fact toby has gone home to stockton after graduating college in the midwest to work at his father's auto shop there. Most of the men are like his father survivors of the killing fields. Here's toby's view of the place..

Maureen corrigan Anthony stockton anthony syracuse university mai li mei li mei li mfa stanford toby california Us midwest
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I had There was always a dancer who was a writer and so we not only did. I have like all of that research but to have somebody in their room. Who was kind of like. are you know. Stir club culture truth. Barometer i think was always super important but on the other side of that people who have never even stepped into a strip club before they brought the experience of having struggled with domestic abuse or they they had complicated relationships with their moms or you know they grew up in abject poverty or they came from really you know whole families but you know still struggled with i would say Body image issues like all of my writers. Different experiences have been funneled through every single one of those characters you know. Oftentimes we are dealing with issues. That are very specific to the lgbtq community. And i would say ours. Interesting are less rhetoric is like. Oh my gosh over. Half of us are queer. This is so cool. How often does that happen. You know and the fact that our show really feels responsible to make sure that you know black. Queer folks get presented in a way that is loving and respectful. Why did it feel important of the directing staff be composed of women. You know. it's so interesting. I will say i was actually open to having men be. Directors is just that once. I went through my interviewing process. They were not the best ones for the job and it was because when i interviewed folks i'd be like what is your idea of the female gaze and i just think that the women who ended up getting those jobs they had a clarity. They have been dealing with it in their own work. They really understood how their choices. Whether it was framing was camera movement was going to feed into..

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I do not come from a broken home. I was taking the pole fitness class. And i was like this fun. And i love my body and I think i have my sprays. And so i want to go show them off at this. You know a audition and then that ended up getting a job. The stories are so different. The women are so different the whys of why they are doing. This is so different. And whether you know it was on the main floor or in The locker room or in a women's home. I was really given Just an entry into These private spaces and oftentimes into these women's hearts. And i think had a lot to do with the fact that i asked questions with so much respect. It was never a thing of like me being judgy or judgment. And i'm not i'm just not that way. Anyway as a human being and so all of that kind of lined up for me in order to help me for over six years interview over forty women in over forty clubs all across this nation. And i took all of the stories all of the mistakes the dreams that these women kinda poured into my ear and create it all of these different care in the world of valley and i understand you also took pole dancing lessons yourself. I did my geiger okay. So how did those go day did not go. Well that not at all. I mean atkins work. Talk a little bit i could. I could get better. Could be better than this. But this is where am and i accept but with the with the classes i was like yeah. Let me see if i can climb up on the pole. Can i hold my own weight. Can i spin and my first class. I literally ran out of the room. Because i was about to vomit. Because it's the dizziness. That occurred like i wish is really bad and it it obviously made me respect them so much more..

atkins
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I was at columbia at the time and we were taking an acting class and our teacher gave us an assignment. She was like go. You and your partner go to the library and find the play. That has the scene for you. And you're seeing partners type so as we all know type it could be physical. Could be racial whatever but you know my my scene partner ended up being another young black woman and our members trudging to the library. We're like pulling all of these plays off the shelf and we literally cannot find a play that had a scene for two young women in it. So we're like okay okay. Maybe our teacher who's been teaching for. Twenty years has a suggestion. So i remember. We went back to class the next day and we were just like. Do you have Any any recommendations for us where we are looking for a play that has seen for two young black women. Ten seconds went by twenty seconds. Went by forty seconds went by and our professor could not think of a single play that had a scene for two young black women and in that moment i was like well. I guess i have to write those plays then. I want to ask a little bit about another award winning. Play of yours. The mountaintop what was just so many of them What was the central theme or truth. You wanted to explore in that play. Which imagines the last night of martin luther king's life set at the lorraine motel. I think the most important truth. I wanted to explore in the play. Was that even an hour. Extraordinariness were quite ordinary as human beings. You know you walked until my big mama's living room and you see you know three pictures. It would be dr king jesus. Nfl life obama. But but you know it. Was this exercise in showing how we put people up on these pedestals and yet they're so human..

columbia lorraine motel martin luther king dr king jesus Nfl obama
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Sometimes trotted out in ways that you know. She's talked about being harmful Having struggled with it's interesting. I felt that the icon part oddly was easy because i feel like. That's the part that we see. That's the part that's been replicated for us. It's always the human part. That's the hardest part. Because it's reliant. On how truthful a subject wants you to be about their life and so i was lucky in that because she was used to being truthful you know. The there was kind of an easy access to her her humanity. Even though it's hard to articulate because you do have to lean into the imperfections of the human being. And i would say that of the entire journey figuring out which imperfections of her to highlight and making sure that you know an in interesting it was really about trying to find the things that made her human i e for example. You know the fact that i would say that. She struggled and had a lot of guilt. Like a lotta mama's do with having to leave her. Her kid does behind at certain points and and the fact that she had to kind of sacrifice that and not be as good of a mom in terms of or how other people define that right. I don't necessarily subscribe to that. But the fact that she had to choose career sometimes over family she had to choose the music over her her son's sometimes and that was that hurt. Her and i was really happy that she was able to be honest about that particular struggle and how that imperfection of her life kind of settled her soul in the way that she still dealing with some of those regrets so in addition to having tina now back on the west though you also just wanna pulitzer for the hot wayne king. Congratulations my god. It was so crazy. Because you know. I think because the world was shut down in theater will shut down right. You just kind of forgot about the award cycle..

wayne king tina
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"She's a superwoman. Mike i think of like the black superwoman. Myth ride that there's nothing can bring us down and it's like oh my god the amount of things that bring us down and continue to bring us down so Anytime i get an opportunity to lay my hands on a black woman story. I just wanna make sure that she is fully rendered and she feels so real and that she's not actually perfect. I always feel like you know. There's always this kind of onus on on black folks to have these images of perfection out there. But i always feel as though you have to allow me access to my mediocrity to my mistakes in order to understand my humanity right and so i was just so happy that that's exactly what she wanted. She did not wanna sanitized version. This show it was like yeah you go. You've all along. But you gotta understand the pay behind every note every wale and be complicit you know as i would say a consumer was in effect in a weird way. Many of us have been consuming. Her black pain heard her trauma. How involved with tina and the original writing process extremely and you know for her. She felt that there was a kind of cultural sensitivity and of regional specificity. That she felt was just you know. Meet it in order for it to come across as authentic portrayal of her life. I was lucky in that. I come from the same soil as her like i knew about growing up in the south. I grew up at totally different times. But you know sadly the south hasn't changed very much and so i was kind of able to use my own lived experience my own struggles being a black woman in the entertainment industry to kind of fuel. the story and so To be able to fly to switzerland and hang out with her for hours and hours on end and for her to tell me her story. And it's interesting because often times you know people who who we think we know. Their story has been told so many times. It's like oh there's nothing new to add to the story. But i really felt like She led me into some new cracks and crevices of life The fact that. I got an opportunity to really talk to her about her mother. Which i don't think has really been addressed in previous interviews or or you know the movie or the autobiography Which talking to her about her very complicated and often. I would say toxic relationship with her. Mother was really the doorway that i walked into act something new to her story. Now the musical begins with tina played by adrienne warren. Centering herself with a buddhist chant. What made you wanna start there. And what role does spirituality play throughout the production..

wale Mike tina switzerland adrienne warren
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm terry gross. Our guest could hall is nominated for two tony awards. Best musical and best book of a musical as a producer and the writer of the broadway. Show tina the tina turner musical. The show just reopened in london and scheduled to return to broadway. This fall hall also received this years pulitzer prize for drama for her play. The hot wing king said in memphis where hall grew up. It's a comedy and drama about a man prepping a recipe for a spicy chicken wing contest. The play is an exploration of family ties sexuality and black masculinity hall received the olivier. Livy award for her earlier. Play the mountaintop which imagines the last night of martin luther king's life hall is also the show runner and executive producer of p valley. A breakout show on stars about the women working in fictional mississippi strip club. The series is based on her play of a similar but more explicit name. The show is currently filming. Its second season. Katori hall spoke with our guest interviewer. Hana georges hanna is a staff writer at the atlantic where she writes about culture. Let's start with the song from tina. The tina turner musical. This is a track from the original. London cast recording adrienne. Warren originated the role in london. Before moving to the broadway production. She's nominated for a tony to good evening. Ladies and gentlemen. You're on for quite a treat tonight. We haven't seen this incredible woman performing the big apple. So please put your hands together province. Tina turner offs hard to to win. Those due to our is as a name. Plays that abba do wop.

Tina turner terry gross king's life hall tony awards p valley tina mississippi strip club pulitzer prize Katori hall Hana georges hanna memphis london martin luther king atlantic adrienne Warren London apple
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Yeah like how do i do. I bloom the small idea or these small loves in my family or my community before. I jumped too far outside. I love it. Yeah well we'll be thinking about that. And i want to say congratulations again to the winners of the poll. Surprise as well as the finalists. Thanks so much to our guest today. Natalie as tommy orange mardi tables also thanks to mark trae hint for giving us a call. We're back tomorrow. Was the conversation about the fourth of july. Do you celebrate it as a holiday. We want to hear why you do or you don't. I'm senior producer monica.

tommy orange mark trae Natalie monica
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Know it. I sold the book in the wake of standing rock and trump getting in so like some people were like wanting to really be against what that meant with. That version of america was gonna mean And my book was you know kind of like on this other side and so it felt like you know it was related to what was going on politically in And so the the prize to me felt like Acknowledging from this other areas acknowledgement that It meant something. They had a little more weight to it. Been like the book doing well and the book being popular this kind of thing..

america
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You know and so. It's kind of this It can be a paradox. I think if we don't allow ourselves are full capacity of of imagination and love and the ways that are traitors imagined us before before this country could come with. it's very narrow and poor imagination and the fears that it has which which leads it to do such horrible things to us. Yeah wow natalie your work it. Just kind of gives me goosebumps. I love it today. We're talking with natalie as she won the pulitzer prize This year for poetry. And we're talking with pulitzer prize finalists as well In a minimum introducing a few more But if you want to get in on the conversation let's hear from you. Give us a call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and we've got a special call on the line. Mark trahan is joining us. Hey mark mark is the editor of indian country today. How are you today mark. hi monica. i'm great okay. So i know i left out in the intro that you were also a finalist for the pulitzer prize. Tell us a little bit about that. Well before me Let me mention it john. Actually it'd be considered a winner John toubon is and he was part of the anchorage. Daily news series people in peril which one the public service blitzer which is actually grand prize. That's rates What year was that. I think it must have been about nineteen eighty eight okay. I'm doing this off the top of my head. I've actually been a pulitzer judge twice. Oh man i know you have Some stuff coming up later but there's a great story about cartoons and One of the unfortunate things of the pulitzer's is that the way the process works. It goes through what's called a jury pool so when someone's a nominee that's when it comes through the jury pool and you're one of three that then goes to the board of trustees for the pulitzer's who may or may not take that jury pool so in our case the year we were a finalist for fraud in indian country We had gone through the jury pool and pretty much won every major award that you're got to the pulitzer board and they pick somebody from another category and moved it into us into ours and in cartoons this year. That's exactly what happened. Where the board couldn't come to consensus the jury pool had done its work and The curious thing about that is that there's a secret cartoon contest and it's a contest of all the best cartoons that editors killed my. I was at the seattle post intelligencer. Editing david horsey won two pulitzers and David used to give me a bad time. And said i could never enter the secret conscious because i'd never killed. One of his cartoons. Well mark i. I mean you know folks folks need to know about this It's been a while but you're fraud in indian country which is of course you know what. What's i dare. i say. Started everything with the co bell Settlements tell tell our listeners about this yeah we looked at oil and gas leases and how the euro how the payments didn't match what the receipts were and how people were getting cheated out of their rightful income and it really did lead to both the senate investigation and then later the co bell litigation and i heard that You know this was back when people use fax machines and they were like faxing the article around like look at this. You can't believe this is that or is that just a myth. No it's true and The first days series ran thirteen pages of the newspaper. And you can imagine. I mean we used to joke that the series itself was thick enough to kill a small puppy When it was tossed to door holy. Yeah i mean the arizona. Republic is done some really fine reporting in indian country and It's it's really exciting to see work of native journalists. Native artists get acknowledged mark. Anything else you wanna share about the about the pulitzer well. The main thing i think is more native. Journalists need to enter so much of this. Is we sell center. We don't even get into the entry pool. And so we don't get juries. Stephen look at it and that's really the critical first step. Oh yeah you know. Every year. I post that native america calling didn't win a pulitzer and it's kind of is a joke because there wasn't an audio section and then this year there actually was an audio section but Yeah you gotta you gotta enter yourself for something like that. Well mark I have no doubt that indian country today. We'll we'll have you back on the show and you'll be celebrating a pulitzer that indian country. Today has one so. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for calling in. If you wanna call in and congratulate our pulitzer prize winner finalists. Give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. I wanna add to more voices to the conversation. Joining us now is mardi to bold senior. He is an artist. Who is also does editorial cartoons and was a finalist for the twenty twenty one pulitzer prize and margie. Marty is oglala lakota. Welcome back to native america calling marty. Think it's my honor to be here. Also we've got tommy orange. He is an author and finalist for the two thousand nineteen pulitzer prize in literature for his book. There there and tommy is a citizen of the cheyenne and arapaho tribes of oklahoma. Hey there tommy. Hi much rather me okay. Mardi let's start with you. So as i mentioned you were a finalist. There was no award in the editorial category Mark explained a little bit about what happened with that. But honestly i just have to say. I think you were robbed. You were rubbed. So how did it feel to. I find out that you were a finalist. First of all. It's a great honor to be even a finalist for the pulitzer and you know i was. I was on my way to get coffee and usually they. They were just in april but they're postponed it. Which i didn't know about so i thought he was already awarded. I never did it the second top and then on my way to get coffee. My instagram exploded. You know just everybody talking about this. So i i had to look it up. I'd be stopped. Look it up. And i couldn't understand who won or who didn't win so i had to go home to hear that 'cause website you know to try to figure out what exactly happened. Yeah so they just declined to to offer the award in that category altogether which i guess is probably better than losing out to somebody. But you were you were among some other fine fine editorial cartoonists and and. I think there was a piece. That you you all put together about it Can.

pulitzer prize Mark trahan mark mark John toubon seattle post intelligencer david horsey natalie anchorage monica pulitzer tommy orange john senate David america tommy Republic arizona Stephen
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

"If you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native help. Line is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. You're listening to native america. Calling i monica brain jamming out here in studio forty nine in albuquerque. We're talking about the pulitzer prize today. It's an award in the categories of journalism writing and music and to native writers one this year in literature and poetry and a third was a finalist in the category of editorial cartooning the last time a native one was in nineteen sixty nine. It was co author and scott mama day. If you'd like to congratulate our guests or comment on the pulitzer prize give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred. Nine nine native natalie is with us. She's a poet essayist linguist and the twenty twenty one pulitzer prize winner for poetry. now before the break we were talking about love. Love of our land Tell us a little bit more about About post colonial love poem. And then if you would we'd love to hear you read some great Yeah i mean i you know. Post one has several threads in it But i think something that that felt important to me was that i i was still able to be all the things i am in it. You know there's basketball in it because you know that's where my imagination was shaped was largely on on res- basketball courts. You know from from here all the way up into running gun territory of of navajo nation up north and you know and then again there. There's a lot of Points that are in relationship to the lands and waters. That i i live on and grew up on Yeah and i mean. I think in some ways i i you know. I think there should be more talk about about what love is for indigenous and native peoples. But and i also think it. It's seems like more of an anomaly than it actually is you know Which is i think one thing that felt important that the book is being escalated to other readers because i think I think the assumption of course that we not only do we not know how to talk about love for that. We don't talk about love but that we also don't love. And i think that's one of of course you know the country's great mythologies About you know indigenous peoples as well as as anyone who's who's not part of You know the great american imagination of power i. I'm just gonna read this one point. And i think it's explore to that and if there's any like young folks there's a it's it's referencing beyond say songs And then that song was also Referencing a Yeah yeah yeah. Something called map so it's has a couple of samples in it. They don't love you like i love you. My mother said this to me long before beyond say lifted the lyrics from the. As and what my mother meant by don't stray was that she knew all about it. The way it feels to need someone to love you someone not your kind someone white someone some many who lives because so many of mine have not and further. Live on top of those of ours. Don't i'll say say say i'll say say say. What is the united states if not a lot of clouds if not spilled milk or blood if not the place. We once were in the millions. America is not bad argos white and layered with places. I see through. My mother has always known best news. That i've been making for them to lay my face against their white laps to be held and something. More than the loud light of their projectors. As they flicker themselves sepia or blue all over my body all this time i thought my mother said wait as in. Give them a little more time to know your worse when really she said. Wait meaning test preparing me for the yoke of myself. The beast of my country's burdens which is less worse than my country's plow. Yes when my mother said they don't love you like i love you. She meant natalie that doesn't mean you aren't good and so just that idea again. That idea of american goodness that so many of us. I think so many of our brothers in particular i think a lot of my brothers and how whatever goodness is in america in the america's has never been something that was offered to them or too many of us. I wonder if you thought about how How you can love Love back when.

national indigenous women's re pulitzer prize scott mama basketball america albuquerque monica natalie
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

"All of our our women or women identifying or trans or two spirit or clear Persons who have who have gone missing or who've been disappeared or killed And and so. I was really aware of the ways i wanted to hold the bodies in the book with this love. I think you know it's one thing where we're so often denied. Is you know indigenous love. And and it's so immense and it's so overwhelming all of the different ways that that we love not only despite the country but also because we were meant to love and so that's something that felt essential to me And then of course. I'm thinking to the news segments that was on just before we came on and thinking about what love means in the context of of these. These mess graveyards and in genocidal cemeteries that are being discovered. Right now yeah. I've been thinking about that too and You know tomorrow. We're going to talk If it's possible for you to love your country Considering the past in the history that we've had if you're just joining us we are talking with pulitzer prize winning poet natalie di as she won the pulitzer prize this year for poetry for twenty twenty one. And if you want to call in and congratulate her or ask her a question give us a call. We want to hear from you. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native natalie. You mentioned a little bit about about your river. I wonder if you might speak a bit about Your love for for the land and for water. Yeah i'm i grew up at fort mojave On the colorado river. So have you is what we call it. Fort mojave course has another name a colo At least where it's located now but you know it. It's lucky to be. I mean it's it's strange right. I think it goes to the question. You all are asking tomorrow. Is it possible to love your country. You know we know we know what the conditions and the imaginations were that created reservations and yet the reservation. My reservation is where i also learned to love and it's where my relationship with my land is built and so in some ways when i say it's lucky. Yes i- recognizing the reservation construction itself and i. It also feels lucky in like an unfortunate luxury that i do have the relationship i have with my land and my water. No we look north and see where we were created right out our front doors. We look south and see where we go when we leave. And and then. I river runs rights right through the middle. It's almost as if all the things that have are usually metaphorical for other people and they speak about relationships lands and water for us. Are you know undeniably physical embodied and so know the colorado river right now is the most endanger the united states in our reservoir which you know. Basically our river feeds the entire south west corner of the united states and even into mexico in our reservoirs at the lowest it's ever been. And so you set these things alongside again some of these discoveries of of you know the the murders of of our our children and our people the disappearances of our our our women in in two spirit and queer and trans people's and you set that right alongside the water and you know it's just undeniable the the anti life that this country introduced into our lands and waters at the same time i think it also shows the the real power of the ways that we love and care intend to the land in that. We're still able to kind of bloom within those structures. Yeah i wanna. I wanna talk more about that after the break. We're just we're just about to go to a break. And i also want to hear a little bit of From post colonial. Love poem if you'll read it to us natalie You're you're listening to native america calling one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. We'll be right back. Native american. Patriotism is an interesting thing. Participation in military service is consistently high at the same time there are lasting effects from history of violence forced assimilation and injustice as america gets ready to mark independence day. We'll talk about the multiple sides of native patriotism..

pulitzer prize natalie di fort mojave Fort mojave colorado river natalie america south west mexico
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm monica brain to native writers won the pulitzer prize this year. The prize is named after hungarian newspaper publisher joseph pulitzer who willed his riches to honor excellence. In journalism literature. Music and drama. The first award was given in nineteen seventeen this year. The pulitzer prize for fiction went to louise rick for her book. The nightwatchman here. She is on native america calling in march of last year. Talking about the main character thomas and how he's modeled after her grandfather. I up with this name for thomas and his last name is wash. And that's the word for muskrat. And i didn't think about it when i named him and i'll just read this little that here. Thomas was named for the muskrat. Wash the lowly hard-working water loving rodent. Muskrats were everywhere on the flu. Dotted reservation fell. Donna washburn for numerous an ordinary. They were also crucial in the beginning after the great flood. It was the muskrat who had managed to help remake the earth and in that way as it turned out thomas was perfectly named and in the creation story the initial ave creation story. There's four divers who the creator sends down and the last one is really the most humble of them. And that's the muskrat and he he or she. Whatever the muskrat manages to bring back a tiny clump of earth in its pot in that way. The creator makes the earth. Now that tells me so much about our our ancestors in our people because humility was and it's in that story humility was the way people operated. You know he. My grandfather never He didn't even take money for his work. The tribal chair chairman paid thirty bucks a month at the time but the tribe was broke and so he didn't take that money today. We'll hear from the other. Pulitzer prize winner for twenty twenty one natalie divas and we're gonna talk with two finalists in the areas of literature and editorial cartooning if you want to join our conversation the number to get you in will is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine nine native on the phone. We have natalie di as she is a poet essayist and linguist and the twenty twenty one pulitzer prize winner for poetry for her book. Post colonial love. Poem and natalie is mojave. She's enrolled at hilo river and she is optimal autumn. Welcome back to native america calling natalie. Hey thank you for having me well. Congratulations on your pulitzer. This is incredibly significant for native america. And for you as well how does it feel to win. It's really lucky it's You know you never know who's on the other side of these things. So i think prices are are you know. They're they're great and their things to celebrate and and there are also many other ways You know gauge the work. We're doing or who it is connecting us to it felt especially lucky to be recognized alongside Louise you know in her work. And then of course knowing that marty was also being recognized You know it. I think it felt much more meaningful to be alongside other indigenous peoples and then to be what often happens which is just one of us in the room. I know that's that's the thing that i was just. I mean when i saw the finalists my eyes just popped open. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't believe there was three usually. We're just barely half of one person. Shows up in these in these forum. Yeah and so. It's phenomenal and one of the things i mentioned in the intro is that you know as far as i can tell based on my research. The last native american to win this was and scott mama day. Nineteen sixty-nine for the house made of dawn. And so. I'm just wondering natalie what you think about that. The this this long it's taken to Have not one but two natives when this prize. Yeah i mean you know. It's that's pretty reflective. I think of of western north and south american cultures that You know they they don't like to countess for very long and definitely not very often. So they think you know i guess. It's kind of like lunar cycles. They're like oh one came through now. We can wait a while before we have to acknowledge you know another one But you know think it's also a little bit of a sign of just some of the Like the pressure that That native artists and writers are are putting on national conversations on international conversations as well so You know i. It feels right on time in some ways. I mean also the only because i'm also I'm also like in our letting next mexican and the last Latino to win it was puerto rican writer williams carlos williams. So you know in some ways. I guess this is his always. What's at stake when we're trying to exist is that you want add want celebrate that you're one of few and then you also have to to recognize what that means that there are so few of us. Yeah someone really and also you know to sort of acknowledge and say there has been pulitzer prize winning quality work since nineteen sixty nine coming out of native america. But you know committees are what communities are and they and they took their time bringing more native americans into the fold. I wanna hear natalie a little bit about Colonial love poem. Yeah i mean it's a book that it's a book disraeli meaningful to me. I was really emotional. When i found out i say really emotional in a native way right like and then i got got my life together again. I was like okay. This is not gonna cry But the book to me feels I put a lot of of myself in it. And and what i say by that what i mean by that is that the i tried real hold onto the people i love in the book and the being that i love in the book And sometimes that was simply that. I loved myself where i was trying hard to or that i love. You know the people in my community or you know my partner or you know my river and and my mountain and my land and even the strangers who i think are of consequence to me and who i am also consequence To and so you know. There's a dedication that i put at the back of the book rather i know we tend to put things in the front but i also didn't want it to to be seen as a lens of spectacle but the dedication for the book for me i was thinking very Very much toward.

pulitzer prize louise rick america thomas Donna washburn natalie natalie divas joseph pulitzer natalie di hilo river scott mama monica Pulitzer prize flu Thomas williams carlos williams marty Louise
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I think it's the mules he's yeah hello this is great well you're free to grow Faye was and today he's he's pretty much exclusively known as the composer of the rankings he but he was a really highly regarded jazz musician who was a fine jazz pianist this is kind of a very programmatic pieces you noticed it's like it's the mules if the animals something around the canyon for better or for worse when people talk about music on the Grand Canyon that's what they think of I have to tell you we have never played the Grand Canyon sweet and thirty six years of the Clinton music why not well in part because it's symphonic work and we are really chamber music I think at one time or another we thought wouldn't it be kind of fun to kind of arrange one or two movements to do it but there's just so much other stuff that we that's taken a priority really no we've had Pulitzer Prize winning composer is joining us and commissioning new works of music inspired by the Grand Canyon having our native American composer precious projects students from the Navajo and Hopi nations writing new music so you know it's it's a fun piece and maybe someday will transmit of it okay well let's listen to another thing that is on your agenda this is one of many that the Grand Canyon music festival has commissioned over the years this is called the guardians of the Grand Canyon composed by Brent Michael it's got the same idea behind it sounds like to me which is that you know it's it's peaceful and yet it's so grand that you never.

Faye Grand Canyon Pulitzer Prize Brent Michael Clinton thirty six years
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

12:25 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Okay. And the. Pulitzer prize winning that. How does that change your life? What is what is that? What's it feel like what's the process, actually? Is it something that you submit for consideration or is it something that's found by them? I I'm sure it's all on their website, but it'd be nice for people to understand. It's a submission thing, and I have to say, I we were so lucky the journal sentinel had won a Pulitzer prize the year before, and we were so lucky that they had really built up a, a team of people who, who knew what it took to do the application and to do the, the right kind of story that the year that we won. We had a lot of digital components to our story. And we told it in a lot of different ways online, you know, Mark, and I worked very closely with there were five of us who want and, you know, the other three did a lot of the video and photography, and such a big team on those well and that year they had added to the. Rules, kind of. Not a category. But a, a suggestion that you try and tell the story in unique ways and use digital and, and we really did that well, so I think that helped us so you, you really have to have a can't credit, the management, George Stanley, the editor of journal sentinel, and all of the people who work with him on this. You have to have that kind of team to, to turn. We had a really good story that we, you know, we Mark, and I said, from the beginning, if, if, if we can't take this story somewhere, it's our fault because all the elements were there, but then we needed that team around us to take it to the next level to be cliche. Did you ever worry about whether you'd be able to get it there, Mark? And I realized very early on that the story had that potential and we made a pact not to talk about it. And so we just did not talk about it. So it was actually funny. What happens is. We knew that they submitted it for the Pulitzer. And we we just talk about it, and so someone in we agreed. We tell each other when we heard anything. So one of the other reporters came up to me they get announced in April in one of the other reporters came up to me, I don't maybe in March and said, so how you feeling you know heard you're on the shortlist was, like, what are you talking about? He's like you know what I'm talking about. I don't know what you're talking about. We're not talking about it, and he told me that there were rumors in the industry that, you know, we were. In the top kind of stories that were being considered in our category. And I went told Mark and I like she, we had an agreement that we tell each other. And he was kinda mad at me because we just didn't wanna talk about it. So then the, the day they were announced, you know, we knew that we had a shot, and I walked in that morning and I had an interview to do, but I saw I, so I did my interview, and it was driving Mark crazy. I mean he couldn't even sit there any longer and he I got off my injuries like let's get out here. And so we just laughed and we went, we actually went to a used bookstore downtown and looked at DNA books, so marred mired in it at that point. And then we went and had lunch and already writing the book at the palm, we had, we had an agent at that point. I think, but we, we had contract with the agent, but we hadn't won the Pulitzer. The giant was pretty happy after it happened. But. We came walking back into the building. And we saw a local TV reporter sitting in the lobby, and then we were really nervous than we thought all something. But what you're fables are turned. Well, yeah, and I hate to even admit this. But what you're really nervous about is that you're going to be a finalist. You know, and that 'cause they have a tradition in the journal sentinel newsroom. You have to stand up in front of the whole news room, and everybody watches for it to come across the wire, and, you know what you don't want is to be standing there and here you're finalist, and you have to act happy and you are happy, but, you know, you're hoping you win. So so draft day, almost. Yeah. Right. So we, it was funny. We walked back into the newsroom and Raquel Rutledge who had won the Pulitzer fabulous reporter who won the Pulitzer the year before. Kind of called us over, and she pulled up Brown bag out of her desk drawer with some kind of alcohol bottle of alcohol in it and said here, take a drink and then go up there. Switch shot. And we went walking up there. And what would you say your member? I don't even remember. I mean you know, then we won and. You know, it was just a blur. It ended up it. We, it was such a blur in, you're, you're just walking around the newsroom and slowly everyone's getting back to do in. There's champagne and everyone's getting back to doing the work. They have to do that day. And you're just kind of walking around, like I don't even know what to do. And because it's like winning the Oscar. Right. I mean in. I don't know. I never won the Oscar. Okay. Okay, magin that you want the Oscar for bridges of Madison. Laugh at someone someone got in touch with me, sometimes it, what happens to your ear, inbox your emails, flooded. Your we ended up like the New York Times called us and we didn't see it and we didn't call him back. I mean it was just chaos. But someone after that day called me up and said like, okay, you know you won the Nobel, but you still don't know. And I said, I said, well, I didn't win the Nobel. I won the Pulitzer and he said, Nobel poets are. What's the difference? I'm mad at you. So a lot of ways. So what happens is after you win. There is a like an award ceremony at the law library at Columbia college in New York. And there were a couple interesting things about that. But to me, the most interesting, you walk in, you know all the editors go with you, and you walk in, and they're all these steps you walk up, and then there's this grand lobby and you walk over new when you win. You get like a little Tiffany kind of paperweight, that's engraved with, you know, your information and even more valuable to me. You get a book of all the previous Pulitzer winners that was. I thought really neat. But as I was walking across this long, large fancy lobby, I realized this isn't even about us. It was a first of all, you realize it's not it's it was about Milwaukee, and it was about Wisconsin. You know, everybody shared with us, winning the pulsar. So you kind of realized that, that, it's, it's not just yours, it's ever, but then walking cross this lobby, I realized it's a lunch. It's not a very fancy ceremony and it's, it's about the editors you realize these editors show up hopefully often, and they're showing off their latest reporters. Right. And so they all know each other and you don't know anybody 'cause you've never been there before the only ones they continue to go all the time. It's their sort of. Yeah. It's their thing like this is, you know, they're the ones who like they're bringing their latest winners. So and, you know, the big lake Wall Street Journal was like up in front. New York Times it's the whole that also placement another. So we so there's a little reception and then there's a launch, and, you know, Mark, and I stood and, and the rest of our team. But Mark, and I happened to Stanton. Whether we're pretty tied at the hip at that point. And. Who are you gonna talk to all the editors are talking to each other? And so we ended up talking to the poet who won that year and the nonfiction. I remember this book the history of cancer book, I'm blanking on the name of it. I'll think anyway, can't come up with it. It's a great book. We both brought books and got him sign it. But we ended up kind of just standing and talking to them because you don't know anybody. So it was really interesting from that in, and it was funny. I walked up to there's a, a high up editor at the Wall Street Journal, who's from Green Bay, where I'm from his name's Paul zhigo. And sure, yeah, I saw him over at the Wall Street Journal table. I went to high school with his sister. So I walked up, thinking, oh to say hi to him. And I walked up to the table, and they all looked up at me. Like, what are you doing over at our table? Right. 'cause they're the Wall Street Journal. And I said, oh, Well, Paul, I just want to say hi went ice school, Julie. And then he stood up. He was real nice. But it was really funny walking to the table. So you said when we were first getting started that you always wanted to do something. Big was this. It. Well that it was maybe one of it. Yeah. Okay. So now, you know, I've left the turtle sentinel, and I'm running them walkie institute, which is a nonprofit started in two thousand seven by John burns who ran the private equity group, ebonite Bank, and then spun it out into Mason wells, which has been very successful private equity firm rusher. It's the biggest in Wisconsin, and, you know, I've known John for longtime actually will tell you a secret that won't be a secret anymore once tell to you, but John was the person who gave me my Pulitzer tip. So he's and delare in my John. Yeah. Right. He was on the board of the Medical College. And the what the reason we were talking that day he was, you know, kind of berating me about all the great things going on there. And, you know, and I just wasn't sure if he slipped and told me something he wasn't supposed to or he was trying to tell it to me, but it doesn't matter turned out. Yeah. So can I ask just before? Before we get more into the mock institute. So you. You win. You Mark win. You're right, the book, you're sort of, at the top of can I say something? Yeah. That book that I was trying to remember, the name of, oh, yes. The emperor of all maladies. There you go. Get it on Amazon. But the one you really wanna buy one in a billion. Yes. Of course. The story of knickebocker Don McMahon. That's also on him. Exactly. The so you're sort of at the top. Whether you still about Oscar whatever Pulitzer Nobel. And that. Yeah. Six one. And then and then you leave journalism. Yeah. How come? Well, the journal sentinel was a fabulous place and still is in some ways, but we got bought by going at, and I just have to tell you that the day they all walked into, you know, I was a business reporter. I mean, I covered this stuff all the time, like I talked to a lot of CEO's about walking into a company and what you do when the day they walked into the newsroom, I just thought is a work for me. And it was partly because, you know, they're not real focused on business news. The kind of business news. I like they're focused on maybe a softer type of business news than I like so I, you know, I mean I that's not to say the journal sentinel, isn't still doing some good business news. But I just felt like I was going to be frustrated there. And John had started the Milwaukee institute in two thousand seven. He started it as a he had a cluster of cloud. As it were. And they were doing high-performance computing and offering services helping companies in academics around.

Pulitzer Mark Wall Street Journal editor Pulitzer prize reporter Oscar John burns New York Times Wisconsin Paul zhigo Pulitzer Nobel George Stanley Raquel Rutledge Milwaukee Don McMahon New York Amazon