17 Burst results for "Pulitzer Center"

"pulitzer center" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:05 min | 6 months ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"To kind of celebrate. And tell everyone. Hey I had the spirit baptism. I'm save now so you get a load of me yet to meet watch. I'll get dunked. Yeah but if you're a pentecostal you're basically like that's that's great. That's a nice first quarter step up right that and it's not just pentecostals. Who believe that like? I think you know if you're Catholic when you're baptized your baptize. It's just done. You have water. Baptism says a manure officially baptized. Your your your baby souls not GonNa go to purgatory any longer. You can finally go to heaven. Right with like Baptists. I believe off the water. Baptism is enough to. But what differentiates evangelical from other other religious sects that believed that by BAPTI baptism through water. You're saved right then Evangelical are like No. You've just said that okay. I'm dedicating myself to God into Christ specifically but what differentiates evangelical. There's still some other thing coming. And that's that baptism by the Holy Spirit. Well it was different in my church. It was you wait till you have that spiritual baptism and then afterward you have the public. Water Baptism Oh is that right. Okay okay so I've got that backwards but but that's what so so so so then. I guess we're Baptists be considered a type of evangelicals. I don't know I don't know either. But here's what I found that. That differentiates evangelical so that defines evangelical ready. Yes there's a scholar from Baylor. He's an historian. But he's also evangelical scholar named David Babington David W BEVINGTON and he defines evangelical subscribing to four big points. One is that the Bible is the the literal word of God right. Who Wear like if you're reading that God wrote that do not question it do not try to interpret it any other way like it is literally it it on its face what it means is the word of God? Second Point is that Jesus Jesus suffered on the cross in died in order to cover humanity right and that you can be saved by accepting that as fact the Jesus Christ as your savior. That's right I feel like we're having a revival here ourselves a little worked up this the third one is that you have half to be born again by a baptism by the Holy Spirit. So I don't know if you could technically get away with not doing the water. Baptism because the the evangelical say it's that baptism by Ho spirit where you're overcoming your clapping and singing in speaking in tongues and all that well not speaking in tongues. But you're clapping and singing and you have like like been bathed in baptized by the spirit. That that's how you're actually saved. Okay okay point. Four is that you have to be an activist. Activists an evangelist who is actively working on converting the world to godliness and Christianity to prepare for the second coming of Christ. It's not enough to just be like. Oh they're doing it wrong. You have to go over and explain to them how doing wrong and how to do it right. Yeah I mean that was that was I think all four those fall under what I grew up with my church. Okay then what. SIP than what separates Evangelical Pentecostal is that Pentecostals Kosta believed that baptism by the Holy Spirit involves specifically speaking in tongues. And that. If you don't speak in tongues when you're baptized by the Holy Spirit. You haven't actually really been sanctified and made pure so that you can get into heaven and you're a true Christian. I guess right all right. There's a lot thank you. You can subscribe to my news So let's talk about speaking in tongues. There are a couple of ways as that. This can happen. it's also called spontaneous speech It could come through as a foreign language that you don't know how they call that Zeno Glauca Lhasa basically no documented case of that ever right okay so when I say this can happen. These are the ways that it's broken down in theory okay MM or nonsensical utterances which is called. Gloss allow Leah. And that's winning. You know if you've ever seen While fewer people speak in tongues. Or if you've ever seen the movie Cape Fear Robert Deniro at the end with going into the water That's that's what he's doing it. It sounds it's a nonsensical divine utterances. What is defined as yes supposedly? God's the only one who can understand what you're saying you're actually speaking in a language that got understand right right and the other thing is somewhere in the Bible. It says that If you're going to speak in tongues you should only do it in public like if your insurance. You should only do that. If there's there's someone there to interpret that message pentecostal say nuts too. That they do. Because they the cynical person would say they don't have anyone there that could interpret that accurately The believer would say that's They just say that's bunk so back back at zoo's a street mission during the revival of nineteen o six or starting nineteen hundred six they They said they reported. So there is a newspaper called the Apostolic Faith newspaper that was published Outta as street and They said that during the revival people were speaking in Greek Italian Italian Chinese Japanese Zulu Chippewa. Wow yeah And there's again there's no documented evidence that anyone has ever you're been given the gift of Xena Glossy. Oh which is where you are just fluently speaking another language right. You don't know I know. Yeah you you have acquired the ability to speak another language without studying it in any way shape or form No one's ever Documented documented that but that was one of the early interpretations of what was going on at Zoo's a street that the Holy Spirit come down given these people that Gift Zena Glossy and now they're they were to spread out and become missionaries around the world right to so that they could go spread the faith in these other native tongues And a lot of people did they do that. I don't know that they were able to immediately. Go and speak in these other native tongues but they probably picked it up pretty quickly because emerges the best way to do it but the people did spread out from Missoula Street and become pentecostal missionaries and founded pentecostal churches. Like every that really is like kind of like the the the origin region point for the entire faith. Well and wouldn't you say that it's clearly like the pentecostal missionaries have. You've done a great job. Considering the fact that his growing in the global south sure. Yeah I mean how else would they have heard about this stuff right. Yeah absolutely I yeah. I think the the proof is in the numbers that that there's a lot of people who are out there spreading the word that there's a lot of people who are feeling pretty receptive to that. Should we talk a little bit about some more numbers. Yeah the Pulitzer Center Pulitzer Center's Atlas a Pentecostal ISM. I love that book. Estimates that thirty thirty eighty five thousand people convert to Pentecostal ISM every day We were talking about the global south. The redeemed Christian Church of God in Nigeria claims to have five million members in Nigeria alone. there's an article that I read called thank. Christianity is dying. No Christianity is shifting dramatically from West Greenberg Michelson from two thousand fifteen in the Washington Post. So should we talk about more numbers or should we take a break and talk about more numbers. Let's take a break and then we'll talk more numbers okay..

Holy Spirit Nigeria Pulitzer Center Pulitzer Cente David Babington David W BEVING Robert Deniro Christian Church of God Leah Baylor West Greenberg Michelson Washington Post Ho SIP Greek Italian Italian Chinese Apostolic Faith Kosta
"pulitzer center" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on 1A

"This is one A. I'm Indira Lakshman on of the Pulitzer center sitting in for Joshua Johnson with Democrats now in charge of the house of representatives. They've put the dangers of global warming back on the front burner. House Democratic leaders have revived a select committee on climate change. Meanwhile, progressives plan to introduce a green new deal Bill as early as this week and several democratic twenty twenty hopefuls are jostling to champion a green jobs creation plan, though, the details are still fuzzy not all Democrats are on board, though, some believe it's a political nonstarter that will never win BI partisan support and some moderate Republicans are pushing their own plan to slap fees on carbon emissions given that others including the president dismissed climate change as liberal hysteria Representative ro Khanna democrat representing California's seventeenth district sees a green new deal as a bipartisan crowd-pleaser and a smart way to revive American jobs. He's with us here in. The studio. Also, joining us to talk about the politics of the possible on climate changes. Ryan Castillo, a former Republican congressman from Pennsylvania's sixth district. He's now managing director of Americans for carbon dividends. Ryan, thanks for joining us. Good to be with you last, but not least Amy harder and energy and climate reporter for axes is in a studio. Amy, thanks for being with us. Thank you for having me on so Representative kinda you were one of the early supporters of the green new deal, and it is not a small concept. It seeks to be a dramatic overhaul of the economy. The title. Of course is a throwback to the FDR new deal economic reforms during the depression. Tell us more about what this plan aims to do. And whether one of your political supporters, California Representative and house speaker Nancy Pelosi is she on board with you. She certainly on board with a bold vision for dealing with climate change as she had appointed and Markey back in two thousand eight to the select committee on climate change. Here's what we need to do. After the intergovernmental panel on climate change came up with a report that said in twelve years, if we don't get the temperatures rising at one point five degrees instead of two degrees. We're all in a world of hurt. And they gave some very specific things we needed to do from investing in solar and wind to planting trees and preventing deforestation to making sure that we were capturing carbon. And what the green you deal is is a vision that says we really need to take bold steps to be able to achieve this. And we can do it a while creating jobs, very, specifically and Markey. And I have a Bill that we're going to come out with that's going to help make electric vehicles possible in the next ten years to get it to fifty percent fleet and provide a refundable tax credit to me. Manufacturing in the United States. So that the GM factories can put people back to work to make electric vehicles. Those are the types of things that I think our win wins. And this is the same Bill that you're saying democratic Senator of Massachusetts, Ed Markey. And also, New York Representative Alexandria, Kazuyo Cortez have been talking about introducing this week. They are introducing broader Bill which is the framework for the green new deal. And what they're saying is, especially here are the types of things we need to do. So that we can deal with climate change in have all policies, then the question is what are the specifics? And and Markian I are introducing one idea as a very very specific issue, which is here's how you get electric vehicles. And I think we're going to see a lot more policy proposals. That fleshes out the broader vision of green new deal. All right. Well, briefly Representative kaanai you wrote this book called entrepreneurial nation, why manufacturing is still key to America's future. So explain to us how you can. In create manufacturing jobs while at the same time cutting carbon emissions. Well, a lot of the new manufacturing is actually a good for the environment. Consider these two data points, the fastest growing industries twelve times. Other industries are solar and wind. These are creating a whole new generation of jobs in manufacturing. And when you go around the country as I did when I wrote the book, you see that. Most of the modern factories aren't the traditional ideas of dirty or pollutant factories..

Representative Ed Markey Amy managing director California Bill Indira Lakshman Joshua Johnson FDR Pulitzer center ro Khanna New York Ryan United States president
"pulitzer center" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Like ours or the Pulitzer center or or solutions journalism network or the other nonprofits that are doing really good work in the space of trying to find a way to create new models for journalism. I think we should should rule that out and say, you can't be part of repairing the landscape. You can always recognize you did a lot to damage it. And we hope they'll they'll do a lot more. I I agree with you. They can do more. And we think they will do more. We wanna be part of that. But a practical matter here is also the reporters that we're putting in the field are not covering technology. There's not going to be any crossing of the line there. There's no one who's going into a newsroom to cover Facebook and funded by Facebook Facebook has given generously to the idea along with these foundations night Ford Google. As well. The more. We blend the funding the more we make it a pool. That's a lot of contributions the more. I think the readers of this work will be convinced. There's no influence peddling here. There's just an attempt to build the resources will need to go. Do a nonprofit model to really help. Put more local reporters in the field. And they'll Campbell Brown's answer Facebook VP when I asked her version of that question aren't y'all just throwing scraps at us her answers started with we're not going to uninvite the internet. I don't say I respect that response. We're not going to invent the internet the internet's not going to go away. Right. We cannot rewind the clock twenty years, even if we wanted to and I don't want to we can deal with the reality today figure out ways improve the environment and the ecosystem today, but all that said St. was there any hesitation about Google or Facebook money. Whereas, you know, I've I've written earlier quite critically about both Google and Facebook and their role in the in the what's happened in the media industry. Sorry. But I've got to say we've been really pretty thrilled with the relationship and not just the money, which is great. But there have been no strings attached. They know point said, we're going to give this you. But only if you do this that's going to help our business model or something like that. And anyone who's worked in any media knows that that's not always the case. You know? I mean, even with advertising to deal with something. So they've been terrific. They've been terrific partners that way, and you know, in terms of the the weather. It's crumbs are not well that remains to be seen..

Facebook Google Pulitzer center Campbell Brown VP St. twenty years
"pulitzer center" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on 1A

"This is one A from Washington. I'm endear Lachman on executive editor of the Pulitzer center on crisis reporting in for Joshua Johnson. In late twenty seventeen the New Yorker published a short story called cat person that went viral, perhaps the only work of short fiction ever to do. So in the story. A young woman develops a crush on an older man who she eventually sleeps with despite her reservations when she distances herself from him afterwards. He becomes so angry at her that he calls her terrible word whore. The final word of the whole story. It's an impactful end to a piece of fiction that resonated in the early stages of the metoo movement, it articulated, what had become a common experience for women, especially millennials that is uncommonly discussed a year later, the author of that story has a new collection of fiction out like cat person her collection explorers stories that we. Tell ourselves about sex dating and consent. Kristen repent is here with us in the studio in her new book is called you know, you want this cat person and other stories. Welcome kristen. Hi, thanks so much for having me. Well, thanks so much for being here. Let's go back to the weekend. When cat person I published online like I said it very quickly went viral from the New Yorkers accounts. And people were talking about it all over Twitter. I remember it very well. I'm a dedicated New Yorker reader, I read it in print and then suddenly my Twitter exploded with people sharing their experiences. And as you know, and our listeners know, it's common for me GMs or videos to go viral. But it's basically unheard of for short fiction. What was that experience like for you as a writer? It was both amazing and overwhelming at the same time as you say, I had absolutely no reason to expect that anything like what happened. And I certainly didn't it actually took me a little while. To even realize what was happening. I wasn't on Twitter much at that time. It was my girlfriend in fact to noticed it who was on her, computer. And you know, it was probably three or four days after the story had been published actually. So I sort of thought that the the moment has ended and Kelly Michael fractured, her computer and said, you know, there's something going on with your story, which was in retrospect, the understatement of the air, and then yeah, it was it was exciting. But it took me a while to wrap my mind around it to really get a sense of the scale, and as people were reading and talking about it and sharing their opinions on it, which were very strong in both directions. I realized pretty quickly that I had to step back because I tried to keep track of this conversation. I would be pretty quickly overwhelmed. So I closed my computer probably Friday evening, and then didn't open it again until Monday or Tuesday morning at which point. Then the think pieces were coming out explaining what had happened with cat person. So I learned about it from them. So I had a slightly different experience actually than many of the people who initially share the story on Twitter. Well, I mean before cat person went live. Let's begin with the point that you had very little published work and nothing in a publication with the prominence of the New Yorker after it went viral. You suddenly landed the six figure book deal. You're short stories got option by HBO. We'll talk more about that. But I mean, I tell us for all the aspiring fiction writers out there..

Twitter kristen Joshua Johnson Lachman Washington Pulitzer center executive editor Kelly Michael fractured HBO writer four days
"pulitzer center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank you. Very much. If you guys have a question or two I'd be happy to take it. If you still have the time. I have one question another one. Here we have just just a few minutes here. My question involves how can our continue when we as a nation. No longer teach civics and civility as part of living in society. What we've had in this country many many times. When violence has been used to which Riva political end, the use of violence itself is disturbing. But it's not necessarily an indication that we have lost our way. Violence can come. As the result of justifiable anger. It is not violence. It seems to me the way ought to be concerned about, but but what motivates that violence, but what motivates the anger, and there are good motivations that can lead to violence unfortunate. But understandable. That is not what concerns me Mike and Mike concern rests with the thoughts that people have as they direct violence against people who disagree with them. That is my deep concern. Yup. I'll try one more is democracy. More dangerous for. For American now because of the financial pressures independently bearing down on the press. Lost circulation audience splintering and the internet financial related risks. Yeah. That's a good point. And there's no doubt whatever that there are huge financial pressures and the the work, for example that the Pulitzer center on crisis reporting does on a regular basis to try to find out whether there are ways in journalism today to come up with a better financial. Means for running newspapers for running networks radio stations. Yeah. We have been a number of papers have been blessed in recent years, by the fact that very rich people. Excuse me. That's I said, I warned you. I'm not used to talking in the morning. But for example. The Washington Post has been purchased by Mr. Beza Scott lot of money. He's pumped that money into the post. They are hiring more reporters and they're doing a fantastic job. Now, the Los Angeles Times has just been purchased by another very wealthy man will claims that he wants a good solid newspaper a true to the traditions of freedom of the press. Time magazine has just been thank you. That's very kind. Thank you..

Washington Post Mike Los Angeles Times Time magazine Pulitzer center Mr. Beza Scott
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reporters who write critical stories have a tendency to die under mysterious. Circumstances. A few months ago three Russian journalists were murdered when an activist tried to investigate their deaths and potential Kremlin connections. He was poisoned, but survived the committee to protect journalists lists Russia as number eleven on its global impunity index meaning when Russian journalists are killed or attacked. It's rare for anyone to be held accountable all of this violence and intimidation of the media has huge implications for Russians, first and foremost. But Thomas says it also matters to anyone who wants to try to understand the Russian Arctic. He says the media is needed to serve its traditional role here ferreting out corruption and highlighting voices. That would otherwise get drowned out. What do we lose by not knowing more how can affect I dunno decision making policy international relations by just not having the information. I think the most untold stories or the consequences for the locals living in areas where big oil is moving in or where the military start to rebuild their facilities. And and so so the media's role of being the voice of like indigenous reindeer herders that is what what I'm most scared lever. We are lacking. Allege off the map never really we will most likely not. Realize it before it's too late for for many of them. And that is what journalists is all about it's about being inside. And being able to see a story from different perspectives. And that is more difficult to do today in in northern Russia feeling like there's hope for the Arctic. Today, we lose the hope then it's kind of game over. So of course, we we do have hope. As a symbol of their hope and determination, the Barents observer has this Russian toy in their offices. A plastic doll was huge green eyes and around read body. If you try to knock it down at Bob's backup schooled unevenly Oscar music. You cannot tip it over all this race. Again, Thomas Nelson and his colleagues and Kirkenes have stuck a sign on the belly of the doll. That says try to tip over freedom of expression and see what happens you can try to tip over Jerusalem. But we've always come up again. For the world. I'm Amy Martin curcas Norrland. Amy's reporting on climate change in the Arctic comes to us through a partnership with the threshold podcast and with funding support from the Pulitzer center from Iceland and Sweden to Russia and Alaska over the past few weeks, we've been bringing you stories from the Arctic and the people who live there check out our Instagram for a recap of some of the stories and to test your knowledge with our Arctic quiz. We are at PRI the world on Instagram..

Arctic Russia Thomas Nelson Amy Martin curcas Norrland Barents observer Bob Alaska Pulitzer center Jerusalem Kirkenes Iceland Sweden
"pulitzer center" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"But they hung onto it for most of that first year, and it didn't budge until after my escape attempt. I'm not sure I would have risked the escape attempt to negotiations have been underway. But I thought these guys are, you know, I knew from phone calls that they were still stuck at twenty million. And I thought these guys are being so ridiculous. Can you know, it's worth a try who's negotiating for you? They're just calling your mom and freaking her out. What's happening on the field? That was basically it. I mean, my mother heard about my kidnapping from the FBI, so they came to her door and the FBI went to several other places, including the Pulitzer center on crisis reporting where I had a grant, and I'm also German citizen. So German officials went to the Spiegel online office where I worked in Berlin. And my relatives in Cologne and everybody was ready for a phone call everyone had to be the head to guess where the phone call would come and because parrots stole my notes of the only phone number. I knew as my mother's here in California. So I called mom, and she was obviously terrified but by then she'd been briefed by the FBI. So she she got pretty good advice from them. What was the advice? Just like, hey, don't start screaming and crying. Yeah. Keep your cool and don't act emotional. Don't give them the emotional perhaps. And my mother could do that. I mean, not every relative can do that, you know. And that's one thing the agent said was that she was remarkable on the phone. She she was. Obviously emotional, but when it came time to talk to a pirate how she could switch it off. So it I don't think it I don't think just anyone could have negotiated like that for a relative. But my mom was pretty remarkable. Yeah. That seems incredible. I can not imagine most people's mum's doing that. And and you didn't have a whole lot of hope. In fact, even wrote hope has become a psychological risk. Yeah. No, it it became a problem. Like, I said the pirates kept trying to keep my hopes up and say, oh, can Michael you're going to get out in two weeks or you're going to get out in a month. And I would believe them at least in the first several months. I I was stupid enough to believe him and then a month ago by I'm still hostage, and you feel that much worse afterwards. You know, the cycle is not just up and down. It's up and down with a downward trend and your your emotion just gets. I mean, the the risk of of and suicidal depression was very real. So I realized that to to save myself from that I had to detach myself emotionally from the whole cycle. Meaning no hope but also not so much despair and I managed to. Live without hope without a at after two years or something. I didn't think I was gonna say my family in front to get. I thought that the the likelihood I was going to die in Somalia was about fifty percent. You know, either in a who knows a military raid or just some disease or by accident. You know, the pirates they try not to kill you on purpose. But sometimes they kill you an accident by accident. So I just thought that at some point. I'm not gonna make it out. And I can't pin my hopes and my reasons for going on on the idea that I'm going to see the people I love him. So I I've learned to live just day to day. How did you do that? How do you manage your sanity from day to day? Like, what advice would you give someone if they're in a situation right now where they think I'm in this awful situation. Nothing's working out in my life. Granted they're probably not listening to this. Well being held hostage by Somali pirates, but they feel equally hopeless. What what sort of advice, would you give that person?.

FBI Michael Cologne Somalia kidnapping Spiegel Pulitzer center California Berlin fifty percent two weeks two years
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The frozen soil is right on the cusp of that pivot point where change of one or two degrees can transform it from being something that stores carbon to something that emits it. We might tip the scales of these really large exchanges, then it can have really dramatic consequences. It's not about saving the poll. I think a lot of people when they think of affirmative. Yeah. You know, some plants will disappear the polar bear is cute. But it's also about like us surviving species because if it gets much warmer Victor way that we have volved with our agriculture, and how we like the food that we eat and where we live. It's just not adapt to. We don't know how close we are to a massive release of carbon from frozen Arctic soils, but we do know that every bit of carbon. We emit into the atmosphere gets us closer to that point scientists call it a positive feedback loop more carbon in the air leads to more warming, which leads to the release of more carbon. And the process just builds on it self another thing, we know is that we don't get a second chance at this once our emissions potentially trigger this huge release of carbon. We've put ourselves at the mercy of processes that we can't control and that will dramatically reshape the earth's climate and our own civilizations. I asked your came if he thought there was any way to stop the experiment. We're conducting on the Arctic or if he thought the damage was already done. And now we just have to ride it out. No, we have an ability to say stop. Of course, we do. We have choices. And I think especially in the western world in the ritual we have chosen differ. We have a responsibility. And one of the ways is to try and understand is a permanent better. And that's my court. That's what we do here. And the other part is acting on what we already know which is stop putting so much greenhouse gases and yet, Mr.. Yeah. I think we have a responsibility and a single candidate for the world any Martin obvious. Go sweden. Amy's reporting comes to us through our partnership with the threshold podcast and radio program with funding support from the Pulitzer center, you can check out the rest of Amy stories at the world dot ORG slash the big melt. It's the world.

Amy Arctic Pulitzer center sweden Martin two degrees
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stay with us coming up on the news hour the political stakes of a supreme court decision on purging voter rolls and the argument for travelling alone but first we returned tonight to our ongoing look at the global fight against hiv aids produced in partnership with the pulitzer center william bring him begins a new five part series and he's here tonight so william this is a follow up to the series done twenty sixteen tell us what's different about this one judy of the last project we looked at places that we're starting to turn the tide against issue places the researchers hope that ending aids actually might be possible this year we wanted to look at places where those challenges are still enormous so producer jason kane and working again with john cohen of science magazine went to three very different locations russia nigeria and florida these are places where the fight against hiv is not going so well tonight we start in russia where some proven strategies to stop the spread of hiv are being ignored and shutdown welcome to the last needle exchange program in the city of kazan russia what they do here is textbook hiv prevention free clean needles for those who need them hiv tests so people know if they're infected and can get treatment right away for those who can't make it to the center counselors like marcel zara pov will come to them this father yasha slob.

pulitzer center jason kane john cohen science magazine nigeria florida russia william producer kazan
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stay with us coming up on the news hour new revelations about the epa administrators questionable dealings with lobbyists and an inside look at a website that turns out hyper partisan content picked up on social media but first when someone is charged with a crime but cannot afford an attorney the court is required to provide one in most cases that person is a socalled public defender but one is that public defender already has too many clients to serve as competent representation that's a situation playing out in many states including missouri where public defenders have started refusing cases throwing a wrench into the machinery of the criminal justice system john yang has the story produced by frank carlson and with support from the pulitzer center on crisis reporting and as part of our continuing coverage of broken justice in december ray shot ashton was arrested in platte county missouri charged with resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer unable to make bond he'd already spent four months in jail with his public defender told him that is caseload was so heavy he wouldn't have time to take his case to trial for another six months like from six months from now abc totally repaired all the damage that's been done from the fourmonth that i've already been you know this is my life right here ashton spoke to us from jail i mean there's room for the forty hours right now who haven't been there are just waiting on the next thing to happen is just a write in game on just sitting here waiting sixth amendment of the constitution guarantees every american facing trial the right to a lawyer even if they cannot afford one.

attorney john yang frank carlson pulitzer center ashton missouri officer epa platte county abc six months forty hours four months fourmonth
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We wanna tell you up front this next story is not suitable for children if there are kids in the room please turn us off and come back in about eight and a half minutes when paul solomon helps us make sense of what some people call the bitcoin bubble even for adults this is a disturbing story but an important one special correspondent tania rashid viagra for phillip kollar take us inside the dark world of human trafficking in bangladesh horrific things are done to young girls this is the final installment of a three part series of partnership with the pulitzer center on crisis reporting at a checkpoint on the main road leading from the cap bangladeshi soldiers aren't looking for guns or drugs they're searching for rahima women trafficked into sex work the majority of refugees are women and girls many are poor and without a male breadwinner they are rebel to traffickers looking to make fast money by recruiting girls into the bangaladesh's sex trade soldiers stop vehicles they suspect could be used by traffickers and passengers are asked to show their national id cards according to the army officer in charge of this checkpoint around ten row healy girls attempt to pass every night at the night goes on the searches continue they look inside buses and motorized rickshaws known locally as seeing questioning passengers what school did you go to you to ten so he says and local bangaladesh's can have similar appearances which makes it hard for the soldiers to identify who is who show me your cards you come from where are your id cards they suspect one of the girls in this vehicle is working there get out.

paul solomon viagra phillip kollar bangladesh pulitzer center officer bangaladesh tania rashid rahima healy
"pulitzer center" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on Reveal

"Iran and north korea will never invited the trump administration has promised to support this work even as it seeks a trillion dollars to modernize the us nuclear arsenal in the face of perceived threats security situation right now internationally is is not great and our look as much further down the road it's been just over seventy years since the first nuclear bombs killed hundreds of thousands of people in hiroshima and nagasaki mites work reminds me the people have been working to get rid of these weapons for almost as long but lee producer for today's show was emily harris she had help from on a yossi dea's cortes and amy walters rep myers edited this episode early it's reporting from iran was supported by grant from the pulitzer center on crisis reporting production manager is malindi hosa today show was mixed by rump teen arab louis along with our sound design team that dynamic duo jake breezy msrp jim briggs a fernando man yau arruda they had help from catch shook fit are acting ceo is christa sharpened berg our executive producer kevin sullivan are theme music is by camaraderie lighten support for reveals provided by the we've and david logan foundation the john d and catherine t macarthur foundation the jonathan logan family foundation the ford foundation the hiding simon's foundation and the ethics and excellence in journalism foundation reveal is a coproduction of the center for investigative reporting in p r x amount him and remember there is always more to the story.

"pulitzer center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I recently visited moral rock on the coast of california the secret place is now a state park when my grandmother was alive we'd come here often i find it ironic that we as solent and have to ask the federal government for permission to be who we already are and to live on land that we have lived on for generations i know who i am i'm still learning for npr news i'm allison had other that story was supported by the pulitzer center on crisis reporting oh and now our series for this week highly specific superlatives of 2017 today the most read tweeted tweet of president donald trump here to present it is and pierre white house correspondent turmeric i had him hello at i liked also think of myself as sort of a resident expert on trump tweeting at this point a k if you accept the role in is already job with somebody's gotta do embassies got to do it and the winning tweets for this past year turns out to be more audiovisual than than textual that's right it is a tweet the went out july second and doesn't have a lot of words just hashtag fraud news cnn hashtag fn n and then there's a video so this is a video of president trump back when he was a businessman in a wrestling match as part of the wwe the professional wrestling where he knocks a man down to the ground the video has been modified to replace the man's head with these cnn logo i think first radio featuring if you're drew president at a wwe event throwing somebody to the crowd yes probably and it's it's it's part of the president's preoccupation with the news media and with cnn he tweets about the news media on a very regular basis including today feel that he's missed treated and talks about it a lot i should say that this tweet generated a huge amount of controversy because you have mis entry the president of the united states take king out and news organization metaphorically but still it was highly criticised at the time president trump he has a certain philosophy about his tweeting which he outlined in an interview in late october on fox business with maria barreda romo i put it you put it immediately on your show i read the other day with something a.

california allison pulitzer center president wwe wrestling news media united states maria barreda romo npr donald trump pierre white fraud cnn
"pulitzer center" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"To get support for the conversion after that request was made the iaea ask china and the united states work together on this i noticed that some parts of the story were first person say you were kinda travelling the world tracking what was going on where did you go when all this was happening a heads support from the pulitzer center for crisis reporting to travel to ghana uh with the us and chinese research team is really a thrill it was the first time for me to report from africa and i've been all over the world they never lifted from africa uh so it's quite excited about that i was able to observe the chinese and us researchers as they removed the old core and put in the new lome rich core and the conditions that there were working in ghana for them this was very important it's quite interesting to go there because they've had a little science city on the outskirts of the capital acros the last half century with streets like proton avenue neutron have you they've really been committed to nuclear all this time for them this was kind of a landmark achievement that they could be on the front line of a conversion the first time the soda conversion has has been done and then you also major way to china take see what happened on that end as well it was important too give the bigger picture of us and chinese nuclear cooperation it's not just in ghana so to prepare for these conversions of the miniature neutron source reactors the us and chinese work together.

iaea china united states pulitzer center ghana africa
"pulitzer center" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Tonight we conclude our threepart series about fighting isis and life in northern syria the country has been ravaged by war many parts now lie in ruins in the north grip of isis is slowly receding but what happens once isis have been pushed out how does a community rebuild special correspondent gales a mock lemond travel to man bitch a city that was liberated from isis control last year this story as well as last night story about the role of serious kurdish population in the struggle against isis was done in partnership with the pulitzer center on crisis reporting in a neighborhood that looks like this one front door is hard to miss why the color daunted fatah because it's the color of abdul qadeer ali abboud is a construction worker born and raised in mandach gordon syria his home in the neighborhood of his army was hit by an airstrike in the fighting that pushed isis out exactly one year ago saw them that that leave us all the she it's been determined muddle sussex began renovation of the lome refer saw that damage we were set of out but then we realized that we do justice of asia and it was worth nominal everything can be made rights as the fight to defeat the socalled islamic state pushes forward the question of what comes next comes up again and again one year on this town offers a look at the possibilities and the pitfalls when it comes to rebuilding and restarting after isis.

syria pulitzer center fatah sussex asia lemond abdul qadeer ali abboud one year
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The population here we rely on god we cannot rely on the governor he doesn't see the sewage treatment plants or the international money he just sees a haitian government that doesn't seem to listen to people like him for npr news i'm rebecca her shirt in portauprince this story was supported by a grant from the pulitzer center on crisis reporting time now for sports all right baseball fans it is time to get serious the summer is not endless after all so while you get your amulets in good luck charms all lined up you better hope your team is ready to write checks and cut deals the mlb trade deadline is fast approaching and here to talk about the rumblings the rumors all of that with this saw high transaction part of the season is howard bride of espn and espn the magazine good to talk to you again howard how are you doing good i'm good so the trade deadline it's monday monday afternoon what are we know so far what are you have your eyes on well what we know is that lead we're in that great period where you try to separate their and tenders from the pretender than who's going to really make a run to determine whether or not they think they can win i think one of the great things about the trade deadline is that told you a lot about the organisational attitude give a lot of teams now that you have two wild card spot more teams ever are involved in the pay that race even if they're really not very good teams so you'll find out whether or not a team really believe that their championship ready despite what their record is and the chicago cubs they beat the if the cubs even without that got the echo cuff had surprised at how air so they beat the curse last year but they played like the copies of all that the started this season they've come back there in first place saw in a panic race with the brewers and they daily some of that by making a deal right exactly and they got uh cantat out from the.

haitian government pulitzer center espn chicago cubs brewers npr rebecca baseball mlb howard espn the magazine
"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the our nick good to speak with you thanks lot x very much next work in dagestan was supported by the pulitzer center for crisis reporting lenovo if you visited websites like wikipedia or read it today you may have noticed something different as because this tech giants and thousands of other websites and companies are participating in a day of action they're protesting plans to roll back rules protecting net neutrality the maker of the fire fox web browser mozilla zone along listed companies participating the noviks and his chief legal and business officer at mozilla so the now i take it you've managed to explain net neutrality to your three young sons which is good because whenever someone asked me what it is i have trouble my short and is equal opportunity for all websites but i feel it's kind of insufficient this reminds us what net neutrality is a good start but the notion in the principal behind net neutrality is that there should be no ability for any company or entity to be able to throttle block access not allow certain content require pay prioritisation per content to anywhere on the ad on the web the end user should be able to change that said he think about it from that standpoint it's just all about the end user having choice at gillette content they wanna have access to that's really what net neutrality thought about what is the opposition to net neutrality here in the us currently the opposition is that i s peace internet service providers like comcast verizon at t they want to be able to create their own rules and regulations around how they provide content to their end user an end what more flexible rules to be able to work their business to the way that they need to what is moselle as actual action today on this day of action so we have several different things that we've done leading up to death leave actually created on it you can find us on muscle as youtube channel we have over fifty hours of voicemails that we collected to send to the fcc violently definition had youtube channel is actually have with a pile nine hours of it that we have.

dagestan pulitzer center lenovo officer mozilla principal end user us internet service providers verizon fcc gillette youtube youtube fifty hours nine hours