40 Burst results for "Pulitzer"

Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on WAOK Saturday Morning

WAOK Saturday Morning

01:28 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on WAOK Saturday Morning

"As my dude. Oh, inefficient partner traveled and buddy and my number one occurred. Do you know what did Negro head Ah, dinnertime as me. As I don't do 7.2 mile. You read it and run some suicide spreads. Now, as a Negro of you don't get out of my face. It might be a homicide down here. But till then, look here. You can't you shoot your mouth Got a black dress? Man about the fall of my leg can't go no more. And you appear Tell my some suicide, but they couldn't be a homicide down here in this place, so in a way I had that dress from my digression, but, you know, so we had a great time, but that go because you get Manu. Um, a new MP three player got me some great gospel music. The first album I spent with Aretha Franklin. My new inspiration Now is the Amazing Grace Live would Herd and James Cleveland I listed at for how one ahead. And half of my walk was over it over, right? Because everything on there is inspirational it just hold the whole inn. You know, all of the amazing grace all those stuff I like his own there. And put out of wall and I'm the glad I'm the last person down there. And I'd be damn fun on name a pedometer reading. Comes off of my phone with this special app. Don't you? No other. The last time I looked at was a 6.2 Maza said. I am going to get on here. The book of faces that I know I'm gonna do it. And Ah, at six point to my I'm just walking like a beast and I dropped the phone and I don't walk about a mouth and went to pet my pocket and realized My new shops. A the pocket A very deep the phone on fell out of my pocket somewhere for the lad mouth, So it didn't he He had a devil Busy. It didn't record with land. Miles has the Omega and no way The people won't believe me if I told you I dropped the phone in the last mile a known here But trust me. Guess what I had to do. I had to pick the phone up at the find in it. Put it back in my pocket again. I hold in my hand and walk another mile or so. But Lo and behold, I made my 7.3 which really is eight something some 80.3, probably about eight for real. But anyway, I feel I feel like absolutely invincible. 10. And Kay. Nobody tells me nothing. Look here. Five. The phone lines. Whatever you got Talk about. You've got some interesting happen. Is we coming up at five o'clock? We're going talk to Douglas A. Blackman, who was Douglas Blackmon. Hey, is the award winning author of Slavery by another name I've been talking about This book for a long time Pulitzer Prize winning author. And he's based right here in Atlanta, and we're gonna talk about this book. If you've got it, then get it out, and we're going to talk about the Chattahoochee brick company. This recent impending lease of the property. That was the def Ah, bid for so many blacks up out of slavery right here in your city of Atlanta. And one of the people most responsible for that place is a former mayor of the city of Atlanta. You don't want to miss this riveting conversation. Coming up at five o'clock but will be back five the phone lines for for 89 to 2703. If you're in a D b walking club, you came out. You can't say the prayer you would spy on the brother. You were pushing the brother. And call me up. Let me know full for 89 to 2703. We'll be back his news in talk. 13 80 w okay. Hold steady right back with too much truth can't handle the truth. And your host Derek Bozeman on news and talk. 13 80 w okay. Hi. I'm Tom Wilson on the roads Just like on the ice. I keep it tough. Lindsay Automotive Group gets me with over 1400.

Atlanta Miles Maza Aretha Franklin Tom Wilson Partner Pulitzer Prize James Cleveland Derek Bozeman Lindsay Automotive Group Douglas Blackmon Douglas A. Blackman LO KAY
Trump Launches 'Patriotic Education’ Commission, Calls 1619 Project 'Ideological Poison’

All Things Considered

00:58 sec | 16 hrs ago

Trump Launches 'Patriotic Education’ Commission, Calls 1619 Project 'Ideological Poison’

"Archives yesterday, standing near the U. S Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. President Trump announced he is establishing a commission to restore patriotic education in our schools. Our mission is to defend the legacy of America's founding. The virtue of America's heroes and the nobility of The American character. We must clear away the twisted web of lies in our schools, classrooms. And teach our Children the magnificent truth. About our country. In a speech that lasted about a half hour. Trump argued that American school Children are being taught that the United States is a wicked and racist nation. President took specific aim at the 16 19 project in New York Times Siri's that looked at American history in the context of slavery in the contributions of black Americans. The project, which won the Pulitzer Prize Has also been incorporated into a curriculum taught in many schools across the country.

President Trump America Pulitzer Prize United States Siri New York
Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

00:44 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"So I don't know if they're quite ready for that, but it's not technical at all. It's a very good good read as long as they can practice on on like their dragon lizard or their dog and not me then I'm cool with that all I'll link to that one in the show I think this a pretty new book isn't it Hacking Darwin? Yeah, it's in the past i. feel like everything was like two months ago. Because there's like the six month blackout right now but it's like in the past year do you think people are going to be writing a lot more books and we'll see a lot more books getting published because of the lockdown a lot more people being stuck at home writing because a lot of people I know are writing lot of books. Yeah I think. So I don't necessarily think there's going to be a lot more great books. I think that's a skill that you know takes takes time to learn other difficult skill but I do think you're gonNA see a lot more books written during this period. In fact, one of the things that I've been doing is coming up with what I call Thirty Day book challenges. So I'll I'll come up with a broad outline for what I think would be an interesting book could be written. Within thirty days and I describe exactly the step by step process of how to write one of these books in three days and the outline is broad enough that everybody I tell to one hundred, thousand people everybody will read a completely different book and all hundred. Thousand Bucks will be what I would say is equally interesting if they use the my step by step process. So I've done about six of these book challenges and People Really Respond to that I think people want to write books. And I think it'd be interesting too because I I'm I'm interested in how the future books progresses with this new. There's this new artificial intelligence algorithm. I think it's called GST or GDP? Gt three that supposedly can you know you can plug in a few instructions for what you'd WanNa website to look like some other websites that you like and it will literally create for you a big beautiful website in a few seconds. That's exactly what you want and I'd be curious if you were to feed like a like a script, some characters, your general hero's journey into an artificial intelligence space algorithm like that. If it could begin to generate books that literally are thrilling titles that seem as though they are written by actual humans. That's a great idea. So here here's here's the idea would try I. Would feed in like forty. You know you have to train its feet in forty Harlequin Romance novels and say go and have it spit back Harlequin romance novel to me and see if it's good and then submitted to the editors at Harlequin and see if it's good enough to publish. But the problem is you'd know when you're reading it if it was written using the GP three algorithm, there'd still be that sense in the back of your head that it was written by a computer and I think you'd have some kind of a bias knowing it didn't come from the mind of an actual real human. I wonder because as these things get better, you won't really have you won't have that bias. You know there's a lot of. A lot of interesting things like there's a story So there's this writer Jersey Kosinski. He wrote the novel which became the movie being. And he wrote a Pulitzer Prize winning novel called steps. which was published I, think in like nineteen, sixty seven won the Pulitzer prize that year or the National Book Award a few years. Later, a guy copied the book word for word did that change a single word and submitted it to twenty publishers back? Then there were twenty publishers much fewer now and he got rejected by all of them. So nobody realized that not only was this book published before, but it was a national book award winner was like the best book in the country and they all just uniformly rejected. This book from the sky. So it's amazing. How little awareness people have like they don't really think like Oh has this been written before Oh is this an AI engine? It sounds a little bit weird just read it and Harlequin published it. So it must be like are decent romance novel and they just move on and you know fifty shades of grey. If you read that that almost seems like it was written by a robot. It's it's by the way I think I all credits, L. James she she wrote something that. One hundred million copies sold so she's brilliant but it's not the best writing in the world. You could sort of feel that right away even when you're reading it and nobody cared they became like the best selling book of all time. Yeah, it's interesting about that. I mean even people some people think that J. K. Rowling was really not the person who came up with all the ideas for the Harry Potter novels. And that that was an entire kind of team effort and is just too far fetched for her to have done all that on her own and that it must have been like a team or some kind of computers that were assisting artificial intelligence like Veer Google J. K. Rowling, conspiracy theory like pretty much. The claim is that a team of writers collaborated on the series and rolling was just kind of like an actress. Oh, my gosh. I feel like an entire book or podcast could be done just the controversies around J. K.. Rowling. Like there's there's that there's the whole recent turf thing and if you. Is A let people look it up. There's her her pseudonym. Robert. Galbraith where she started writing mystery novels and how people uncover that it was her says like a lot of interesting stories runner but I will add to what you said about her which is that prior to Harry Potter, there was a graphic novel by Neil Gaiman who's obviously famous writer of comics, novels, movies, and so on. Neil, gaiman wrote a graphic novel called the books of Magic about a boy magician didn't realize at first he was a magician and the boy has like black. Straight hair and glasses and kind of looks exactly like Harry Potter. So there is some suspicion that she got not maybe not consciously but at least subconsciously the idea from a fellow British author who who had a popular comic book about two years before I came out that's crazy and by the way that that's on my my list of books to read I listened to based on the recommendation from Tim Ferriss to kneel Gamons graveyard on audible and it's really good and I actually want to read his new book American. Gods have. You read that book Yeah American Gods Great I I really like his American guys is great and then I would say maybe American guys is the best thing I love books of magic..

Writer J. K. Rowling Harry Potter National Book Award Neil Gaiman Pulitzer Prize Tim Ferriss Gamons Graveyard Robert Galbraith Jersey Kosinski L. James
Trump downplays legacy of slavery and embraces white supremacy

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:51 min | 1 d ago

Trump downplays legacy of slavery and embraces white supremacy

"Donald Trump intensified efforts to appeal to his core base of white voters on Thursday by downplaying the historical legacy of slavery in the United States and blasting efforts to address his stomach racism as divisive. The president's comments marking the two hundred and thirty third anniversary of the signing of the constitution amounted to a defense of white culture and denunciation of Democrats the media and others who he accused of trying to indoctrinate school children and shame their parents whiteness. He also argued that America's founding set in motion the unstoppable chain of events that abolished Slavery Secured Civil Rights defeated Communism and fascism and builds the most fair equal and prosperous nation in human history. But he did not mention the two, hundred, forty, six years of slavery. In America including the eight thousand nine years it was allowed to continue after the colonies declared independence from England nor did the president acknowledged the ongoing fight against racial injustice and police brutality which has prompted months of protests. This year trump has long fanned the nation's culture wars including defending the display of the confederate battle flag and monuments of civil war rebels from protest is seeking their removal. He speech on Thursday suggested his rhetoric could become even more nationalistic. In the final weeks before the election given that he's off to a second term relies largely on energizing culturally conservative white voters trump already cracked down on anti racism training sessions in federal agencies he said on Thursday, he will soon sign an order to establish a commission to promote patriotic education dubbed the seventeen seventy, six commission. The panel he said we'll be tossed with encouraging educators to teach students about the miracle of American history and plan for the Commemoration of the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of independence. The move is a response to the New, York Times Sixteen nineteen projects, which highlights the long term consequences of slavery and the contributions of Black Americans Nicole? Hannah. Jones won a Pulitzer Prize for a piece in the magazine in response to trump's remarks Hannah Jones said the First Amendment to the constitution opposed government attempts to censor speech and guarantees free press the efforts by the president of the United States to use his palace to censor. Of American journalism by dictating what schools can and cannot teach what American children should and should not learn should be deeply alarming to all Americans who value free speech she said.

Donald Trump President Trump Hannah Jones United States America Pulitzer Prize York Times England Nicole
Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

00:38 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"In America to how community and creativity can flourish. It's pandemic to how Democrats could win and Deep Red America do each week on my podcast. Wise is happening and I'm joined by uniquely qualified guests like Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Nicole Hannah Jones, progress. Does. Not Mean Justice or equality or that we are right after four hundred years of black people being in this country the time for marking incremental progress in patting ourselves on the back of that has been long over author Rebecca Solnit. How do we take care of each other in the context of not being able to physically be with each other in ordinary waste crooked media's Jon favreau it's going to be the highest turnout election history, which means that it is a persuasion game and many others who helped me make sense of what's happening in our society and our world I really enjoy our conversations I hope you will. Join me for new episodes. Every Tuesday just search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. Joining us now Valerie Jarrett former senior adviser to President Barack Obama Valerie Clare just. Took my breath away with a personal story about Justice Ginsburg and I WANNA ask you if you have any personal stories to share. On my goodness well, first of all evening Nicole Brian, I want to begin by saying that my deepest tarp, all condolences to justice skins works family and thank them for sharing her what get to our nation and we appreciate them for that. I remember the first time I spotted her in the White House and it took my breath away. Of course, I followed her career. Since I was a young lawyer, she was an icon for women fighting for women's rights against discrimination and watched her confirmation, the Supreme Court. In every decision said and any time I was in her presence she was decent kind thoughtful human and really funny and we will miss her deeply and I just think it's unconscionable that on the eve of her death senator McConnell would be talking about replacing immediately gets just it's unkind is not respectful of her family and it is going to irritate a whole lot of folks around our country and I agree with Senator McCain Splits GonNa put some senators who have tough races in a in a very difficult position. Valerie does Joe Biden now find himself in a position of having to. Produce some names of people he would appoint I mean, how does this change we've talked about Peter Baker and his colleague Maggie Haberman of reported out how this changes the race and perhaps give style trump an opportunity to change the topic but it would seem to me that at this moment and because it was just as Gilbert Ginsburg this is an equally sort of powerful political opportunity for the Biden Harris ticket do you see it that way? Well I think what Vice President Biden will do is point out double standard the facts that when President Obama appointed Mirror garland chief judge Merrick Garland in March of two thousand sixteen. What did Mitch Mcconnell? Say he said Oh but we couldn't possibly. Confirm a justice in an election year. The People's voices should factor. Ram and now. They're considering jamming through an appointee in just forty six days. It's unprecedented in the history of Supreme Court appointments, and so I think it gives Vice President Biden equitable argument to make whether I don't imagine that he would release names before he's actually sworn in as president but I think he can put by put president trump in a very offer position. I guess I only pushback would be when is that ever stop to president trump or Mitch McConnell norms or feeling awkward being indecent or being unkind and You're right. Right I mean. There's edgy. Jayme Donald Trump will take this and run on this now. I think I think president trump will absolutely run on but senator McConnell the most important thing to have as he is proven to us time and time again is to maintain his leadership position and it will be in jeopardy if he loses the Senate and the polls that we've all seen have showed that those races or tight and so for him to put his Senate. In top spot who already had tough races I think puts him in a in A. Very Awkward Position. So he has to choose does he want to jam this through give the Democrats map pretended to galvanize around that double standard or does he want to hold off? My guess is he will take his chances in January through and my expectation will be that there will be consequences to be play in November for those senators who take that to vote. Valerie the soft bigotry of our low expectations of today's Republicans. Thank you so much for joining us. Important. Political And historic night but the country. Thank you, Valerie. You're. Welcome. Thank you and with us now Robert Costa National Political reporter for the Washington Post moderator of Washington Week on PBS and Eugene Robinson Pulitzer Prize winning columnist for the. Washington. Post Robert quickly to you because I've been following tonight on social media and your reporting between. texting and calls again. Once we get beyond the impact of this loss to American jurisprudence and everything else justice Ginsburg touched. What are the politics of this breaking out to be? Brian I of course, my condolences to the GINSBERG's family as they deal with this loss but you did ask about politics in based on my reporting tonight talking to top Senate Republican sources. They're already discussions about how to move forward number one leader..

Jayme Donald Trump President Trump Valerie Joe Biden Justice Ginsburg Vice President Senator Mcconnell Mitch Mcconnell Pulitzer Prize Senate Supreme Court President Barack Obama Valerie Jarrett Reporter Rebecca Solnit Senator Mccain Washington Jon Favreau President Obama Nicole Hannah Jones
Could Trump push a vaccine through before election day?

The Al Franken Podcast

02:32 min | 5 d ago

Could Trump push a vaccine through before election day?

"Just wrote an article or a informed policy that about the vaccines and about whether we can trust them or not. If one comes out before the election and can we can we? Trust vaccine that comes out say but what would be a good date November I. That's their target date November I. That is not that the trump administration instructed the CDC to instruct every single governor in the United States and territories to be ready for mass distribution and to by October I have. SENT CDC their Master Plan for how they will vaccinate their population for approval, and then actually it out courtesy of a private contracting firm called mckesson on November first. But we saw a real blowback from political leaders and of course, the public generally and the public health community saying wait a second. How in the world? Can you imagine that you're GonNa, have a safe proven effective vaccine in the next fifty plus days. that's just inconceivable and nine major vaccine makers jointly released a statement promising the world that they will not go along with being shoved out the door hastily and that they will indeed do adequate safety and so on, and then Astra Zeneca which had the most promising vaccine. Let it be known that they're stopping their trial temporarily because they've seen a side effect in one of the trial participants will stop and just say ask you how many vaccines are in the research. Pipeline. Well, if you count the ones that are rather dubious from places like Russia and you put them all in the pile, it's close to two hundred are in the pipeline worldwide. There are. Basically, ten leading contenders that the United States government is looking at most of them are made in America, but there's also Astra Zeneca made in in in the UK and a joint American German product that is probably at the front of the line right now jointly made by Pfizer and a German company. There are many many many products out there all in various stages of testing all the way from just in the Lavatory to already in thirty thousand trial subjects in phase three trials

Astra Zeneca CDC United States Mckesson Pfizer Russia UK America
Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

01:01 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"Rejection of Donald, trump from his own former officials and up next as promise bill bars attempt to potentially influence the election and news on the blowback with talked to a former Muller Prosecutor Andrew. Weissmann Ra back in thirty seconds. Hey everyone it's Chris as you know these days, I find it helpful to just take a step back from the day to day onslaught of news and take a broader look at the issues I haven't had time to cover my TV show all in everything from the legacy of racism in America to how community and creativity can flourish minster pandemic to how Democrats could win in. Deep. Red America I do it each week. My podcast wise is happening and I'm joined by uniquely qualified guests like Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Nicole. Hannah Jones progress does not mean justice or equality or that we are right after four hundred years the black. People being in this country hypermarket incremental progress patting ourselves on the back for that has been long over author Rebecca Solnit. How do we take care of each other in the context of not being able to physically be with each other in ordinary ways crooked media Jon favreau it's going to be the highest turnout election in history, which means that it is a persuasion game and many others who helped me make sense of what's happening in our society and our girl I really enjoy our conversations I. Hope you will to join me for new episodes. Every Tuesday just search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. Developing,.

Pulitzer Prize Jon Favreau Rebecca Solnit Hannah Jones Muller Prosecutor Donald Trump America Andrew Chris Nicole Reporter
Former Top Editor Of Philadelphia Inquirer Named Post-Gazette Executive Editor

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last week

Former Top Editor Of Philadelphia Inquirer Named Post-Gazette Executive Editor

"And a former top editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, who resigned after an upward over a controversial headline back in June, is headed to Pittsburgh. Stan Wish now ski who spent two decades with the Inquirer and lead the paper to a Pulitzer Prize in 2012. Has been named the executive editor and vice president of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Now he stepped down from the Enquirer after the headline during the protests here in Philadelphia earlier this summer. Red buildings matter, too. He directed the merger of the Enquirer The Daily News in the Philly dot com newsrooms and help modernize the newsroom into a 24 hour news operation. He begins his new job in Pittsburgh next week.

Philadelphia Inquirer Stan Wish Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Post Gazette Enquirer The Daily News Pulitzer Prize Executive Editor Editor Philadelphia Vice President Philly
Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on John Howell

John Howell

00:40 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pulitzer" discussed on John Howell

"Dot or Him. up the first mayor Daley was always on the new Mander belong order in Chicago is watching how the reporters covered him heightened my interest wanting to be a newsperson myself. You've got to understand Chicago and the way that people feel about this city, you've got to respect that to really do the job of being a Chicago news anchor. John Dempsey with the news on a 90. W L s Kind of town people in Germany when I sit among the most informed people in this country that he's taking credit for it or anything. I'm not making up. Do mice Limbaugh 11 2 Days on being 89 Chicago? Actually, it's w l s a 8 90 Nobody when I Is Chicago. I'm starting to forget people's names. I'm starting to have difficulty with my vocabulary. And I would just like to publicly say nice knowing you, America, you're now qualified like Joe Biden to run for the Democratic right home With John Al Show. It's happening. I can feel it happens every week day from 5 to 7 on 8 90. W L s Here's a guy hired by Obama Hates Trump is making stop up Chris plan working for the Democratic Party against the interests of the United States. Right? Is this government doing enough to protect the country? Is Shapiro attorney happens to be completely insane? And so he just keeps saying that we're going to sign endless checks to be how I don't know where it came from? But frankly, this perfect publicity to sell books right side of conversation. Let's get into this 8 90 double you No Yes. They condemn country music can article after article in the Washington Post where they have songs like Red Solo Cup Loca, and they give Kendrick Lamar the Pulitzer Prize for misogynistic, racist, violent anti police stuff. Because we're not for double standards, liberals would have no standards of their brains. Don't work of design plans tonight. Rush 90 u L. Yes. Secret agendas are truly a threat to democracy itself. I don't buy it, but I know you might. I am actually a card carrying member of the Deep State Trilateral Commission, Illuminati and the Mason So I disagree. It's the John Hall Show C and you should listen to it. Sometimes it really works weekdays. 5 to 7 on 8 90. W L s But you didn't hear it from me. Hank has become.

Chicago John Dempsey Mander Democratic Party Joe Biden Pulitzer Prize Kendrick Lamar Daley DOT Germany John Hall Limbaugh Washington Post Barack Obama Deep State Trilateral Commissi John Al Hank Shapiro America United States
Trump denies suffering 'series of mini-strokes,' doctor says he 'remains healthy'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump denies suffering 'series of mini-strokes,' doctor says he 'remains healthy'

"That he had a Siri's of many strokes last year after a new report emerge that he was poised to hand over power to Vice President Mike Pence during a still mysterious visit to Walter Reed Hospital. But the report in a new book Never claimed that the president suffered a mini stroke or any condition for that matter. The book by Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times reporter Michael Schmidt says in the hours leading up to the president's trip to the hospital. Word went out in the West Wing for the vice president to be on standby. To take over the powers of the presidency temporarily if Mr Trump had to undergo Ah, procedure of some sort the president tweeted it never ends. It never happened. Wins news time of

Vice President Walter Reed Hospital Mike Pence Pulitzer Prize New York Times Siri Mr Trump West Wing Michael Schmidt Reporter
Launching the Cyber Intelligence News Site The Record by Recorded Future

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

06:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Launching the Cyber Intelligence News Site The Record by Recorded Future

"My whole career has been in journalism I started that at her of my college newspaper immediately came to new. York to. Intern I for the Wall Street Journal and then Bloomberg. News. Rating about startups and a little bit of technology and I got completely lucky with those positions and those beats. Him at the time startups where really starting to catch fire facebook lays in the news for. Only it's launched, but it's Very, high profile, public offering. So after covering startups That kind of was able to morph into cyber security. When the Wall Street Journal was launching more cyber coverage, they were hiring three cyber-security reporters dedicated to the beat. And I've been I've been writing about the topic ever since then for the past four years. And most recently had left the Wall Street Journal to join a publication that launch rate before the pandemic started called protocol. which was not the best timing to launch a publication. But. Yeah. No I'm reporting about cybersecurity for this new publication. The record which recorded future is launching by the time. This podcast will hopefully already be launched and I'm very excited about it. Yeah. Well, we're going to dig into some of the details about the record in a little bit but before we get to that and I'm curious we can you can you give us some insights on what it's like being a journalist on the cybersecurity beat what was that like for you shifting to that topic getting up to speed and and covering the folks who are doing their day to day business in that part of the world what was that experience like for you? Yeah. Absolutely. The topic has probably one of the steepest learning curves in. Any journalistic discipline. As I mentioned, my background is not in computer science. I did not know how to Code I didn't really know anything about state-sponsored hackers or TPS or all jargon that. Is Sort of anyone that you talked to in the industry. Uses. Like second nature or a second language for me. It was a very quick learning curve where I had to catch myself and I think maybe six months after I started covering the topic that was when the world was rocked by Vajna cry and then soon after not. Quickly that was that was kind of a trial by fire. So. Like having the resources in the backing of an organization with the the reputation of the Wall Street Journal I, mean that must have been a place to to have surround you. It was. It's it's a pretty. humbling experience when you're just out of college, you call up. You Know A. Like a CEO who's at the top of their game or a cybersecurity analyst that everyone respects and here you know twenty two year old who has no idea about anything in the industry and you and you say like, I'm I'm a reporter from the Wall Street Journal can you help explain this very basic topic for me and there they make themselves available? So. It's it's very. Nice luxury to have. Definitely when you're starting to cover something in the Wall Street Journal, itself is one of the best organizations in terms of the journalistic expertise that they have in house just being able to sit. A couple desks away from Pulitzer Prize winners or heard you know. John. Kerry who is Not. Too Far Away from from where I sat and During my time there, he wrote the book bad blood. I'm was this all over the news so it's it's just a humbling experience to be around literally thousands of journalists to are reporting about the biggest stories of the day. What what's your? What are your thoughts in terms of of the state of things when it comes to journalism covering cybersecurity in general, you know the spectrum of the types of coverage that you've seen. Do you have any thoughts on that? Yeah I. Think we're kind of at a a real inflection point where a lot of not only journalistic organizations but also the audience. Is Waking Up to the fact that we're in a different time when it comes to cybersecurity that this is a topic that affects not just to every organization of every industry, but it affects. Every government agency, it affects individuals even your grandmother who might not have any idea how they used. Basic Internet. Applications noticed that hackers trying to get her data. And so I think that I think it's a time where a lot of there's a need for more cyber security news need for more informed and educated cybersecurity journalists. I think it's really good time to be covering the industry and in terms of just answer your question bit more specifically about. Sort of wound scape. Healthy spot where some publications are focused on. The hackers, they take a look at specific events and get really detailed technical and other publications focusing on breaches news since there's a time of news with this topic I don't think that there are that many publications that sorted filled the gap to. Be Informative. Towards like sort of A. Average cyber security professional or somebody who has an interest in the topic, but isn't an expert in it So I think there's a lot of room there for extra

Wall Street Journal Facebook York Pulitzer Prize Intern Bloomberg Kerry Vajna CEO John Analyst Reporter
Are we being CENSORED?

Photography Daily

04:28 min | Last month

Are we being CENSORED?

"Censorship the Suppression or prohibition of any parts of books, films, News, etc that are considered obscene politically unacceptable or threat security censorship. Of the press censorship of Photography, Censorship of the big stories of our time, it's not something I thought possibly in the so-called civilized Western society. We don't have that problem. Do we now? Of course not this is a country where we reveling being transparent. Some have argued that there's too much transparency and not enough privacy but privacy and censorship a two very different conversations. It's about time we talked about this with a guest in more detail is this is a subject that has been mooted a good few. Times in only a few months on this program in more than a handful of interviews, it's difficult not to politicize this discussion. But if we're going to start having more debate on it I'm certainly not going to be the editor who get squeamish about that Facet against busy censoring what a guest has to say on the subject Edmund Tara. Kobean is a well respected award-winning furhter journalist with decades of experience covering big stories in the UK and internationally, not just conversation starters but inform real discussion and decision. In fact, today and tomorrow episodes about just that pictures tell stories that need to be told with Pulitzer. Prize when Carl mcnaughton being tomorrow's commentator on the subject. Let's begin though with Edmund Tear copious and we're talking today about the necessity for change. But actually you have a very early story about change Hamen, you made a decision right from the start about direction you changed from medicine to making pictures and and I'm curious as to how that came about some Y. Yeah. It's but it's not quite as grand as that I never actually made to medicine I was. At the point of wanting to study medicine, the direction was going to be surgery I was fascinated by surgery. So that's that's what my goal was. That's where I was sort of headache. So I was already doing the relevant levels at high school chemistry body and so on. On Getting Ready to apply to do medicine I mean who knows if I would have been accepted or not but it's it was a kind of red at the beginning of my a-levels bullets a camera an ESA Larios it was the bottom of the range nick on a Nikon. And of course, prior to that I had an interest in photography. So this sort of interest was brewing brewing and getting bigger and bigger, and of course, as I was going through my early teenage years, sort of a expansion of mind and understanding of the world and history and news and paying more attention to what was going on. and also being able to start to digest visual imagery. That's when my sort of love of talk graffiti massively blossom. And that started right at the beginning of my of and that sort of continued and continued and continued to I reached a point where I thought. This is what I want to do. This is what I have to do. You know I want to be a photo journalist because I was so. Impressed by all the work that scene. But by this sort of work by these amazing photographers, mainly Magnum photos, photographers that was the sort of my main I chunk of education self. Education I. Basically go to the library comeback with a pile of books every every couple of weeks Some money out by a magazine or to to sort of read and yeah. That was my first sort of first education was magnum fighters, inverted journalism, and all of a sudden I realized this is the direction I want to go. You know it's amazing landscape photography, amazing portraiture fashion and saw. But as soon as I started getting into, it was one book that really kicked it off a book called in our time. by Magnum photos, photographers, and it's kind of became almost like a Bible. I just couldn't put that book down. and that sort of made me change direction. To my parents, this may one day I sort of came downstairs into the living room from my bedroom to. Delving into whatever books I was reading and I said, I've made a decision. I want to be a photographer by my parents just looked at each other sort of shook the heads and this son who went from wanting to be a surgeon all of a sudden wants to be. Photographer So yeah, that's that that was the change

Kobean Nick Carl Mcnaughton Edmund Tara Edmund Tear Pulitzer Editor Nikon UK Hamen
Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

Here & Now

03:39 min | Last month

Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

"Of the continental US, the covert 19 pandemic is happening as the push for social justice continues. Natasha Alford is a journalist for the Gri Oh, and Pulitzer Center grantee. And she traveled to Puerto Rico shortly after the island's political protests in 2019 to understand another uprising taking place on the land What she calls the Afro Latino revolution. She joins us now. Welcome to hearing now. Thank you so much for having me, Tanya. Yes. And Natasha. What? Through lines? Are you saying between the Afro Puerto Rican community and what's happening in other parts of the country in the protests for racial justice? How does PR's history and culture Play out in the construction of race and racial experiences. Yes. Oh, there's so much to unpack there. But you know, the first thing I'll say is after the death of George Floyd, we immediately saw protest. We saw vigils and we saw memorials in honor of his life right in Puerto Rico, So obviously there was something that really resonated with people there. And specifically in Afro Puerto Rican communities. Now often times when people think of Afro Puerto Rican Sze, they may associate them with just one community. One town one neighborhood. I'll give you an example. Louisa has a really high proportion of residents who identify as Afro Puerto Rican. But the reality is that there are black people everywhere in Puerto Rico. It's just his divers as the United States. And so we saw that what was happening in the continental US was really resonating. It's resonating because there are similarities. What have you found in terms of health disparities without for Latinos and other types of disparities? Do they mirror what we see in the continental United States? Yes, I think that there are parallels, and it makes sense, right? Because well, you think about the history of Puerto Rico. There was slavery there as well. Right? Even though our societies may be different, you know, we think of the continental US we think of segregation and Jim Crow. Ah, lot of people just don't know the history of Puerto Rico and and slavery and the aftermath of how it played out. They often assume that Puerto Rico is a Nyland of racial harmony that it is a racial utopia. The phrase La Grande Familia, Kenya. Is about being one Puerto Rican family. But a lot of people will tell you that that's actually not the case. And so with health disparities, one thing that researchers have found is that darker skinned Puerto Rican Sze report poorer health outcomes. And some of the reasons for that are social treatment. The communities in which they live in are sometimes poorer exposure to social stressors. There's ah great research paper that was written that came out of the University of Puerto Rico by Jose Caravaggio, Quito and S. R Boudreau and they talked about Changing the way that we measure those disparities by changing the language we use. So we often think of black and white in the United States, but they did a study where they asked people to list the shade of their skin tone. When they did that they actually got more information that showed what those health disparities were, and the key was using local language and understanding of race rather than trying to impose the continental US is language when it comes to race. Of course,

Puerto Rico Afro Puerto Rican Sze Afro Puerto Rican University Of Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Sze United States Natasha Alford George Floyd Pulitzer Center Tanya Kenya Louisa Jose Caravaggio R Boudreau Jim Crow
Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

The Book Review

04:34 min | Last month

Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

"Isabel Wilkerson joins us. Now she is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of the warmth of other suns which she came on the podcast to talk about a little bit when she reviewed Michelle Obama's becoming. She is back now to talk about her new book cast the origins of our discontent Isabel. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me. So as I alluded in my intro, the last time you came on this podcast, you did come extensively to talk about one book in particular, which was Michelle Obama's becoming which I used as an excuse to talk about book of Your Own the other sons, and I don't have to have that excuse to talk about a book of your this time because you have a new book, let's talk about how you got from the warmth of other suns to this new book cast because you wrote in your book something sort. Sort of intriguing, which is that you didn't seek to write this book, but you felt like you had to write it and I'm curious what you meant by that. Well, with the warmth of other suns, had spent fifteen years looking into trying to understand the great migration and and why that happened, and so that meant that I spent a lot of time looking at and having to investigate and understand wife as it was during that era from the end of reconstruction until the nineteen seventies essentially and what I discovered was that the word. Racism, which is the word that often is applied to descriptions of the warmth. Sons did not actually apply. It was not sufficient. It was not the precise or comprehensive word to describe the structure of repression that was in place from the end of reconstruction. Until till essentially the civil rights legislation of the nineteen sixties, and so I found that I was using the word cast. Cast was the word that anthropologists until geologists and others of the era who had gone into the South during the time of the depth of Jim Crow. They had emerged from that era and that region and that time using the term cast in. It intrigued me when I came across it in the research for the one of the sons and decided that that was really the only way to describe it, and so the word racism does. Does, not, appear in the warmth of other suns and in the intervening years especially with events such as Charlottesville, I have been in a forced to have to think about the language and think about how we remember our history, and so it's as a result of that that I felt I sort of felt, I had no choice, but to dig deeper into what I had begun with the warmth of other signs and it led to this. So in those intervening years. Did you start to think about another book, but you kept coming back to this idea of cast and sort of switched gears or was this the project you went into immediately as a natural outgrowth of the warmth of other suns was the former. You're exactly right I actually had other things that I was working on and was very excited about and very deeply wanting to get into and this this phenomenon helped rearing itself in the news kept prodding me and poking me to look further at what I had already begun. Would not let me go essentially. And an I, at every turn, I was seeing things that were manifestations of what I had written about. But no one was using the language. We we actually need new language to better understand the era in which we live. The old language may not be as efficient as it might have been. Say You know during the Early Twentieth Century? Such words, it's racism, which is a very fraught word means many different things to many different people and is often conflated with personal animus hostility, hate What we're dealing with now goes beyond that because actually it's the underlying infrastructure that we've all inherited that, and that has been here all along since the since the founding of the country actually since before the founding of the country and so this, the the recent events kept drawing me back to what I was not wanting to do, I was not wanting to write this. I really hasn't. And yet, it kept pulling at me

Suns Michelle Obama Sons Isabel Wilkerson Jim Crow Cast Charlottesville
Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:58 min | Last month

Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

"This month we're going to hear the years of my birth by Louisa Drake, which was published in the New Yorker in January of two thousand eleven growing up in the midst of a large family I had never registered visitations from my presence. At those rare moments when I was alone as something strange. The first time I was aware of it was when I was taken from Betty and putting the White Room. After that occasionally had the sensation that there was someone walking beside me or sitting behind you. Always, just beyond my peripheral vision. The story was chosen by Tommy Orange whose first novel there there was published in two thousand eighteen and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Hi Tony. Hey Deborah. So what made you choose a story by Louis urging for the podcast so you had published, I think last year. Short story of hers called The stone is a pretty short short story and is it was a strange story and it just struck me So when you asked me to choose a story I went looking for another one of hers. She's actually published a lot in the New Yorker because I haven't known her for Short Sir she only as one collection of short stories you don't with pretty massive career, most of her stories started stories and end up in her novels. Yes. That's what I've heard her say and this one just struck me I think it's such a perfect story. In what way is perfect for you. You know what I love that fiction can do is the way it can get inside a consciousness and the way it can push mystery. There's something. So mysterious in this story and I don't necessarily always like magical realism but what Lewis does so well, in a lot of her work is sort of pushing boundaries of reality where it still believable still realism you never are asked to believe too much sort of realism's magic. There's something so strange and mysterious about it and really powerful the sort of cultural touchdowns that she does. So subtly though a native culture plays into it in the way, white culture comes up. Yeah. It's interesting because there is a supernatural component, but it can also be read as almost completely realistic. You can kind of how much you WANNA. Think of this as a kind of allegorical story and how much you want to think of it as real. Yeah. This is exactly what what I love about this story and what Louise doesn't work like I said. And if you've been reading, Lewis worked for most of her writing career at least. I mean, she's definitely one of my favorite writers of all time but I came to her a little bit later in my reading path. It wasn't until I was going to the Institute of American Indian Arts Getting my MFA a lot of native literature I didn't come to until getting into the program I. Sort of came in through a back door reading. Wise. I read a lot of work in translation, but I read love medicine I and just completely fell in love with her work. And do you feel the connection for you is that you have shared native American heritage? Definitely when I first started reading actually was a little bit turned off to some native fiction because it was. So reservation based and I, I have this urban experience but that was just sort of at the beginning of me thinking about native representation what it would look like in my own work the way that she handles bringing in native culture I think is so perfect. There's a clumsy way to do it and she never does it that way. always comes across really organically. and. Do you think that this story the the years of my birthday this characteristic if that main character as we'll discover is actually not native. Yeah I. Think the way that that works for the reader to something. Really Cool. Sort of putting you into a native family as a white character does a lot of work for the story I think. We'll talk more after the story and now here's Tommy Orange reading the years of my birth by Louise urge. The years of my birth. The nurse had wrapped my brother and a blue flannel blanket and was just about to hand him to his mother when she whispered. Oh God there's another one and out I slid half dead. I then proceeded to diner ernest going from slightly pink to a dull grey blue at which point the nurse tried to scoop me into a bed warm by lights. She was stopped by the doctor who pointed out my head and legs. Stepping between and the mother, the doctor addressed her. Mrs Lascher I've something important to say your other child had a congenital deformity and may die. Shall we use extraordinary means to salvage it? She looked at the doctor with utter incomprehension at first then cried. No.

Louise Deborah Tommy Orange Lewis Louis Louisa Drake White Room Pulitzer Prize Institute Of American Indian A Betty Mrs Lascher Tony
The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

The Book Review

06:35 min | Last month

The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

"And Applebaum joins us. Now from London, she is the author of the Pulitzer Prize Winning Gulag History and her new book is called twilight of democracy, the seductive lure of authoritarianism and thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me, I want to start with a very basic language question because people are throwing around a lot of terms, these days, authoritarianism, dictatorship, demagoguery, autocracy, fascism, and sort of get to an understanding of what we exactly mean and what you need. Europe by authoritarianism. Book is about democracies really and it's about people and political movements in democracies who become dissatisfied with their own political systems and seek to change radically. And I. Agree with you that it's hard to sometimes describe what it is that they want to go towards whether it's a one party state or a liberal democracy or A. Not necessarily dictatorship. In which there's less openness and less competition, and so you know my book is about that. It's about the disappointment that some people feel with democracy and the draw towards more authoritarianism more centralized, less competitive, less open political systems. You're not so much concerned in this book with the specifics of the autocrats of our time, the Erdo ones and Putin's, and Orban's so much as you are with the people who vote for them side with them enable them. Why did you decide to look at it from that angle, but actually it's explicitly. None of book about voters I mean I think the reason why people vote for populist or authoritarian parties are various and I you know that sort of separate subject but you're right. It is a book about journalists spin doctors, intellectuals, and the people who sometimes help create these movements who create the ideas behind them, and then sometimes sell those ideas to the general public. Poorly I read about the because those are people I know not all of them are my close friends, but some of them are people have run into. The World I know and I thought it would be useful therefore for me to try and explain them in an an understand what happened to them over the last twenty years I wanted aired Juan because. About journalists and intellectuals he someone who and I think we could say this. About Putin von and others as well. These are people who have suppressed. The Press Ltd journalists closed down newspapers imprisoned writers who are the people on the other side who are the two of these other journalists and intellectuals who are supporting someone like Oregon. For example, in Turkey, will some of them are people who have become convinced. There's only one form of Turkish patriotism and that it's a nationalist form of patriotism and that anybody who has a different vision of Turkey vision of Turkey this integrated with Europe or a Turkey that secular those people are traders to. The country and their voices don't deserve to be heard. Some of the will have other motives. Some of them will be opportunists. Some of them will see the chance of if you get on the Government's bandwagon and you get on state media than its way to make a career, some of the will like the proximity to power. There's a range of reasons actually that's one of the themes of the book is, is the various different kinds of attractions that these kinds of movements have for people like that. So I'm probably betraying a little bit of my prejudice. As journalists and someone in the book world that the pamphleteer is the bloggers, the spin-doctors, the producer of TV programs in creators of memes. These are people that I can easily see supporting some of these autocrats I. Guess I'm interested in what circumstances in which countries it's writers intellectuals and and what's behind that I mean look they've always been nationalist intellectuals and intellectuals WHO and writers who supported dictatorships. well, into the twentieth century one of the themes of the book one of the kind of threads that I run through it is an analysis that was written in the first half of the twentieth century by French writer Julien Benda called it was called the clerks, the treason of the intellectuals, and it's a book about intellectuals who align themselves politically and who abandoned their search for truth or their object Tivi in order to be part of political movement. So this urge to do that and to be to play a political role or to be the voice sir to provide the ideas for movement is I mean I think it's as old as writing, public speaking itself. Talk about how you've seen that in Poland where you normally spend most of your time. So the book actually the idea for the book came from my reflections about the history of Poland. Over the last thirty years in especially some of the people who I felt aligned with in the nine hundred ninety s there was a kind of center right anticommunist movement that was I mean it wasn't ever cohesive, but it was the people within it certainly spoke to one another in the nineties who all had a similar vision of Poland and who all hoped for Poland it would be part of Europe and part of NATO and would be. Some kind of democracy. And connected world. Some of those people now have acquired a very different vision of Poland and they. Hope to pull, it becomes kind of Catholic nationalist one party state. They've been part of or supporters of a government that has cracked down on independent media and may be doing. So further that uses openly homophobic and anti Semitic slogans in its election campaigns and that I think worse of all really has sought to pack the courts in order to remove the independence of judges and the transformation of those people is one of the subjects of the. First part of the book, and again I think their motives are various I mean some of them are personal. They personally didn't like the political system that emerged in the nineties and two thousands and they they are. They didn't fight until they had a personal role in it. Some people felt police losing something they. They developed a stellar sometimes mythical nostalgia for some other version of the country that they preferred may have existed sometime in the past. Poland's cases to pre-communist past you know some of them felt that Poland was losing its identity as emergency urban there multiple reasons but the the overall impulse is one that I think Americans should be aware of too because the you know the attraction of authoritarianism, the attraction of the one party state or the attraction of liberalism I think can be felt in lots of countries including our own

Poland Europe Turkey Government Putin Pulitzer Prize Applebaum London Oregon Julien Benda Press Ltd Orban Juan Producer Writer Nato
Activists uphold John Lewis' legacy to fight for voting rights

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:48 min | Last month

Activists uphold John Lewis' legacy to fight for voting rights

"Imagery of these past few days comes close close to the honor John. Lewis deserved in life as was said over this past weekend this time they saluted the man who was almost killed at the hands of police this time, his final crossing of the bridge that may soon bear his name. was on rose pedals John Lewis witnessed his share of history during his time here on earth, and now in death he becomes the first ever black elected official to lie in state at the US Capitol. We welcome to the broadcast tonight. Nicole Hannah Jones, correspondent for the New York Times focusing on racial injustice this year she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for her work on the time. Sixteen, thousand nine hundred project, which analyzes how slavery has affected our country among her many other honor. She's also a past recipient of the MacArthur Genius Grant. Thank you so much for spending some time with us. All of us who were lucky enough to spend any time with John Lewis are left just with our memories, but I'd like for you to talk about his personal legacy in your life for you. As, thank you so much for having me on to talk about one of the greatest Americans that this country has produced John Lewis was just a few years older than my own father. like my father was born into the segregated south into a family of sharecroppers so I very personally understand how he change the country that my father, and that he. He was born into. That would allow someone like me. an opportunity to work at a place like the New York Times and to do the Piper journalism that I do I just would not be here without him. and you know all of the other civil rights activists in everyday Americans who I consider to be really this nation's true founding fathers. How do you keep the legacy alive of such a towering and unique American? During a time in our lives, where everything we see around us is kind of his antithesis sadly. Yes, I mean the amazing thing about. Congressman John Lewis is that he was not one who felt that he needed to dictate our control the movement that was coming. He was a supporter of black lives. Matter. We spoke about it when I interviewed him about freedom, summer one of the last things he did before he died was to go see the black lives manner banner that was painted in DC so i. think what he much more than myself was. Optimistic he believed that. We would need to keep fighting these BABS, but they will worthy and that we would have victories and I think he has passed that legacy onto us, and it is our charge. You know we know that as As John Lewis died, there was a bill in Congress right now to restore the provision of the Voting Rights Act. That was good by the Supreme Court and that is his legacy. If we want to honor him, then the way to honor him is to continue his work, and that is one way to do that. I. Hope. My, sarcasm. Comes through over zoom or whatever it is, we're calling this technology because it is meant to be the dripping kind of sarcasm, you guys at the sixteen nineteen project must be working on some very scary stuff because it seems to trigger a lot of officeholders. Yeah. It's been an interesting time. The Sixteen nineteen project published almost a year ago. Next month it'll be a year and yet it seems like the people in the highest offices of this land have a bit of an obsession with the project and it's been. It's been interesting I hope though that this conversation will drive people in this country to do some reflection on why we hold so dearly to these founding myths, and why we still four hundred years after the first Africans were brought to this land. To be enslaved cannot deal with our history and our past. Thank you for not minding a little well. Sarcasm and thank you mostly for talking about the life and legacy of the giant, we just lost John Lewis and I'm reminded people will line up tomorrow morning at eight am. The line will stretch tomorrow evening until ten pm just to pay their respects Nicole Hannah Jones. It's been a great pleasure having you on. Thank you so very

Congressman John Lewis Nicole Hannah Jones New York Times Pulitzer Prize United States Macarthur Supreme Court Congress
Tom Cotton calls slavery 'necessary evil' in attack on New York Times' 1619 Project

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | Last month

Tom Cotton calls slavery 'necessary evil' in attack on New York Times' 1619 Project

"Republican Senator Tom Cotton wants to punish schools that use a New York Times Siri's examining slavery in the US. The 16 19 project was published about a year ago and won the Pulitzer Prize. Last week, Continent produced a bill that would penalize schools that use a curriculum linked to the project by withholding federal funds. Cotton says the essays, poetry and fiction falsely pushed the idea. The U. S is a systemically racist country with slavery at its core. Over the weekend, Cotton told the Arkansas Democrat Gazette. The founding fathers believed slavery was the necessary evil upon which the union was built

Senator Tom Cotton Pulitzer Prize New York Times Siri United States Arkansas
Washington - Library of Congress to honor author Colson Whitehead

WBBM Morning News

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Washington - Library of Congress to honor author Colson Whitehead

"Announced this morning that author Colson Whitehead is this year's recipient of its prize for American Fiction at just 50 years old. Whitehead is the youngest winner of Lifetime Achievement Award is already this year's recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction of the Orwell Prize for political fiction. And since the

Colson Whitehead Pulitzer Prize Lifetime Achievement Award
Snapchat removes Juneteenth filter that asked users to smile to break chains

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Snapchat removes Juneteenth filter that asked users to smile to break chains

"Snapchat has removed its Juneteenth filter after critics slammed it as tone deaf and offensive it shows chains appearing and then breaking when the user is prompted to smile the pan African flag is also in the background the online firestorm started after digital strategists and Pulitzer Prize finalist mark as lucky posted a video of himself trying out the filler filter with a sarcastic caption saying interesting this comes as Snapchat CEO says he will not release the company's diversity report because releasing the data would reinforce the idea that minorities aren't properly represented in the tech

Snapchat CEO Pulitzer Prize
Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

Solvable

05:51 min | 3 months ago

Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

"Were excited to share with you. A new season of conversations with leaders and change makers about how to solve the world's biggest problems. This is an extraordinary moment. We're living through global pandemic, and in the United. States were experiencing the most powerful protest movement of my lifetime against police, brutality and racial injustice. It's a time of great possibility. Our Society seems to be open to the kinds of moral and social transformations that were much harder to imagine before the virus, and before the killing of George. Floyd! For this are second season I'll be joined again by by Pushkin. co-founder Malcolm well and journalist and friend and Applebaum a Pulitzer Prize winning historian and staff writer at the Atlantic. To start this season, we're focusing on two problems racial injustice and the twenty twenty election. We can have an election that is participatory. With robust. In twenty twenty justice isn't blind. We have to be far more critical and thoughtful and have that Lens. On today's episode, we hear from an international expert on non violent protests. Let's saw this one big issue. Let's more racial equality. Great to look at our narcissism of small differences later. When the outcry went up over George Fluids, killing peaceful demonstrators took to the streets in Minneapolis then in other cities across the country and across the globe, and a problem arose. It's a problem. We've seen elsewhere. Bad actors outliers with destructive agendas overtaking the news coverage by engaging in retaliatory violence. This isn't a new issue. It's one peaceful. Protesters have long faced in south. Africa Egypt Ukraine Tunisia and during occupy Wall Street. Of Popovich is a Serbian activist and scholar, social movements, organizers from around the world have turned to him for advice about how to strengthen and propel their movements. Popovich, as the Executive Director of the Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and strategies or canvas. He literally wrote a user's manual for successful. Social Change. Our host and Applebaum lives in Poland. She spoke to Popovich from his home in Belgrade Serbia. Here's their conversation. My Solo bill is to create social change through the successful strategic nonviolent movement so surgeon. Why is this your solvable? In other words? What makes this issue personal to you? While first of all I started getting better young on my freshman year on the university, we were faced with a with a crazy regime in Belgrade their nineties any kind of choices, you can fight three concisely. I guess I was stubborn. Police stadiums fight together. Together with a group of France who launched the movement, called out four, which is a Serbian for resistance, and then built from eleven people to seventy thousand people, eventually getting rid of the best guy lawsuits, and I kind of addicted to the idea of the social change. Group People Power movements since you originally began odd for you and your friends without any experience. You had run protests before you had an organized movement before. And now you're able to advise people. So how did you begin thinking through the problem in the beginning was just spontaneous, or did you plan first of all? We started by doing it without planning. Which is why it took us nine years to actually do it so ninety two. We did a little bit of the of locking ourselves in the campuses, seeing east kind of stop. It didn't work because it didn't enroll the rural. Deny, six seven lot of people were mobilized. To smaller places, we protested for one hundred days day by day by day. This refigure out that everyday protest is probably not the best way to do it because it's very exhausting, so we figured out that it is unity thing that we are message. Most of the protesters were getting wall in the protest in, and they say we are too busy to plan so a learning by doing and making mistakes is actually the best way to do stop, but it's very slow so strongly. Advocate to the people start reading books and learn from other people's mistakes, rather than learning from there on. How did you break it down into solvable pieces How should people who WANNA create? Change think. Think about that for a successful protest. You need so much more than the protests. You need an idea what should be different with the cold vision of tomorrow. Then you need to share this vision with different groups. Then you need to work with people. You're not normally alike and probably disagree on many other stuff to really get to the change, so need to take a really sober. Look at the groups you need. And then then we dealt politicizing indulging groups, and then you try to figure out how you work together for the change that benefits everybody because we talked to stand. Social change is a very kind of selfish of for matinee, people and the trick indistinct stinks is. A unifying proposition, which is the smallest common denominator from the groups you want to mobilize and very orchid. You want to agree on what you agree. Also went to read what you disagree, so this is not about the things that that are different among us. We leave this thing for layer, but let's solve this one big issue. Let's get rid of of communism. Let's get rid of luxury L.. Let's make more racial equality, and so on and so forth, and then we are going to look at our narcissism of small differences later.

Popovich George Fluids Applebaum Belgrade Floyd Center For Applied Nonviolent Pulitzer Prize Atlantic Minneapolis Serbia Poland France Co-Founder Pushkin. Malcolm Well Tunisia Executive Director Staff Writer Africa
BIPOC Theater Artists Post Petition Demanding Change: ‘We See You, White American Theater’

All Of It

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

BIPOC Theater Artists Post Petition Demanding Change: ‘We See You, White American Theater’

"All around the world we continue to need to have these important and overdue conversations about race in the twenty first century we are seeing established cultural institutions face their own practices from The New York Times staff revolt to the Twitter led movement to expose publishing pay inequities to insensitivity and foodie publications people are speaking up even the theater world is being put on notice as an open letter began circulating on social media this week with the title we see white American theater he was signed by actors and playwrights including Pulitzer and

Twitter Pulitzer The New York Times
A.O. Scott on the Work of Wallace Stegner

The Book Review

03:33 min | 3 months ago

A.O. Scott on the Work of Wallace Stegner

"Were some of those big questions that stagner wrestled with in his writing the segments such a fascinating writer for one thing, and I don't really get into into the peace, but he really spans generate. I don't think there are that. Many writers who cover quite the same amount of time as he does, so he he's born in nineteen o nine and grew up in various places around the western United States to Seattle Salt. Lake City not just the United States schedule on, but he started writing in the thirties is first. Four novels were published in the thirties and kept writing and kept going up until his death in. In nineteen ninety-three, the big novels that people tend to read the to that that are probably the most red angle of repose and crossing to safety are from the seventies and eighties. And he already had you know four or five decade career behind him. At that point, you know it's almost a cliche to think of him as a Western writer because he taught at Stanford for many years, he founded the creative writing program. At Stanford, the creative writing fellowships still bear his name there. A lot of his nonfiction is about the West about ecology about the settlement of the West. He wrote a really fascinating book in the forties called Mormon country about Utah Settlement Utah. Conflicts between Mormon and Non Mormon? Population and native Americans there, so the West is kind of his big theme, but it's always in opposition to the Western as we think been in movies or in popular Western literature sort of the mythology the west so. The whole idea of cowboys and railroad man. Rugged individualists, the whole myth of. Western expansion Western settlement something that he's always looking at from a very critical angle. When we think about this idea of like the great American writer and the Great American novel, which is probably all just a false notion, while the feels like in many people's minds like a terrible. Oh, that people know of Wallenstein. They, know the title usually angle of repose and crossing to safety both books that sold very well as in addition to being critical success says. But he's not one of those people that's on the curriculum. For example you said in your essay that he's the writer that you come across on shelves of books where you like you rent a cabin for the summer, and there are inevitably a copy or two of worn paperbacks of his novels, and and and that's the way I came across stagner. What is his reputation in the country? Did he get the recognition that he deserved I think in his lifetime. He was pretty well. We won or was a finalist for most of the major awards Pulitzer in the National Book Award, and he he was a very powerful and important figure in the world of creative writing. I mean the the the list of his students you know includes Berry. Edward Abbey Tillie Olsen Robert Stone Larry. mcmurtry Ken Casey so the people who pass through Stanford and were stagner fellows. There is part of legacy in American writing. Kind of off to the side of whether people are still reading his books, but but I think there is this interesting status where it's not that he's obscure, forgotten neglected, but he's feels a little bit. Marginal to me a little bit, maybe unassimilated.

Writer Stanford Edward Abbey Tillie Olsen Robe United States Stagner Utah Seattle National Book Award Lake City Wallenstein Berry
"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

02:44 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> These are <Speech_Music_Male> my people. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This is <Speech_Music_Male> the land <Speech_Music_Male> where my <Speech_Music_Male> fathers <Speech_Music_Male> live. <Speech_Music_Male> These <Speech_Music_Male> are my <Speech_Music_Male> people <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in brotherhood. <Speech_Music_Male> We're <Speech_Music_Male> heirs <Speech_Music_Male> of creed <Speech_Music_Male> to live <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Creep <Speech_Music_Male> back proclaims <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> that by loved <Speech_Music_Male> ones bloodstain. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This is <Music> my land <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> these <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are my <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> program <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is produced today by Nadia <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Raymond with help from <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Aviv Cornfield. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> People put together. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> A show includes <Speech_Male> a bigger Emmanuel Berry. <Speech_Male> Susan Burton Ben. 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Flynn <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> billions and Betty Gilpin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the Netflix show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Glow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks today to Harrison <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nesbitt an AB <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kaufman. Kimbro <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Kelly Rinaldo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Lanos Junior. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Kenji Zucca <Speech_Male> Chris. Turpin William <Speech_Male> Dobson Digit <Speech_Male> Schanche Russell. <Speech_Male> D Lewis Klay <Speech_Male> Bogs Marine Meyer <Speech_Male> Nick Mariela and <Speech_Male> Whitson Martin <Speech_Male> our website this <Speech_Male> American Life Dot Org <Speech_Male> this American <Speech_Male> life to public radio <Speech_Male> stations by PR. <Speech_Male> X. 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An amazing <Speech_Male> dog and <Speech_Music_Male> a man who's becoming an <Speech_Male> inhuman terror <Speech_Male> only or <Speech_Male> force greater than evil <Speech_Music_Male> can stop. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What's coming next? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Read devoted <Speech_Music_Male> by visiting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Amazon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dot COM. <Speech_Male> Slash <Speech_Music_Male> voted podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> There's always <Speech_Male> to a progams co-founder <Speech_Male> Mr Tori Maui. To <Speech_Male> you know he recently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cook dinner for some friends <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who hate onions <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and anything <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> in the onion family <Speech_Female> and they wanted <Speech_Female> to keep the the <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> the leak <Speech_Male> to a minimum. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Eric <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Glass back <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next week <SpeakerChange> with more stories <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at this American <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> life. These <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are my people. <Music>

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

03:18 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

11:07 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

"The old credible fear screenings usually took an hour or less these. Mpp interviews can last four five six hours when I ask these asylum officers to describe what these interviews are like for them for the migrants in front of them. Ursula gave the most vivid picture she told me about the very first MPP interview. She did a family from El Salvador. To parents to kids. She had a script she had to stick to. The family was exhausted and traumatized and totally unprepared. You're put into a cell. You're separated from your kids and your wife. You have no idea what's going on because you thought today you were going to be interviewed about El Salvador and you were going to get to enter the United States couple hours later they lead you into this freezing cold cell where chain your hands to a table in handcuffs and someone is sitting across from you. Who doesn't speak your language and starts talking to someone in the phone translating to you that you're going to talk about Mexico you smell like shit because you've been living in a shelter you know without any running water for a month and a half bus. You've traveled all the way across Central America to get there and you don't understand why someone's talking to you about Mexico. This interview goes on for an hour and a half and the person keeps pausing it so they can talk to someone on the computer which they say is their supervisor and another guard. Leads your wife in that. You haven't seen in the last twelve hours into the interview room and you. Can you know. Brush her hand as she passes by. You're so happy to see her. Because you've been separated and you have no idea what's going on. So where are my children? I don't know Sir I'm sure they'll be fine. Your wife goes through a similar interview But she keeps being confronted about the answer. She's giving because they're different from yours and the officer can't understand why this story very so differently between two people who experienced it half an hour passes before her children are brought into the room and then the officer has to talk to a ten year old boy about whatever his parents said and then confront the ten year old boy on inconsistencies between his story and his parents story and then the wife is like. When am I going to see my husband again in the officers like I have no idea? Let them know if you need to use the bathroom. Ursula made the case that the families shouldn't get sent back to Mexico and to her shock. Her supervisor agreed in fact she happened to walk outside the moment the family got released. They've got their backpacks on. They're holding hands. She thought maybe this won't be so bad but that was the last time the very next interview a woman told her over and over she was afraid of being raped and killed in Mexico. Ursula believed she was going back to a place that was very possible but because the woman couldn't name specific person who'd assault her Ursula had to send her back since then it's essentially been no after no after no asylum officers told me that even when they find one of those Unicorn cases where they check off all the boxes and recommend not returning to Mexico their supervisors overrule them and told me and my producer Nadia Raman about one asylum-seekers case where their attacker even spelled out their motive and it still didn't fly. It was basically a situation where there was a really clear connection to the nationality. Like the persecutor had like really said like I am harming you because of this nationality and your nationality and harm was really really severe. It was leaked definitely torture and It was really clear that the police weren't GonNa do a thing about it. Didn't care at all and the supervisor rejected it. Why do they say why they said We can't show that if this individual went back to Mexico. The persecutor would be able to locate them so the standard. Today's upside down from what it used to be in a credible fear. Instead of. Let's err on the side of letting people in because we don't want anyone to be tortured or die under. Mpp The standard is almost impossibly high. So almost nobody gets in the Department of Homeland Security says only about nine hundred sixty people interviewed have not been sent back to Mexico ultimately of a little more than forty seven thousand. Mpp cases registered as of October. With about thirty seven thousand of those still pending of those only eleven people have been granted asylum or some other kind of relief according to Syracuse University which tracks all this using government statistics. Eleven and. That's what the policy was meant to do the administration credits P P for a sharp drop in the numbers coming to the border. Mark Morgan the acting head of customs and Border Protection. Calls it a game changer. And absolutely successful. It only took doug two days and five interviews to go home after work and pull out the lawbooks. He's a lawyer. He actually owned a beat up copy of the Immigration and nationality. Act The law hundreds of pages long that makes up the foundation of the US immigration system. He grabbed off his bedroom shelf along with a few other books from law school he printed out a bunch of court cases and Supreme Court decisions with more cases pulled up on his computer screen in the middle of all of. This was his pen and white legal pad as an attorney. He wanted to get his feelings about. Mpp How much worse it felt. Compared to everything else did down in writing. He worked for hours and he wrote down. Seven bullet points the main ways he thought. Mpp was illegal. Once he saw the list laid out there on the Line White Paper Doug knew what to do the next day. He went to tell his supervisor. He wasn't going to do anymore. Mpp interviews his response. Was I know these interviews are hard? We're all required to do them. That's we're trying to spread it out. You know rolling basis etcetera etcetera and You know at that point. There's like this moment. Where a could it could have just said you're right. I now the socks and gone back and paused and I told him you don't understand. I'm not doing these interviews. What you're not doing these interviews and no. They're legal to definitely immoral and I'm not doing. His boss was stunned. He didn't really seem to know what to say eventually. He told him he was probably going to have to write him up somehow to start disciplinary proceedings. Doug went home that night and decided to escalate. He went back to his legal pad essentially read a legal memo explaining all of the reasons that I thought it was illegal in wires refusing to do it and then on that Monday I e mailed that to all of the administration in San Francisco and the two supervisors that were involved on the disciplinary proceedings. And then nothing. Nothing happened instead of sparking some kind of rebellion or at least forcing a confrontation. It's crickets so we took it a step further. He sent his memo to Senator's office then he drafted his by email attached as memo and since it out office wide to all of San Francisco asylum about eighty people into to a representative of the Union for asylum officers across the country and with that Doug Shutdown is work computer and walked out. He they make one change and everyone at the offices like. Oh this is terrible. But we'll figure it out and then make another change go. This is terrible but but I need my job. I'm going to do it even if I don't want to complain about it and not complain about the work complain about the hours. The end of the day. I'm going to do it and the more I do it to easier. It is to deal and that is terrifying. I mean that's how all the awful things in the world had happened. That's how you get so many good people doing really bad things and that's what's happening and it's terrifying. You're like literally sending people back to be raped and killed. That's what this the three officers I spoke with are not alone. A union representing the asylum officers and USCIS. Employees filed a brief in a lawsuit against the administration arguing that MPP was illegal and a ton of officers acquitting. I've heard this from a bunch of people in the asylum core and that citizenship and immigration services the parent agency several use. The word exodus and if officers can't quit they're calling in sick anything they can do to avoid MPP INTERVIEWS. We try to get some numbers from the government. They wouldn't tell us how many people had left. They did say that. By the end of the year they hope to have seven hundred seventy one asylum officers but as of a month ago they had something like five fifty meaning. They're roughly two hundred people short. I tried to get an interview with the acting head of. Us CIS can cook Nelly to talk about all this. He's since been named Deputy Homeland Security Secretary. He didn't give us one did get one question. It was at a press breakfast. So this audio was recorded on my phone molly tool from times. And how do you eat with the concerns from some of Your asylum officers their concerns that many of these policies being handed down by the trump administration particularly targeting asylum in fact illegal that they're being ordered to implement policies that are in direct contradiction with immigration. Laws that are passed by Congress. Well they're not a direct contradiction. Would've utilizing them. We've nineteen thousand people that S I don't expect any of us to completely agree on all this But I do expect that the the professional employees at UCS implimented policies in place. They're part of part of the executive branch he said. And so long as we're in the position of putting in place we believe to be legal policies. That haven't been found to be otherwise we fully expect them to implement those faithfully and sincerely.

Mexico supervisor officer Doug Shutdown Ursula Mpp United States El Salvador acting head Department of Homeland Securit Central America UCS Nelly Union for asylum Syracuse University Mark Morgan USCIS Sir Supreme Court
"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

05:06 min | 4 months ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on This American Life

"Gwen goodbye stranger. So like I said at the top of the program today show was first broadcast in November. And we are rerunning it today because it just won the Pulitzer Prize. This is one of the spectrum jumping into the original broadcast to say The president's policies at the border have only intensified since we first broadcast this show. Since covered nineteen in March the Administration. Shut down the border to all asylum seekers aside. I'm hearing aren't going to resume until late June though. It seems possible that even that date is going to get pushback. Why first broadcast this program? One of the things that we were especially interested in was the US officials on the front lines whose job under remain in Mexico to send people back lots of them. Were resigning saying no. That's actually not my job loss Angeles Times reporter. Molly O'Toole talked to a bunch of them and here is the version of the story that we ran in the fall before the remain in Mexico policy began an up ended the asylum system and completely changed what it is to be an asylum officer. Here's how the job used to work when a Central American showed up at the US Mexico border and said let me N. I'm afraid of going back to my country. That's where the asylum officer came in the officer. Did something called a credible fear screening to check if the person was likely to face harm or death if the US sent them back home if there's even a chance that they would the asylum officer with let them into the United States to wait for a court date. We're an immigration. Judge would make the final call. Doug Stevens says people don't understand how hard the job is. At the time. All this started he was an asylum officer in San Francisco. Have people come into my office and my job essentially has told me the worst thing that happened to you. You have an hour go and then I'll decide if you're telling me the truth and all the side. If you gotta stay you are expected to be really do the job. Well needs to be an expert in the political cultural social and economic situations in innumerable countries around the world. And you're expected to be a human lie detector all at once. President trump talks about asylum itself. As if it's fraud he says it's a hoax. A big fat con job that people come in with fake asylum claims that asylum officers. Just let everyone through. And then asylum-seekers never show up for their day in court that it's a border wide thousand mile loophole and it's true. The most people do pass that first. Stop with an asylum officer and enter the United States. But there's a good reason for that it's built into. Us asylum law a common sense humanitarian idea. We don't want to send people back to situations where they'd get tortured or killed. The legal term is non-refoulement and so loss at the Barlow. If there's basically any chance an asylum-seeker Cook get killed or harmed officers supposed to let them into the US and doesn't need a lot of proof or evidence at that point later when they get before an immigration judge and by the way the majority do show up there they need proof and most of them get rejected even before. President trump took office less than fifteen percent per year got asylum. That's because most people don't meet specific criteria in the law or don't have enough evidence or it doesn't check out all the asylum officers I've ever spoken with SITA's job to weed out the fakers. The people who don't really need protection the ones that just trying to game the system. Oh my God. Here's where I'm going to be real with you. This is an asylum officer. We're calling Ursula. This isn't her voice. She's afraid of getting fired. So we had an actor copy what she said as closely as possible. The Fried Is like happening on a scale. That's re- that's huge. We're talking like hundreds of people a month. I interviewed three asylum officers for this story. In all three said the groups that have been the primary target of President Trump's immigration policies. They actually aren't the main ones committing fraud. It's not the Central Americans. It's not the Middle Eastern people. It is the Indian people and the Chinese people. They all have the same bullshit story about getting beaten with hockey sticks three times because they're part of Sikh party and the police told them they're going to jail them if they ever bad mouth the ruling party ever again bullshit just hap- they all just happened to do the same thing and suffer the same fate even though there's absolutely no confirmation in any media that any of this persecution is happening and studies done by our our department of State Counterparts in the country are straight up. Like this is not a real thing. The Chinese are running a similar scam with Christian claims.

Doug Stevens United States President trump president Mexico Pulitzer Prize fraud Ursula Gwen Administration Middle Eastern Angeles Times Molly O'Toole hockey San Francisco reporter SITA Barlow Cook
"pulitzer" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Survive. But we hope and pray that it continues long enough for me to finally collect every Lilly Pulitzer designed Pulitzer every Lilly Pulitzer design. We just need this show long enough for you to actually start saying Pulitzer Pulitzer Pulitzer into Reagan Soviet bureau week, we've had we've added a new one to the new to the lineup. If the worst comes soon, this recording like all recordings, maybe our final word. One of these days, I'm just gonna stop right there. Or less show our final. We're literally be the final all recordings maybe our final. Wind blowing. But if providence allows we hope to be back with you soon for another entry in In the. the. For more podcasts from iheartradio throughout history. People have been denounced for dissenting from the majority, but that didn't stop them from speaking up. Popular is about resistors rebels and revolutionaries people. Like sitting bull foam, Eliah, resum Kunti and Galileo. Took a chance on what they believed in and inspired real take. Every week on top we'll tell the story of someone who challenged the status quo. Connecting the dots between their history and the history, we're making today. Unpopular drops every Tuesday, you can listen and subscribe at apple podcast or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast..

Pulitzer Pulitzer iheartradio resum Kunti apple
"pulitzer" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"By nineteen fifty nine Louis. Hewlett's are got out of the orange juice selling business entirely and incorporated, her company as Lilly Pulitzer Inc. I assume she was never sowing the stuff herself. She all she was. Oh, he was the seamstress and, and, and one of the things that made her business explode in popularity was that her old classmate and chum Jacqueline Bouvier now Jacqueline Bouvier. Kennedy was photographed wearing one of lily's creations, which lily later claimed was made from a set of curtains like kitchen curtains that she took down and took some scissors to and made into a cute little frocks. He's really tapping into that kind of inventive Scarlett. O'hara marie-yvonne trap idea of the woman who can today's modern smart woman who can produce a smart outfit out of anything. Well, this may be what she learned at miss Porter's school, right? I mean curtain tailoring one she was learning. A she was learning pharmacy and agriculture and how to take a take a pair of sheers to the curtains and make a dress for Jacqueline Kennedy. But that's a good. That's a real good origin story, though, to have that in your arsenal like today, internet companies famously make stuff like that up and will lie and say that they're just wanted to sell his Pez dispensers. So he invented EBay, just so there's a one line hook that might make the Wall Street Journal. Well, this was I mean, this picture of Jackie Kennedy in this bolt floral kitchen curtain, dress. And now underwear possibly and almost certainly no underwear. You know, if we're talking about talking about my horrid story. You're just imagining. Jackie Kennedy with no underwear before I imagined Jack be with no underwear. I was just a normal farm. And then I woke up the next day, and I was a fashion designer Italy. This dress became the must have item of this sort of period. If you were a socialite in particular the Lilly Pulitzer was of your class, and of your time and style..

Jacqueline Bouvier Lilly Pulitzer Inc Lilly Pulitzer lily Porter Hewlett Wall Street Journal Scarlett EBay Jack
"pulitzer" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"You know, I'm not interested in writing actually political things incorrectly, but I want to change people the way they interact with each other. And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, the book includes a side by side translation of every poem in Spanish. The other poem we'd love you to read from his depopulation blues, which talks about the broader obligations. We have people around the world even if there happened to be of a different nationality country. Oh, absolutely. But also many people don't realize this, but we actually had a depopulation order that was concocted by Kissinger and Nixon. And so we are actually people color, especially in danger of being depopulated here in this country as well as in other countries. And I know it feels really shocking, but they can research this evil can be brilliant though. Speaking of depopulation. Of people. It will find a way we are not fools completely to be seduced by it. For Nixon Carter Reagan, perhaps all the others knew we were counting on them to be as human as we are, but why eight hundred thousand Rwandans died while we watched a televised presidential sex scandal might have told us something that politicians who smiled at us and kissed our babies, blue eyes shining with triumph. Well, knew we were falling into our graves kicked by them as they counted our votes. Why do you think we tell so many stories about ourselves about America that don't always match up with the ugly realities because we can't face the reality. It's a terrible history and until we face it, we can go nowhere. We can expect to grow. You have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year, and I want to play for you something from one of his songs and a video that echoes your work. Take a look. Chips like. Humming. If God got us, we're going to be all right. Have you have you heard him quote you before the now? You've never seen that now and he's big. He's not Alice Walker big, but he's big, I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people who call her in this country, we've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other across generations prizes are a funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize the Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes. No, so whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. Did it change your status because there's your work that stands on its own, and then there's the. Reach of your work. And so I wonder whether the prize is in the prestige that you've amassed did make a difference in the reach. I mean, we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast in a film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work in hasn't really come from the prize. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're going to do, but I'll play you one clip of President Trump..

Pulitzer prize Alice Walker Kendrick Nixon Carter Reagan president President Trump America Kissinger Oprah Whoopi Lamar
"pulitzer" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, you have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year and I wanna play for you something from one of his songs and video that echoes your work. Take a look. Night. Chips like. Have you heard him quote you before, but now you've never seen that? No, and he's big. He's not Alice Walker, big big. I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people to call in this country. We've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other cross generations prizes are funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes, you know? So whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. And we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work doesn't really come from the price. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're gonna do play you. One clip of President Trump. I went to an Ivy league school. I'm very highly educated. I know words I had the best. Words, what does it tell you that it's important to him to be perceived as so smart. It tells me that he knows he probably is not, and he has an inferiority complex and that's very sad, but it's even sadder that we elected him to lead. We definitely need a very different kind of leader. And in fact, we actually need to lead ourselves and until we do, we probably won't get very far. You're saying fury already. I mean, there's a feeling of inferiority or lack of self. Affirmation love. Does that in your view, make people more more dangerous when they come in contact with power money? Yes, because there's always in the, there's always the feeling of need to measure up, you know? And I mean, even see that between him and Barack Obama, I think n. b. there was just so blatant that Donald Trump envied Iraq Obama his even though he started out with much more than Barack, oh, of course. That's part of the problem that he had everything in Barack as a black man was supposed to have nothing and said, look, what happened is all of the things that this. Isn't isn't in this very hard to take. But the answer is not to make us all suffer is to go and improve yourself. Alice Walker for me, it's an honor to have you here, so I really appreciate you coming by. Thank you. Thank you. Hey, it's Chris from MSNBC every day. I come to the office and we make television show every day. I think to myself, there's so much more I want to talk about. And so this is our podcast it's called, why is this happening? And the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see out every day. They're driven by big ideas each week. I sit down with the person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening. New episodes of Weiss. This happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

Alice Walker President Trump Pulitzer prize Barack Obama Nobel Pulitzer president Ivy league school MSNBC Weiss Oprah Lamar Chris Whoopi
"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

"Have to admit because years ago more than three decades ago i started in the news business and i started at a newspaper called the christian science monitor and that was explicitly founded as an antidote to the hearst and pulitzer era they were fighting yellow journalism and we had a guy at our paper named david road who now writes for the new york times and while he was there at the monitor he won a pulitzer for his coverage of bosniaherzegovina the the conflict there certainly and i remember thinking how ironic it was that this was this newspaper seventh pulitzer and they're always bragging about their pulitzers and yet pulitzer was the very thing he was the guy that the founder of the newspaper you know was really trying to push back against their others pushing back against hurston pulitzer in that same way trying to clean up the press you know certainly and if you look back from when the ox owes burger family bought the new york times a little bit before this period that's one of the things that they professed that they were going to produce in their newspaper news without favor without fear right that was always present in some level in american journalism but it was not the dominant form of journalism until after the second world war when the again the news marketplace shifted dramatically most people who grew up in remember that era lived probably city that was served by one newspaper that newspaper had basically a monopoly in that town there only a few cities in america in the postwar era or by nineteen seventy that actually had real sort of competitive newspaper markets new york city being one boston and chicago being another but only a few when you have monopoly control of an area saint louis for example the newspaper then is trying to appeal to everybody when it tries to appeal to everybody then it's news gets a lot more serious and somber and it's a pinion driss to the back of the sections and that's to simply a smart business in because that way you're not gonna offend readers who might have a different ideological stance yeah that's the opposite of what of what pulitzer and hearst doing they were out there clubbing addy every day to fight for that reader and woo them over to their side what do you think it was though after world war two that created those conditions that hunger for the objective journalism that came to be the standard in that second part of the twentieth says theory i mean a lot of people sort of are nostalgic for return to to something more like that and i'm just sort of wondering what would you say how would you identify the factors that that ultimately led to objective journalism as we know it sure so you would say hunger on the audience i would more cynically say actually what it was was a great system that newspaper owners had of finding away that there would be no competition what you really had after the second world war was the emergence of television as a you know mass media means which began to suck a lot of advertising dollars that newspapers traditionally could claim for themselves right once that happened a lot of newspapers collapsed you had tremendous consolidation and that's when you had this massive shift between towns and cities that had two competing sources of news to towns and cities that were dominated by one newspaper that one newspaper again the incentive to not upset advertisers to not upset different readers becomes this practice of objective journalism which is again a smart way to feed your audience when you have no competition i'm wondering though if in a way what we're really talking about was news that was monopolized by a handful of of of operators really and the television networks to the extent that they had news operations in for a while there they did have rather robust news operations international news operations even that everyone was looking over everyone else's shoulder to make sure that they had the the story that the other guy did absolutely and that's really where they competed they competed for scoops but not for perspective they were you had this allah gobbly of nbc abc and cbs which until nineteen eighty divided up the entire country and so they were really trying to create a mass audience to appeal to someone in seattle as well as someone in miami and again when.

three decades
"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

"The death of his old rival doesn't quite stop hearst in his tracks but the mogul does take time to pay his respects in an editorial appreciation hearst calls pulitzer the originator of journalism of action and chievements and a democrat in doctrine and indeed i never suffered the ill health pulitzer did at forty eight he's a strong as an ox with time still left to shape his legacy but that legacy is in jeopardy hearst returns to the journal to find that his decade in politics has weakened the paper he still owns radio is starting to take over newspapers as a mass medium the journal has been forced to shrink its once unbeatable staff now it's getting out flanked by cross town up starts it helped spawn like the new york daily news in nineteen nineteen it debuts is the first new york city paper printed a vertical tabloid format to make page turning easier on the subway the pug nations paper makes its reputation by sneaking a camera into the execution of murderess ruth snyder the paper prints picture snapped the moment the switches thrown on the electric chair syncing the ground shifting underfoot hearst makes a bid to buy out the daily news the paper rebuffs him so in nineteen twenty four he launches a rival daily mirror the mirror has its moments in a flash back to the heady days of the journal it lures big names away from competitors and hires the best talent hearst's money can buy though it eventually becomes the top circulated paper in the country it's revenue has to float other money losing hearst papers and it never gains anywhere near the cultural influence the journal once had this second taste of disappointment makes hearst restless again he begins to produce movies getting to know the film business one starlet at a time as he approaches middle age he also revels in one of his inheritances forty thousand acres on a hill overlooking the pacific ocean in san simeon california back before he launched the mirror the native californians started to wonder if putting down roots in his home state might make him feel more centered more in control of his destiny he commissioned builders to set to work on a new vision hearst castle construction of his estate and the surrounding grounds will go on for nearly three decades the castle is a seductive monument to american success and excess it has two olympic size pools an indoor compound totaling ninety thousand square feet.

hearst new york daily news ruth snyder san simeon california new york hearst castle forty thousand acres three decades
"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

"Standing near the tree with the crowd bathed in candlelight pulitzer thinks he spots someone in the crowd he tells his wife catherine and his medical aid that he wants to go get a closer look and sure enough standing there on the other side of the tree is william randolph hearst pulitzer makes his way over mr hurst mr bullet sir i never thought i'd see another hard bitten journalists in this kind of setting well i do occasionally fall off the beam you may have heard i'm exploring a run for congress elected office i was a missouri legislator once can exactly recommend it nowhere near funds newspapers the mere mention of hearst's name used to make pulitzer furious now seeing his enemy makes him more nostalgic than anything else you think it was all worth it all that frenzy for scoops hearst shrugs he's been a halloween adventure hadn't it have you thought about the truce i proposed the world can handle the more upscale news and we'll leave you in the journal with all the hertie gertie i'm still thinking about it remember i'm the one who hired mark twain to write for the san francisco examiner you know i'm not just going to see you the high ground politicize hearst and pulitzer smile tip their hats to each other and pulitzer heads back to his wife this is the first time the two longtime rivals have ever met it will also be their last this episode of business wars is brought to you in part.

catherine william randolph hearst pulitz congress mr hurst missouri mark twain san francisco
"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

"The army of street boys has defeated the titans of the media when the news is here the latest they gather at the part down the street kid blinks steps up on an overturned garbage can to address the faithful he's waving sheet of paper in wearing a grin from ear to ear the newsies gather looking over their shoulders and keeping watch for the cops the newsies don't know and don't care how the papers figured out how to balance their budgets boys it's official hurston pulitzer just sent word to all the distribution centers they roll the price back we stuck it to them and they'll never forget on august the second we start back up with the world and the journal just remember boys we stick together like glue it is an incredible victory especially for a workforce so young and inexperienced beside rolling back the price to fifty cents hurston pulitzer agree to refund the newsies the cost of each paper they don't sell but for all their efforts the triumph won't last the city is changing and growing rapidly and in a few years hearst pulitzer and their many peers in the newspaper game build corner new stands that makes more sense than a bunch of free roaming news boys zigzagging through the streets even with their victory the era of the newsy is coming to an end hotel barry there's a new headline moving papers these days it's the arrival of the automobile and that will put a final end to the newsies on our next episode hearst fuller finally meet face to face five years after the rival publishers i locked horns in new york as the twentieth century wears on the encounter will leave both men questioning their choices and their legacies i hope you enjoyed this.

barry hearst fuller new york official hurston hearst pulitzer five years
"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on Business Wars

"It's six am in long island city section of queens just across the east river from an hatton horsedrawn paper wagon is just rolling into position creaking as wheels across the cobblestone street the driver parks on a street corner he's expecting the newsies to lineup and grab their stack says they always do but today kid blink is put the word out to enact a different plan dozens of boys of assembled ready for action they form a circle around the wagon and confront the driver hey mac is at the world and the journal you got there what's it to you we just wondered how much you're charging sixty cents for a hundred you know that komo by your papers are scrammed how about you put it on our town come out boys the newsies descend on the cart grabbing papers by the armful let's flip it over what are you doing comeback with papers nice try how these papers go in the river you get away with this we just did buddy read about it kid blink leads the newsies away from the wagon and then they jubilantly defiantly run to queens bridge park and tossed the bundles of papers over a low wall right into the east river it doesn't take long for hearst and pulitzer to hear about stacks of their hot off the presses papers floating in the river and hearst is furious he vows to punish the kids pulitzer doesn't admit it to the people around him but he feels ashamed perhaps he thinks the kids gave him what he deserved still his sense of law and order doesn't like the news mob like approach and both newspaperman know their empires are being undermined by this strike it's taking more of a toll than either thought it would a week and a half into the walkout hurston pulitzer decide on a counterattack not together my two competitors of still never met or spoken but once again in their long rivalry they wind up following the same playbook without comparing notes the journal in the world have often taken the police to task in print for their rough treatment of striking workers suddenly with the issue now on their own doorsteps they've reversed course they run daily editorials praising the cops for breaking up packs of protesting newsies a dangerous pattern is now in place newsies swarm in the streets and hold impromptu rallies that disrupt city life they can't tell us to leave this park this park belongs to allah just like harrison pulitzer can't tell us what to do that's right i thought i told you to get out of here kids get outta here goes scranton he's swing in that billy club again run for it police used to treat him with kid gloves but now they quickly move on the strikers they're not afraid to rough him up a bit either the new york strike is spreading to other nearby cities to newsies are walking out in sympathy in rochester in new haven fall river and providence angry letters arriving newspaper offices by the sackville and circulations are plunging readers are not happy at the world offices pulitzer checks in again with his business operations executive still kids will consider putting the price back depending on sales levels at the end of the year how about that i understand sir but should really see the mail were getting a traitor to the children of america that's how one reader put it that's not fair i mean we gave these boys a lifeline a lot of them walked off steamships started delivering our paper but things are changing our people are starting to talk about child labor protections i would've been grateful for a job like this their age we thought of an alternative mr pulitzer the executive proposes recruiting homeless men from the bowery to deliver the paper's pulitzer reluctantly agrees to the plan and hearst does the same but down park row in the offices of the new york journal hearst gets his own briefing on the plan a few days later by bombs didn't show up what one ought seems they wanted to go easy on the kids guess they got a soft heart card swallow now we got hundreds walking out all over the city from the bronx brooklyn papers stacked up but the printers okay i get it i get it this cannot go on with the newsies holding strong hearst and pulitzer reluctantly admit they need to find a different way to cut costs they can cut staff reduce the number of foreign correspondents pulitzer orders his staff to draft a memo to go out to all distribution centers the following morning.

hatton horsedrawn
"pulitzer" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on American History Tellers

"The block pulitzer is determined not to get beaten on this story as the summer has progressed he's sometimes fled for health reasons to the south of france or to his three hundred foot yacht the liberty when he is in the newsroom he often clutches a hand to his abdomen each broadside from hearst triggers his list of chronic ailments as mma neuralgia insomnia exhaustion through it all pulitzer fights back and finds new ways to retaliate let the journal concoct whatever half truths they want we're going straight to our readers instead we wanna get them personally involved in this case how are we gonna do that here's the headline and i wanted to run the width of the page five hundred dollar reward five hundred who lee there's enough left payroll the world will pay five hundred dollars in gold for the correct solution to the mystery of the remnants of a man's body found in the east river and harlem must be exclusively for the world boss what if the journal scoop system add to that appearance of the solution in any other paper will cancel this offer that's a staggering song a year salary for whoever has a good enough tip but just when it looks like pulitzer has the edge one of hearst's spies from down the block gets wind of the world's plan the spy hustles down to block to the journal intel's hearst hearst immediately orders his front page to be ripped up a final evening edition will now hit the streets right after the world's one last chance for a scoop in this brand new game of mass media scoops aren't always bagged by great reporting the owners of the papers can make their own scoops the late edition of the journal hits the streets the lee lead headline is just two words long but they're big enough to almost fill the page the message signals just how badly hurst wants to win this war a thousand dollars reward only in the new york journal it was the opening volley in a war of words that would rivet the city joseph pulitzer a self made hungarian immigrant is nearly a generation older than hirst bespectacled bearded anxious a sharp contrast from hurston age temperament experience and motivation pulitzer came from a family with modular jewish roots his father was a grain merchant in budapest which is where joseph grew up at the age of nineteen he emigrated to american settling in saint louis after the civil war he worked a series of menial jobs and learned english eventually he earned a law degree and developed a passion for civic life you went into politics i as a campaign worker and then as successful candidate for the missouri legislature politics who satisfying but it's victories were fleeting the job that resonated most with pulitzer was working as a reporter for the german language daily newspaper which reached a sizable audience of fellow immigrants later he moved to the city's largest englishlanguage daily the post dispatch he showed unusual hustle and tenacity in exposing fraud and misdeeds by city officials in a letter to his parents pulsa wants detailed his exploits in america i'm working from early morning until midnight i want to immerse myself in every single detail newspapers shouldn't just be mouthpieces aimed at the elite we can champion the cause of average citizens this is my covenant with my readers he made good on that promise delivering exposes of wealthy tax dodgers and perpetrators of government corruption the stories weren't just earnest dogooder stuff either they had plenty of hooks for the reader to he was so committed to the mission that he scraped together three thousand dollars to buy the paper in just a couple of years pulitzer had turned his investment or about forty eight thousand dollars in today's money into eighty thousand dollars in annual revenue by the time he made his way to new york pulitzer's knack for packaging.

pulitzer forty eight thousand dollars eighty thousand dollars three thousand dollars five hundred dollars five hundred dollar three hundred foot thousand dollars
"pulitzer" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"It's just some my experiences a physician so i've had some real moments in in medicine itself i know said the big one was the black hole principle so pulitzer prize for that or nobel prize or something you're journalists to we were talking last hour about evil and and i'm convinced it exists it's out there why do you think it's there so incident of experiences we can't even get to the grips just how amazing maria and just experiencing lots of things in the is is what we would call easil you know so it's it's learning from that and i think at this point in in humanity.

pulitzer prize maria nobel prize
"pulitzer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The villain doesn't fit your narrative does it what's odd though is that the villains are all white males in the media isn't that odd most of the villains in the media white males who have a narrative attacking white males how is that possible they won't cover the s p l c scandal of money being funneled offshore disclose today by the daily caller should win a pulitzer prize when pulitzerprize without me what does that mean pulitzer was a amok reicher pulitzer was a muckraker in a in a war with the the hurst's they made up stores they in the pulitzer was the originator of fake news pulitzer prize or whatever and now i want to talk about who was really running america and this trump merely now a figurehead like the queen of england because i looked at the news and i saw that the trump administration has forced russia to shudder its consulate in san francisco as well as annexes in dc in new york the are doing this as a response to russia's actions that cut out with diplomatic staff in russia a while ago now i thought we were trying to avoid war with russia i thought we were trying to have better relations with russia is that what trump said just the other day right after the congress force trump's hand by implementing sanctions against russia because they want war never forget that there's money involved in this never forget that all these good liberal senators of speak so badly about russia have house vans and wives will make a fortune in.

pulitzer prize pulitzer hurst the queen england russia san francisco new york trump running america congress