2 Burst results for "Pueblo Grandee Museum"

"pueblo grande museum" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"pueblo grande museum" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And Rosie on the house. Wickenburg a hot spot for Ayla celebrities. What? Kevin spacey. Tiger Woods Selena Gomez, Ringo star. Michael Douglas, Kate moss and Naomi Campbell. Are just some other people you could meet if you've got twenty nine thousand dollars a month for your rehab. That's public information. Okay. Fair game. Then. I thought maybe they'd stated our partners. Okay. At some point. But they checked into the meadow. A little less known fact that you don't really publicize a whole awful lot. It was this segment we cover famous iconic people structures are symbols. And I had if we'd like it from Arizona Wickenburg. And I was I was a little bit of stretch. We're we have just gotten to the park of four waters, which sounded very interesting. I want a little more detail on that before we move on with our guest in studio, Steven Schumacher, and Robert Malaysia both very active in the preservation of the Phoenix area. But you could take this type of passionate go to any town in Arizona. What led us to this interview was our coverage of Prescott? There's a lotta great history in Tucson. We were in to back this week. You could take this passion for historic restoration to to any town. And if we don't do it. I mean, no one else is gonna do it for us. And it's all just going to be lost. Yeah. That's absolutely right, Robin. I share share a common passion. But yes, pretty much any city if you research it whether it be San Francisco or Boston or Philadelphia more the eastern cities that have more of a history than us. They still struggle with it. I think most most metropolitan cities struggled to some degree because developers are in a hurry. They don't want their money to sit idle. They wanna they see an old building is something that's in the way to development and progress, and they're very quick to knock it down with their eighty million dollars and move on. So so, yeah, it's a challenge for all kinds of cities. But but history sells a moneymaking proposition more longer term than short term short term you. It's kind of in the way just as you said. But if you make the effort, it really does pay off every developer that has done that will tell you that it makes money more money in the long term, then just demolishing it incorporate the historic building into your. Development is the way to go and the park for water real quick, right? Yeah. Parker for waters is a very historic part of the Pueblo. Guerande museum out about forty four street in Washington. It's called the Parker for waters because it's a location where four prehistoric coal com canals all came together. And they'd give regular tours. You can just go on the Pueblo 'Grande museum website to give monthly semi monthly tours with the city. Archaeologists are the museum curator will tour you around there. But it's fenced off you can't necessarily go in there on your own really fun story about the park four waters. Is it used to be more accessible and people that actually go out there? And in the early nineteen twenties. There is a lady named Trinidad swilling who had been married to the founder Phoenix Jack swilling and the daughters of the American revolution. We're having a gathering at the park of four waters and Trinidad swilling said to the president lady who is the president of the daughters. The American revolution. She said you promised you would put some memorial together for my husband and unfortunately, Trinidad passed away before the daughters of American revolution. Put a plaque on the fountain in front of the old Maricopa city county courthouse. And so that to me is really fun story. Not only about the park for waters, but the wife of the founder of Phoenix. And also what the daughters of the American revolution. Did and you did mention if you wanted to see that Parker for waters, you you have to have a guide Z we go. Yes. Grandee museum to get that done. That's right. That's right. And they have regular tours set up. The reason they have it fenced off and so forth is there. So lot of JoJo, calm artifacts and arrowheads and so forth. Just right above the ground out there, and they don't want people going around just scavenging them and picking them up. Well, let's talk about going forward. I think that's a big part of the conversation. And you and I had talked a lot about. Just eating, and I think with our transient society, it's it's harder. Because people don't have the connection just kind of automatically built in like, this is my hometown. So your idea is is going in educate early in hope to invest in people who will stay here and invest here, right? Yeah. In my my cynical mind at times, I tend to sometimes I think let's just give up on the adult. So let's focus on the eleven twelve thirteen year old kids, and let's educate them, right? That's make them more aware of the different buildings the history. The culture, let's teach them to celebrate these things and then when they get old enough and become decision makers. They'll think twice about knocking down a building, and they'll value and celebrate the. The history and the culture a couple of things that we're doing around that. I've connected with the head of curriculum for the Phoenix union high school districts to try to get something into the regular curriculum about Phoenix Pacific history. Couple of other things that we're working on is is thinking about getting actual bar codes put up on some of our historic buildings. So that people are walking by of course, with technology. They can put their smartphone right up there. Click that bar code, then look at their phone, and there will be pictures and information about the historic buildings. So that's and rob has the idea of creating a marked walking paths around downtown and the combination of the path and the bar codes. We think will be a great free educational device for people are walking around when you're talking to teachers to incorporate the flat Stanley idea. Have you seen him? I have not he's a flat like paper doll. And when kids go away for vacation, or whatever they take this little dog. With them. And then they take a picture of himself with flat Stanley wherever so our youngest one. We did that with it was fun. So then when they come back to classroom, they'd say, whereas flat Stanley been so maybe a different little icon, but something where kids competition or it's a show Intel take your flat Stanley to some place historic in Phoenix that would be fun and get off the phone. I'm sorry. No that's jazz. A one more reason for people to walk around their head down. That's a great idea any way, we can get the younger generation where it's millennials or even younger kids, I know down in Vail eyars Zona, they've done a great job with their historic preservation and involving school children in projects and so forth. So yeah, it's all about getting the the younger generations more attuned to what the history is. And the heritage of Phoenix. And as they get a little bit older, make make sure they're stewards of Phoenix history. Just like, Robin. I think of ourselves. Well, let's talk to the to the older talks the adults. I love the idea of repurposing, and we talked about some of the venues and things talk to a couple of about a couple of really cool places to go. And I think just going in those kind of venues of inspires people. Well, thank goodness. That's the best way to save a historic building make it economically viable, so the private marketplace. Does it for you? And we have so many great examples of that in central Phoenix, seventh street central avenue. Seventh avenue. People love history, they love going to historic buildings, and that's really one of the main ways that people that love joy history can support history and encourage it by going to businesses restaurants retail shops that are in historic buildings. That just makes my heart sing when I'm in places hold and they've re purposed it for ardor eating or whatever what's the clothing store downtown. That's and he's and he's magnificent wondrous building, Robin. I were lucky enough about a month ago dab lunch or the guy named Jim Kaikan doll who owns what was well, Nick, marketplace and leaf-green seed company and right across the street. We used to be the Phoenix Motor Company, which is now the van Buren, which is a very successful entertainment venue. Right, fourth avenue and van Buren. And he owns all three of those buildings as repurpose all three of them. And it's just done a magnificent job. And he's a guy that grew up in Phoenix. So we don't have a lot of we don't have to educate people like that. Actually, we had lunch. He was going through his whole family photo album from his old days in Phoenix. But those kind of people are pretty rare that already have their own passion about saving buildings very valuable Jonathan Vento on Roosevelt who's been a real supporter of historic buildings and made it very very economically successful Chuckie Duff whose many took many old buildings. So we have a half a dozen great developers in town that support history and those that's our best avenue for saving them in the future. Maroma asked a question that kenniston JAL until something the top five historic buildings. So how'd you come up with that was a lot harder question than we anticipated? Where'd y'all come up with? Well. I mentioned Jennifer when she posed that question, there's all kinds of criteria determined. That are the most the ones that are nearing demolition. Are they most endangered? Most popular are the oldest whatever it might be and Robin. I went back and forth by Email about this. And we've come up with five from our standpoint. Just our own. The first is the Rawson house. If you've been to the Ross and house, you know, exactly what I'm talking about. It's over inherited square right near seventh street in Monroe built in eighteen ninety four and you can take tours of that just a fabulous building the second one that we came up with his cO called the fry building. It's actually the oldest commercial building in downtown Phoenix. It was built in eighteen eighty five. It's more known now by Marley's restaurant is right there. It's at second street in Washington. The city county building was built in nineteen twenty eight I believe thirty was okay. Twenty nine and it's between first avenue. Second avenue in Washington. It was at one time both Phoenix city hall as well as a miracle pa- county building. And that's a great example of government cooperation where the actual city and the county came together to benefit both by cooperative to build a bag different architecture building at these buildings. You cannot you can go in all these. So you can go in and experience them and feel feel. The culture there the lures building and tower nineteen twenty four thousand nine hundred twenty eight George lures on the early pioneers who built those buildings as well as the commercial hotel, which later became the lures hotel. And then our state capitol building, which is built around nine thousand nine hundred. We just took a tour of it a couple of weeks ago, and it's just fabulous to sit in some of those decision making halls..

Phoenix Robin Phoenix union high school Washington Phoenix city hall Phoenix Jack swilling Parker Wickenburg Kevin spacey Selena Gomez Phoenix Pacific history Trinidad swilling Phoenix Motor Company Rosie Prescott Arizona Tucson Rawson house Stanley Arizona Wickenburg
"pueblo grande museum" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"pueblo grande museum" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Order that when is it going to come off the presses well when we're done with the voting then people can start preorder for the picture a does their address and will ship at once once they come off the perner neca hey and the other thing that's going on today not only is it the second day of fall but it's also national museum day sponsored by the smithsonian now if you didn't know about that it's actually on our event page on our website we try to post them not everything that's going on that the things that some things that come across our pat we'd like to share and today is an museum day live hosted by smithsonian where you you can get into museum free and i had the list up anti do you have the part i think it's two tickets or something do you have an open not no if you just find your zip code it tells you that museums plus by in may so you have arizona museum at national history in that i don't high is idea e a r idea the desert botanical garden there is a of argun for yet pueblo 'grande museum which we love probably i think one of the most overlooked little jewels of all the park systems in phoenix located right there on the east southeast corner of sky harbor air report 44 street washington this tucked rapiki that you wouldn't even know it was there it it's tucked right in there it is a fabulous place to go and get a small taste at appreciation of the whole com that originally settled the salt verdy valley area and the number of people that were in the valley back vera a thousand 1214 100 years ago when it taking the kids they're on field trips it's need because they have a lot on the outside it's not just the museum inside but you can walk around and see the ball pets in the differently irrigation systems and things that for a kid to stand there and try to imagine life without all the buildings and all the roads in just just to be able to visualize life so different set right in the heart of the contrast is pretty pre impressionable there's actually a section of the original handdug canals that you can take a look at these these canals ran hundreds of miles and they were a handdug and there are approximately eight to twelve feet.

arizona museum phoenix washington smithsonian pueblo 'grande museum salt verdy valley thousand 1214 100 years twelve feet