35 Burst results for "Puerto Rico"

Atlantic hurricane season ends with 14 named storms

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 23 hrs ago

Atlantic hurricane season ends with 14 named storms

"It's farewell to the Atlantic hurricane season. I'm Lisa dwyer. The Atlantic hurricane season that had 14 named storms has officially ended, leaving residents in the Florida keys to celebrate, even as others around Florida and Puerto Rico continued to grapple with the damage caused by hurricanes, Ian Nicole and Fiona. The 2022 season had an unusually calm first half but made up for that with three destructive hurricanes in the second half, ending the season with an average number of named storms, the official season runs from June 1st until November 30th. I'm Lisa dwyer

Atlantic Hurricane Lisa Dwyer Ian Nicole Florida Puerto Rico Fiona
🔴 Bitcoin Thrives, NASDAQ Dives | This Week in Crypto – Nov 7, 2022

99 Bitcoins

00:33 sec | Last week

🔴 Bitcoin Thrives, NASDAQ Dives | This Week in Crypto – Nov 7, 2022

"6 a.m. Monday, November 7th, 2022. Bitcoin thrives, NASDAQ dives this week in crypto November 7th, 2022. The post Bitcoin thrives, NASDAQ dives this week encrypt on November 7th, 2022 appeared first on 99 bitcoins. Bitcoin outperforms the NASDAQ maker deo's cofounder is found dead in Puerto Rico and the SEC. Bitcoin thrives, NASDAQ dives this week in crypto November 7th, 2022 read more.

Bitcoin DEO Puerto Rico SEC
Grim Outlook for Bitcoin

The Bad Crypto Podcast

02:03 min | Last week

Grim Outlook for Bitcoin

"Timestamp is November the 21st, 2022, two 34 AST because in Puerto Rico, we don't change time here. So for half the year, we are with New York and the New York and the rest of the world decides in the fall. They're going to fall back an hour. And we're like, no, it's the same time here. So New York is now an hour behind us. So figure it out. The total crypto market cap $823 billion Bitcoin, $16,000 exactly. I've seen it go into the 15s in the bump back up. Ethereum, $1101, B and B, $253, and where is Solana now? Solana is now look at this $11 at 67 cents. If I was going to pick Travis, one token that I think is done, I'm going to say it's Solana. I'm not saying the blockchain is going to die. I'm saying that as the place because it's so closely tied to FTX and the money that came from there, that why would you build on Solana now when there's so many other options? Yeah, when you look at their chart overall, the Solana price chart max when it was sitting around a few bucks if you box. And then, you know, you look at, you just kind of lay that over what happened with ICP Internet computer protocol, how FTX and then sort of thrashed that and blew the price up and then shorted it all the way down, took that money that they gained from a legitimate product. And then started pumping up Solana. And then you can literally see when it happened when Solana was like last while it was December of 2020 and then pom pom pom pom. And then really started pumping in July of 2021. All the way up to over 250 bucks. In November of 2021, during 20 months, now it's 13 bucks, 11 bucks, 12 bucks, something like that.

Solana New York Puerto Rico Travis Bucks
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:55 min | Last week

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Never there's never a shortage of cocktails, beer, and music, as you probably noticed. When do you remember Puerto Rico? I did notice that, yes. Yes. And so you have two options. You can keep on going south, which is southern coast of the island. Or you can cut and go towards the center, either way is fine. I love the center of Puerto Rico for many reasons. One is a lot of the culinary traditions come from the countryside called the Puerto Rico and there's also a place that's for me is very special called, which is in the town of hunks. And it's nestled in the mountains and these young chefs bought a farm basically. And they have this beautiful restaurant studying views. I was there a few months that I think right before the pandemic, I was there with my friends and we literally were walking to the restaurant in a college just walked past us and we had a bit of a staring contest with a cow and we walked into the restaurant but really beautiful and what they do is just like a combined refined dishes, but in this very rustic setting. So definitely worth stopping by. I also love the tone of calle is known for the route of the roci pig. I remember talking about that in an older episode and I've wanted to go to Puerto Rico since then and it was one of the things I wanted to do that the darn hurricane kept me from. So you'll have to go back because it is, I grew up from guayama, so it's 30 minutes from guayaquil, and once a month, my dad would always we have an aunt that lives near there so my dad would always take us there and we would have lunch and we would have and you just see like these full side pork, especially on the weekends being roasted on Spitfire and they're cutting them with these huge machetes. These are small off the route restaurants that are not fancy. They might be sitting on a plastic stool, but I'm eating some of the best pork I've ever had. Is that the eating on some benches, but some of them, even though they're basic in terms of benches or whatever. But on the weekends, I do have a dance floor. They have bands playing. The basics in Puerto Rico would include dancing, I would have said. Everybody, yes. At least music. There's definitely music and people dancing and I just love asking you order the pork and they'll ask you what part do you want in this guy with this machete will cut it into little pieces for you. And then you'll have all sorts of sides. You'll have like rice and beans and even if you don't eat pork or if you don't eat meat, there's a lot of root vegetables that are very hearty and filling. So you can have like rice with pumpkin and sweet potato and so even if most people think oh it's meat but I think that lately there's been a big effort also to accommodate vegetarian pilots as well. Okay. But I love that area of guava. But the root of the roasted yam doesn't have the same no. But if you want to go, if you want to be supportive to your vegetarian friend, hook them up with some yam and you can have your lechon. Here we go. And everybody can agree on pina coladas, right? There you go. And so that's one area that I like a lot.

Puerto Rico guayama calle guayaquil
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

03:50 min | Last week

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"I love vehicle because I love coulee. And if you have time to even go there for an overnight is definitely worth it. And I love, obviously, the rainforest, Luke ejo is like a cute little beach town, and it has the yellow scarce, which is a long stretch fulfilled with kiosk. Serving all sorts of food, but what they've done is throughout the years they've changed it quite a bit because before it used to be like these very kind of basic shacks with the fried food, which are great, but now they have several restaurants, even like a ceviche restaurant. There's a restaurant that I really hope that which is like artisanal Puerto Rican food. That's very nice. And that's been around now for several years. And I believe you can still make reservations ahead. So there's a little bit of everything for everybody. There's tacos. So it's so for those who want the traditional stuff it's there, but for those who wants to reach a tacos, you can find that as well. I think it's all together like 40 different kiosks that you can eat at kiosk restaurants. So the east coast of the island is very lively and I also love the scenic route that you can take all the way to the south of Puerto Rico like row three, which is really nice because you go past save and then you end up in Macau. Now and those are also just very nice, especially if you're renting a car. Unfortunately, Puerto Rico has really bad public transportation. So the only way you can get to these places is by renting a car because there is some public transportation, but it's even the locals don't take it. We talk about one of the advantages of Puerto Rico is it's the U.S.. And so it's very easy. It's Spanish speaking U.S., but it's so familiar, but of course that's one of the problems in most places in the U.S. is we're a car centric culture.

Luke ejo Puerto Rican Puerto Rico Macau U.S.
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

03:06 min | Last week

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"And it was a wonderful menu, it was a little high end restaurant there. I was recommended and sponsored. I should say by the discover Puerto Rico. I enjoyed it. Maybe more because they were big for it, but I think I would enjoy it quite a lot. And I've been there and I've dined with my own money. It is very good. Thank you. But they're also doing an interesting thing where if you're a local in the area, there's an app that they're working with called a produce or with a pound at the end or an exclamation point. And it's basically getting farm to table to locals so that they can order local produce and support the farmers in such because I guess one of the problems is when you've got your coffee beans that are coming locally, it's great, but when a hurricane blows through, it can really disrupt some of that. So that's part of what's happened, but also part of it is just economics of things where it can be cheaper to bring in the fish on the big tanker than it is to get it from the local fisherman. So I like that somebody is working to change that. And then in a delicious fashion. And unfortunately, also with the food production, there are several things another one that makes also the cost of food in Puerto Rico is very high, is one of the things that they're trying to do away with. And it's like the Jones act. We have to require anything that goes to Puerto Rico to have to pass through the mainland of the United States, which becomes not only a problem for everyday eating, but in a time of crisis. A hurricane. And I can't believe it's 2022, and they still don't do away with such an archaic rule that just makes things more expensive for an American citizen. Exactly. Cool. Anything else we want to do in San Juan, I know you want to get us somewhere else. And in San Juan, I love if you're there, especially on a weekend or you give from the airport is the area of pinos and Luisa is a lot of fun. Especially if you have a lot of fun being lively nightlife, more for me is more of a daytime vibe. But there is also a night. There are two, but it's lively during the day. There's a lot of places that are making like fried column fritos, so fritters, and it's just we should say when you're eating Puerto Rico, you can expect fried. You can expect plantains. You can expect pork. If you can make it in fried and put some combination of those, like plantains, all of them. I have to say, my biggest surprise was I had plantains before and love them. But also tried breadfruit for the first time. Which tastes like bread, strangely enough. I wonder why they called it that. And what time when did you go? Like you said, September. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and yeah, in August, from July, August, September, like the season that it's very abundant on the island. So it's a great time to go if you like breadfruit because it's like in a lot of money. Although it is, we should talk about time to go. It is also hurricane season. And in my experience, that isn't necessarily the best time to be there is when they're hurricane is passing through the island. Where I was fine. Relatively did mean all the restaurants were closed one day that I was there and I was living off of snacks I had in my backpack, which wasn't ideal. Yeah. That's nearly as bad as the people had it in the southern end part of the island who had real flooding and real problems.

Puerto Rico San Juan hurricane pinos Luisa Jones United States
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:34 min | Last week

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"That's where we stayed just because I know that she can swim and do her thing. And I'm not freaking out as mom. And the southern coast, to me, it's like it's one of those unhidden or those hidden gems that you have these towns that no real big tourists go to because there's no big resorts, but there's so much history, so much to see. For example, la parguera, which is very popular with locals, but you don't see that many tourists that are not from outside Puerto Rico, but they have a bioluminescent bay. Unfortunately, because the pollution and everything, it's not as strong as the one in the same vehicle, but it's still kind of a good experience. To do bonsai is a hub if you keep on going on the southern coast sponsors a hub for culture, they have one of the largest museums, which is called the Museum of Art of Ponce, unfortunately, is still closed. They're doing this campaign to reopen it. But it's a hub for Puerto Rican culture. And if you keep on going through that southern coast, I'm going to slow you way down. All right, I get all hyped up talking about it. You're going to do this in 5 minutes, and I'm going to run a road trip. We're going to put the hello and goodbye back to back. Let's all just wait. I'm backing up a bit. We started in San Juan. You didn't spend any time in San Juan. Is there anything you want to see in San Juan before we leave town? Yes, absolutely on is even though it's one of those places that is very touristic. It is steeped in history. You have a Moro, which is also a part of the national park system. They do have tour. Which is a big castle fortress and the end of the year. Fortress, that was built by the Spaniards.

southern coast la parguera Museum of Art of Ponce Puerto Rico San Juan Puerto Rican national park
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:06 min | Last week

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Amateur traveler episode 826. Today, the amateur traveler talks about beaches and bioluminescence and Boracay, history and hurricanes, rainforest, and rum. As we go to the island of Puerto Rico, this is Chris Christensen from amateur traveler, let's talk about Puerto Rico. I'd like to welcome the show Jessica from dining traveler dot com who's come to talk to us about Puerto Rico, Jessica, welcome to the show. Thank you for having me, Chris. I wanted to do a show on Puerto RICO and everybody kept asking me when the show was going to come out because many of the people who follow me on social media know that I was just in Puerto Rico because I thought it would be really good to go down for a hurricane, which wasn't my original plans. But I didn't get out of San Juan.

Puerto Rico Chris Christensen Jessica Chris hurricane San Juan
CBP agent dies in shootout with suspected smugglers

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

CBP agent dies in shootout with suspected smugglers

"A costumes and border protection agent and a suspected smuggler died during a shootout off the Puerto Rico coast a unit was on routine patrol when the shots were fired in an area considered a major drug smuggling corridor for cocaine coming out of South America at a Capitol Hill hearing Homeland Security secretary Alejandro mayorkas spoke about the shooting These are a brave members of our air and marine operations within U.S. customs and border protection So the difficulty of this job can not be compared to the difficulty that our frontline personnel face every

Puerto Rico Coast Alejandro Mayorkas South America Homeland Security U.S.
🔴 Bitcoin Thrives, NASDAQ Dives | This Week in Crypto – Nov 7, 2022

99 Bitcoins

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

🔴 Bitcoin Thrives, NASDAQ Dives | This Week in Crypto – Nov 7, 2022

"6 a.m. Monday November 7th 2022 Bitcoin thrives NASDAQ dives this week in crypto November 7th 2022 the post Bitcoin prize NASDAQ dies this week in crypto November 7th 2022 appeared first on 99 bitcoins Bitcoin outperforms the NASDAQ maker Diego's cofounder is found dead in Puerto Rico and the SEC Bitcoin thrives NASDAQ dies this week in crypto November 7th 2022 read more

Bitcoin Diego Puerto Rico SEC
Daylight saving time ends Sunday. Here are 4 things you should know

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Daylight saving time ends Sunday. Here are 4 things you should know

"Daylight saving time is out standard time in starting this weekend I'm Ben Thomas with the reminder It means a change for most of the United States standard time returns at 2 a.m. local time Sunday It'll last until March 12th so the clock goes back an hour darkness will arrive earlier in the evening but it will be lighter earlier in the morning Of course some are already there Hawaii American Samoa Guam Puerto Rico the U.S. Virgin Islands and most of Arizona do not observe daylight saving time The twice a year time change has led some members of Congress to push to make daylight saving time permanent The Senate passed the sunshine protection

Ben Thomas United States American Samoa Guam Virgin Islands Rico Hawaii Puerto Arizona Congress Senate
Ben Thomas, United States And American Samoa discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ben Thomas, United States And American Samoa discussed on AP News Radio

"Daylight saving time is out standard time in starting this weekend I'm Ben Thomas with the reminder It means a change for most of the United States standard time returns at 2 a.m. local time Sunday It'll last until March 12th so the clock goes back an hour darkness will arrive earlier in the evening but it will be lighter earlier in the morning Of course some are already there Hawaii American Samoa Guam Puerto Rico the U.S. Virgin Islands and most of Arizona do not observe daylight saving time The twice a year time change has led some members of Congress to push to make daylight saving time permanent The Senate passed the sunshine protection act in March but the house hasn't acted on it Ben Thomas Washington

Ben Thomas United States American Samoa Guam Virgin Islands Rico Puerto Hawaii Arizona Congress Senate Ben Thomas Washington
J. D. Vance: Tim Ryan Will Vote to Get Rid of the Filibuster

Mark Levin

01:46 min | Last month

J. D. Vance: Tim Ryan Will Vote to Get Rid of the Filibuster

"And I just want to be clear I think I have been to the people in Ohio to conservatives and Republicans I've gotten to know you much much better and I have a great deal of respect for you and what you're doing and how you're going about doing it You're up against the Democrat party machine All of our guys and gals are pouring tons of money into these races to try and redefine who you are and to try and redefine who Tim reiners who the Democrat is And then they complain about dark money The other thing I'm worried about is they're at war on the constitution If this guy Tim Ryan goes then he's going to vote to get rid of the filibuster rule and they're going to ram through everything possible aren't they That's right And they've also he's voted to add Puerto Rico to the state list He's voted to add an additional state of course Washington D.C. That's four new Democrats That's exactly that's 40 Democrats that's awful for the United States Constitution And look you really Mark you know this better than I do But the constitution is fundamentally it's the set of rules that govern how we do self government in this country right And what I can't stand about this effort to change the filibuster to completely nationalize our elections to add new states so they can add more Democrats senators They're just trying to change the rules They know they can't win in a fair fight So they're trying to change the rules and it's one of the reasons why this election is so important because look of course I don't agree with Joe Manchin about most things I do give him credit for saving us from Washington D.C. as the 51st U.S. state I do give him credit for saving the filibuster but look can we count on them indefinitely I don't think that we can't

Tim Reiners Washington D.C. Democrat Party Tim Ryan Ohio Puerto Rico U.S. Mark Joe Manchin
Ice Cream Is the Only Common Ground Herschel Walker Finds With Biden

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:09 min | Last month

Ice Cream Is the Only Common Ground Herschel Walker Finds With Biden

"Walker asked about Joe Biden cut number three. Can you name one thing that President Biden has done that you support? One thing that he's done that I support. He eat a lot of ice cream. Is there anything policy wise? Obviously, why is it he's done the I support? You eat a lot of ice cream. Why the ice cream? Well, I mean, you got to like Herschel Walter. He's the unifier. He's the united. You know, it was any thought about it. There's got to be something that I can find common ground on with Joseph robinette bite. And it's not corn pop, it's not, well, no, it's not corn poverty, it's in your corn pop because he's from Puerto Rico. It wasn't corn pop. It wasn't sitting poolside and letting children fondle your leg hairs. It's not sniffing, it's not sniffing the hair of innocent children. At campaign event, so it turned out to be ice cream. So, you know, it's hard, but at least at least Herschel Walker is going out there and he's trying to find some common ground with Joe Biden. What do what

President Biden Herschel Walter Joe Biden Joseph Robinette Walker Puerto Rico United Herschel Walker
Larry O'Connor: Biden Fished for Hispanic Votes by Going to PR First

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Larry O'Connor: Biden Fished for Hispanic Votes by Going to PR First

"The cynic in me pointed out the shock and awe that he decided to go to Puerto Rico first. That to me blew my mind. Can you imagine? I mean, you know, obviously Puerto Rico was hammered too, but you might want to go to Florida before you go anywhere. Well, I'll tell you, I don't know if you've seen the latest polls out from telemundo of all places, but the conservative Latinos in America, ten years ago in 2012, I self identified conservative Latinos, lean Democrat by a factor of plus 6, ten years later, they lean Republican by a factor of plus 56. That's an extraordinary political earthquake that's happened. And this, by the way, with the propaganda from the media end Democrats telling Latino Americans the Republicans hated them that we were racist that we were building a wall. The fact is Latino Americans, especially conservative ones, they want that wall too. So my guess is that he's trying to shore up the Hispanic vote base by going to Puerto Rico first.

Puerto Rico Florida America Earthquake
Eye Opener: President Biden to survey Hurricane Ian damage

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Eye Opener: President Biden to survey Hurricane Ian damage

"President Biden will tour hurricane Ian's damage in Florida today and meet with its GOP governor Spokeswoman karine Jean Pierre acknowledges the president has his political differences with Ron DeSantis and there will be time to discuss them But now is not the time As the president put it Monday in hurricane ravaged Puerto Rico the time now is for unity We show up when we're needed He and the First Lady will be in Fort Myers Desantis says he appreciates that the Biden administration approved an emergency declaration for Florida even before Ian struck That was huge because everyone was full steam ahead But in a briefing yesterday I'm W zv stops

President Biden Hurricane Ian Spokeswoman Karine Jean Pierre Ron Desantis GOP Florida Biden Administration Puerto Rico Hurricane Desantis Fort Myers Ian Struck
Ukrainian Forces Break Through Russia Lines

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Ukrainian Forces Break Through Russia Lines

"Forces are amazingly. They broke into more Russian lines. They've broken through the curse on frontline. They are pushing Stroud south into the strategic curse on region according to Wall Street Journal, Ukrainian forces broke through Russian lines made new advances in the southern Kirsten region while expanding their rapid offensive in the eastern part of the country to be taking areas that Moscow now claims to be part of Russia, pushing south the new Ukrainian advance secured a corner of the only Russian foothold on the western bank of the dnieper river, which bisects the country, Ukraine is in recent months destroyed all the bridges to the enclave, which concludes the regional capital care sun, making an increasingly difficult for the large Russian military to be resupplied with food ammunition and food. And fuel. They're going to run away there too. Russian disarray, on display, as Ukraine's forces advance on two fronts.

Ukraine Wall Street Journal Dnieper River Moscow
Supreme Court to Take on Tech Case

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Supreme Court to Take on Tech Case

"Big news from the Supreme Court yesterday they announced that they will hear a tech case. They are going to be examining section two 30, which limits the liability, section two 30, the communications decency act of 1996 passed at the dawn of the Internet age to protect Google and Twitter and Facebook and YouTube from the consequences of the material they post, including ISIS videos. Twitter and Google have been sued by victims of ISIS for their propagation of the terrorist group's propaganda over the many years that it existed till Donald Trump crushed them in the early year of his presidency. However, section two 30 is a shield and will that shield be taken away in the Gonzales versus Google case, or in Twitter versus Tommen, I don't know. One thing you're interested in is does that shield make them government actors?

Twitter Google Supreme Court Youtube Facebook Donald Trump Gonzales
Death Toll Rises in Hurricane Ian Aftermath

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Death Toll Rises in Hurricane Ian Aftermath

"The devastation in Florida is truly staggering. The Wall Street Journal reports this morning that 5 days after hurricane Ian ripped its way across Florida to the scale of the destruction is still coming into full focus. Officials have 64 64 storm related deaths, the majority of those victims died by drowning. Virginia today is going to be the one that sees tidal flooding along Hamptons road, reaching Chesapeake Bay as the water for me and as it moved inland continues to flow down towards the coast, it may stretch into Delaware and parts of New Jersey, the damage estimates are staggering risk model or Karen Clark and company estimated that the privately insured loss that means the insurance companies will be writing checks up to $63 billion, but there's another 35 to 40 billion and uninsured loss there.

Hurricane Ian Florida The Wall Street Journal Chesapeake Bay Virginia Karen Clark Delaware New Jersey
"puerto rico" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Hurricane Ian hit Florida and then swept along the Atlantic states last week and this weekend. Millions of people lost power, but for the most part, the electricity was pretty quickly restored. Now, consider another storm. Hurricane Fiona hit Puerto Rico in mid September. Hurricane Fiona slams into Puerto Rico, knocking out power to the entire island. Their electricity is not back on. Tens of thousands are still without power in Puerto Rico as well, it continues to recover from hurricane Fiona's hit two weeks ago. As Fiona bore down some people still didn't have reliable electricity after the last major hurricane there. Hurricane Maria in 2017. It sometimes seems like the only thing Puerto Rico's power grid does with any reliability is draw the ire of Puerto Ricans. Why is Puerto Rico's power grid so vulnerable? Coming up on today explained. The case of a missing indigenous Alaska woman sparks new questions about other missing and murdered indigenous women. But when the cops stop looking, a team of local journalists step in to bring the truth to light. That's where ABC's thrilling new drama Alaska daily begins and where it's headed will have you on the edge of your seat. Starring two time Oscar winner, Hilary Swank, grace dove, and scandals Jeff Perry. Alaska daily premieres Thursday, October 6th on ABC, in stream next day on Hulu.

Hurricane Fiona Puerto Rico Hurricane Ian hurricane Fiona Atlantic states Hurricane Maria Florida Fiona Puerto Ricans hurricane Alaska ABC grace dove Jeff Perry Hilary Swank Oscar Hulu
Katie Hobbs: Liz Cheney Is Welcome to Campaign for Me

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:14 min | 2 months ago

Katie Hobbs: Liz Cheney Is Welcome to Campaign for Me

"Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, who is a radical leftist in the state of Arizona, she laid something out that would be I think a great opportunity for Kerry Lake to capitalize on. Carrie Lake, I'm watching this race very carefully. The other day we interviewed Carrie Lake, we're going to be in Arizona, of course, with a big battleground talkers tour. Listen to what the Democrat Katie Hobbs said about getting somebody to Arizona to campaign on her behalf. Katie, are we going to see you sharing a stage with Liz Cheney? We welcome support of a broad coalition of folks to make sure that Arizona stays in the hands of a leader who's going to bring sanity instead of chaos. If that if Liz Cheney wants to come to Arizona, I welcome her as well as the broad coalition of seeing Republicans who want same leader in the governor's office who have joined our campaign. Well, that would be great news for Carrie Lake. Carrie Lake, I guarantee you is sitting there praying that Liz Cheney goes to Arizona to campaign for Katie Hobbs.

Carrie Lake Arizona Secretary Of State Katie Hobbs Liz Cheney Kerry Lake Katie Hobbs Katie
Ed Raine: What 'Food for the Poor' Gifts to Affected Hurricane Victims

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Ed Raine: What 'Food for the Poor' Gifts to Affected Hurricane Victims

"For the benefit of people who are of course not here in Florida, let's go over what these hurricane kits are providing the vinyl tarps, the wipes, the water, the portable generators. I mean, there's so much that you guys are doing with your with your ministry partners. So let's talk about the conditions right now in Florida and why the need is still so profound. Well, you know, I think we're still learning just how profound those need jobs. So the devastation is just that devastating and is catastrophic for many of us who live in south live in Florida. We know that this is a challenge that we face every now and then a hurricane. But this was a month to hurricane and the destruction is so significant that it is going to take months to rebuild. So let's start with the time frame. This isn't a few days of response and we can walk away. No, this has to be concerted over time. People are still struggling with having no power. They'll have to go into making do. But we know through our outlets. And this is primarily a church. It's the hierarchy of church organizations who are really working with us. We prepositioned to have those relationships. And they're telling us send all of these items. You are mentioning. These are essentially a health and hygiene kits that allow people just to have a little human dignity as they try to make do. But they definitely need things like buckets and laundry detergents. And soaps and insect repellents. And then anything that can help them talk, as you say, just there's a whole list of things that we've made available throughout online. So the best place to go is go for it. Dot org and Mike on Mike online dot com there. There's a banner right there at the top of the page. If you don't mind it, of course, food for the poor and our resources I want to give everybody the way to give

Florida Hurricane Mike
More & More Hispanics Are Turning Republican

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | 2 months ago

More & More Hispanics Are Turning Republican

"There's all kinds of reporting about Hispanic voters turning Republican. There's all kinds of data suggesting that more and more Hispanic Americans are voting Republican. Hispanics are particularly worried about crime about the family about the border, after all, many of these Hispanic voters immigrated here legally, or they know if people who did, they played by the rules, they dotted every I and they crossed every T and they did it legitimately because they wouldn't dream of breaking the law in order to sneak into the United States. Kamala Harris the other day said that resources will be directed towards people of color and poor people because hurricanes, she said, disproportionately impact people of color. That has to be what this is all about. And I'm shocked that there's not more outrage over the president of the United States rushing off to Puerto Rico before he goes to Florida.

Kamala Harris United States Puerto Rico Florida
Joe Biden Explains Visiting Puerto Rico First Before Florida

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Joe Biden Explains Visiting Puerto Rico First Before Florida

"This is why he said he went, cut three guys. This is why he went to Puerto Rico, I guess, instead of Florida first, which to me is a stunning breach of courtesy and respect to the victims of hurricane Ian in a state like Florida. This is all about equity. This is all about people of color and this is all about thumbing your nose to Ron DeSantis and the people of Florida. And the Puerto Rico because they haven't been taking very good care of them. We've been trying to tell the ketchup from the last hurricane. I want to see the state of affairs today and make sure we pick that in and you can. You know,

Hurricane Ian Florida Puerto Rico Ron Desantis Hurricane
"puerto rico" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:44 min | 9 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on On The Media

"So sun cardona Morales is the author of a collection of short stories called Levittown monamour. Sasan and I met under the rust streaked belly of the blue water tower a couple of weeks before the pandemic. It's part of the aerial map, he says. I checked this out and he's right. Pilots have to tell air traffic control that they're passing it on their way into the airport. In other words, I'm not the only one. Levittown keeps surprising him. Every time he comes here, despite the detritus and the decay. He sees colors that call his attention. Writing about this place was his way of making a kind of peace with his country with Puerto Rico through the fiscal crisis. The deterioration, the difficulty of making ends meet. To leave the resentment about what wasn't an appreciate what is. I asked him after all this historical research, if I'm trying to see the beauty in Levittown, could he give me some pointers. When I pull up in the air, yes, I would love. Well, it depends on what you consider beauty. Look at what time has done to this place. Look at the rest at the shuttered businesses. Looking at closed door fronts gave him the possibility to invent to imagine businesses that maybe didn't actually exist. And walk along the boulevard, which is called avenue boulevard, a redundant name that tickles the sun. It tickles me now too. And much more does as well. A few steps away from where we sat, the public high school is named for doctor Pedro albizu campos. Puerto Rico's independence icon right there in Levittown, the American suburb. And then there's the water tower, which doesn't actually hold any water. It's a monument to uselessness, a symbol of a failure to have functional infrastructure, and.

cardona Morales Sasan Levittown Puerto Rico Pedro albizu campos public high school
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"The shoulder. People will try. They'll just build this hop on the shoulder. Only one time did I see a police officer. Pull somebody over. They just don't. The police are very lax here. This seems like this is let it go, let it go. I got pulled over. You did? One time. Yeah, and it's funny because where he was, I was on the highway and I knew I was speeding. I pulled over on the left side and he pulled over on the right and he rolls down the window and starts speaking to me in Spanish. This is the funniest thing Aaron was with me. In the first move on the left side, I pulled on the left side and we're rolling down the windows. We're looking out. He's over there, yelling at me and the first thing I came out of my mouth was no ablow in glaze. And she looks at me and starts laughing. I'm like, oh my gosh, that sounds Aaron left to you? Yeah, because I'm like Noah blowing today. I don't speak English. And he's looking at me, and he's trying to speak to me in Spanish and you said to him, yeah. He was hilarious. What came out? I'm going to speak in Spanish and tell you that I don't speak English. It's classic. So he's still talking and then he realizes I don't speak any Spanish, and he goes to me. It's 60. It's 60. And I look at him and I know full well, but I'm going to play dumb. I go, oh, 60. And he looks at me and he goes, he just wins. He's like, stupido gringo. Oh my God. That happened to me. I got pulled over in Albania. And they were wanting to give me a ticket in Albania and I'm speaking albanese or whatever you need to speak, right? And I was like, but I wasn't doing anything. I don't even know what he thought I did wrong. And he was like so angry and then something else just go. I'm like, okay, I'm like, I'm like, dude, I'm one of the best drivers here. Like there's some horrible drivers in Albania too. Just like on your ass. Like the drive Formula One racing, like I'm driving good. What do you mean? I'm not gonna cry, right? But this episode is going quite crazy. We're close to an hour into it. So I think, hey, if this has been helpful or if you have additional questions, maybe we'll take your questions about Puerto Rico or experiences here in anything that you want to know and we'll address them in a future edition. Or if you're already here. I've ran into people at crypto Monday who says I'm here in Puerto Rico because you talked about it. Uh oh. So how many of.

ablow Aaron Albania Noah albanese Puerto Rico
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

04:59 min | 11 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"Some things don't ship here. You have to learn to finagle the ins and outs of how to get certain things. Super heavy stuff is like, you're going to pay a major fee. Sometimes when they say, oh, it's free in the continental United States, and then it's like, wow, $500 to ship is in Puerto Rico. Right. It's a big heavy thing. I ordered some Omaha steaks. You know, they come in this dried ice cooler and it says free shipping, but then you go and to Puerto Rico it's 39.99. I'm like, I don't care. I want my meat. Send me my delicious meats from Omaha steaks. Who is not sponsoring the show? And who I do not have an affiliate code for. But you know, you just kind of get used to not having all the things you had as a tradeoff. It's like, okay, I'm living in a beautiful place in a community surrounded by awesome people. I'm keeping the money that I'm making and not giving it to the U.S. government for programs that I don't even agree with and probably don't actually help the people that are intended to help..

Puerto Rico Omaha United States U.S. government
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:49 min | 11 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"You kind of skip most of fall, fall just happens one day, all the weeks hit the ground with one good rain and spring is short because winter extends. And so, you know, you deal with the cold, you also deal with the beauty in Denver, but I've had them out. My God. And that last place that you live because I mean, I was there, one place on high street. And then when you moved and got that on the 23rd floor, overlooking, and you could see in the mountains and that shit is so beautiful. It was amazing. I lived there for three years. I had floor to ceiling windows and just a view of the entire front range. You could see all the way up past Fort Collins, the mountains there all the way down to Colorado Springs. But you know, so I've lived on the plane since lived in the mountains. They were very sexy. But I've never lived on the beach and one of the dreams a lot of people have is being in a place where the weather is always beautiful in its sunny and there's water beach. And so now what my point was every time I went on vacation somewhere tropical, the worst part of it would be leaving. I hated leaving good a Hawaii or you go to Jamaica or are you going to Puerto Rico and you're just getting in the groove you've been here for a week and now you've got to get on a plane and go back to wherever it is that life takes place. Well, we never have to leave here and I love that. Oh my God, when you first got here, you didn't. No. I did. You got here in April. And you did not leave until like November. You can't like I've been offered keynotes, and I'm like, you're not able to pay me enough to leave the island. I'm not trying to be snooty. It's just like my time. No, you're so fun. It's like, we're still fans enough. My time is better spent. Being home working on the next NFT project that will make me more in the long run than traveling for a day because it is like to go to even to go to.

Fort Collins Denver Colorado Springs Jamaica Puerto Rico Hawaii
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:18 min | 11 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"But he became the pied piper of palmas. Once he started talking about it, other people started looking at it and asking what you could do what? That's what we're going to tell you guys about why we've done this. How many people do you think is he directly responsible for me? Because I'm indirectly responsible for me because he talked to you. You heard about it, and we're like, hey, we're in the crypto. And I do want to share this. Because this is kind of a joke that I say is like, if you don't know anything about crypto, your crypto level zero. Crypto level one is, oh, you got a coinbase account. Maybe you connected it to your bank, and now you're able to buy a little bit of crypto. Crypto level two is maybe you got your meta mask. Level up. Yeah, you level up, you get your crypto. You get a meta mask. You get set up with your Ethereum wallet, right? So now you can buy NFTs and you can go on open C and extra wallet. Then you learn how to, oh, I can add multiple chains to networks to my meta mask. Level up. So then you start doing some deep maybe that's like level three and doing some DeFi. Now you're getting all buff. Yeah, your crypto, your crypto wallets, you're starting to flex it. You're like the Mario that ate the mushroom and then got the power up thing. I was like level four and then you start doing the DeFi. You understand this, you understand, you know, maybe you do some rebasing stuff, you huddle some Bitcoin, you've grown it up and then level 5, but that's where you pick up the star and you're invulnerable. That's when you go to Puerto Rico. Well, level 5 is finish him. Right. It's the final move. Well, now there's level 6, and then there's level 7, which is somehow get a yacht. We can't tell you about that one day. You have to be. There's some people here. We actually hung out on New Year's Eve on this dude's yacht. We're gonna chat with him in a couple episodes. But like, wow, hanging out. I don't think it was quite a super yacht, but it was pretty soon. It was pretty super. I don't know. It was super mega super yacht. Yeah. So maybe what's it called? I don't know. It was pretty amazing. It has an elevator in it. That sounds amazing. Take me down to the crew. So it's like I look at like this. I'm like baby crypto guys compared to the people other people who are here. Oh, yeah. In Puerto Rico, crypto. You might be listening like, oh, those guys have earned someone. We haven't. No..

palmas Mario Puerto Rico
"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:57 min | 11 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"As listeners of this show, you know by now that both Travis and myself have relocated our bad selves and our businesses to the tropical Paradise of Puerto Rico. Many of you have asked why we made the move and what our experience has been like so far. Today we're lounging poolside at the travilla to share with you the financial and personal benefits of moving to Puerto Rico, as well as things we have discovered in our time here thus far. So grab a margarita lather on the sunscreen and brush up on your espanol as we bring you a muy bueno episode. Of el podcast cryptographical Myo. Who's that? When it's not just the witness title this in all the nachos to those of you, this is the bank crypto podcast. Buenos with artists. We're the good retards. You.

Puerto Rico Travis Buenos
"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

06:49 min | 11 months ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"And the level of poverty in a town like go to LES. But the other thing is the actual roots. I mean, when you talk about when you think about communities outside of the metropolitan area, are there places like the metro areas like bones say my Jaguars places like that, but when you think of a town like Kevin, I think there's roots. People do not leave. Generations. You know what I'm saying? People do not leave these towns. So this notion of the generations of families that have lived in these towns and these municipalities outside of sort of the urban centers is also part of this. And that's a very important point because I think sometimes because my content is in English, people will watch it and we'll think about it with the mentality of maybe someone who has grown up in the U.S.. You know, maybe you're from a small town, but kind of the norm is you leave your small town. And you go somewhere else and people move. So a lot of times I'll post videos and people would be like, people are allowed to move. What's the big deal? And what people don't understand is that it's a different culture. And in Puerto Rico, you're right that you have generations of people living here. There are people who had no intention of leaving care alias. The lady I interviewed in my story, she's like, my plan was to die here. I wasn't going to move anywhere. So when you come with that sort of mindset to these towns, you could really disrupt communities. Yeah, so let's talk a little bit on the bigger picture because you've obviously been following a lot of the things and doing an excellent job educating people on what I like to call this sort of like the post Maria Puerto Rico that had foundations of people saw this coming that what was going to happen in Puerto Rico didn't just happen magically. It happened. There's roots of this, you know, with the government spending and the debt crisis and it's all this perfect storm. So I guess my question is, how does this reporting link into your larger body of work in how you begin to look at Puerto Rico as a place that colonialism is just so fervent now? And how does your reporting sort of reflect sort of this new colonialism that's happening on the island? And talk about your other reporting, not just the Capital One. Yeah, I would say that I focus on that relationship between the U.S. and Puerto Rico. And the status of colonialism that Puerto Rico has been in for hundreds of years. So it applies to this story because Puerto Rico would not have those laws that give outsiders tax breaks if it weren't because of its status. You can not pass a law like this in a state. But Puerto Rico has sort of the best of both worlds for people who want to take advantage of that kind of law because you don't have to get a different passport. You can use your U.S. passport. You don't have to go to customs, you know? U.S. territory. But on the other hand, you can have laws that are very beneficial for the people who want to move here and on top of that, you have a place that historically suffered from policies and government mismanagement that has led to people having lower salaries, not enough opportunities. So then, you know, it's a place that's ripe or people with more buying power and acids to come in and having an advantage over the local population. So and the other thing is, again, that mentality. You know, I have a lot of people tell me in my videos that this is just how capitalism works and you just have to make sure that you're competitive, but it's not a level to playing field. And today I tweeted about this, how you can not compare the opportunities that people in some states have had with people who have been living their whole lives in a place that has had a lot of disadvantages for its local population. Right. And this is the part where you as a journalist and I think one of the things that I just want to commend you because one of the things that I did starting back as a journalist when I kind of got back into journalism about 12 years ago, is I started focusing on Puerto Rico in English. I was creating content in English. To begin to educate and inform people who had sort of these stereotypical misperceptions about the island colony. And what I see in your work is that you're doing the same thing. You're trying to make that connection. By going outside of sort of what I think is the insula Remo type of media you know that it stays in solar, it stays insular. So in that sense, what have you seen from your reporting? What has been the reaction not only on the island, but outside in terms of trying to change the perception of how people view Puerto Rico in the United States? I mean, how does that how do you make those two connections for you as a journalist? Yeah, and you know I love creating content both in English and in Spanish. If it were up to me and I had the time and the resources that would make every single story in both English and Spanish. But when I have limited time and resources, you're right. And the reason I choose English is because I saw that there was a gap. There was a need. And I saw that whenever Puerto Rico was covered in the networks and U.S. media. I was like, what would I see those for them? Look at the disasters. They can't catch a break. And that context was missing. And I think being able to go independent and create my content reach people, especially on platforms like TikTok, where I have an opportunity to reach an audience outside of Puerto Rican. I'm reaching people who just had no idea. They've heard, you know, Puerto Rico isn't that, you know, like, a part of the U.S., but they had no idea of the history. They had no idea of the responsibility that the U.S. has and a lot of the things that have happened in Puerto Rico. So for me, it's a process for myself because there are a lot of things I just didn't know and I am learning. It took until my adult life for me to understand a lot of these things. So to privilege for me to be able to learn these things as I go and communicate them to others. So what do you think where this, you know, in terms of where we are now in the context of Puerto Rico in 2022, just focusing on even the issues of gentrification and displacement and what you say it's like Puerto Rico without Puerto Ricans, which seems a little bit dramatic, but there are examples of it happening throughout the island. You know, you go to places. I mean, I just was back in November. When you stay inside one, it's our places. You're like, does anyone speak Spanish here? Things like that go through my head. Right, and I know that's, you know, that's in the tourist sections and things. But it's not like it's that, you know, there are parts of Taiwan that are very.

Puerto United States Maria Puerto Rico Jaguars Kevin Puerto Rican Taiwan
"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Think the fundamental point is that statehood and I know I'm a minority, maybe one in what I'm saying. I'm talking as a journalist. Obviously, statehood. Mistake is bad. I don't say it's good or bad. I don't get into that. I'm not into politics. But things economically impossible. For Puerto Rico. And that's the point that like trying to make and try to communicate and try to prove, actually that economically statehood is not possible. So there are positive, which is based on status is based on an unreality. That will not show is my book. Okay. I mean, there's a lot to unpack there, but let me ask you a follow-up question to that. And I know you explain it in the book. I read it, but I want to make sure that why in your estimation and your reporting, do you think that statehood is not economically viable for Puerto Rico? Like what makes you make that conclusion? Let me just give you one statistic. I assume you're going to ask me that. I'm ready. Puerto Rico's per capita income, domestic per capita is 26,822 to be exact. That's 2020. Compare that to Mississippi, Mississippi is 40% more. So we are 40% poorer than the poorest state in the U.S. for capital income in the U.S. is 65,280. So we are two and a half times Quora than the U.S. now how do you quit economically? Such a poor island such a port economy tends to the U.S., you know, one of the conditions of being a state aside from the political and everything else is you have to sustain economically after, you know, carry your weight. You know, it doesn't to me, it's unreality for Puerto Rico to aspire to be a state in order to live off welfare, totally welfare, you know, that doesn't really apply to the fact that to me, it just lacks dignity, you know, self cried. It makes no sense. For me, that's unreal. There are many other statistics. Labor participation rate. This is very important. Our labor participation rate is 42%. It's one of the lowest in the world. So the two biggest problems here answering your question. Why not economically impossible? Poverty, and unemployment. Then how then well then the argument could be made that if Puerto Rico paid off his tests and now you have the junta and you have there's still sort of this fast forwarding now to what we're seeing, then how then does the fiscal control board help in this situation or you make the argument that now is Puerto Rico in a time of bus? We are still in a time of bus right now. And now we have this fiscal control board. We have a competing government in the Parisian administration kind of competing against pensions and you have policemen striking now and everything that's been happening. Police officers, students, all the basic services that are being removed. Is that more of a quagmire as well? Because it feels like there's another level to this besides the status issue. There is now an unelected politically appointed fiscal control board that is trying to get creditors paid, or trying to put the best interests of Puerto Rico in mind. Where do you fall? I mean, looking at what's happened in the last couple of years, where are you at? You're absolutely right. It's undemocratic. It's bad. Everybody hates it, but I mean, you know, we were the topic. We were thinking, the government of Puerto Rico and in this case, both parties went to Congress and look, as always, we can't pay our debt. We have no credit. We can't borrow. We can't government. You know? So something had to be done. So it was done. It was drastic. It was terrible. It's horrible medicine. It's undemocratic. It has powers that go way beyond, you know, that are democratic and elected powers. But we were thinking and, you know, you asked me again as a journalist, not politics. There was a single politician in Puerto Rico, but doesn't attack the board every day. This is like breathing. But then I ask, okay, fine, a second, but what the solution now the board, you know, the board has a mission that is to take Puerto Rico out of bankruptcy and its credit back and get the economy moving again. And once it does that, it leads us to exist. So I think. We're on the road for mess up to be expected to come to an end. And this happens when we get our credit back, we reach an agreement and secondly, the governor Puerto Rico, I think two or three years approves a balanced budget. Then it's over. And then we're back on our own. Then we have to lift the economy. We can't depend on the federal government or anybody. We have to do it. How much do you think in the last couple of years in Puerto Rico has sort of this post Maria Hayes led to sort of a reexamination of Puerto Rico economically socially politically, obviously there are examples of, you know, the rise of third parties in the last election cycle, the governor of Puerto Rico, winning with a very closely just a third of the popular vote. And how much are you seeing that also playing into this or the awareness of the dead and sort of beginning to reexamine Puerto Rico is in its place in the world and it's a relationship with the United States? Well, let me get your question right. And how much is the Puerto Rican people aware of what? The economic the crisis? I'm talking about like in a post muddy situation, since the hurricane, right. How much do you think is there more of awareness of a reexamination of sort of the territorial relationship with the United States sort of understanding that this debt crisis in essence was the product of Puerto Rican political parties and the relationship with Wall Street? We tend to overlook it's too easy. I think to blame the United States to being like the debt was created. This was spending by the island's political class. How much are you seeing sort of the Puerto Rican society challenging that in the last couple of years since a hurricane or just the rise of the third parties in the last election cycle? Well, the political structure is enormous stress. Because I think most people are aware that we were on a that we were sinking and that we have to change and that what we were doing was bad. We shouldn't have done it, and we shouldn't do it. For tomorrow it's one thing to know what the what the illness is and I answering your question. I think there is growing awareness what the illness is and we can't continue that way. And that's why, you know, a Puerto Ricans are not reelecting. I.

Puerto Rico United States Mississippi Parisian administration Maria Hayes Congress federal government hurricane Puerto Rican society Puerto Rican
"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"So we are here it's another week and when I was talking to my producer Oscar, I said, we have to have the author of a book. I just finished and the book is called boom and bust in Puerto Rico. How politics destroyed an economic miracle, totally up my alley for people that know what I've written about in Puerto Rico over the years. So I would love our guests whose base in San Juan to introduce himself. So fabulous guest from San Juan. If you can say your name and who you are and what you do. Now let's go to your Maldonado and I've been a journalist for many, many years. And written a few books. You have. You have written a few books. You were for the San Juan star, which is my the first newspaper I read in Puerto Rico when I was 5 years old. How about that? And you were an editor and a mundo, which is the other newspaper I used to read when I was 5, 6 years old. So I remember the days of journalism in Puerto Rico. We could have a discussion about that some other time on how much it's changed, but thank you for being on. You wrote a really fantastic book. I just want to thank you for getting boom and bust. Thank you for getting out, boom and bust in Puerto Rico. For obviously, you know, people follow the show we cover a lot of Puerto Rico, people do know about la junta and promise and the debt crisis. But if you could explain the main thesis of your book to someone who might not understand why your book is so important. I think it's an important people need to read. So how would you explain your book to someone who needs to read this? Well, the purpose of the book is the title says is to describe what happened when you had a we had an economic miracle and the 50s and 60s and 70s, we were admired throughout the world. It would call something democracy in the Caribbean, very small island, you know. Only on your mild by 30 miles, but made a lot of ways. And that you wanted to know those guys or that size actually is economic decline. And a few years ago, 19, I'm sorry in 2015. The governor declared that we were bankrupt, we had run up any bed of $73 billion. Now, it doesn't sound like a lot of money nowadays, you know, but for Puerto Rico, small island, that's a new amount of money. And we couldn't pay it. And that was actually the biggest municipal bond bankruptcy in the mountain history. That was a big story. So what happened? So the point of the book is just to describe it's a factual book, a lot of statistics, describing what happened. And why it happened. And I have my views, of course, I've always had them as a journalist. Although, you know, I've never been involved in politics, always newspapers. But that's the book. Yeah, I would love to, I mean, I don't know how much you've looking at your bio and seeing your past clips. But I have written a lot about the debt crisis and one of the things that I wrote back in 2015 for The Guardian was sort of this realization. That what was created? What had happened in front of our eyes? Had a lot of factors and a lot to blame. And it was too easy to just blame Wall Street when the Puerto Rican government sort of also it was easy to get. It was easy to get the capital. It was easy to get the money. So when your eyes, how did we get here? Share some of those reasons because I do think people don't know the historical roots of why we're here and why we now have a fiscal control board. And we can talk a little bit more about that after, but let's talk about the roots. Tell me some of those reasons from your perspective. The most important thing was the elimination of section 9 three 6 with sounds technical than it is. But this was crucial 9 three 6. Was a section of the U.S. internal revenue code that gave Puerto Rico a very powerful incentive to attract industrial investment. And in fact, this small island became among the world's biggest pharmaceuticals producers from a local products. And we had, you know, just about every big pharmaceutical company was located here. And that was based on that fact incentives, which was approved by Congress, but I think it's very important also that that vaccine senses was linked to Puerto Rico's exception of federal taxes. We have an unusual relationship with the United States. For American citizens, we don't think federal taxes. So the government going back to the 50s and 60s, offered tax exemption, local factors engine on top of federal tax exemption. And that proved to be a pretty powerful incentive. Well, in 1996 for reasons that we can go into, the government of Puerto Rico has Congress to repeal. Section 9 three 6. This is important. This was initiated by the government of Puerto Rico. Now, there was always opposition to 9 three 6. Some people thought it was too generous, et cetera, you know, big pharma was taking unto advantage. So we're always arguments, but it was the government of Puerto Rico in 19 96 that asked Congress to eliminate it. Congress eliminated it, we had a ten year fate of played off of that tax exemption and by 2006, it was down to zero, and that when the crisis began. So of all the reasons, that to me is the most fundamental of the most important. Yeah, no, and I think anecdotally I mean, myself growing up in Puerto Rico in the 70s and the 80s, I do recall an island that was, you know, you talk about the boom. There were things that were happening that we were Puerto Rico was seen as sort of this economic shining light. And then all of a sudden, the rug comes out of you in 2006. And then we still haven't recovered as a country. So in your perspective, is this something that is it too easy to paint it as just a problem that pertain to just one political party from my perspective I've always felt like all political parties in Puerto Rico kind of participated in this spending spree and then they had to pay for the check. Oh, yeah. So talk to me about that because I also think that's part of what people tend to overlook. What runs through the book is what I consider the most fundamental cause of Puerto Rico's economic crisis. And that is that there is a serious illness in our politics. And I would call it unreality, Puerto Rican politics is unreal. Now, what happened 9 three 6 was eliminated because the government at that time believed and it still does actually. That any kind of tax exemption is incompatible with statehood, which it is. The Puerto Rico became a faith, we would have to pay the same taxes. You know, constitutionally caused the taxes after the uniform. So Puerto Rico would lose its tax exemption. And it would lose it incentives. Now, 9 three 6 was incompatible. So they asked Congress to eliminate what drove that was partisan. Ideological status politics. And the point of my book, I.

Puerto Rico San Juan Puerto Rican government Maldonado la junta Congress Oscar small island Caribbean The Guardian U.S. Puerto Rican
"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Listen as you know we cover a lot about puerto rico. Although sometimes i need to take a break from puerto rico. Puerto rican journalist because I think of myself care and especially in the online space. But there's another story. That came out of england. Puerto rico that everyone tagged me on. I was off this weekend. And it's like who really the holy though you need to look at this and i did..

Puerto rico Puerto rican england
"puerto rico" Discussed on Talking To Change - A Motivational Interviewing podcast

Talking To Change - A Motivational Interviewing podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rico" Discussed on Talking To Change - A Motivational Interviewing podcast

"So we have a lot of influence. Also from africans like using gains food. So that's basically how i can describe our culture. It's very buried. So our culture not going to be the same as other people from other latin american countries because our history is very different. But we also have a lot of american influence. Because our territory. So it's kind of very complex. I guess are true. We have a lot of. Let's say with programs and projects in different Situations that are going on. We relate a lot to latin america and then a lot to us background. So lots of different ingredients lead into the expanse of being an individual and the community levin on the island of puerto rico. And i guess leading on from what was asking just high in high. In what ways do you think this particular and unique bland of culture has received motivation. What family has it had to do with motivation. Enter into odd. Some ingredients adds some of the spice of puerto rico to the practice of ma for it to be useful and meaningful for them. Hopkins of puerto rico in a land. Break-ins are enough. Sure you guys heard about this before we're used to going to someone a doctor a counselor social worker. And they're the expert. Were sitting there listening to the expert. Ause what to do as puerto ricans. Were very familiar. You know we're a little bit more sometimes. We don't call the doctor dr something. Sometimes we call them by the first name because even the doctors. Tell me bob or some so in that aspect. I don't think it's too far not that another we're going to be working professionally..

puerto rico latin america levin Hopkins puerto ricans bob