17 Burst results for "Puerto Rican Latino"

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Gotta I gotta share with Dan. Danny sent me a note. Okay. What did Daddy Because first it's been a year. Yeah, he said Wow. I forgot about the anniversary 19 years. Amazing. Sorry. Couldn't be part of it today. Have you let your listeners know it's a milestone PS. I'll check out sweet tooth because we always each other TV ideas that two more of those last name up to four. Yeah. Oh, you guys, there's only eight episodes there. Do you like it? I do. I don't know. It's I don't think my wife would like it because I think it involves Children in peril, Right? But Yeah, it's pretty neat. I know you like it. Okay? I seen I finish it. Okay. So you guys remember my very compelling random thoughts today about which Google the Statue of Liberty, So I know how that story ends. Okay, so I started telling you about the baby girl. They call this Paris. France is sending us and you get that? Well, you didn't love me. So I start talking about France's giving us the Statue of Liberty Light. Yeah. Um And I was going to tell you all about it. Just poo pooed. But before I even said a word I still don't want to. You don't know. I know. Some guys got a funny is email from Mary Subject Statue of Liberty. I was intrigued by your statue Gravity story and had to Google it since they cut you off. Not sure are you lasted 19 years with her bow bowing you all the time, but a happy anniversary anyway, Mary, Thanks for your note. It made me laugh, Hysterical laugh. So thanks everyone for your kind wishes because we'll locate how you brought up the Google search on the little Lady Liberty. Well, we're Yeah. You've done good today, Julia. Right there. You've accomplished more than if you'd told the actual story about a little 20 inch replica or whatever. Hello, Larry. Yeah. You don't care you so don't dare it. I love that about you. You're so bad at faking it, though. Okay? Yeah, I can tell you is. Are you guys interested in a review in the heights? Because that drops on HBO? Max, we're night. Oh, it does. It's a It's a theaters tonight. It's on HBO. Max. I hope you're going to theaters and see it. Well. Apparently, we are going to want to see this. Okay. You know that Lin Manuel Miranda created in the heights before Hamilton because that goes back to 2000 and eight Yes, And then he had a big, long dry spell, and he can Milton when he was on the beach, and I have to do play. So here's what Johnny Olesky at the New York Post, he said Lynn Moran. Done it again. He gives it five stars, he said. This is a blissful movie is the best movie of the year. So far, it's also easily the best movie musical since the Oscar went in Chicago from back in 2000 and two Wow, it's romantic. It is funny. It is a dazzling ode to Washington. Heights and New York City, the You know, Upper Manhattan neighborhood where Miranda grew up and still lives. And, um, you know, it's this vibrant Latino community. And if you know that story, but in the heights as unusual, as far as Broadway musical, uh, His musicals go because it In the movie theater packs even packs more of a punch than it does as actual theater. Okay, now that's a never happened right? That is a rarity that is and Jon M. Chu, who directed crazy, Rich Asians. Directed this and movie member How we Love loved that movie, and he shot the movie in the Real Washington Heights and I heard him, Um, do an interview with Lin Manuel Miranda and he said. Even though Lin Manuel had this whole experience living in Washington Heights, the Puerto Rican Latino community I was living in that version of it in San Francisco in Chinatown. Oh, interesting, right. So, he said, So I knew the aunties. I need a little what our version of a bodega is. You know, everybody's Everyone's communities have this like in that way. So we have the same character anyway. The too just like he did with crazy rich Asians. He makes movie magic and how he films because even ordinary stuff as well as extraordinary stuff. He kind of films with A dazzling sparkly I Yes, And we were bedazzled by that. That sounds good. Doesn't I've got a good reason for years. Best movie. All right. I've got a new and it is ready to go on HBO, Max. Right right now. Yeah, we could watch it. Alright. Well, here's something else that is happening tonight or tomorrow. Um, have you guys heard of the TV show star struck It's coming to us from the U. K and we're going to love it and it drops on HBO Max today the series was created and it stars a comedian from New Zealand, New Zealand. Previously premiered and the BBC. They've already um you know, optioned it. They're already doing Season two. But here's what it's about in starstruck. This gal Rose plays a London millennial working two dead end jobs who sleeps with a guy and then discovers he's a movie star. The show follows their budding relationship as they realize they can't stay away from one another. Did we read this book? Laurie. Well. I know what book you're talking about now, But this is it doesn't um, it sounds like this is an exciting talent whose international stardom is on the rise. Her team We can't wait for our audience to see this hilarious and quirky love story. Mini driver guest stars in it, Um, it's coming back for season. Two people love this, and it's called star struck. What's it on HBO? Max Looking right now. It's only a 20 minute show. And there's only six episodes right?.

Lynn Moran Dan Johnny Olesky Lin Manuel Jon M. Chu New Zealand San Francisco Julia Miranda New York City Washington Heights Lin Manuel Miranda Larry BBC Laurie Danny Chicago five stars tomorrow 19 years
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Puerto rican latinos artists like harvey addicott. Lana who was a like a base major league baseball player. No no no. That's isn't different person because you have a photo of harvard the drag queen in the place of harvard. Cardona the baseball player. Okay so it's really wonderful okay. So have you. Flown is not really a drag queen. Javier cardona the big players. Different heavier guide on how we guy. Donna is a incredible puerto rican who was born and grew up in portland legal and received training at the university of puerto rico and then received a master's degree at nyu in educational theatre and is now a phd student at indiana university in bloomington He is afro. Puerto rican and his a lot of his work has been precisely about navigating the borders of blackness and queer nece and his best known performance from the nineteen nineties is called udal. Look like and you don't look like is exactly so you don't look like is well. It's it's a one man show about Casting a advertising in puerto rico and bias against black performers but also about an experience that he had when he came to the united states and people would say would surprise. Euro look puerto rican because people assume that puerto rican somehow will. They don't look why they don't look black. Somehow they're supposed to look some something inbetween or something different. Yeah it's like a vr coffee with milk at starbucks and it's like ever comes with too much milk or not enough milk that they're like this is not a real drink and i was. I faustus had that same experience. I'm sure larry you probably have had that same experience too. How do you handle it when somebody says that you well i mean it depends how much energy i have an how patient i will say june stupid but just said something really stupid. So says the puerto ricans come in all shapes sizes coladas e szabo's order flavors and colors. So so so. The reason have done is in. My book is because this this famous famous play on from the nineteen nineties starts the same way as snow white with Dona looking into a mirror and talking to the mirror asking mirror mirror not on the wall because it's in his hand to please tell him. And as part of the performance there are stored graphs. There are photographs of Gonna dress different. What you could identify stereotypical.

Cardona Javier cardona harvey addicott bloomington Donna Dona puerto rico portland starbucks nineteen nineties united states indiana university udal puerto rican latinos nyu Lana one man university of puerto afro
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Puerto rican latinos artists like harvey addicott. Launa who was a like a base major league baseball player. No no no. That's isn't because you have a photo of harvard. The drag queen in the place of harvard. Cardona the baseball player. Okay so it's really wonderful. Okay so have you. Flown is not really a drag queen. Javier cardona the big players. Different heavier guide on how we guy. Donna is a incredible. Puerto rican noticed who was born and grew up in portland legal and received training at the university of puerto rico and then received a master's degree at nyu in educational theatre and is now a phd student at indiana university in bloomington He is afro. Puerto rican and his a lot of his work has been precisely about navigating the borders of blackness and queer nece and his best known performance from the nineteen nineties is called udal. Look like and you don't look like is exactly so you don't look like is well. It's it's a one man show about Casting a advertising in puerto rico and biased against black performers but also about an experience that he had when he came to the united states and people would say would surprise. Euro look puerto rican because people assume that puerto rican somehow will. They don't look why they don't look black. Somehow they're supposed to look some something inbetween or something different. Yeah it's like a vr coffee with milk at starbucks and it's like ever comes with too much milk or not enough milk that they're like this is not a real drink and i was. I faustus had that same experience. I'm sure larry you probably have had that same experience too. How do you handle it when somebody says that you well i mean it depends how much energy i have an how patient i will say june stupid but just said something really stupid. So says the puerto ricans come in all shapes sizes coladas e szabo's order flavors and colors. So so so. The reason have done is in. My book is because this this famous famous play on from the nineteen nineties starts the same way as snow white with Dona looking into a mirror and talking to the mirror asking mirror mirror not on the wall because it's in his hand to please tell him. And as part of the performance there are stored or graphs. There are photographs of Gonna dress different. What you could identify stereotypical.

Cardona Javier cardona harvey addicott bloomington puerto rico Launa Dona starbucks portland Donna nineteen nineties united states puerto rican indiana university one man latinos udal nyu rico afro
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Puerto rican latinos artists. Like god lana. Who was a like a base major league baseball player. No no no. That's isn't different person. Because you have a photo of harvard. The drag queen in the place of harvard. Cardona the baseball player. Okay wonderful okay. So have you. Flown is not really a drag queen. Heavier cardona the baseball players. Different heavier guide on how we guy. Donna is a incredible puerto rican artists. Who was born and grew up in portland. Legal and received training at the university of puerto rico and then received a master's degree at nyu in educational theatre and is now a phd student at indiana university in bloomington He is afro. Puerto rican and his a lot of his work has been precisely about navigating the borders of blackness and queer nece and his best known performance from the nineteen nineties is called udal. Look like and you don't look like is exactly so you don't look like is well. It's it's a one man show about Casting a advertising in puerto rico and bias against black performers but also about an experience that he had when he came to the united states and people would say would surprise euro. Look puerto rican people assume that puerto rican somehow will. They don't look why they don't look black. Somehow they're supposed to look some something inbetween or something different. Yeah it's like a vr coffee with milk at starbucks and it's like ever comes with too much milk or not enough milk that they're like this is not a real drink and i was. I faustus had that same experience. I'm sure larry you probably have had that same experience too. How do you handle it when somebody says that you well i mean it depends how much energy i have an how patient i will say june stupid but just said something really stupid. So says the puerto ricans come in all shapes sizes coladas e szabo's order flavors and colors. So so so. The reason have done is in. My book is because this this famous famous play on from the nineteen nineties starts the same way as snow white with Dona looking into a mirror and talking to the mirror asking mirror mirror not on the wall because it's in his hand to please tell him. And as part of the performance there are stored or graphs. there are photographs of Gonna dress in different. What you could identify stereotypical.

Cardona Donna bloomington portland puerto rico Dona starbucks nineteen nineties united states one man indiana university udal Gon nyu latinos afro university of puerto Puerto rican rico Heavier cardona
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

05:38 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"So that's that's part of the the fact that even us here having this debate of whether she was aware she was what she did at. Stonewall really does a disservice to the political power of her message. Which is to advocate for the most vulnerable people in lgbt's society. Yeah so so. That is correct so i am less interested in verifying or confirming whether she was there or not. What is true is the. She used the weather. She was there or not she. She used the respect that she received as a she. She used that as a tool. She used stonewall as a tool for people who are obsessed with stole only wants to talk about stonewall so we have a whole a homeless under age sex worker who is becoming integrated into the activist movement by nineteen. Seventy is clearly being arrested by nineteen seventy is taking over buildings at nyu by nineteen seventy is publishing articles in gay power the newspaper of the gay liberation front. So you know so for me. It's really it's. It's not crucial to confirm historically because sylvia nevada is clearly a historical figure with nineteen seventy nineteen seventy-one nineteen seventy two and nineteen seventy-three did absolutely crucial things. Not only that. But then she was absolutely forgotten she was absolutely forgotten for almost twenty years and continue to live on and off in the streets continue to battle drug and alcohol addiction. So it's very complex is very complex. And i think now people have recognized that she was intellectual. She was a thinker. She was a an activist with a political vision and the transgender movement and transgender studies. And all of us benefit by paying attention to the message as she was conveying in the early nineteen seventies bravo. Let's talk a pivot here talking about Some of the lesser known You know because everybody sort of like is very familiar with the rue girls and of course sylvia rivera but ear. Your trans look looks at The lives of other Gender non conforming. Puerto rican latinos artists like harvey addicott. Lana who was a like a base major league baseball player. No no no. That's isn't because you have a photo of harvard. The drag queen in the place of harvard. Cardona the baseball player. Okay so it's really wonderful. Okay so have you. Flown is not really a drag queen. Havier cardona the baseball players. Different heavier guide on how we guy. Donna is a incredible puerto rican artists. Who was born and grew up in portland..

Cardona Lana Donna sylvia rivera harvey addicott sylvia nevada portland early nineteen seventies almost twenty years nyu nineteen seventy nineteen seve Havier cardona latinos nineteen seventy harvard puerto nineteen Puerto rican -three two
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. They make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before. I never knew that this happened and I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm.

Maui Honolulu Jason Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee African American University of Connecticut Connecticut Asian and Asian American Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Professor Puerto Rican Latino Senate Depression
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:30 min | 6 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um, they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history. In order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before. I never knew that this happened and I've been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Oliver Chang Jason Erika Lee Connecticut African American Asian and University of Connecticut Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Senate Professor Latino Depression
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We need to make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before. I never knew that this happened and I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Oliver Chang Jason Erika Lee University of Connecticut African American Connecticut Asian American Puerto Rican Asian and Asian American Studi Pacific Islander Senate Bill 678 Professor Latino Depression
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 6 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before? I never knew that this happened. And I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry, Frustrated. There are so.

Maui Honolulu Jason Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Connecticut University of Connecticut African American Asian and Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Professor Senate Latino Depression
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before? I never knew that this happened. And I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Connecticut University of Connecticut African American Asian and Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Professor Senate Latino Depression
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on 990 The Answer

990 The Answer

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on 990 The Answer

"Com and now on radio dot com Morning, Johnny who never, ever learned me to write so well, but he could play a guitar just like a ringing the bell. Go go. Number two is waiting patiently in Philadelphia. Hello, sir. Good morning. I'm talking to you, Chris. Likewise. What's on your mind this morning? All the problems, you know that? You know the numbers don't make sense. Philadelphia this party. I'm a Democrat like you know, for for Trump in the Latino nation when with Trump Fan and Issues. Unbelievable. All these numbers going up and stacking up like that, and the statistics show on closing night Trump was a head 600 Some 1000 votes. It's impossible for fighting to catch up. It. Does it does. The math doesn't even make sense. I got to tell you, the Latino even in this story in the Enquirer yesterday on birth, though the number of Latino activists elected officials and scholars critical of Democrats and Biden, saying they reached out too late, didn't address issues that resonate with the city's predominantly Puerto Rican Latino population. Didn't have enough information available in Spanish. Uh, even Democrats said We didn't see the Biden campaign. I mean, that's the point. These people didn't even know they didn't campaign. The Latino community know they didn't even try. Biden, didn't he? That's the other thing. It's damn your lying eyes, Grandpa hit and Wilmington in his house. They didn't even try. We all saw what we saw. It's just insulting to suggest otherwise. Pats and Delko high packed Good morning, Chris. I want to tell you First of all, I trusted me Powell and.

Biden Trump Chris Philadelphia Johnny Enquirer Pats Grandpa Wilmington Powell
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Actually, I'm not sorry. Not sorry. Don't you do the shows that I turned down to notice picked you? You would be very impressed with yourself data that I could tell you delivering the truth. Are you a citizen? Or are you a subject? As I'm a citizen, and I last whatever question I want to whenever I want to. If your subject you go on and you be a subject, I'm a citizen. Yes, and by the way, You all know most people don't know. Unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is incredibly diverse community. Incredibly different attitudes about different things. My goodness shakes. No wonder No wonder he's hiding Biden. No wonder they they leave him in the cellar. Just just hide this dude until Election day. Maybe maybe he'll win. This is the Danish. L appreciate you checking in. I'm Sergio in for Dana from when I referred to her Southern command office here in deep South Texas, on the US Mexican border. And alive. Eight for four. 344 Dana is the phone number If you want to hop aboard, Man, this is just the gift that keeps on giving. Talk about water cooler conversation on steroids today. Joe Biden, you know bye. Current definitions and obsessions. Joe Biden. What else can you say? Joe Biden is a racist, right? I mean, what more does this dude? Thereby current definitions and obsessions. And how the media they just go ate the poop crazy. With stereotypes whether Whether they are somewhat In jest or Or some would say they're never ingest their never helpful stereotypes are never ever ever helpful. They're never funny. It's The The situation we're in right now. We're comedians who normally bounce off and they play off of our differences. Are you unique? Qualities, distinctive characteristics and then it should be celebrated and I should be at times laughed that and recognise and were. I think we're all the better for it. Comedians. They can't go to college campuses nationwide in these so called universities, is you never. There's nothing universal universities universe about these universities these days. They have pigeon holed themselves into safe spaces. The snowflakes who cannot hear do not wish to hear. Any differences. Any other point of view? It is they know what racism is. They know what's better for black people. They know it's better for Latinos. They know what's better for everybody got thes. A leader's thes, maybe trust from baby's going very expensive school in California and Ivy League schools, and they get all militant begat belonged to these. These groups are out there telling people You are oppressed, you black woman, Hispanic man. You are the oppressed. I will fight for you. I will represent you. I would join organizations. That will fight on your behalf. I don't want your sight on my behalf. I don't need your sight on my behalf. Going back to that comment from Joe Biden. Is right. When he talks about Latinos. Which could be the same could be said about any group any ethnic group. Whites. Whatever that means, right? What White Irish. White English by German white, Polish white Mexican. Yeah, white Spaniard right. There's white Mexicans, too. What what is like It's like when I When I fill out the census, one of the things I was looking at, if you didn't know this on the census No. There was no like Little like, What are you African American, then? I don't know. White. Look, it was the lightly tanned scanned. Ah! Parents were Mexican American. You kinda have to go further down it Sze like you. People from Mexico. People in Latin America, people that They trace their roots back to Europe. There's a mix. There's a misty so Indian mix with the sticks, the Mayas, the the Yaqui All the There's a mix, but the lineage back to Europe makes pretty much all Latinos. Y. Well, I know something. I'll go wincing on what it was, like Some of the Latinos going. No, I'm not like I know. I need to put some more brown on my skin. No nip Biden was right. There's a diversity. There's a diversity in the Latino community when it comes to Not necessarily family culture, because there's there are many similarities in all Latino cultures. And I say in all human, just human being called all humans. We love our normal. I think normal human beings. Love the parents. They love their Children. I think I'm going back to the Rice University speech by JFK where he was tryingto You know, tell people that whether it's Americans or it's the Soviets any any human being on this earth right before he was making a call for us to go to the moon. You know, we all love our Children. We know we all laugh. You'll cry. We all feel pain. We all die. Just know I'm paraphrasing, but it was. It was a beautiful examination of the human condition. Puerto Rican Latinos. Have a certain political bent. Cuban Americans. Latinos have a different political ban Mexican Americans who come from a Mexican ascent. Yeah, and so on and so forth. Central America Spanish. He just go on and on and on. It's many different flags. Many different points of view. Politically speaking. It is as diverse as the menu for Goya Foods going off. You know that going food that you didn't know anything about until AOC try to deep six these people because the president had the back, President Trump say you're good for the economy. You good for business, just like you did for President Barack Obama. And then all of a sudden we all became Goya fans start my GOY cookies and Goya paste and going cans with this that the other home this tasty what it's it's a huge menu just as very As the cuisine from Spain to Central America, the Caribbean in Mexico. All that Black people in this country are equally as diverse What you see. Joe Biden. And call me if I'm wrong. Call me if you hate me for for saying Joe Biden is a racist. Joe Biden comes from a political point.

Joe Biden Mexico Goya Foods African American community Dana president Europe California Barack Obama US Ivy League Rice University Spain President Trump Sze AOC Caribbean Latin America South Texas
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"My seat. Says he's Puerto Rican as you Newark. Right Say where are you from? I think she said she's from nowhere. You're a girl girl a will you know. I love the Puerto Rican Latino women one of my one of my baby mamas a Puerto Rican in from the Bronx. So that makes me half Puerto Rican only problem with Marseille issues. From like os well documented every woman from Newark New Jersey's completely out of their mind. Now we now meet the no How many baby was she has now genuine. That she's from any that's Great Bragar all Wendy's I think if I o Maria Mari Orlando just popped there. Good Morning Mari. Welcome to the show. Because your name really does not even sound familiar to me so to show. How how'd you hear about us? You know you are friends and family right now so come on and say hi sit for Awhile Cop squad you know have seen good morning. Is this a man or woman Let me see if I could see. They profile Pitcher at Mari is. What happened only on a? I'm guessing it's lady Mari Orlando Lady. I think she are. You know I was in nursing. Shot out to you girl and Audi Lonnie I. You're from Louisville. Did You Rob Lee Scott? Great he yeah he was from Kentucky and he was yeah. He was from Marina it's just popped in seven marina h shop with the. I'll just say that. Yeah because he keep up I I.

Puerto Rican Puerto Rican Latino Mari Orlando Lady Maria Mari Orlando Newark Rob Lee Scott Audi Kentucky New Jersey Louisville
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"I don't know how this is going to end. I don't know whether the outcome of I don't know if it's going to get better or worse or how wrong can take what I've noticed. Everyone has a lot more appreciation for each other. And just seeing your family and friends or going to your favorite restaurant or bar or picking up your favorite food or just. 'cause WE'RE ON LOCKDOWN. Now here it's like you. You can't just go out like. I actually have a letter from work if I get pulled over like. It's just an appreciation of freedom. I got I think you see a lot. And I don't know how much is true or like animals coming out in the world kind of in a way healing skull and I think we need to pay attention to that you. We've taken a lot of things for granted and this is a big wake up call. It's a scary awful terrible wakeup call but here we are and I feel a lot of people saying wow. I'm I have a lot more appreciation for this now. And and that's what I see and I hope we hold onto that and we don't forget that were to get we all get through this. Thanks so much hillary. This was wonderful. Really appreciate your candor. Here thank you John. I appreciate it. You Take Care of you okay thank you. We'll do all right thanks. Charlotte thank you bye. This is jamming their transmission. I'm John Madera. I've been speaking with Hillary left. Which about life during the contagion. My next phone call is with Antonio Nidal Hello Antonio Nepal John Madera here. Welcome to jamming their transmission. Thank you thank you very much before I ask you. How life has been during the contagion. Please tell us who you are. What you've done well. I retired about three and a half years ago from college. I was a professor in a department that I had a few activists. Students put together help to form the Puerto Rican Latino Studies Department started as Puerto Rico Studies and then You know now move into the study of the diasporas in Latino roots in the US. So it's a hit not Puerto Rican Latino study's chairperson Bowman Shepardson muddy up that escorted the Pearls Department. Pr It is now Fifty strong and we're we're about to get ready in spite of everything. That's going on to celebrate the Fiftieth Anniversary to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the apartment. We started in nineteen seventy and The commemoration will take place. Hopefully this all just car owner. Ira Brochure Sometime in October or November of this year. Not next year thank you. How has life been for us? So far in this new reality well you know even before quarantines and everything else I love to spend time at home. My wife and I knew what I see the mom to our only daughter and then he not by Seattle. Now we did a lot of traveling and then we kind of settled down. When Lena was born boys still stayed active in the Puerto Rican and Latino Movement in the city but equally on questions of human rights Our education housing all these issues to various organizations that we work with and we still work with in spite of everything that's going on thankfully technology has got much better from the time that we only had a phone to get in touch with people Now you can do it with all kinds of social media so it's still stay very active although we're at home most of the time personally. I work with three organizations that time one of them is alone. Our Book on college called the Alliance of Puerto Rican education and empowerment our which is now entering its fifth year and it's enough trucks and Redo work in the human rights area in education since most of us should I do caters and alums of looking college. All many young people have joined the group as well. The other two groups are the The friends of the UN. 'cause many years. I've done work sort of diplomatic worker Around the colonial Keisha Puerto Rico on that of course. demands that we speak to the people in the Committee of Twenty four which the Decolonization Committee compare documents translations in the like there's admissions and basically get the UN to reconsider are the colonial situation of thirty To have the case included in the list of countries that have not reached independence through the Committee of twenty four and then just General Assembly Concerned Group is The Territory Puerto Rico. Where are most of the work that we do is cultural? Are- celebrate commemorate gifts and important dates in the Puerto Rican calendar until eighteen sixty and Commemoration for three calls Struggle for independence in nineteen fifty fifty. Four mysexy Ponce. So the idea is to stay in touch with the political but also the social cultural. And that's what I've been doing Amelia as well Through these organizations that I've mentioned thank you. How are you feeling these days? Wow I'm feeling well I've been very cautious like everybody else. You know I send out stuff that has to do with cleaning hands and whether it's Jocular humorous in nature or serious. The fact is that we do have to communicate and Show so the country that it's the people of this country that have to take command of the situation and not the politicians Jewish for their own self interest so I'm feeling good also feeling very well. sometimes get a little bit of cabin fever so we have to go out to drive you know. Just go get some fresh air. I'm hoping to whether it gets better because I'M GONNA TENNIS PLAYER AFTER ALL. My name is now daughter and then name is famous still came before but many years before and I've been playing for last forty five years or so and I'm waiting for the weather to get benefit out there now. Just some heading. You think you'll you'll be able to find people who'd be willing to play with you. Wow there's only one good thing about ten inches on the other side of the net is well over six feet and there won't be too many people out there tennis courts especially here in Brooklyn College. We have six cards and the Anti So. I think it'll be pretty safe and other you've been writing while in self imposed quarantine and you've been sending out poems that you've written in Spanish in response to the current moment. I wonder if you might read the palm and also do an on the fly translation for us. I do right primarily in Spanish. I have many things. Most of my academic work could college Was done in English I also did some work in the UN where we have to translate documents to the other language that I'm fluent in French I don't write creatively and French. But I do write creatively mostly in Spanish sometimes in English but I prefer Spanish language Okay this Latest poem working on a few of them. Now that how time at home but the one that I wrote About two weeks ago Arch. It's called in condition this mine. I eighty bit feeling I I'm a big fan of French literature. like only sean human. The human condition Is Actually inspired this because the poem has a great deal to do with the fact that the one condition that we just regard when there is crisis in when people are protesting yourself interest as a human condition so I wrote it conspired by the human condition that cohesion. Oh my goodness I forget the name of the French later that But anyway it was inspired by that and I can read it in Spanish if you want for you. I don't doubt your audiences. Many of them are Spanish speakers as well and then I could do a kind of like a brief translation. Be Right so diplomas call inc on these young woman. I actually put Dessel. Mina or inhuman you might say but put the D. S. very up the precepts of that in parentheses. And then I put the word. So there is a An inhuman on annual main condition which we treat each other without taking consideration that that. It's really awesome. People who have the responsibility to look after each other and then of course i. I tried it into situation of the Ricoh which I know very well. Because most of my academic writing has been done on Puerto Rican history culture the Diaspora of Puerto Ricans for the United States and other groups. So I I called it. Ankara shown dessel minor and he liberation. So that would be the answer. Why feel that most people who are in any kind of bondage or living in colonial slavery Have to they have to put together their own resources. Ashby people to get out of this condition. Usually done were too small group that then inspires of a much larger constituency. So there is a Spanish okay. It's politicalness DC as who combine USA Embroi- Shia. They all analysis. Yeah say.

UN Puerto Rican Latino Studies De Puerto Rican Latino United States Alliance of Puerto Rican Dessel Hillary Puerto Rican Puerto Rico Studies Keisha Puerto Rico Territory Puerto Rico Antonio Nidal Hello Antonio Ne Puerto Ricans Committee of Twenty Ricoh John Madera TENNIS Brooklyn College Ponce
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

11:40 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Connection. No judgments whatsoever. But, but that's so to me when I look at art, I always look at it, obviously through the lens of a woman of color because of one equipment and everything else. You know that I didn't have access to growing up. So I would see my father always through the lens of someone that had to capture through photos because I've had to capture my whole life through photos like journal and. I couldn't relate to other projects because culturally where I come from. I look at my mother, and my father in a very respectful way. Yeah. There are certain things. He don't let Puerto Rican families of certain things, you don't share in public certain things. You don't talk about in public outside of your own family and photography is about opening that embracing that boundary between participant and viewer until for me. That's what it's really struggled with. So I couldn't never divorce myself from where I was in the subject that I was shooting. So. Has it gotten more difficult with my father? Absolutely because he has aged guy. You know, he's ninety years old. He turned ninety December. Thank God and still incredibly sharp working currently an incredible holder of I can't express of Latin music history. He will read music encyclopedia's like books, and he will tell me he's like well that person that's the wrong caption because that's not that person this this musician and also seeing as a person of color understanding, the lack of means and connections to education and materials, also the low how lead music is really seen as low art until also have that pressure. Like, I really have to document this guy Riley, really try to get you know, the the right information the history because this is not just my history. But this is American history to loud music being so incredibly popular late forties. Fifties. Early sixties, you know, desegregated the dance halls in New York City in the fifties. Eight pool son, his reputation absolutely many others. Many others. And that's the thing. My father has worked with so many different people that people would already. He's awesome. Awesome. Awesome. Then he isn't. So it's been challenging to really walk that line of being a loving daughter. A daughter that also wants to develop her own photography career, regardless of what's happening in my personal life. But then also trying to elevate this person that I feel has been really ignored this incredible creator and giver of talent, you know, within the Puerto Rican Latino community, and then also to really try to pass on this pride about the Bronx too. Because Bronx has also been the cradle of Ladd music within a New York City to so many of the greats lived in the Bronx and met in the Bronx for a reasons just may spill over to something bigger in that sense music and letting music in the city, or when I really I really do hope so I've been very much, you know, because I feel as an older photographer myself. I started later in life and photography not like a lot of people. Start very young or go to in undergrad and grad, I think that I'm super open for this to really off into someone's first long term project. Yeah. Absolutely. I want to ask a bit about you. You talked about the gear or the the cheap camera. Who cares? Right. None of us care about that stuff. But but was there a kind of a process to get over the the worry about the gear, and what you were using and and legitimizing the process because oh, I don't have a good camera or something like that? And then how did that evolve an ICU shooting with Fuji, which is kind of in some ways the right now, the the camera of choice for St. documentary and things like that. So talk a little bit about that process to as you went alone. I think that's a great question. I think that's a great question to really talk about and theme to talk about when it deals with of color, photographers or photographers that you know, two times. I mean that Israel when I would meet all these different photographers, and you know, again being of the BBC so blessed to have these amazing famous people walk through the door every Friday. You're just like, oh my and there will be ten people in the room. But one of the questions always Abe's like about accents. Where did you get your, you know, nothing necessarily about you know, what a court camera, you're using. But how can we create art? If we don't have that ten thousand dollar camera. You know, and it became this personal and political point for me. And it really informed me. As I continued. And this is why I do the Instagram feed on the founder of everyday Bronx and part of the the everyday projects group, and because it is about creating images through your phone. I mean, obviously now things have changed since it's an Instagram started. But I'm such a huge proponent of access. Everyone should be able to express themselves through photography. They choose. So so I don't until when I talk, and I, you know, do talks with kids and things like that or other adults. I always try to bring this up about access for me. It was hard because I did walk in believing. I have to get you know, the top camera. There are some projects. I mean, what look do you wanna have what do you want to say? So it's a real thing. Also bottom line, though, I think that once you wanted to Utah is the camera that is not the critical aspect. It's your is. Like, you know, if you're a photography, and you know, what you do it. You can you could just take a box with all ten. And you can go and within those limitations together. But you have to get wants to get there, which you realize that you don't need that thousand dollars camera. You don't and also got that lack of access makes a difference. Then it really it really does in inform who is actually taking photos now, and who is not into that a good thing to talk about as well, you know, to be able to how can we usher more people of color? So we can tell more well rounded stories and also to me just even not even wanting to be even if you don't want to be a professional photographer again talking about, you know, how if you're poor you don't have the privilege of exercising your creativity. And that is painful, and I think that that is something that we need to talk about as well, I don't teach photography or to try to push everyone into becoming a photojournalist, but it is so much so about giving people the knowledge. And belief that they can express themselves, and I think it's important, especially among a community of color or flips. I'm sorry, Jeff. But the flip side to to this conversation is that in a series like you're doing with your dad or any other kind of intimate thing. You may not want that big camera. You don't want that big loud. Clunker you want something that's going to these more transparent. And it's a great point. Because I actually the reason that the exhibition is called hashtag, and maestro is because I started it on my phone so talk a little bit about like, did you I think Ellen touch on this. Did you ever think you were going to be having this in the New York Times exhibiting, it even was it? Did it start as something just to kind of work through your own system and see where it goes the project, and you mentioned the BBC and how it how it began. But would you think about it? When you first started just I also thought besides just practicing, my photography and documenting this, you know, famous important man, I thought it would be important for our families. You know, I grew up I only had two photos of myself to from Puerto Rico to the United States to me also printed images or big deal because I didn't grow up with any and we were so poor. When we got to the United States. We didn't have a camera for a really long time. So they're huge chunks of my life. That are not documented at all. So I'm obsessed with that. Because I didn't have that in in my life. This is a cruise Bikaner show said they'll make similar. Yeah. It's and it's meaningful, and it does reflect because also I have been privileged enough to travel the world of lived, you know, in Spain. And I love art, I go, you know, love going to museums. And the thing is my experience has always been I barely ever see people that look like me in frames in photographs, you know, and for me, it's like, wait a minute. I want to try to create images that I wanna look at you know, when you find something that is missing. Then do it yourself. I mean, that's how come my series fandom size and the force. I went to Star Wars convention in Anaheim, California, and I decided to photograph plus size women Star Wars fans at the Star Wars convention and. And. For you know. Week. And I felt really weird telling, you know, my friends at the BBC that it was going to do it. But it became one of the most transformative spirit experiences. I have ever had in my entire life. Because I had always hoped looked for in dreamt to see those photos because one they're female fans and to. Plus is people do exist, and we have respect. And so I've been photographing some this is going to be going to go to the stores convention in two weeks. So I'm gonna meet some people that are photographed through three conventions and to really chronicle the difference in how it's a movie, but how this movie and the changes in the movies of inclusion of other people of color has changed fandom in how as people of color. We also change a space because we are there. If you go there about fifty thousand people in it people in the world, unlike what you would see in some of the phantom world with just it's just, you know, looks like white men like that's not really true. Well, that's a great point. They wanted to get back to maybe two questions regarding the puppy almost. But. You said that he has to take out a photo. Was there a decision that you had to make her which is a no brainer. It's absolutely no brainer. By the end of the day. You know, I at it myself even before I photograph I did heavily. I think that now. Since the exhibition of gotten such positive reaction from the images that I'm showing a lot of other photos, again still trying to be very respectful to my father in his wishes. But no, it wasn't an it was a no brainer that I would remove that image that he didn't feel comfortable with is a photograph that I saw of him with a Walker isn't there or my mistaken the? No, I have not in the show. Not in the in the New York Times article perhaps. Yes at the Senate and a cemetery. That's the only, but he was over here. He was okay with that. I think that he. I think he's had to relent to a little bit. Favorite newspaper.

Bronx BBC New York Times New York City United States Puerto Rican Latino community Fuji Instagram Senate Bikaner Riley Spain Abe Anaheim Puerto Rico Walker Israel Utah founder
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Statehood, I think there was any participation of about twenty or thirty percent. Do I have that? Right. Yes. So in the aftermath of the twenty twelve plebiscite President Obama called I follow series of follow ups plebiscites. In the thousand seventeen plebiscites was supposed to be certified by the department of Justice. But the local government made up all kinds of ballots that were inconsistent with congress and the department of Justice request. So they held a plebiscite on on June ten twenty seventeen and only twenty three percent of the electorate showed up the boat and twenty two percent of those of the electorate voted for statehood or ninety seven percent. Now, the problem is that the standard for statehood that the bar for statehood that has been placed by both conservatives and liberals alike requires a sixty percent of the electorate or more or sixty five percent of the electorate board and affirmative or -firmative for statehood. Now, that's not a strong, not set rule set in stone. But that's the political expectation. So when you only have twenty two percent, supporting statehood are showing up to the postal vote for statehood. Is not taking that very seriously, especially when it when it refuses ratify or or affirm that that particular plebiscite, but how do you explain the attitudes of Ramon nervous once served in Puerto Rico Senate with the Popular Democratic Party? He said we the Puerto Rican people have our own national identity. We do not consider ourselves Americans since we have our own culture traditions, and languages is that sentiment in any way. Widespread? I mean, it would seem to contradict all of what the candidates running for governor. And what I understand to be these overall sentiment of the people, which is you know, where supposed to be citizens, but we can't vote. Well, you know, it's a tricky question street, and I say that because a part of living Puerto Rico's except in the sort of dual identity, if you're actually average Puerto Rican are they willing to give up their citizen the US citizenship. I'm willing to bet that upwards of ninety percent would say, no, we don't even if Puerto Rico became independent we'd like to remain citizens for a range of reasons at the same time. If you ask the statehood party, particularly the governor of Puerto Rico's father who was the former governor for you whether they'd like to give up their. Olympic team. Former governor on record saying, hey, if we become a state, we're going to retain a separate Puerto Rican Olympic team, even for the fifty first state of the United States. So you have a at a cultural level a lot of Puerto Ricans went to affirm a sense of difference and identity, but at a political level they still want to maintain a link not only citizenship, but also through the a sense of belonging to one of the most powerful nations in the world. Well, how do they feel about President Trump? I mean, if if the governor is saying that statement about if the bully gets class, I'll punch the bully in the mouth, which you say he's playing for the local audience in Puerto Rico. I kind of get outta my memory Trump tossing paper towels when he went down there. And as you mentioned the governor went along with Trump in playing down the normal death toll at the time. They said there was any sixteen people died in the result of a devastating hurricane. Now. It's the was it three thousand or something. One study suggests that. So the question would be then to my mind, I think Trump is quite racist in his attitude tossing paper towels pretty damn patronizing. But we know that he refers to countries as assholes, and that's I think that's an element that we have to deal with here. No, the rhetoric that Trump embraces whether it's the border walls with the lies about immigration and crime in their lives because there's the distinctly inaccurate and false or whether the way he describes Puerto Ricans Latinos are non white populations and his pass it supports for white supremacists. The as we saw his comments in the Charlottesville incident clearly define sorta how Puerto Ricans in some ways see him or reject him. I think in the if you look at the latest poll and the latest I mean last year spoiled by the Washington Post and Kaiser foundation the average..

Puerto Rico Puerto Ricans Trump Puerto Rico Senate Puerto Rican Olympic department of Justice United States President Obama Ramon Washington Post Kaiser foundation President Olympic Charlottesville congress Popular Democratic Party twenty two percent ninety seven percent twenty three percent sixty five percent
"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican latino" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Of Ramon nervous once served in Puerto Rico Senate with the Popular Democratic Party? He said we the Puerto Rican people have our own national identity. We do not consider ourselves Americans since we have our own culture traditions languages is that sentiment in any way. Widespread? I mean, it would seem to contradict all of what the candidates running for governor. And what I understand it be these overall sentiment of the winter, it can people which is you know, where supposed to be American citizens, but become vote. Well, you know, it's a tricky question as street, and I say that because a part of living Puerto Rico's except in the sort of dual identity if you average Puerto Rican are they willing to give up their citizen the US citizenship. I'm willing to bet that upwards of ninety percent would say, no, we don't even if Puerto Rico became independent we'd like to remain citizens for a range of reasons at the same time. If you ask the statehood party. Particularly the governor of Puerto Rico's father who was the former governor whether they'd like to give up their. Olympic team. Former governor has ears on record saying, hey, if we become a state, we're going to retain a separate Puerto Rican Olympic team, even if we're the fifty first state of the United States, so you have a at a cultural level a lot of Puerto Ricans went to affirm a sense of difference and identity, but at a political level they still want to maintain a link not only through citizenship. But also through the a sense of belonging to one of the most powerful nations in the world. Well, how do they feel about President Trump? I mean, if if the governor is saying that statement about if the bully gets class, I'll punch the bully in the mouth, which you say he's playing for the local audience and Puerto Rico, I kind of get out of my memory Trump tossing paper towels when he went down there. And you mentioned the governor went along with Trump in playing down the normal death toll at the time. They said there was any sixteen people died in the result of a devastating hurricane. Now. Was it three thousand or something? One study. So yes. So the question would be then to my mind, I think Trump is quite racist in his attitude of tossing paper towels was pretty damn patronizing. But we know that he refers to countries as holes, and that's I think that's an element that we have to deal with here yet. No, the rhetoric that Trump embraces whether it's the border walls with the lies about immigration and crime in their lives because there's statistically inaccurate and false or whether the way he describes Puerto Ricans Latinos are non white populations and his surpass it supports for white supremacists. That's the as we saw from his comments in the Charlottesville incident clearly define sort of how Puerto Ricans in some ways see him or reject him. I think if you look at the latest poll and the latest I mean last year spoiled by the Washington Post and Kaiser foundation. The average Puerto Rican at the time right after the hurricane felt that the the inadequate and slow response by the federal government under the leadership of President Trump, what's likely based on his racist attitudes start Puerto Ricans so in that sense. Yes. I think the there's been some Bruin resentment in the island because a lot of Puerto Ricans feel they're US citizens, and they should be entitled to some sort of support or comparable support to the mainland. And they're not getting that. Plus, they're getting policies that are in some cases, harming the island. Well, let's hope the those and fled the island because of the devastation and moved to central Florida will vote, and that's the irony isn't that gee can econ- vote in Puerto Rico. But if you move to the United States you can. Well, you can't really vote in the United States either. Remember, the president is elected by an electoral college, the popular vote. All right. So in that sense, what we're seeing is the migration of Puerto Ricans to the mainland can only have an impact in local elections, school boards or city councils are mayor's offices, or with the exception of maybe Florida, whether it's a large amount of population at a at a federal level. We're it's not clear based on an electoral data that there's turning up to the polls. A lot of folks expected more Puerto Rican presence and last round of elections in eighteen which was so so now only one by the Republican governor Republican Senator to it could have made a difference. Yeah, they could've so we and so based on that electoral later, it's not clear that Puerto Ricans are making a difference could, but they're not doing it. Well, Charles, a santia go, I think he very much for joining us here today anytime, and again, I've been speaking with Charles gonna know Santiago, whose professors Latino politics public Lauren political theory who holds a joint appointment with the department of political science and the chips from Puerto Rican and Latino studies at the university of Connecticut, and he's forthcoming book is less than equal a history of the extension of US citizenship to Puerto Rico. Take a brief station break with back speaking with an expert on Saudi Arabia about Jared Kushner's appearance before the Senate intelligence committee today, and the chairman of the house farm relations committee's demand for a briefing on what went on in the secret meetings Jared Kushner had with crown prince Mohammad bin Salman..

Puerto Ricans Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Senate Puerto Rican Puerto Rican Olympic United States Trump president Florida Jared Kushner Ramon Popular Democratic Party Charles Washington Post Olympic Saudi Arabia Kaiser foundation