23 Burst results for "Public Radio International"

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 months ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PR Public Radio International. It's time now for a perspective. That's our daily listener. COMMENTARY. Siri's The New World sometimes seems like a shrunken world thanks to shelter in place, But Christine sure for prefers to think globally. Here's her perspective. Brazil, India, South Africa, The covert number count has me thinking globally, I want a picture how the virus is spinning its worldwide Web. I'm a context person in the age of digital timekeeping. I still wear a watch. That's because when I glanced down to pinpoint an exact moment, I like seeing the other hours and minutes on the watch face. Past, present and future all at once. The sense of possibility. I appreciate the genie in my car that guides my driving, But my glove compartment is also stuffed with paper maps. I love to unfold one to look at desserts and fourth Mountains and cities. Tracing a route with my finger feels like a little dress rehearsal for the real journey. It shows me the roads not taken the grid of towns that remains hidden. The rivers I won't see from the freeway. Paper map helps me see how my route relates to the larger terrain steering towards a specific destination. I'm aware that there are many places I'm not going My stepfather was passionate about geography. Shortly before he died. He told me about his dream project off pitting a world globe in every classroom. Children would grow up having a sense of location they would know which countries are far away and which ones are close. They see their hometown a suspect their country as one of many they would know that the earth is more water than land. Our enthusiastic endorsement of globes culminated in our agreement that seeing the world as a giant ball would foster a sense of connection. Would this not contribute to peace? Today. I want to know what Cove it is up to. Not just in my city and my country but everywhere around the globe. The virus is a frightening way to be connected to be sure, And yet it is a non negotiable reminder that we are With a perspective. This is Christine Chauffeur. Christine Chauffeur is a writer and educator. You can share your thoughts on her commentary online at dot org's slash perspectives. Support for.

Christine Chauffeur PR Public Radio International Siri writer Brazil South Africa India
The Ho-Chunk tribe of Wisconsin has permanently laid off a number of employees

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 4 months ago

The Ho-Chunk tribe of Wisconsin has permanently laid off a number of employees

"This is national native news. I Megan camera in Perrine Tony Gonzalez. Indigenous activists are asking former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to drop out of the Democratic Senate primary over photos of him, and what they say is imitative native. American clothing common dreams, reports, coalition of indigenous women in their allies sent an open letter on Saturday outlining hickenlooper participation in hunting competition where they say winners are dressed in war, bonnets and losers must address like quote. Unquote squaws. The letter points out. This ethnic slur is associated with sexual assault of native North American Indian women. The one shot antelope punt has been a tradition in Wyoming for many decades A. Video from Wyoming. PBS shows the clothing being placed on the winners and losers by members of the Shoshoni tribe. Other? Groups joined the letter including sunrise movement converged. Colorado, and the indigenous environmental network, the latest controversy follows others including video that has surfaced showing Hickenlooper six years ago, comparing politicians scheduled to working on a slave ship. The letter says he has shown a pattern of quote. Behavior. The Ho Chunk Nation in Wisconsin has permanently laid off an undetermined number of tribal employees. The tribe has several casinos in Wisconsin that have been affected by corona virus closures and restrictions in a video statement Ho. Chunk President Myron White Eagle said the difficult decision is aimed at preserving the nation's financial health. This is a hard road to recovery to where we were pre pandemic. No one knows when we'll get back to. To those conditions, we hope to recall as many as employees as we can. But the future is uncertain White Eagle said laid off. Employees are not eligible for health insurance through the tribe, but they can seek services with the state. He said tribal officials failed to approve a budget for the coming fiscal year, but instead are working with a bare bones sixty day, operating budget in the hopes of the financial picture improves. Navajo nation leaders want new, Mexico to end efforts to dismiss a landmark education case meant to address educational inequities in the state. President Jonathan knows and Vice President Myron analyzer sent a letter to lawmakers expressing their opposition to a motion to dismiss the Yes Martinez lawsuit. Nez Native students deserve an educational environment that prioritizes their culture and unique needs. A judge ruled in twenty eighteen that New Mexico had denied English language learners, Special Education, native, American, and low income students, their constitutional right to a sufficient education, the Santa Fe new Mexican reports. The state filed a motion in March to dismiss the suit because it claims it has met the. The requirements of the decision the New Mexico Center online poverty, which representing the as he plaintiffs argues the state's efforts have been piecemeal in an op-ed, and the Albuquerque Journal they right. There are still large inequities in access to reliable Internet and technology, and they say they're still a lack of culturally and linguistically appropriate instructional materials, and there's a shortage of certified teachers. In Brazil people more into the death of KAIAPO leader and rainforest defender Paulino. Akon from covid Nineteen Public Radio International reported con played a key role in creation of tribal territory and ensuring indigenous rights were included in the country's Constitution The New York Times reports pie controversial, the world warning of the destruction of the Amazon appearing with celebrities like sting, but in the early nineteen nineties he was accused of rape. Supporters claim to the charges were. Were created a silence him. More than three hundred indigenous people in the Amazon have died from covid nineteen. The Guardian reports fears are rising. The virus will bring terrible losses of knowledge and tribal history, culture and traditional medicine. Many indigenous leaders accused the government of far-right President Gyro Bolsonaro of failing to protect Brazil's indigenous people by delaying aid and forcing them to risk infection by travelling to nearby towns for help for National Native News. I'm Meghan, camera.

Governor John Hickenlooper Shoshoni Tribe Ho Chunk Nation Colorado President Trump Wisconsin Perrine Tony Gonzalez Wyoming Akon Vice President Myron Analyzer Nez Native Amazon New Mexico Brazil Covid Myron White Eagle Democratic Senate President Jonathan National Native News White Eagle
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 8 months ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 8 months ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I. public radio international and we had a way out our if you're someone who plays guitar for fun maybe you took it up as a hobby when you were a teenager maybe you got really good so imagine opening your email inbox Wednesday and this guy is asking you to come audition for him I was in junior Roberts in the hot tub pretty woman every time I hear this I'm incompatible prince with his hit song if the guitarist in this amazing story is Donna granted she's from Toronto and yes she went to that audition and she ended up touring and recording with prince for the next four years until he died in twenty sixteen now done is doing her own thing this year she released her first solo record it's called diamonds and dynamite to this kind of beautiful spacy jazz rock fusion you're about to hear her tell Tom power how she got her first electric guitar as a kid and how she coped with extreme nerves when she had to play in front of prince but first she's going to play a special stripped down version of one of the songs from her album here's Donna grant is performing Mister majestic and.

Roberts Toronto prince Donna grant Tom Mister majestic four years
"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And from PRI public radio international. All right. So to kick things off I'm excited to bring out one of this country's finest songwriters. He has assembled one of the most town groups of musicians for my money, you'll find this country his latest earth tones is nominated for four Juno awards this year, including adult alternative album of the year and songwriter of the year which happens to be a category. One before other nominations video of the year for no depression for Allie is Eisner recording engineer of the year for Robbie lack grits earth. Tones was even up for a Grammy last month. And we're so thrilled that you're going to hear someone that Juneau and Grammy nominated music for you right now. Ladies and gentlemen, performing the song. No expectations live at the London. Music hall. Please give it up for urban, aka Bahamas. Sweet. Was it? One. Hands. Black. Bahamas. Williams, and Robin, Dan on Bogle and the gray Christine buji on the lead guitar on that will give her around applause to. Next to me right now. Hey,.

Tones Grammy Bahamas Christine buji Music hall Juno Allie Robbie engineer Juneau London Eisner Williams Bogle Robin Dan
"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:00 min | 2 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From PRI or public radio international. My name is Tom power. I do not think it's too big a stretch to say some lives were changed this morning. The governor general's literary awards unveiled their big winners. Just a few hours ago. There are some of the country's most prestigious literary prizes. There are seven awards for seven categories in both English and in French, but the name that a lot of people are usually pretty eager to hear is the English fiction winner and this year that prize goes Sarah, hence for her book the red world. Her novel takes you back to an Ivy league school in the mid nineties and introduces you to a woman who's found herself split between two really different worlds. She's in a relationship with a man who's in a fraternity where the members are notorious for being accused of sexual assault at the same time. A group of feminists have taken her under their wing what unfolds is a series of events that really ignites conversations about power consent. And has some of the dynamics at play a really nothing new. Joining me live in the studio to tell you more about it and a little bit about her. Big win this morning is the author Sarah Hester. Hi, sarah. Hi, tom. Congratulations. Thank you so much. Tell me about getting the call that you one. Yeah. It was pretty exciting. Call and I should have been prepared for it. I've been waiting for it for weeks. And and I was totally thrown off by it, anyhow, I just I guess didn't really believe that. I've is going to actually win was the first thing you did when you hang up the phone. Cried, really? Yeah. Had little little quiet shaky moment of very very grateful. I wasn't in front of a camera or something because it kind of felt a little sick and cried and then and then called friends and got really excited. Congratulations. Your book the red word is all about rape culture on campus. I handed this a little bit earlier. But in the book, there's two groups that really go to war. There's a group of female feminist activists students and a group of who belonged to a fraternity notorious for sexual assault. So why have these to grow groups go head to head in this book? Well, they're all extremely excited and passionate about these new lives. They're living on campus there undergraduates, and they're the party culture is raging and they're all partaking in that. And they're also learning a lot of really exciting new ideas in their classes, and this group of feminists students are basically calling themselves feminists for the first time, and they have a very charismatic women's studies. Professor and my main character, Karen. Answers. A roommate wanted ad, and because she remembers some of these young women from her classes and wants to learn more about you know, she thinks they're really smart, and they're sort of in the in group of student activism, and she's attracted to that. And she wants to be part of the group says she befriends them, and she moves into that student house, and in almost the same moment, she starts dating one of the boys living in the frat house. His name is Mike and wasn't really her intention to find a frat boy for a boyfriend she hooked up with him at a party at the beginning of the school year. But she ends up hanging out at the frat house a lot and befriending a lot of the frat brothers. And so she finds herself moving back and forth between what essentially increasingly become to enemy camps on campus. So you're going to read a little bit from the book right now tells a little bit about the passenger factory. Yeah. So so Karen. This is Karen first visit back to the frat house after that initial party where she hooks up with her friend, Mike and. A little wrinkle for Karen in terms of her visits to the frat house. Is that while she's dating, Mike. She actually has a crush on a different frat brother who's sort of the golden boy of the fraternity. And this is basically someone that Karen, thanks isn't a good fit for her in terms of you know, he's not he's not an academic. He's not he's not interested in ideas and things like that. But she can't stop looking at him, essentially. So this is the scene where Karen first comes back to the fraternity house in broad daylight. And all the frat boys are hanging out on the front lawn on sofas and chairs and yelling at passing students and things like that partying. Mike popped up from one of the couches on the lawn. Gentlemen. This is Karen hulls. He announced he hoisted my bicycle to his shoulder and carried it up the steps. Hi, Karen halls. They all droned like kindergartners greeting their teacher. Hi, Karen halls said, Bruce. I hadn't seen him there on the grass, but I saw him now feet. I flat on his back shorts. No shirt hands behind his head elbows out a gold dark valley between his thighs and gold bright tufts under his arms, the secrets of BRUCE'S body laid out carelessly for the whole world. I'd begun reading the Iliad for Dr Eszterhas he's class. And it kept picturing the hero achilles. As Bruce comfort blessed by the gods. The book said beloved by FINA, even if I had brought my camera with me, I couldn't very well. Take a photo of Bruce comfort. Not in front of all these frat boys not in front of Mike. But if I could if I could I wouldn't bother. This beer commercial Tableau at all. Here was the essence of the scene right here. It would be a single close up of BRUCE'S ribs curving under his skin sweeping down into the grass like the hull of a war going ship. That is Sarah hamster reading from her book the red word, which is awarded the governor general's literary award for fiction was just announced this morning. So much of the press around this book, and so much of the conversation around you winning this award or focused on the book and its conversation around consent is this conversation around rape culture on campus. Obviously, I'm asking you to give a spoiler or anything about the book that you don't want to tell us, but you could tell us a little bit about how that factors into the story as well. Yeah. So Karen roommates who are all fired up on their third wave feminist theory from class decide to wage an activism campaign against the fraternities on campus, essentially, they would like to see frats banned from the campus because they really see what happens at frat houses, and the sort of whole culture, the bro culture of the fraternities as being the site for mistreatment of women on campus, and where all the talk of equality sort of breaks down and falls apart. And so they essentially create a scandal at the fraternity house and make it very public in an attempt to basically exposed the misbehavior at the fraternity to the public. And they think if they can if they can create a. They can expose the frat house. Then no one will be able to deny what's going on at the frat house. And and everyone will agree that fraternities need to go. But of course, frats are a really entrenched aspect of campus culture, especially in the states where this book is set. And and they find that they've taken on a lot more than they bargained for you work at a university. Right. I do I teach at in the English department at Ryerson has any of this based on things you've seen around campus or your own experiences. It's not directly based on things. I've seen at Ryerson. And also this novelist set in the mid nineteen ninety s and so things have changed a lot. I think they haven't changed completely. But they've changed a lot in terms of, you know, gender discussions about gender and consent, and and things like that on campus, and in general, the the sort of frosh week hazing culture. Party culture has changed a lot. I think as well since the nineteen ninety so things are quote, unquote, worse in this novel than than they are on the campus that I teach. But also, I'm not privy to the kind of scenes that I described in the novel anymore. I mean as a professor you you talk to students in the classroom in your office hours. But you don't really see what they're doing when they're pounding back the beers and hanging out with each other. You know after hours what I find interesting about this book is that you didn't write it in eight months. He didn't write it in the past year. I mean when did you start working on this book? I started working on this book in twenty thirteen so five years ago. What what do you think it says that there's so many books that were written again, not in the last eight months five years ago is is this a coincidence that all these books are coming out? Now that were being written up till now, I don't think it's a coincidence at all Ailsa don't think that these writers are are saying what's going to sell down the road. Let's write about that. You know, you don't write a book that talks about, you know, problems with rape culture thinking this is going to be a bestseller. Right. But I do think that writers and creatives in general artists in general are. Tapped really deeply into what's not really being said in our society. We hear conversations in the media, and that sort of thing, and we become really curious about the kinds of topics seem to make people uncomfortable, the kinds of topics that people dance around the things that people fall silent or don't really know which vocabulary to us. And I do think that writers really hone in on those types of things and become really curious about it and say I want to dig into that deeper. I wanna find out what's going on there. There's something here in our culture that we don't know how to talk about you become almost prescient. Yeah. I mean, it's not it's not exactly gazing into a crystal ball. But it's going deep, right. It's going deep into subtext and deep into conflict, especially unspoken conflicts, right or things that feel taboo or dangerous in our conversations. And and so I think there is a tendency for books to feel precedent, right? And they come out, and everyone says this is so timely the writers like, yeah. No one said that. Eight years ago when I was slaving away. And no one wanted to buy this book or whatever. Congratulations on the governor general's award. Thank you so much. I hope your phone last the day doesn't blow up to I know. It's kind of exciting. No, I never get the sense attention. Congratulations. You deserve it. Thank you for coming in. Thanks, tom. Thanks for having their history. Novel. The red word just won the governor general's.

frat house Karen Sarah Hester Mike Tom power rape Bruce assault Ryerson Karen halls Professor Karen hulls Ivy league school FINA Dr Eszterhas Ailsa eight months five years
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Public radio international in collaboration with WGN radio in Boston. In late. August Thirty-three-year-old Nicole rathman was just a week shy of being released from the central Mississippi correctional facility, Nicole had served six years for non-violent drug conviction. She wanted to get out with her grandmother who she considered about frightened to Mississippi, and she has a twelve year old shoes. Just reconnecting Cole's mother Rita Corson because of a Mississippi reform law that went into effect this summer. Her daughter was eligible for parole, Nicole had been corresponding with state lawmakers to thank them and was hoping to become a counselor to help other people with substance abuse issues, the her release day never came on August. Twenty third two thousand eighteen Nicole was declared dead at a hospital in Jackson. State officials told her mother that she died of an aneurysm probably related to Matthews then a different story emerged a cellmate called her grandmother in Mississippi, and that's how we found out. She was beaten the head and had to get four Staples. And then after that she was beat with some. Padlocks that we're putting a sock by mate over sixteen dollars within a few days of her dying shoes having such horrible headaches shoes. Literally trading her psych meds to people for IB program. Nicole was one of at least sixteen inmates who died in Mississippi State prisons in the month of August in an unusual, spike. My daughter may have been a drug addict. Know, she was a good person. She was a human being, and this is an injustice from, you know, being put in there for as long as she was and the help that she didn't receive in there, you know, somebody needs to pay for this. And I don't mean money there has to be some change in the system. That's what this is all about for me, making sure the other Nicole's of the world are not treated inhumanely like this. We reached out to the Mississippi department of corrections, and they declined to answer questions about Nicole rathman death. They pointed us to an online statement which reads the Mississippi department of corrections take seriously its constitutional mandate to provide healthcare to all individuals in its custody. All deaths are investigated. The department believes that a majority of the deaths are from natural causes in that they include cancer, coronary and other medical conditions. Michelle Lewis, a reporter for Mississippi today who covers criminal Justice. She's been following the story. So. So between twenty twelve and twenty seventeen they're an average of four point five inmate deaths per month. No more than eleven in any given month. All of which is to say that sixteen people dying in one month is certainly out of line of prior data and that number merits further. Attention. Now, do we know what could have led to these conditions? If we're not talking only about natural causes could it have been too much heat. Was there not enough medical attention? Are there not enough medical facilities in these prisons? What could have led to this? Do we know? I mean experts have have mentioned all of the above causes as as conditions that we circling can't rule out at this point in time. Right. Both prison officials in the maintain maintained that the majority of these are natural, but we don't have official causes because all in custody deaths have to go through the state medical examiner's office, which has been chronically underfunded understaffed by the state legislatures. There's only a handful of staff during hundreds of autopsies each and that accompanying paper. Work really gets caught up in a backlog. Now, we're talking specifically here about Nicole rathman. And I'm wondering if there'd been any updates on her story. I haven't heard anything new about Nicole story when I spoke with the coroner who handled her case along with a few other deaths from last month, he indicated that the majority of the cases his office had seen that month per of natural causes. But he cannot comment on a Kohl's because it was under investigation. We're talking about prison conditions in Mississippi with the recent rash of inmate deaths across the state with Michelle Lu. A reporter with Mississippi today. This is the takeaway. At.

Nicole rathman Mississippi WGN reporter Michelle Lewis IB headaches Boston Cole Rita Corson Jackson Michelle Lu Matthews official Thirty-three-year sixteen dollars twelve year one month six years
Donation links to come to Overcast and others; PRX and PRI to merge

podnews

01:51 min | 2 years ago

Donation links to come to Overcast and others; PRX and PRI to merge

"Our public radio international PR ax is the public radio exchange US public media companies and PRI are to merge. The two companies are distributors of public radio content, including podcasts. PR. Rex is currently the number two global podcast publisher. According to project, you've probably heard of this American life. That's one of theirs. Markelle almond. The developer of IOS podcastone overcast has announced forthcoming support of a new payment link for podcasts. A big green payment button will appear in the next version of overcast to clearly link to donation pages. It's a simple tag in your show notes. Now explicitly supported by Omni studio and fireside and anchor have also said they'll support it. We already display it in our podcast pages, and we linked to more details at pod news dot net podcast pages. Also now include recent chart information from charter Bill a new website that aggregates him for. Nation from many different apps, including apple, podcasts, and Stitcher. The company offers Email alerts for chart rankings and reviews. You can search for your podcast within pod news dot net. Does he your information including links to a variety of podcast apps like Google podcasts and technical advice, Facebook released, four podcasts, focusing on effective marketing hosted by Australian radio presents Jules Lund face to face, talks to top marketers about their campaigns. It's hosted by whisker cadence, thirteen and bloom house. Television have announced a scripted podcast series inside the Trump presidency, the Oval Office tapes it'll be released on September the fourteenth and apple have apparently fixed the log in issues with apple podcasts, connect. So launch all the

Apple United States PRI REX Jules Lund Omni Studio Oval Office Developer Facebook Google
"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nine head from public radio international which goes by pri tom power generations of people want spoke the language they lived around what you might know now as the saint john river in new brunswick but for decades starting in the late eighteen hundreds their language started to disappear partly through canadian government policies that targeted indigenous language and culture today there might only be one hundred people who speak and understand the language jeremy dutcher doesn't want to see it disappear he's a musician from the west acquai community himself and he's taken these old recordings of songs and chance that were performed by people in his community in the early nineteen hundreds what he's done with these songs and recordings forms the core of his debut album just long listed for the polaris music prize you'll hear jeremy perform some of his music live from the q studio just a bit honestly might be one of the most incredible live sets you've ever heard from the studio i think it's one of my favorite live performances we've ever had on the show if not my favorite i though germs going to tell you what some of these old recordings sound like i just love him so much beautiful voice yeah that's jim paul from sit on sisk first mission in runs and yeah beautiful voice and i think it's been interesting for me as a singer and musician to explore like alternative technologies and think about the sort of micro tones that that he is using and thinking about musical systems and key signatures that maybe aren't part of the western classical way of doing things you know how did you feel when you first heard that recording i think you can't you can't not listen to these and understand the humanness that's in them you know when you when you hear the life that has actually like within these voices that have maybe past but are still with us even if it's one that is mediated through the lens of of this guy who came in and collected these songs and then put them in a museum it's still for me it's the closest glimpse i have inserted into what you know what my ancestors would have and how they were living in how they have they saw the world and how what their relationship was to the land to right so we're going to hear right now your interpretation of the song so what we're going to hear if i'm not mistaken is the actual recording with you company ing and would you say accompanying reimagining that recording i like that yeah i get i get to sing along with with with this recording with this voice going from the the museum and listening to these cylinders for the first time and then going back to my to my studio at a piano and just having those those melodies in my ear over and over and oregon and letting those guide how totally and rhythmically i'm i'm composing you know so not taking the western score like pop form as like the thing but really letting it come from the melody that was really really important to me and so respecting that fidelity to the original was important but also yeah i bring my own sense of of our history and what i can say a contemporary moment as well because i think there's so many things to say around these pieces and there's so many issues going on in our community right now that that need to be addressed this is jamie dutcher and performing on q you go ahead ooh ooh good.

Are the Kurds of Iraq and Syria About to Reconcile?

Here & Now

01:22 min | 2 years ago

Are the Kurds of Iraq and Syria About to Reconcile?

"On friday and saturday in canada as the us imposes tariffs on steel and aluminum imports markle says there will be quote no sense papering over divisions between nations a us backed kurdish group in northeastern syria says it's prepared to hold talks with syrian government over the area's future at move comes a day after u s and turkish authorities agreed on a roadmap to revolve resolve divisions over a border town under kurdish control at kurdish group remains the us is top ally in syria government forecasters say may was a record warm month for the continental us national oceanic and atmospheric administration reports the average temperature rose to sixty five point four degrees breaking the nineteen thirty four record of sixty four point seven you're listening to here now when climate gentrification causes climate evictions they've not gonna projects before moved them somewhere else never moved back climate change pushes developers onto higher ground forcing residents out i'm tansy nevada broadcasting from miami and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international we'll bring you that story and more on the takeaway just about twenty minutes from now that'll be noon today here on k q e where support for k q e comes from berkeley wrapped presenting what the.

Canada United States Syria Syrian Government Miami Berkeley Twenty Minutes Four Degrees
Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

Morning Edition

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump is traveling to texas today npr's mara liasson says the president will be meeting with survivors of this month's deadly attack at santa fe high school along with family members of those shot to death he's unlikely to encounter calls for gun control in texas it's a pro gun rights state and most of the focus there has been hardening schools making them more secure against potential shooters the shooting at the high school left eight students and two teachers dead a seventeen year old student at the school is facing capital murder charges the president's trip to texas includes a speech at a republican fundraiser in houston the mayor of san juan says she's not surprised president trump has been silent about a study from harvard university researchers suggesting thousands of people in puerto rico were killed by hurricane maria not one tweet not one tweet from a man that tweets about the sunrise to say look people puerto rico we're sorry that's mayor carmen ulan cruise speaking yesterday the study published in the new england journal of medicine estimates maria directly or indirectly killed more than forty six hundred people in puerto rico that's more than seventy times higher than the official death toll i'm dave mattingly in washington i'm robin young as we head into the wedding season a wedding planner has some of the latest trends including influences from the royal wedding children instead of bridesmaids flowers since her bouquets since megan's was so small i've had a few calls about wanting to change their case and it was picked by prince harry apparently next time here and now here and now at eleven am later on this morning followed at noon by the takeaway turning a drug lords life into a tourist attraction so they go to the cemetery they go to jail for he was for one year they go to the house where he was killed what's the price of glorifying pablo escobar i'm tansy nevada and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international the takeaway at twelve noon and then just one chance to hear marketplace today and that will be at four o'clock because it's thursday so that means at six thirty this evening it's political breakdown she may be.

NPR Pablo Escobar Robin Young Official Puerto Rico New England Journal Of Medicin Carmen Ulan Harvard University Houston Murder Santa Fe High School Dave Mattingly Washington Prince Harry Megan Hurricane Maria San Juan
"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And from pri that is public radio international i'm tom power hey nice to be back after a week off thanks so much to jill deacon thanks so much to jail richardson for sitting in for me last week too but it's it's nice to be nice to be home when you turn on the news and if you're like me but all you do is in watching the news or waking up in the morning and reading through your twitter reading through the news or reading some kind of briefing find out what's going on in the world right now it can feel easy to get lost and everything that's going on specifically at the white house if feels like every day there are some new details about an investigation every day something new is going to come out that you just can't miss her a whole new batch of tweets from the president is going to come out and the people are going to analyze it there's a new scandal sometimes you really need someone to help you make sense of at all what's the big deal but the small deal and what it all means for a lot of people especially if you watch cnn that person is jake tapper jake tapper award winning journalists he host the lead state of the union on cnn but here's the thing when jake tapper isn't reporting breaking news from washington he's actually writing fiction somehow he found time to write a whole novel that as you might guess draws you into the world of us politics it's called the hellfire club set nine hundred fifty four when dwight eisenhower was president senator joe mccarthy was leading a witch hunt for alleged communists and as you're about to hear from jake there's a lot about that political climate from sixty years ago that feels pretty relevant today now i should mention i spoke to jake i see it was about a week and a half ago so it was before this past weekend's white house correspondents dinner but don't worry we'll talk a little bit more about that on.

richardson twitter president cnn jake tapper washington us dwight eisenhower senator joe mccarthy jill deacon white house sixty years
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com this is p r i public radio international over the past year i've been investigating why american mothers die in childbirth at a far higher rate than mothers and all other developed countries but there's another disturbing statistics that's refer to as the tip of the iceberg because for every woman who we lose there are lots of other women who we came very close to losing that story and the rest of the news sunday on weekend edition from npr news we addition comes up in about seventeen minutes here on kqed public radio this week the president said he likes conflict feel likes to watch his advisors fight it out in front of him there was at one time that stephen miller broke off a chair legs that kellyanne beamed him with that busted winston churchill the thing they got a feeder sehgal will encourage the same bed created chaos from our panel of nothing withdraws blood though this week's wait wait for men field wait wait comes up at ten o'clock on kqed public radio good morning the time it's 443 it's living on earth i'm steve kerr would tens of thousands of dead starfish crabs and other sea creatures recently washed up on beaches in the uk scientists are blaming the death on a severe cold snap that brought freezing temperatures and snow too much of europe wildly fluctuating weather is consistent with what scientists expect from a changing climate macarthur genius and noted ecologists carl safina says we shouldn't be surprised in the nineties we used to hear that global warming was coming now it every place i go there is something going on that has to do with the fact that the climate is warmer than it used to be indeed so how exactly is the warming is the climate disruption affecting the the oceans and the plants and animals the live there well in a in a variety of different ways i mean it depends a little bit on what system in the.

president winston churchill steve kerr npr kqed stephen miller kellyanne uk europe carl safina seventeen minutes
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Un lie c and and pri public radio international and the take programme comes your way beginning at noon today here on kqed this is form a michael krasny this czar monday morning political news roundup and were discussing recent political developments including next steps and tax overhaul and amanda becker's with us from reuters and kelsea snell from npr and see rosenthal who's with the urban urban brookings tax policy center at the urban institute in uh steve let me read a couple of well a question and a comment first a common on taxes a listener says this is not a tax plan this is our highest against the american people by the republicans transferring massive wealth and tax cuts to their paymasters billionaires wall street operatives and multinational corporations but here's who wants to know is any tax cut in the recent past resulted in kickstarting the economy is republicans contend steve rosen i don't think so i think there's very little evidence that supplyside and trickle down theories work i if you look back to the last couple of of big pack pieces of tax legislation you have the edge of bush number two big tax cuts in two two thousand and one which eventually expired they didn't seem to do much good by the time bush number two left office our country was in huge debt and deficit in our regulatory and financial system was spinning out of control if you go back a prior decade when i was working on capitol hill i worked on on the budget reconciliation of 93 in which un secretary rubin persuaded president clinton.

secretary un financial system little kqed president urban institute people tax policy center brookings capitol hill npr kelsea snell reuters michael krasny time public radio international
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I z deny valve it's another hired sprang up into the yellow air all four legs splayed shit yet landed in the grass bounded on and we chased it taking risks this week on selected shorts from we are i public radio international if selected shorts later tonight at eight p m on kqed public radio good morning it's twenty minutes to six i'm joy l snyder with these headlines syria's state news agency says israel has launched an attack on a military post outside damascus the israeli military has not confirmed the attack but syrian media reports say israel fired several surfacetosurface missiles and that syria shot down two of them a strong cyclone is moving of the arabian sea battering southwestern india with heavy rain and strong winds at least eight people are reported dead and authorities have launched a rescue operation 414 fishermen feared trapped at sea and tensions are high in honduras where people are still waiting to hear who won last weekend's presidential election the election sparked protests prompting hunter and government to impose a curfew on trial snyder npr news from washington the tang support for npr comes from haines.

syria news agency israel damascus israeli military media reports honduras presidential election hunter npr washington twenty minutes
"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Public radio international in association with slight right after this live from npr news in washington i johnston crowds are taking to the streets of zimbabwe's capital celebrating the ouster of president robert mugabe the country's ruling party voted this morning to replace the longtime leader hurry resonant vicar thunder says the people of zimbabwe can relax now that mugabe is expected to leave with the alleged much is that we want without an indepth view of did have been in people i hit be so the final nail his we have to feel a continental if one should be head be should go about his business being what it what they want this is what the soldiers wanted embed us so we ahead before the info led the deed for us god is refusing to resign at his meeting today with the army commander who put him under house arrest last week the ruling zanu pf party says is prepared to began in each man proceedings of mugabe dozen stepped down by tomorrow police in kenya are using teargas to break up a crowd protesting the murder of at least four people in nairobi and member of parliament was also shot npr's aitor peralta reports the violence comes on the eve of an important supreme court decision residents of one of the city's biggest homes c four people were killed overnight by a gang because of.

washington zimbabwe robert mugabe commander house arrest zanu kenya murder nairobi npr aitor peralta president army break up
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is p r i public radio international this is kqed public radio at twenty minutes before a 5 o'clock on a recent reporting trip to canada we heard a lot about america ed monica like we have our own politics here what will hear about because we only hear about american politics sierra leone trump this and it's hannah eggs offering an immigration to oil pipelines we explore our northern border um how canadians see us must latest from washington summit on reconditioned from npr news we can edition begins at five am the minute ten o'clock it's way wait don't tell me followed by perry home companion at eleven o'clock i'm peter settle this week alone courageous figure rose up in the senate and said the time has come to fight back dwight quit join us for lillay tell tell me the news with ferment deal we're looking at his sunny sunday after morning clouds and temperatures will range from the '60s at the beaches and in the city and around the veins 70s up to the upper 70s inland is living on earth i've steve kerr would the books titles says it all a farewell to ice is is the result of nearly a halfcentury of personal ice research mostly in the arctic by peter waddams he's head of the polar ocean physics group at cambridge university and the fast retreat of glaciers and polarise is sobering if not terrifying and what it implies for the future of life here on earth living on earth helin palmer met up with peter waddams at the oxford university press offices in manhattan peter ward and i have to fail book a farewell to life paints a very grim pitch chat houeli were you aware that things were going downhill as it were when it took a long time before we realise things with changing i think from me the legalisation came when in 1987 i did a submarine village of the same grounds that i follow the 1970s sakes and found that the ice was much fin the bat fifteen percent loss of ice of a huge area fiat take so that was my first realization that's the situations not staple now you'll books foot of incredible graphs and tables and one that i found particularly telling is what you cool the arctic death spiral can you explain that to me and describe it well it was not invented by may but by as science codemax survey as at.

senate steve kerr peter waddams cambridge university palmer peter ward kqed canada washington npr perry peter dwight oxford university manhattan fifteen percent twenty minutes
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's four blocks from public radio international this is living on earth my steeper would tropical forests have become a net source of carbon dioxide instead of sequester in the global warming gas until now the focus has been on for station in we knew that the wars something more epping so the studies showing how removal all single trees qian there and just the mortality of threes all results afternoon a significant amount of loss also how the epa decision to roll back the obama era clean power plan what's a finger on the scale in favor of polluting fossil fuel instead of letting the market continue to operate and build more solar more of win more natural gas cleaner energy sources trump administration is actually trying to revive the coal industry when the market is determined to kill that more this week on living honor stick around live from npr news in washington on giles snyder authorities a northern california now say the wildfires there have killed at least forty people and destroyed some fifty seven hundred homes the fires broke out a week ago governor jerry brown calling them one of the greatest tragedy lisa state has ever faced hundreds of people are still reported missing in illicit jong perry from member station kqed reports on the search and rescue teams whose task is to find the missing search investments from up and down the state spent saturday going through piles of rubble and destroyed neighborhood from santa rosa but there's so much ask and debris and that ashington obree is almost like a powder it's almost like a baby powder and you have to sift through that and in some way find human remains and be able to hopefully identify them in some way if you can you can see of of bone and you pick it up just turns to powder in your hands sergeant break kelly of the alameda county sheriff's department says unfortunately searching for bodies is similar to an archeological tank special taking tools and.

global warming alameda county kqed governor jerry brown giles snyder npr natural gas obama epa epping carbon dioxide ashington obree santa rosa jong perry lisa state california washington coal industry energy sources
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's four o'clock from public radio international this is living on earth deeper with in the wake of this year's deadly hurricanes private researchers are finding high levels of benzene and used a neighbor though the epa is a little much more informative to the community if they have be upbeat of points out exactly what level of the exposed tier rather than juice asked summary data as the epa has been giving out some also house smartphone photos of endangered plants and animals posted on the web tip off odors and dishonest collectors as soon as data stotts being suppressed and starts being held back it can caused damage to the core of biological science on the other hand it is absolutely blake the obvious that criminals are using this data for nefarious ends that more this week are living on earth stick around live from npr news washington non giles snyder clashes today in spain's northeast region of catalonia police are cracking down on today's independence referendum the spanish government in madrid says the vote is illegal and has told police stop the process reported lord prayers in barcelona at first catalan police visited polling station saw that they were occupied by activists and then abruptly left failing to follow through on orders to evacuate them then spanish national police role dean in some cases forcing their way into polling stations in grabbing ballot boxes in internet has been cut in someplace it's the regional education ministry was also raided by police catalonia's regional president is denouncing the violence calling it unjustified disproportionate and irresponsible regional officials say nearly forty people have been treated four mostly minor injuries oj simpson free on parole today and of out of prison a spokeswoman says simpson was released just after midnight to avoid media attention simpson was granted parole back in july after serving nine years for an armed robbery conviction he has said he wants to move back to florida but his whereabouts are currently unclear the federal children's health insurance program or a chip has officially expired in pay ars allison kojak reports of funding for the.

epa spain barcelona dean regional president simpson media attention npr giles snyder catalonia armed robbery florida health insurance allison kojak nine years
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To move the world forward this is p r i public radio international eighteen minutes before 5 o'clock this is kqed public radio good morning in the film lady macbeth florence pugh plays a young victorian wife who finds release in a passionate affair we wanted it to feel halt like we were watching these two people that potisk destined to have sex with each other because sometimes it's like that florence pugh on women sex and murder sunday reconditioned from npr news we can addition gets underway at five am and then coming up later on this afternoon it's the new yorker radio our next time on the new yorker radio our one of the architects of obamacare on what lies ahead for american health that's next time on the new york we do expected to be sunny in hot especially inland triple digits and a heated visory in effect and around the bay big cooler '60s and '70s and '80s '90s living on earth i'm steve kerr would seven decades into the age of nuclear power the united states has yet to solve a problem of waste brand new uranium fuel was only slightly radioactive in easily handled but one uranium is burned in a power reactor the waste byproducts including strontium cesium and plutonium can be a million times more radioactive than uranium and one kind of who told him as too hot to handle without touch for at least two hundred fifty thousand years and while the us debates what to do nuclearpower waste finland says it has found an answer and plans to build one of the world's first longterm nuclear waste storage facilities and elaborate the underground tunnels the on carlo nuclear waste repository is plan on an island off the west coast of finland and nuclear policy researcher matti kogo says that once they bury the waste in the tunnels not much else will need to be done the idea is to more or less to from gadgets it's based on long asked him say they are and he plans to who any kind of warning signs source on black that there won't be any the plan is ronkko to store.

florence pugh new york steve kerr nuclear power united states finland researcher kqed murder npr new yorker matti kogo two hundred fifty thousand yea eighteen minutes seven decades
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Would be the first to harness patient's own immune system cells to fight their cancer scientists called the therapy a living drug that's because scientists genetically engineer patient's own immune system cells to attacked their cancer the idea is to infuse these genetically modified immune cells back into the patient's body to act like laser guided drones to obliterate cancer cells while sparing healthy cells rob stein npr news a father and son were killed when a deep sinkhole swab follow their car on the major mexican highway wednesday morning the rebel covered volkswagen jutta was found lying on its roof of the bottom of the whole mexican highway officials say the same call was apparently caused by heavy rains during the past three days which led to erosion of a drain that runs beneath a highway a new tropical storm formed off mexico's pacific coast wednesday even as former hurricane eugene faded back to tropical depression status tropical storm fernanda is centered about seven hundred eighty miles southwest of the tip of the baja california peninsula fernanda is expected to gain strength as it moved westward i'm jim hark and p r news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include home advisor matching homeowners with background checks professionals for a variety of home projects from minor repairs to major remodels homeowners can read reviews compare prices and book appointments online at home advisor dot com from public radio international i metal.

jutta mexico hurricane eugene baja california peninsula fern npr advisor immune system engineer genetically modified rob stein pacific jim hark washington three days
"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"public radio international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is p r i public radio international america is fake mostly a nation of immigrants often immigrants fleeing harm in seeking a better free life will have story sunday morning about refugees in the united states in experience is now in the past and america is a nation of laws so have the latest on the fastmoving russia investigation and the fall at this week's testimony from tap power of that and more sunday reconditioned from npr news it gets underway at five o'clock next time on the new york radio our tensions between the us and north korea have ratcheted up very high and one experienced negotiator things we had every reason to be concerned both leaders are impulsive and known to be impulsive in both are inexperienced in these matters that's next time mm on the new york radio our the new yorker radio our errors this afternoon at three on kqed public radio is living on earth i'm steve kerr would the analytical lhasa for daniel dented almost always seems to be thinking about the nature of consciousness and bus he's writing about it as in his newest book from bacteria to buff and back the tufts university professor has an enormous white beard and a twinkle behind his spectacles that makes them moreno looked like santa claus that is if santa claus were deep thinker who written a dozen books and spoke with a gently authoritative voice inflected by playful curiosity professor dan it looks to nature itself the help explain consciousness in a seemingly unkind asia's universe peering through lenses that range from.

america united states north korea steve kerr daniel professor santa claus asia russia npr new york new yorker kqed tufts university moreno