35 Burst results for "Ptsd"

26 Medications for PTSD

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:24 min | 1 d ago

26 Medications for PTSD

"PTSD pharmacotherapy is you took a second line and Psychotherapy has the more robust evidence the effect size for Psychotherapy is in the large range and PTSD while medications are in the small range with perhaps one exception in studies where patients were allowed to choose their preferred mode of treatment those who preferred medications tended to do better with them than they did the therapy route. And for those whose gut instinct was to prefer therapy. It was the opposite. Among medications paroxetine and search lean have FDA approval but there's nothing about the pathophysiology of PTSD that points to the ssris as the Curative route. Today's study the largest meta-analysis to date compared to effect sizes for 26 medications across 58 randomized controlled trials involving close to 7,000 patients with PTSD their focus was on efficacy that is reduction in symptoms and tolerability which is the rate of discontinuation due to side effects. Here's what they found to appear mate risperidone Quetiapine paroxetine venlafaxine off fluoxetine and Sertraline. We're the ones that passed in terms of their statistical significance for their benefits within that group Fluoxetine. And stood out as having the best balance of efficacy and acceptability. But this Advantage was mainly due to its tolerability because its effect size for its benefits was rather small, despite lacking FDA approval to appear innate risperidone and Quetiapine had the largest effect sizes which were in the medium range of 0.5 to 0.6 effect sizes were all in the small range for the other treatments. Remember the effect size for Psychotherapy was closer to one the large range. However, the studies back into a pyramid and Quetiapine were few and small and small studies are notorious for inflated effect sizes. So while they're large effect is intriguing choice, not at all definitive.

Ptsd Quetiapine Risperidone FDA Paroxetine Fluoxetine Sertraline Venlafaxine
Man charged in Black protester's fatal shooting kills himself: lawyer

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:37 sec | Last week

Man charged in Black protester's fatal shooting kills himself: lawyer

"Man charged in the death of a protester in Nebraska has committed suicide. 38 year old Jacob Gardner was found dead outside a medical clinic and Hillsboro, Oregon. The Omaha, Nebraska bar owner was indicted last week on charges including manslaughter. The fatal shooting of a black man during protest in Omaha, Gardner's lawyer stood Dorner. I am angry at not having an opportunity to defend a man who acted in self defense. Jordan says Gardener suffered from PTSD after serving in Iraq and that he had a a war war flashback flashback during during the the protest protest over over police police brutality brutality and and racial racial injustice. injustice. Jim Jim Crystal, Crystal, a a CBS CBS News News

Jim Jim Crystal Jacob Gardner Omaha Nebraska CBS Gardener Hillsboro Ptsd Dorner Iraq Oregon Jordan
PTSD may double the risk of dementia, study suggests

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

PTSD may double the risk of dementia, study suggests

"Experienced post traumatic stress disorder. Commonly known as PTSD have a much higher risk of developing dementia. Later in life, the scientists analyzed more than a dozen studies involving 1.7 million people, they found those who'd had PTSD were some 60% more likely to develop dementia. Yet when the researchers looked at military military veterans veterans who'd who'd had had PTSD, PTSD, dementia dementia risk risk was was much much lower. lower. Since Since PTSD PTSD treatment treatment tends tends to to be be most most accessible accessible for for veterans veterans in in most most of of the the country country studied, studied, the the researchers researchers theorize that the treatment helped reduce the veterans. Dementia risk suggesting that could work in the general population to Vicki Barker. CBS NEWS London McDonald's running low on

Ptsd Dementia Vicki Barker CBS London Mcdonald
Briana Holt is the Queen of Muffins

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Briana Holt is the Queen of Muffins

"BRIANNA welcome to most street. Thank you so much. Maybe we should start with a description of where you work because it's an old gas station turned into coffee shop pastry. Destination. So so what does it look like and what is it like working at? Gas? Station. It's really beautiful. It's like a big white building. It's got that kind of awning out front like it was never actually gas station. It was actually a body shop they worked on brakes and shocks and cars they would lift him up inside that kind of thing. So it has that really beautiful sixties shape to it. You know it's kind of wide and lots of front window big windows in the front and a big awning out front into the parking lot. So there's a lot of room to hang out there the light streams in and it's basically a big open space that we built a kitchen. So you have this. Vote interesting view of baking. This is a quote from you. You're talking about a tray of biscuits. They referring to the biscuits do the thing that I've asked them to do already they're alive the little. Hands they pop up in the right way. The top looks right. They lean over just a little. That is the moment that keeps me doing it. So you have this personification of of baking goods as friends or or or people you like to spend time with is that right? Yeah, I think. So I mean I think it's. Like anything you do with someone else kind of like a transaction of sorts you know I'm trying to. Coax. Something out of the ingredients or the combination of ingredients in the oven or something like that I think. Yeah. especially with biscuits, it's easy to talk about that idea because every single little thing you do with your hands and your fingers results in that That top or that lien or the flake you know. So yeah, that's kind of how I think of it. I think I read somewhere that you have PTSD when it comes to muffins because you've made thousands of them is that true? Have you got onto some could've recovery clinic and our back into muffins again man it's tough. I would say I'm very very slowly gingerly tenderly coming back around to the MUFFIN. But yeah, when I was probably like twenty four. I went back to Martha's vineyard for a short time. I was in love with this guy this musician that lived there and I thought. If I leave my sort of post college what's coming next kind of life and I go back to Martha's Vineyard we're GONNA, fall in love and get married and lived together forever, and so I went back and I A worked at this. Pretty, crappy little sandwich up and. I Made Muffins at like five in the morning every morning. So many I mean I can't I don't even know how to talk about it. We would make the mixture in like. Huge vats and then store them in home. Depot. Buckets. Five. Gallon. Home Depot buckets in this dirty walk in and the place was owned by this crazy guy. Who has never really there he just kind of left it up to the teenagers in the twenty year olds and we would come in hung over and it'd be like five am and I'd be scooping like really crappy muffins out of these five gallon buckets. But. We had to make them. You know that was his recipe, the muffin mixture, and then you added blueberries are like Bananas Walnuts or whatever, and and there were huge. They were like the size of like a like a softball and we sold so many I can't even begin to tell you and I just never liked them thought the could be better, but it wasn't my job to change it and I just saw so many muffins it became this like Muffin nightmare so. Let's talk about your interesting way of combining ingredients. I remember last summer you did a chocolate cake with juniper in it or Pineapple and married Rosemary or apple with fed. So you have this herbal savory mix was something fruity or sweet you just end up doing this because. It's two in the morning and you just chance upon it spent. Months Thinking about these combinations in scientifically. Both I think all of the above Yes. Sometimes it just. I mean, it sounds silly and cliche but sometimes, it just POPs into my head. I think that probably happens with a lot of people out there the more that I eat and the more that I see food around in the world the more things there are kind of Ping Pong around in my brain and so if I'm thinking about making something, you know it's almost like just reaching into like a bucket of fish or something you know there's so much that I like and so much that I've seen 'em excited about that Sometimes. Something will just jump out to me or I kind of want to. Make something. That feels right for the season or something like that. That chocolate juniper cake was sort of like a fall winter wintertime You know that that the inception of that cake was like deep winter thinking about like richness and cold weather and sort of like this is gonna sound silly but like rich beautiful kind of medieval feasts you know and like what might be on the table and something kind of mellow but strong flavored It's also really beautiful juniper berries. Gorgeous. It's not really a barrier it's almost more like a pinecone. What we do at the bakeries roast to them, and they start to release their oils and they get this crazy fragrant smell fills the kitchen we try to do it. When it's not busy 'cause it is almost of weird crazy smell and people aren't necessarily sure if they like it but then you grind it up and we make ground toasted juniper and it so it just. It's really beautiful smell it's it's deep and Woodsy, but also floral, and it just seems to pair really nicely with chocolate and it's it's really good. It's almost like you bite into it and you're not exactly sure what it is.

Muffin Martha Ptsd Pineapple Apple Rosemary FED
Parenting in The Time of Corona

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Parenting in The Time of Corona

"For almost every working person in this country, what it meant to go to work changed radically in March and what it meant to go to school changed at exactly the same time between Graham Adams lives in Indianapolis she has four kids at home she is a single parent I have an eighth grader. I have a fifth grader in a second grader and then I have a one in Preschool Patrice works fulltime at Indiana University. School of Public Health it's a desk job so she can do it from home. That's all set at the same time though Patrice his four kids were all suddenly at home with her trying to go to class online and this presented a bunch of challenges. For Instance Patrice did not have five computers at home. We basically share it devices. If I didn't have meetings, I would pass my device onto whoever did have google meet for their class. The second issue was space there were five of Them in one house. So Patrice developed a system, my daughter WHO's in middle school? She's up in her room. My fifth grader sits at the bar in the kitchen I sit at the dining room table in have my work set-up Patrice was especially concerned about her second grader. He's a special needs student and structure and consistency are really important to him. Patrice says learning off screen and the whole idea of being at school while he's actually at home, which is really difficult for him and so Patrice says she needs to watch him all the time. Make sure he's focusing doing. Okay. Absorbing lessons I'm in I shot A. Fifth grader but I'm an ear shot and I shot of my second grader. So if I hear something I can jump up from where I am and go over to him to assist him with what's going on and to tell him to pay attention and then there's portrays youngest her preschooler there was no zoom class for him at all so patrice improvise I'm just going to be honest with you I turn on Youtube and say go elmo's teaching you today We're going to watch a loop of elmo videos and then I may take I will take a minute and may read him a book. So Patrice is trying to do her job in a house with four kids at the same time she's trying to make sure her second graders do milquet with the screen learning and she's trying to make sure her little is occupied and she's trying to make sure kids aren't like on their computers and phones all the time, and she's also trying to make sure that everybody gets in a little outdoor time like time to. Be a kid we actually go outside for recess we get some fresh air. We take a walk around the block or we have a basketball hoop in our driveway we play basketball, and of course, all of this is on top of you know regular mom stuff caring for the kids kissing booze wiping noses, rubbing the household cooking, the dishes, paying the bills all that stuff, and you know this has been patrice his life for six months. I'm extremely exhausted Friday will. After we got done with learning on Friday I, took a shower because I could not remember the last shower I took. I shouldn't say that on this interview but. I can remember the last. Hour and then I lay down in Saturday I didn't leave the house. I literally needed an entire day to recover. It was taxing like I literally felt it in my body. Like the how how the week wait on me It was a lot. For many people, it's too much millions of people are in situations like Patricia's and the job of parenting suddenly feels like it's not always compatible with a job in a lot of mixed gender couples where both people work women still take on the lion's share of housework and childcare, and so as a result of all these things coming together, women have been dropping out. Of the labor force last month six, hundred thousand men reentered the workforce at the same time five thousand women dropped out of the workforce meaning they stopped looking for jobs that today's indicator five thousand women leaving the workforce in August. So Patrice for her part says, she does not have a choice she has to work all of our kids are counting on her. And a third of children in the US aren't single parent households and those parents they have to make it work even if it's not working the bind single parent families are in right now is unreal and a lot of them even if they can't stop working, they are losing hours or having to cut back and losing income in that way. So I, mean in that way, Patrice just doesn't. Have a choice. She did have a choice about sending her kids back to school. So Patrice his district in Indianapolis. They said, you can send your kids back to school or you can continue with virtual learning for a semester at first patrice his choice teams really clear. The schooling from home working from home thing just didn't feel sustainable. It's almost like I had. PTSD. DidN'T WANNA go back there. I literally said. I am going to call the school and see if they have spots where the atoms children. When school opens up. We will it, but then you know her calculus really changed because there was a pretty serious cove outbreak. In Indianapolis, over the summer now bridges really had to worry about herself or her children possibly getting sick also just the quality of the Education Patrice as the school has actually done it miraculously good job it got laptops out to all the students. So now all of her kids have their own devices she says, the teacher is tried really hard. Even still she says the education everybody got. Nowhere. Near what it was when they were like in physical school. So she had this like really tough decision to make well to be honest it was an agonizing decision. It was a decision that I went back and forth. A couple of times and so patrice had to make this decision that millions of parents are having to agonize over. She weighed the pros and cons, and finally she made her call opted to keep them home and healthy, and so at least for the next six months, Patrice GonNa keep trying to do basically the impossible work parent teacher. Cook. Clean fix a sink. I may say these things in in exhaustion. Sin Them Back to school but in all honesty I'm in the virtual learning I'm in this actual any for the long haul she's in virtual learning for the long haul and on that is similar to decision you may to right right. So my preschooler is back in a classroom, which is great. Her School is licensed as a daycare center so it's able to open fulltime. My fourth grader isn't home working on her laptop, but she's pretty independent for the most part. Answer. And also, we indicator wanted to see if we could potentially help battle with the educating of children. So if your kids have questions about money. Or business please send it in. You can send US voice memo at indicator NPR DOT ORG that's indicator at NPR dot org just have your kids say their name and their age and the

Patrice His Indianapolis School Of Public Health Indiana University Google Graham Adams Middle School Basketball Ptsd United States Youtube Patricia NPR Dot Org
Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should  Just Keep Going

Good Life Project

06:47 min | Last month

Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should Just Keep Going

"I believe in curiosity I just I. Just think that we can't do anything without it early and just asking people obey the is basically a version of empathy. Enemy. Empathizing with WHO people are and what they do over were you the curious kid like is this something that's been part of your life or somebody who cultivated? Yeah. I mean. I think the circumstances of my life you know being born in Iran and then moving here as young immigrants in the eighties where Iran was like enemy enemy number one if you recall. And like Iran Russia which kind of back there again I kind of felt that like you know I was so curious about this world is culture and I think that's kind of where it started also you know It's crazy. It was crazy. My parents don't speak any the my spirit's English is not great. The they came here when they were forty and fifty. The I mean it's not like they. You know I'm thirty seven. So like imagining myself in three years time taking all of an IV and Chrissy and saying, Hey, well, going to move to China and we're GONNA make this. We're going to make life better in China as a show I mean that's All you can be as curious I. Guess. Yeah. I guess. So how so how old were you when you actually let on? Well, we laughed Iran you know it's hard to tell because at time here was crazy there was a war happening and I think a lot of you especially you a bit younger don't don't really remember that whole window of of our history and our relationship with Sir Yeah, the Middle East Yeah. Yeah it's complicated. It's long and it's GonNa either bore fascinate all of you guys. But the the the the the truth is we you know it's it's. It's it's hard to talk about because there's so many levels to like how crazy it is. One is my mom was married to my dad at the age of thirteen. My mom was thirteen Wendo arranged marriage. My mom is pretty standard. You know it was on the outs in that time period. Yeah. But my parent, my mom's mom was a single mom she was the youngest you know she couldn't make she couldn't make it happen, and so she had to like you know she had to like give I, guess her her daughter La youngest daughter away and so then my dad, my dad's they were more religious than my mom's side was and so. They got arranged. My mom had her first kid at fifteen years old her second kid at sixteen and Arthur kid eighteen, and then had me when she was thirty five. So my siblings are seventeen eighteen in. I'm sorry. Yes. Some teen eighteen basically twenty years than me. So, and then and then the revolution hit seventy nine. And then a war hit right after that because Saddam invaded with you know and then got the support of the United States. You know because we of the Iranian situation and then we were in a war. And so everyone was closed inside as is bombings happening all over Tehran all over the border, and so we were indoors and and you know when when people get doors and there's a lot of fear in the air of uncertainty, you procreate you know and so the baby boom in Iran happened at that moment in seventy nine to eighty five, where like sixty percent of Iranian. Population right now in Iran is under the age of forty. Fascinating you walk down the street and everyone's young. So anyway and then and then. CRAZILY my brother. My oldest brother was sixteen. When he graduated high school in Iran, his name is Amir And then he went to A. He got accepted to a school in. CHICAGO. Right. When he was sixteen. So sixteen twentyish he's in Chicago, ish issue like something like that, and then the revolution hit. And then my brother was like should I come back and. My parents were like you're never coming back here will come to you. And then in that time period. My. Youngest my brother that's closest to me who seventeen his name is. Oh, mead omen was drafted in the Iran Iraq war. And fought three years in that war. With a couple of my cousins who are who are who have passed away who died in that war one of them, which data that were, and then my brother was in war my sister was in the middle there. I was just born. We got the F out of town and we went we went as far as my dad's connections and money and. You know and you know connections could could could take you in that was Dubai. We've got to Dubai who lived in the Arab Emirates and we were there for off and on for about five years and then and then we and then you know a long period of time you know no one heard it from my brother was fight in the war. And trying to and trying to try to like move three pieces ahead while also like making sure the pieces back here it's a chess game you know and and dangerous one. And then my dad then. We had were that Amigos live. We went back to Iran. Might he got back? He was no nine, hundred twenty you know fought three years in a war in a city called Oh mead his name is omitted, which means hope and wherever like was slaughtered murdered and died because it was a brutal war brutal war and he he's a twenty year old brainwashed you know. PTSD. Kid. And in that time period as we're figuring out to go back to Dubai and come back, my sister falls in love. Falls in love with the guy and and then that made things tricky and then, and then we all laughed and my sister stay. So I- sister got the states in two thousand and three we left in eighty five. So An and then we came to the states and again you know the analogy that the Chinese like us like you and me and you taking your family and your son going to China or whatever language that you don't know our culture, the No, and you're like, this is the best news for us. Now you know you're GonNa, you're not going to be easy and so in all of that, you just get you know a a sense of like the world in a very kind of complicated way. A very young age and and not only do they not speak the language they don't know what? Christmases. They don't know what Hanukkah is. They don't have any idea why people are going to church all the time. They have no clue why the cars are this way they don't know why the food is patching. There's nothing that is familiar. There's nothing that you can empathize with as as an Iranian living in the states and being like I know this thing and so in all that you are learning rapidly. You know a very drastic way and so that curiosity might have had something to do with it. I'm not really sure

Iran Dubai China Amir And Sir Yeah Chicago Wendo Middle East Ptsd Chrissy United States Arab Emirates Saddam Arthur Tehran Russia Iraq
Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

The Psych Central Show

04:19 min | Last month

Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

"Gabe Howard calling into the show today we have Gabriel Nathan. Gabriel is the executive director of eighty-seven recovery. Diaries and they produced a film series called beneath the vest first responder mental health and features police officers, EMS personnel, dispatchers, fire service all individuals talking about trauma and complex PTSD Gabriel. Welcome to the show I. Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. Gabriel. Today we're going to be talking about law enforcement reform and I know that you have a lot of thoughts on the subject first of all before I really get into the. Weeds of the question would I have found is whenever you are taking a position that is critical in any way of law enforcement or attempts to raise questions even about the way law enforcement agencies do anything. It is extremely important to establish your own bona fide because anybody who steps up to challenge law enforcement is immediately regarded with suspicion. Paranoia is dismissed as a quote Lib tarred Troll anti-cop Antifa, whatever I'm none of those things I am someone who for the last twenty years has been an advocate for slain police officers and their families through editorials commentaries in newspapers I've attended over ten police funerals in Philadelphia, down to Maryland. I have done a lot of advocacy work for law enforcement in regard to mental health of first responders. I'm very well aware of the suicide rate for police officers. I am someone who knows law enforcement culture. I am someone who has a respect for police officers and what they do, and so I just want people to know that I am doing this from a place of love and concern and from a position of someone who believes ardently that they're absolutely needs to be changed and radical reimagining of law enforcement across the board. Thank you Gabriel for say and all that, and I agree with many of your points and I wanna point out that you were a recent guest on another podcast I have the pleasure of hosting not crazy and you had so much to say, well it it's built over into a second podcast. I strongly encourage all of our listeners to head over to central dot com slash not crazy and check out that interview. Alright. Gabriel to get started. You believe that in many ways we're recruiting the wrong people and that a lot of our problems start early even before police officers get into the academy. Yes. Look at the people who go into law enforcement. Okay. A lot of people decide they WANNA be cops when their children, they're watching shows like cops they're watching shows like law and order they're watching the weapon movies even as far as Hill Street Blues I would say that this problem started with Hillstreet Blues, the opening credits of Hillstreet Blues. I, love the music and then the garage door opens and the Plymouth fury is in the garage with red lights bursting out of the graduates exciting, right so who is drawn to that Profession Action Junkies? It's people who want that adrenaline rush and then we put them in situations where they're in a constant state of hyper arousal they're always looking around they're doing the head swivel. Someone's GonNa hurt me as someone GonNa, shoot me. In a twenty five year career most police officers never fire their weapon. Never fire their weapon once. Many. Many police officers never pulled their weapon and yet that's the kind of human being that is drawn to that profession and I have had people tell me well, we pull in people who are really resilient well is that what you're doing or are you pulling in people who are craving action and are not necessarily maybe the most empathic people because a law enforcement agency can't function if a police officer responds to a call and then starts falling apart emotionally because they can't process what they saw. So maybe law enforcement is either consciously or subconsciously trying to pull people in who maybe don't have that kind of empathic response. That's not who I want riding around in a patrol car with a firearm and the power of arrest.

Gabriel Nathan Officer Gabe Howard Hillstreet Blues Executive Director Maryland Philadelphia
Bayern Conquer Europe for 6th Time

ESPN FC

03:21 min | Last month

Bayern Conquer Europe for 6th Time

"WELCOMING SOLICITATION ESPN AFC on down Thomas. Of course. One topic dominates today show and Matty's volume unit being crowned the twenty twenty you eight for champions the winners Kinsey Komen's goal the difference between the two sides I ever player in fact that Champions League final to school against his old Jamie Lee, frank and Craig Burley with me to reflect on the final Craig that wasn't quite as high scoring as we as expected however the best. The best team one and appear she will get CIANCI's the third clearly. Stating the obvious but there were good chances. You'd expect much better protect the MVP chance not long before halftime quite an embarrassing finish. To be honest and I personally think by got macho a first gear. In terms of you know what they can produce. were, able to control the game and when the Champions League yeah. This wasn't quite what we are expecting. Frank. Why not? Well because of clumsiness, some some players and and just mentioned MVP I think I'm not sure that mini. Was the best team overall during the season of chimpanzee. Yes. But then that game I think they were in control of the game but personally, I had some chances to to to surprise him to kill them even and. The fantastic new year in goal I. Think. Could have lead the game in the first half but again, mini chinses wasted by a the strikers and I think Keefe I can regime the game I. Think the defense is the defense is better than the tax which pulls them what we were expensive causality. Wasn't but I think a good example of that was choice at NC. Flake makes in terms of having Komen playing therapeutic. Essentially telling us you know what we think insulin common can dominate one one situation sending doing that we don't need. WE'RE NOT GONNA force funds Davis to get forward down the left hand side because kids can take care that. Finish it cannot do that as well. He talks signed. Davis on the overlapping runs and I think is by design that Afonso Davis did not really have a for dissipation in attack he was holding back almost as if to say, you know what this is our way of not dropping off we're going to maintain our hide line while we're not gonNA take many chances going forward and I think what you saw from by Munich is they played A conservative game with a lot of talented players and bathing. Not WanNa take chances really going forward because the the time that they did take those chances going forward than PSG had opportunities and when we say that PSG had opportunities, we're talking about PTSD team who had the chances fall to the right people. It's too bad is to Neymar is to Maria three clear opportunities in my opinion. In the first half they not take advantage of and from then on it was difficult to see PTSD to get after by Munich particularly after by an escort PSG got disorganized, they were more concerned about the files, the yellow cars, the physicality of the game rather than playing the game a no better example of that that Neymar who in the second half had difficulties trapping the ball passing. The ball doing the basic stock he was busy drawing fouls but not actually having an impact on the game. We

Kinsey Komen Afonso Davis MVP Craig Burley Frank Jamie Lee Champions League Ptsd Neymar Solicitation Matty Munich Espn Thomas Keefe NC Maria
Michigan announces $600 million Flint water crisis settlement

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:02 min | Last month

Michigan announces $600 million Flint water crisis settlement

"A a year year and and a a half half of of negotiations, negotiations, the the state state of of Michigan Michigan will will reportedly reportedly announced announced $600 $600 million settlement with the people of Flint later this week. Settlement will cover citizens of Flint, who were adversely affected by the lead tainted water that began flowing into their homes in 2014. Although the state claims that the water quality has met federal standards for three years now, many residents told us they don't trust officials and they still don't trust the water. One person told us yesterday that no amount of money can heal the suffering of those impacted by this crisis. And the Corona virus pandemic has just made the situation worse. Money. Money don't equal help, like you know you could be rich and die. It ain't the same. Craig Davis is a lifelong Flint resident who has lived to the devastation brought on by the city's tainted water crisis. It's almost like we got PTSD with the water because you won't really drink it comfortably like You know, saying people actually lost, they live to it. He's also a Corona virus survivor and says he and his neighbors are struggling to deal with both issues. At the same time, you got people with just taking extra money out their pockets. Just going to the grocery store and just buying up the water and grocery stores. But you add on the pandemic, not a water is not even there to even grab. The water crisis started in 2014 when as a cost cutting measure, officials switch the city's water source from Lake You're on to the Flint River, but the water was improperly treated, allowing lead and other chemicals from the pipes to leach into the water supply. The city switched back to its original water source in 2015. My heart breaks because the fact of the matter is, I handed them the glasses of water. CBS News was on the ground in Flint for months. At the height of the crisis, we heard firsthand from parents about how they believed the tainted water affected their Children. When I hear my son gave up at night and cry because his bones hurt There's nothing I can give him. There's nothing I can do for him to take away his pain. I feel completely helpless. Although tens of thousands of plaintiffs are reportedly set to receive a payout as part of the settlement, Much of the money is expected to go toward the Children affected by the crisis. Flint Mayor Sheldon Neely says he hopes the settlement provides some sense of victory for families allows Flint residents to move forward in a positive way. Getting out of the mindset of being victims, but more of Victor's on that's what we need to move as a community. Theo office of Michigan's attorney general would not confirm details of the agreement, saying quote way and the other parties are bound by a federal court order to maintain the confidentiality of detailed settlement and mediation communications until we reach a certain point Now, as you know, $600 million is being reported as the payout but just for context. If you divide that by Flint residents, most of whom are eligible for money, that's $6000 per person. And again that wass CBS's Adrian Diaz reporting well, many

Flint Flint River Craig Davis Michigan Michigan Ptsd Cbs News Mayor Sheldon Neely CBS Victor Adrian Diaz Lake You Theo Michigan Attorney
Next Level Leadership  Innovative Leaders Guide -Maureen Metcalf - burst 06

A New Direction

02:50 min | Last month

Next Level Leadership Innovative Leaders Guide -Maureen Metcalf - burst 06

"The human factor of this is you know as a psychological professional marine one of the things that really clicks in my head is how stubborn we are to change. We we just really are resistant to change because we kinda like we kinda like oftentimes starting in our own dysfunction. and. Right. So I'll share a bit of a personal story My Dad was Vietnam Vet he did to tour of duty, and so he came back with what we would now call ptsd growing up in that environment that was normal for me. So he was a little emotionally sensitive and so we as the kids especially kind of. very careful around dad not to upset Him in a way that is not normal for kids of those ages So as I grew up, I continued to contorts myself in my own head about what was quote model when I had to face the fact that I was. My upbringing was not from a psychological perspective wasn't healthy. then. It forced me to either continue to live in that kind of illusory world or face all of the things that that upbringing did to me to make my habits ineffective. Not. Blaming my dad, he served his country very honorably unfortunately, that service in his case impacted us as kids, and so it's my responsibility now as an adult. To. Attend to my own inner workings to to bring them to a place that is healthy for me as an adult and leader, and so I think often as humans we we are Dented is my very pedestrian word We become dented over the course of life and we just have to get the dense pulled out. which by the way? That sometimes, it's not only not easy, but it's also can be very painful. Yeah right for big defender of that. Rain into. Lender hurt. Well I'm getting it pulled back out hurts too but it's not exactly. It's not exactly pleasant either by the way we're with Maureen Metcalf and she is the author and of this book and Great Book entitled Innovative Leaders Guide to transforming organizations and you're listening to or here on a new direction.

Maureen Metcalf Ptsd Dysfunction.
6 Ways to Survive Survivor Guilt

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

05:00 min | Last month

6 Ways to Survive Survivor Guilt

"Have. You ever made it through something awful or survived a disaster and instead of feeling good, you felt this heaviness in the pit of your stomach. When. Tragedy befalls those around us. But leaves US unscathed. Some of US feel really guilty. Welcome back to savvy psychologist I'm your host Dr J. Woo. Every week will help you meet life's challenges with evidence based research, a sympathetic ear and zero judgment. Today we talk about how to understand and cope with survivor guilt. Survivor. Guilt happens when a person perceives themselves to have done something wrong by surviving catastrophe or injustice while others died or suffered. Its intensity can. Shoot from bittersweet to all out despair. Survivor guilt is conventionally associated with large scale catastrophes like the battlefield or a plane crash, but it can actually pop up in more common situations to. For example, one study found that about sixty, five percent of cancer patient caretakers, experience survivor guilt. Anyone who has participated in a cancer support group will recognize the many layers of grief after the group loses one of its members, the survivors ask each other. You know, why did she die while we're still here? She was so kind and giving in behind to kids and grandkids. Why are we the lucky ones? In Two Thousand Twenty, survivor guilt might be even more salient than usual. For example of CO, Grad student from Florida despairing over the fate of his family and country while he studies physics and Germany watching the coronavirus number. Sore at home. He, says, I didn't do anything to deserve being safe. How can I sit here and play with equations all day when my community back home suffering? And what about survivors of economic devastation? A employees who keeps her job while her equally qualified co workers laid off in a large scale. Corporate rightsizing might feel uneasy about her unjustified privilege. Why not me? She asks, do I really deserve to have this job more than my co workers did? Finally and tragically. Survivor, guilt has been a well-known experience among war veterans for whom this experience can be Ashley a significant risk factor for PTSD and even suicidal thoughts and attempts. In a research study interview, one veteran recounts. The only thing I've really had issued dealing with was when I got wounded how I came away. Relatively Scott free. If you will, whereas the guy on my right died and the guy, my left can't lift his arm higher than this anymore. and. There are scores of examples, but in general survivors have some of these themes in their experience either alone or in combination. Theme, Number One is guilt about surviving. This is what we classically think of ask survivor guilt. If you remain safe while other suffered in an accident in a war and the covid nineteen pandemic by being granted asylum, you may feel you don't deserve your safety believe that you should have succumb to. Question, the wisdom and fairness of the world. And theme, number? Two is guilt over what you should have done. You might feel guilty that you didn't do enough. You should've known. You should've tried harder. You should've worn them, maybe try to rescue someone from addiction, for example, but failed, there's an over exaggerated sense of failure or responsibility. If only I had done something differently. Another theme number three is guilt over what you did. You may feel guilty for things. You did instead of feeling guilty about things you should have done. You may feel guilty for things you Ashley, did do for example from running without looking back for your friends while escaping the burning building or escaping poverty by leaving your family to go to college. Or. You may feel intense guilt for things that you did. That were mere coincidence. On the day, the music died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine, country music star Waylon. Jennings. was supposed to be on the plane that killed musicians buddy holly, the big bopper and Ritchie. Valens. When Jennings told Buddy, holly, he given up his seat as a fever to the flu stricken big bopper and was going to take the unheeded tour bus instead holly joked that he hoped Jennings, froze on the bus. Then twenty year old Jennings joke back while I, hope you're all plane crashes. In an interview decades. Later, he said God Almighty for years. I thought I caused it.

Jennings. United States Ashley Holly Dr J. Woo Buddy Ptsd Florida Scott Ritchie Germany FLU Fever
Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

"More than half of people who received hospital treatment for Covid nineteen were found to be suffering from a psychiatric disorder a month. Later, a study has found. Out, of four hundred, two patients monitored after being treated for the virus, fifty, five percent were found to have at least one psychiatric disorder according to experts from San. Rafael Hospital in Milan found. The results based on clinical interviews and self assessment questionnaires showed post traumatic stress disorder in twenty, eight percent of cases depression in thirty, one and anxiety in forty-two. Additionally forty percent of patients had insomnia and twenty percent had obsessive compulsive symptoms. The findings increased concerns about the psychological effects of the virus. The paper published yesterday in the Journal Brain behavior and immunity says PTSD major depression, and anxiety. All high burden. noncommunicable conditions associated with years of life lived with disability, the study of two, hundred, sixty, five men, and one hundred, and thirty seven women found that women who are less likely to die from Cova than men suffered. Suffered more than men psychologically patients with previous positive psychiatric diagnoses suffered more than those without a history of psychiatric disorder. They said, psychiatric efforts could be caused by the immune response to the virus itself. All by psychological stresses, such as social isolation, psychological impact of a novel severe and potentially fatal illness concerns about infecting others and stigma outpatient showed increase anxiety and sleep disturbances while perhaps surprisingly, the duration of hospitalization inversely correlated with symptoms of St Depression anxiety and OCD.

Psychiatric Disorder Covid Rafael Hospital Sleep Disturbances Journal Brain Behavior Social Isolation Cova Ptsd Milan SAN
Why Do Balloons Stick To Our Hair?

BrainStuff

03:17 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Balloons Stick To Our Hair?

"Why do balloons stick to our hair? Brain stuff is Christian Sagar here when you were a kid, did you ever rub a balloon really fast against your hair to make it stick what about as an adult well, after many years of speculation Case Western Reserve University scientists have pinpointed exactly why this party trick happens. We've known forever that when two objects are rubbed against each other, there's a build up of an electrical charge called static electricity or tribe electric charging. If the two objects have opposite charges positive and negative, they'll stick together but some objects appear to charge more or stick more closely together than others like the balloon on your hair now wise that according. To a new study published in the Journal Physical Review Materials. The crux of the phenomenon lies in how strained the balloon material is for the purpose of this study, the scientists stretched a film of Polly tetrafluoroethane the lean let's call it p. t. f. e. for now that's one of the brand names. For Teflon, they took that and they rubbed it against a film of unstrained unstretched PTSD and they found that even though the materials were chemically identical, they generated charge transfer in one direction as if they had two different chemical compositions, the stretched or strange sheet carried the positive charge. Well, the unstrained sheet carried a negative charge. The more strained the material was the more likely. It was to experience systematic charge transfer. This is because the micro structure of the material was altered when strain leading to tiny holes and cracks. These imperfections allowed the rubbing induced friction to facilitate charge transfer leading to static electricity in a press release. Co Author Dan Lacks explained that they think the void regions in the fibers are tiny cell fibers. They think that those were strained when the polymer had different bonding and thus a charge that was different. The researchers also examined the phenomenon using packing peanuts which just love to stick to people's arms. In fact, polystyrene peanuts and plastic bags are currently being closely examined to give us a better understanding of static. Electricity Ideally, scientists will nail it down. So precisely that they will be able to control it, helping to prevent tribe electric explosions such as explosions of coal dust in mines and develop more effective products. For example, pesticides that will stick better to plants or paints that will stick better to cars. It may not seem that dangerous but in fact, static electricity can ignite fuel vapors at the gas pump causing fire to avoid such a catastrophe try not to get back in the car after you start the fueling process because sliding across the seat generates static electricity. If you must re enter your vehicle, be sure to ground yourself I when you get back out by touching the metal part of your car door.

Journal Physical Review Materi Dan Lacks Christian Sagar Western Reserve University Ptsd Polly Tetrafluoroethane
Working through those old emotional triggers so that you can stop the PTSD and start living life again

The Overwhelmed Brain

07:09 min | 2 months ago

Working through those old emotional triggers so that you can stop the PTSD and start living life again

"Right I'm so glad you here. Thanks for joining me today I. Think I'm going to go over some PTSD. Stuff. Not Mine. But PTSD in general which I like to refer to sometimes as emotional triggers. Because anytime, you are triggered emotionally you know something happened some sort of stimuli out there causes an emotional response in you. It's usually often related to a past trauma of some sort and let me just get this out of the way your trauma is different than someone else's trauma. Someone else may have experienced a terrible event in their past, and yours may not be that terrible in the grand scheme of things but that doesn't make it any less traumatic. What happened to you is personal to you and you compare it to what else has happened to you in your life but you probably shouldn't compare it to what other people have experienced unless you're just going around as an ungrateful person all the time. I mean if you are very pessimistic about life in, you think that you are getting a bad deal all the time and you're just not grateful for anything, it can be very helpful to see other people's trauma up other people's suffering their misery as something. So awful that maybe you shouldn't complain I'm not saying you shouldn't. I'm just saying if you're one of these people that doesn't have too much gratitude in your life can't really see the big picture that you might be better off than other people Then it is helpful. And I'm also not saying that you may not be a victim to a lot of things. And, there's a possibility that you may still be suffering. There may be things going on in your life that are very real and are very traumatic and you're still suffering. All I'm really saying is that when you can't see past your own trauma in your own suffering. And see that there are other people that may have also suffered in can't ever be grateful for what you do have than it is helpful to see other people suffering so that you can look at yourself. I am be grateful for what you have. I mean a good example. We have a good friend young kid he has down syndrome has undergone operation to fuse some of his vertebrae because he has fallen and he broke his back technically. And this would be his. I. Don't know how many surgeries he's had but his bone structure isn't the greatest. He's had accidents before and this poor kid. I mean is not a kid is is an adult now but he's a kid at heart. This poor kid this poor guy has gone through. So many surgeries used to be flexible. He used to be mobile used to be able to do anything that any young boy can do a however over the years. He's had all these operations that have stiffened his back that they got metal in his back now and he's lost a lot of mobility. And I have never ever heard him complain once in fact, he brightens the room. With his smile and he says things so endearing like, Hey, look I can move my arm. I. Mean I hear something like that. It makes me stop and think about how I view the world and how I think that I have problems that are so bad that. I have to stress about them but here's this kid that keeps getting his mobility decrease in his latest operation. We thought might end up paralyzed or worse. They actually thought he might die and so when I think about any stress or problems in my life. I think about this kid who is just happy he can move his arm. That to me just touches my heart am that's why I'm telling you this because if everything does look dismal if you are feeling any sort of stress or anxiety that there are other people out there that you know certainly have gone through a lot and again, not to minimize what you've gone through I'm going to repeat that is that your trauma is no worse or better than somebody else's trauma because you're trauma happened to you and all you have is what you are have gone through in your life and that's all you can compare it to. But when you're so stock in the obsessive thought process of how tough life is it can be helpful to remember that there are other people that have gone through a lot worse and are still going through a lot worse and it's going to even get worse. We don't know if this wonderful person that had this operation today is going to have the longest life I don't know. But right now when he sees someone who's never met at the grocery store and says your beautiful instead of thinking of all the restrictions that have been placed on him, all the operations he's gone through and all the challenges that he was alive. He just comes out and says something like that. Reminding us all war is sometimes better to focus on.

Ptsd
Dunkirk Awards

Filmspotting

06:36 min | 2 months ago

Dunkirk Awards

"Welcome to film spotting, we will get to our Nolan Review Awards. Later in the show, we might have an for those awards picked out by. Then we might not. We will share our awards for favourite supporting performance and lead performance from this retrospective of the work of Christopher Nolan will also share our picks for best Nolan moment in the overall best moment or seen after we have revisited all ten of Nolan's films and that will culminate with our Christopher Nolan rankings. The definitive Christopher ranking for each of us one to ten will there be some shifting Adam Gimme a tease. Shifts definitely from the last time, I posted a Nolan ranking on letterbox. There's been some movement Yep me too one I think you'll like I don't know if you'll like it enough, but you will like it I though the World War Two movie from Christopher Nolan that we didn't know we needed dunkirk. The enemy tanks stop. Why? Why waste precious tanks when they can pick from the. Barrel. Their full hundred thousand men only speech. Your position. Josh, coming into this rewatch was that done kirk is Christopher, Nolan's best film and there's at least one longtime listener and regular commentator who agrees with you that we are culminating this overview triumphantly with the filmmakers greatest achievement Adam Grossman in Vancouver says like many of us. I've completed my Christopher Nolan Review. Biggest takeaway hoover is a really hard were dispel. Well, second takeaway. I've decided dunkirk is Nolan's career highpoint while my heart loves interstellar the most good on you Adam and I. Hugely Admire. and. The Dark Knight for what they meant to Action Cinema and Superhero movies respectively dunkirk is his masterpiece got laid down for you tenant. I just don't know how anyone could argue that the legend of dunkirk could be told any better the setup and the first eight minutes alone from the falling paper from the sky to the distress. Cry of where's the bloody air force is a wonder of a short film. In itself, the lack of dialogue works perfectly for what this movie wants to achieve with. Hans. Zimmer's relentless scored doing all the audio work that's necessary among all the chaos. There are frequent moments of grace. Kenneth. Branagh face as Commander Bolton as the cavalry arrives in the form of the civilian vessels the empathy as Peter Tells Killian Murphy's PTSD soldier. The young George will be okay and no moment more than the shot. Be Okay and no more than a shot of Tom Hardy's planes silently gliding over the beaches of dunkirk knowing his job has been done. dunkirk is also uniquely Christopher Nolan Movie One where his signature use of time has never melded together better and more cohesively than it does in the final twenty minutes of this film while Dunkirk will understandably never be a wholly enjoyable or easy rewatch. It's one that gets richer and richer with repeat viewing. Now, Adam Mention Nolan signature use of time, and that is one aspect of dunkirk among others that certainly connects to his entire body of work. But there are other aspects that Mark Dunkirk is unique. It is only film that is based on historical events, which means it is inherently rooted in the past and yet I'd argue it is only film that truly feels present tense meeting there are no. Dead parents or wives or forsaken children or other tragic events haunting the air's barrier played by Tom. Hardy the Moles Army private Tommy fiene whitehead or for the most part the sees Mr Dawson played by Mark Rylance like all Nolan protagonist there's plenty of personal sacrifices on display but no guilt no sense of futility about toning past actions just the seemingly futile need to survive the current event that they. Are Tragically experiencing here's something else that argues unique about dunkirk as we every other commentator on Dolan's work is discussed in some form or fashion for all those dead parents and wives and foresaken children. There's nothing so emotional or borderline sentimental in any of his previous films as the climax of inception and yes, mileage may vary there which led to interstellar and not only mcconaghy's crushing breakdown watching twenty three. Years Worth of miss video messages from his family but the verbalize message love is the one thing we're capable of proceeding that transcends dimensions of time and space. Maybe we should trust that even if we can't understand it, it's hard to imagine any character in previous Christopher Nolan movies saying something like that which led to Dunkirk am I crazy josh this is his most blatantly sentimental and even heart film. And if so is that what establishes Dunkirk as his best its balance of coldness the sober portrayal of the hell of war of life in the misguided choices, some men will make when facing death with warmth. In the compassionate inspiring choices some men will make to maintain a way of life. So a lot of subtleties in that question and you're onto something so you're not crazy I think I would distinguish. The word blatantly, I. Don't think this is blatantly emotional or moving, but I do think you're onto something in the fact that it is maybe his most heartwarming in where it ends up and let me kind of try to parse those. You're right as long as the Nolan Canon has convulsing McConnell. Interstellar is going to be his most blatantly emotional I mean you can't have a scene like that without registering that on it surface. That's his most emotional movie. But I will also say that I find Dunkirk to be his most emotionally affecting movie maybe even more. So than inception, which we about how I did find that very moving especially in the character of Mal. So yet dunkirk is really a unique thing even as it's working within the strands and trends that we have been tracing in Nolan's other films, I. Think the heartwarming aspect is probably a part of that. You've nailed it there in that it brings us to a place that. Is One of Constellation and I think it's earned because I think up until that point we have just been suffering alongside all of these other characters in so many ways and we've also been recognizing as the movie does that this is You know a an account of a military failure, a huge defeat and so for the movie to kind of offer, some sort of solace at the end of that I think is. In proportion and well

Christopher Nolan Dunkirk Mark Dunkirk Adam Grossman Nolan Canon Tom Hardy Josh Hoover Action Cinema Zimmer Hans Kenneth George Moles Army Tommy Fiene Whitehead Vancouver Branagh Dolan Kirk
Trump's tanking in the polls

Campaign HQ with David Plouffe

21:39 min | 2 months ago

Trump's tanking in the polls

"Anzalone, welcome to campaign HQ David Blah always good to hear your voice. Yeah, you and I met I back in Iowa back in the eighties, not to date ourselves, but the answer. Let me start with this. Let's talk about swing voters for minute. Obviously Joe Biden is doing. Incredibly well in public polls I'd assume he's also doing well in your own polling correct. Yeah I think that it's fair to say that. We're seeing a lot of what the public polls are showing that you know. This is in some ways I. Mean you've seen you've been through a lot of presidential campaigns, and as you said, we've been in this together for over thirty years, so we've seen a lot of historical data and quite frankly what we're seeing right in the public bowls and internal is. Is pretty historic right, so let's start with what we might consider. The Swing Voter Side of the ledger, and then we'll talk about some of the turn out registration targets, so you know you have been part of campaigns world. We Lost White Seniors by twenty points. We a static. You guys right now. white seniors or tied of which means with seniors overall your head. Talk about that like why is that? How much of that do you think it'd be maintained over the next fifteen weeks? I think that there's a couple of things you know. When we take a look at swing, voters There's actually like four really important groups that. You know everyone wants to compare how Biden's doing public Poland's with Hillary but what's really interesting about key group set of moved from sixteen. Is that Biden's not only doing much better and leading in most polling with Voters over sixty five, but he's leading with suburbanites. He's leading with independence, and he's leading with college voters, and so those are like four really important groups that not only did trump win, but is you know Romney won right and so listen? These presidential candidates. Have Different coalition I mean people like to talk about the Obama coalition in. It's important. But Biden's coalition, GonNa look different and clearly part of this started in two thousand, eighteen where we saw suburban women Super White Women College Educated Women but also college educated men really move. I mean take a look at Gretchen Whitmer who is a a a client of ours in places like Oakland County Right She also wanted to Comb County Reagan Democrats which is interesting, which also biting one in the primary, so we're seeing these swing. Voters these groups that Biden is bringing around that is different than the coalitions that we've seen. Seen in the past while at the same time narrowing margins within the Republican base with white voters and also rural voters, and keeping on par with our democratic base, right with young voters in women, and so You know when you, of course you know two thousand eight you. You saw this I. Mean when you are moving, and you have a moment, or if you sustain that moment, you tend to do well almost everywhere, meaning that even in the Republican base voters, rural voters and things like that, you tend to narrow the margins, and they're on margins. In tough places. Is just as important as doing well in some of these other swing areas. Now just specifically unseen Yars I. Listen, you know we see trump's jump rating just getting worse and worse on handling the coronavirus eppendorf pandemic clearly seniors Vulnerable the most at risk, and I think they're reacting directly to that risk in terms of feeling like he didn't get serious enough. He didn't listen to medical experts. He didn't have a plan and now with the kind of the surge feel like he's put his head in the sand and I think it's just cost him dearly with that largest age bracket the motor sixty five, and over the last Democratic presidential candidate to win sixty five and over. Is Al Gore so that Kinda gives you an idea. Of! How important this is! Yeah, reminded. Every election is its unique beast so on whether it's seniors suburban voters, you mentioned both college educated women and men Joe Biden right now, doing extremely well. Two questions for you John Do you think he's close to his ceiling there and the job really for your campaign is to maintain those numbers. Do you think there's room to grow? And secondly just how durable do think it is? Do you think that some of these voters are already locked in and is going to be really hard for trump to dislodge them? You get a feeling that where we are today. is very difficult for trump and listen first of all we should say we. We all have a collective PTSD right from two thousand sixteen, and so none of us are getting overseas, but at the same time you know you have to acknowledge the good polls because you know, there's a couple of things that are different from where Joe Biden is from past democratic nominees, including Barack Obama and and twelve. In that, he's also at fifty percent. Right at this point in time whatever what hundred four days and you know there's been no Democrat or Republican candidate you go all the way back to two thousand who's reached that threshold and so you know that's really import. The other part is is that Joe. Biden isn't scary to voters. I mean that's one reason he's leaving with independence. And if you take a look at I don't know the NBC Paul I think is is a good example or one of the most recent ones where I think it's the Fox foxhole. We're Biden is actually above water popularity. Naturally trump is underwater, but trump's very unfavorable is at forty seven percents, and binding I. Think is at thirty one. There's win been one thing that I think when they write about Joe Biden in the primary and the general election is the stability of his vote, right? It really hasn't moved that much. I mean trump's has moved down during the primary I mean. We're biden kind of started at the beginning. He ended at the end. It was very stable. Other people moved all around, but Joe Biden was incredibly stable and I think. Think that we're GONNA see that same dynamic here and we have really in the last several months. The Joe Biden's vote has been incredibly stable it's in a couple of points to the fifty percent mark. trump has moved down right and that is that is a good thing but the stability is important for Joe Biden. One is how voters view him and to how voters view trump. You know there was the I think it was the B. Poll that showed fifty percent of voter said there was no chance at all that they would vote for trump, and so your question is you know, will biden's numbers remain stable, and there just seems to be a universe of voter that is completely cut off from trump and it's because of how people you him prior. Let's think about this. Let's dissect prior to the pandemic. People you know we always heard the same thing. Whether it was you know for for Biden. Her for US Senate race for a congressional race. Is that people disliked? His behavior is tweeting his bowling. He was a jerk They basically just didn't like him as a human being, but hey, you know it's not like some of his agenda and his policies. They like how he took on. The median shook things up in Washington, DC. Now they're problem with him. Is Not only behavior how he reacted in a protest and things like that doubling down. Of Racism but their main problem is. Is that they feel that he failed the leadership test on the three crises, whether it was the health and crisis, whether it was the police brutality protests crisis, and now the economic crisis, which is hurting his economic numbers, and so they're now viewing him His biggest problem isn't just his behavior which they haven't forgotten. It's his lack of leadership or his mishandling of these crisis, so three and a half years in their judging him president. President. They're not judging him as a personality. That is his biggest problem right now, and you know I don't think that you know that's going to change. I think that we have a couple more crises potentially coming very soon, college kids and K. through twelve kids start going to school and mid August and you know it's GonNa be It's going to be really a a really tense time. I think it's GonNa. Be a problem for a lot of communities, a lot of states, a lot of holds and that is the problem. They're going to squarely put. On trump because he didn't take this series at the beginning, you didn't listen to medical experts. He didn't have a plan. And that's a problem I mean. We have more crises coming quite frankly. Yeah, now that's that's a great point and your point about his very under favorable I mean if he's sailing into voting time in late September and October with forty seven percent, unfavorable lombardo grounds He's really up against a wall there so John. I, think one of the mistakes. Sometimes you can make whether it's politics. Are Businesses your opponent? Your competition does something puts. Puts out, an ad or new strategy and you know you're like well. That's dumb and of course I've learned like you better. Take a minute and think through why they think it's smart right, but on this suburban thing what what strikes it's almost like trump got a briefing saying you're hemorrhaging the suburbs and he's like Ooh I. Know what I'll say. I'M GONNA say Joe Biden is going to destroy the so like. Do you see any evidence that that tactic which seems to be front and Center for trump, and his campaign now has any chance of succeeding. Listen I think that you know you and I have been through a lot of campaigns, and when you're in a campaign where you're behind, and you're behind eight or ten points, what do you do you just kinda start throwing things at the wall and he tends to throw things at the wall I. Mean You know in one week? He's hitting us on. China I mean all paid TV the next week. He's in his on. You Know Nafta now. Now, he didn't on defunding the police and so they try a lot of different things out right but the fact is is that trump was up on TV in the battleground states for a couple of months prior awesome. You sure what the number is, but I think it's close to fifty million dollars. We never saw the numbers. Move I. Mean you see that in the public calling right? I mean our numbers actually got better. His numbers got worse even though he was on TV by himself and very high levels as well as with his allies, and so you know now. We're on TV. So now we're in a position to you. Know have our own message. Ever Own Voice of voters see what Biden's about What's his agenda and his vision and again we don't see any deterioration a matter of fact, if the last ten days are any indication and again we don't you know. We don't get over our skis on this but the. The. Number of polls have showed this in double digits. is a good place to be. It doesn't mean that we're not gonNA work hard doesn't mean we don't take anything for granted. We know that we just gotTa fight for every vote and we know that it's going to get closer because that's what thing, but that's just. The natural physics of presidential races but I think that again it goes to the opponent meaning Joe Biden. clearly isn't Hillary Clinton. You were talking about very unfavorable in two thousand sixteen. Trump's very unfavorable was forty seven percent, and Hillary's was forty five percents, so there was a lesser of two evils dynamic. Going on, you always see this kind of analysis of what they call double haters, people who dislike both candidate. Well you can't call them double haters this time because they are. They hate trump, but they just kinda just like Joe. Biden are they dislike politics? Right is so his very unfavorable with that group is you know literally I? Think it's a quarter of trump's, and he wins that group by forty plus points depending on the pulled that you see, and that's actually really important again. They don't see Joe Biden scary. They see him as a compassionate relatable. Guy you know they keep the fact that he's lunch Pail Joe and he's a guy. WHO's GONNA look out. For Working Families and he is, you know someone that one. The trump and their allies throw punches. you know they? They're not sticking like their sticking and past presidential campaign. Right, so I WANNA. Talk about filling in the blanks on Joe. Biden, what you guys have started to do, but I want on I. WanNa talk about battlegrounds from and so you made an important point. which is you know when you've got momentum? Momentum in a campaign particularly national campaign. You see you see you see progress everywhere. It's just not in a particular state or region, so I a couple of questions one. Are you seeing with swing voters in particular? Are you seeing the same strength for Joe Biden in the south in the Midwest and the West and I guess secondly I would've thought. Let's say ninety days ago hundred twenty days ago, trump's floors, floor and battlegrounds. Forty six. It looks like it may be lower. So what do you think is I? Mean I agree with you that you know when you see a poll right now. That shows Biden fifty forty. You know the other ten percents gotta go somewhere. And you know probably more of that comes to trump it goes to you guys because you're bumping up against a pretty pretty good and healthy ceiling, but I'm curious kind of what where? Where you see both, is there uniformity in terms of the movement across the country and secondly kind of? Where do you see trump's floor now? Yeah, well, I do think that there's again. We you know you can talk about Joe Biden's feeling, but really when you look at it, historically all the way back to two thousand is just presidential candidates ceilings I mean there's not a lot of presidential candidates who've gotten over fifty percent. Who won right and so the fact that we're in this divided country and there are third party. Candidates who siphoned off universe. Hopefully it won't be as much as two thousand sixteen, and we don't think that it will be but the ceiling is is is almost as close to fifty or a little above for almost everyone right I mean that just kinda historically has how it's happened. Happened in the battleground states like you, you say whether it's Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin Florida Arizona I, mean he's having trouble getting to the mid forties right I, mean he in places like Michigan and Pennsylvania in Wisconsin in the real clear politics or the fivethirtyeight average of polls, he stood at forty, one and forty two percent now Florida in Arizona and in North Carolina or Kinda GonNa Act like Florida. And North Carolina in Arizona, they're they're always going to be tighter. Right I mean like Scott Ours no always says Florida tight and that's true now we haven't. You in a lead that's above the margin of error. That hasn't happened very often. That, you and I have done enough Florida. politics polling to know that that is a state that tends to tighten up again. I think that we have. An advantage there because of how we're doing with seniors, and we're competing David I. Mean you know it's like this campaign is going to look a lot like you to you like two thousand eight because of where we're competing? The balanced expansion. In the media markets in Florida, well, where do you WanNa? See I mean I. Remember Two thousand like it was yesterday we were. We were up on TV at high levels. Competing with McCain wear Panama City Talahassee. Jacksonville Gainesville, we were fighting the fight in the panhandle. Right and you know. I mean protect protect I four and all that type of stuff. You GotTa do well Miami Dade Palm Beach etc, but when you see a campaign competing against the Republican in the Republican areas That's what you gotTA. Do to win a place like Florida, and a lot of campaigns often have to make the cost benefit analysis, or make the bad decisions, and this campaign, because it's been under great leadership and the reason, a lot of money gives you the ability to run the race. You need to run to win, right? So I want to just ask you quickly third party because you mentioned it and you live through this horror in two thousand sixteen, where trump could win states like Wisconsin with forty seven point two percent of the vote because the third party vote share was. Higher than historical averages right now in your research and it seems to be true in public research. You're seeing that those numbers may revert more to two percent or less that we've gotten used to write, and that's huge because your ceiling is higher than trump's. I would guess at this point right and so I think that I think that this is how I look at that and you know I mean when you pull when you add third party candidates two point, they always get more on the pole than they actually do on election day right I mean. That's just kind of the dynamic, and so you know you have to. You have to test things a bunch of different ways. But I think there's one thing that we all kind of instinctively know that in two thousand sixteen. There were how a lot of voters Bernie voters etc. WHO stayed at home? WHO VOTED FOR GARY? Johnston voted for Jill Stein and ninety nine percent of them who vote did one of those three things were ninety nine percent. Sure that Hillary Clinton was going to be president, and so they were doing a protests about. those voters now know what's at stake. And they're You know their their enthusiasm. If you will to get vote or get, trump out of office is incredibly high. It's an incredibly intense, and so I think that that dynamic and quite frankly Bernie Sanders and his campaign and the Joe Biden and his campaign have worked together on a plethora of issues. will make the dynamics here much different so we don't see that bleed, and and internally we see we see that you know. Joe Biden just has better with Bernie Voters Than Hillary Clinton did in two thousand sixteen well does tighten up. That's going to be such an important dynamic. So, You mentioned You know the Biden campaign. has a very expansive electoral map again. Something we might not have expected months ago. and you know those are pretty weighty decisions. You're involved in those decisions with General. Molly Dylan and Donald other leadership in the campaign, but John when you think about the places that look now plausible. Not Win them, but you know Georgia in other poll out in Texas today publicly had Biden Upright one Ohio Iowa those are likely not going to be in. My view is two hundred seventy electoral vote, but do you think there's a scenario where you could get surprise? Where maybe you don't win in north, Carolina and Georgia, or is there really a stack ranking on these states? Well as you know, there's always a stack ranking and you were at the you know. Know Genesis in two thousand twelve of analytics right, and so there's a there's a lot of simulations things that you know you and I didn't learn about growing up in this business and there's and there's tipping points, states and things like that. I think that at the end of the day again. The leadership of this campaign is incredibly focused and disciplined, and you can see where we're buying TV. It's public and it's always you know reported on. You know we're very focused on the six battleground states, and you know until you know, they move on to another state. We will be focused on those six states in a very disciplined way, because that is the ball game I think that what's difficult for trump is that he's not only communicating in those six days. He is playing defense right now in Ohio and Iowa, so he is spending a lot of money in Ohio in Iowa. Just protecting himself he's also up in Nevada right, which I don't understand, but you know, right. Right and so she's the one that is actually expanding a lot of money. and I can't say in an undisciplined way. He is in trouble, so he has to expand his hip protected. He has to expand but right now. the Joe Biden campaign is very disciplined and very focused and you know will there be expansion states. You know there's a big map on the wall just like there is you know in two thousand, eight and twelve and sixteen, but you gotta be careful, and you have to be very analytical about doing that.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Hillary Clinton JOE Bernie Voters TA Florida President Trump David Blah Iowa Romney Al Gore Ptsd Gretchen Whitmer Bernie Sanders Poland Senate
150 Minneapolis police officers seek 'duty disability' for PTSD following protests

Tom Sullivan

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

150 Minneapolis police officers seek 'duty disability' for PTSD following protests

"Unrest from George Floyd's death and Minneapolis taking quite a toll on local police officers. Has been retained by at least 150 Minneapolis police officers for purposes of pursuing a medical disability. As attorney Ron User Junior said those duty disabilities include PTSD, he said the numbers unprecedented, he added. Some of the officers were at the third Precinct when it was surrounded by protesters eventually burned in May. Yes, sir also said some have told their families they did not think they'd make it out of the riots

Minneapolis George Floyd Ptsd Ron User Attorney
Philadelphia health officials: Loud noises frequently traumatize military veterans

KYW 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 3 months ago

Philadelphia health officials: Loud noises frequently traumatize military veterans

"Maybe maybe 1/4 1/4 of of July July tradition. tradition. But But for for many many military military veterans, veterans, the the noises noises can can be be traumatizing traumatizing escape escape would've would've used, used, Kristin Kristin Joe Joe Hansen Hansen tells tells us us with with the the increase increase across across the the country, country, and and especially especially here here in in the the Philadelphia Philadelphia area. area. Doctors are most concerned for vets were dealing with PTSD, though military veterans who fought for freedom should enjoy the fourth The July Dr. Hedi Eisenberg, with Philadelphia's veteran affairs Medical Center says most hate this time of year. Any loud noise trigger, so when fireworks and firecrackers pop and boom, it can potentially worsen a veteran's PTSD, all veterans are trained to protect themselves and protect the people around them under very severe circumstances, any perception of threats Well, kind of instantly take them back to a combat training situation where they really their life and the lives of others around them were on the line, she says. It can also bring out something called hyper vigilant symptoms so near the veteran might be immediately looking around, hoping the perimeter, making sure everything's safe. Prolonged exposure to such noises can worsen PTSD or regressed treatment, Eisenberg says. On the fourth or any time fireworks are going off, let your veteran isolated they choose maybe with the family pet but also Be on the lookout for warning signs like being more withdrawn, increased anger or alcohol and drug use and reach out to the medical professionals at the

Kristin Kristin Joe Joe Hansen Ptsd Dr. Hedi Eisenberg Philadelphia Affairs Medical Center
"ptsd" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"ptsd" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"About PTSD along with national preparedness month prepared not scared to death to preserve what causes PTSD PTSD is when trauma either a individual type of the incident or cumulative trauma starts to change how the body normally functions no really you're talking about something that the initial responses normal natural that's not considered abnormal no other words everybody would go through the different types of steps of trauma. what is not normal is when that becomes a pattern in your life so if that is something that is not resolved and able to be worked on pretty quickly Hey it starts to make permanent changes on the body who you're stuck into that traumatic event and you can't get out of it and it causes havoc in your life to that's when it becomes PTSD so dealing with trauma on a media type of basis and getting that under control can present that but if you haven't which most people really don't know the process along those lines then it becomes something that can be debilitating so this is a kind of a car with PTSD is changes in mood having problems with sleeping reliving the events on a continual basis memory issues start to occur there is physiological changes that occur usually some digestive issues because you never get into the nervous system to be able to digest your food there is anger and moved out verse that can occur you also you know you can have triggers the anniversary is of a trauma often times is something that people notice or if there are things that kind of trigger it one of the things is that I knew a guy who was in war and any time there was a loud bang or something like that you could see that he automatically one into a Free State mmhm just because he was re living that is that right and those types of things can become debilitating one of the things is I've known a lot of people who patients who come in who had PTSD and were able to carry on with their life you know the oftentimes our marriages would fall apart they wouldn't able to work because they were able to hold a job because of all the some. terms of their PTSD there was health issues the story starts to occur because of the PTSD because the body is not functioning normally you know there is even instances where I knew that someone have some PTSD who came in to me for that and had was in medical school was a straight a student and couldn't. couldn't continue med school tried to go on to something less inclination do college anymore. just because of the problems with PTSD they said their brain just wasn't working because those areas of the brain that were involved in being able to do that type of work was no longer functioning so you can have some really long term types of and the life changing things are kind of Kerr with that so getting that under control and treated properly is extremely important you know thinking even sexual abuse yes you know when we're talking about trying to sexual abuse or rape or anything like that is something that causes very definite PTSD or even type of any type of a trying time in childhood PTSD is something that occurs that makes permanent changes in in how a summons from being raised ET you know it can be all sorts of different types of traumas that can kick that off now can these changes be reversed yeah one of the things that's excellent even if you had this for a long term and has not gotten treated for it there's something called neural plasticity where the body is quite amazing how you can recover if you get the proper treatment so there is hope for people who have PTSD but the problem is is most people don't get the treatments that are necessary to get that fixed okay let's talk about what treatments can be done to treat PTSD well of course the counseling is extremely important there are all sorts of different.

PTSD
"ptsd" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Just ask you this real quick because we are limited on time here i want to ask you two things first and foremost is what are the qualifications for somebody to be to get a service dog like this that's a veteran and how do they go about doing this i think there's a lot there's a lot of veterans out there that don't think they're qualified or they just don't know how so they never pursue it right well i got lucky enough i went through the va when they had that study but obviously you have to have a primary diagnosis of ptsd but other than that i mean there's several different organizations throughout the country that are provide dogs for vets right so they can always refer to any of their local organizations i know canine companions for independence they're currently early in the process they've got a pilot program going on right now to provide service dogs for veterans nobody i said so in the process i think she's trained specifically for ptsd like she recognizes certain things that have to do with she does yep and her commands are based on veterans with ptsd as well by turning on lights search rooms anything provided like a block position in public all sorts of different things like that so and and but for other veterans i would recommend this i know you would that maybe they don't have ptsd but they just got out the pt as their stress they don't have that meaning anymore getting a dog is is just an amazing even if you rescue it from the pound it's it's an amazing thing to change your life and giving meaning again it is yep and not just for everybody not even veterans anybody to have a dog yeah it just makes world of difference so let me ask you this before we go to break this has nothing to do with velvet but in a way it kind of does you have been have been in marine you paid a huge price for the freedom in this country what would you recommend for those people that are driving down the road there's people are home listening to.

ptsd
"ptsd" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"So i think that that the evidence or that type of therapy little shakier than we think so encyclopedia there are people that are not getting out also in medication there are people that are not getting helped now they're only two drugs that are actually fda approved for treating ptsd they're both antidepressant but as as listeners probably know people are treated off label by all sorts of stuff so you might go into get help for peak at the and you got an antidepressant and asleep aid and an anti anxiety drug and a blood pressure drugs that somehow supposed to help any reef with five six twelve different medication a lot of it seems kind of weird front just from the onset it seems kind of weird to treat ptsd with depression i mean i'm sure depression one symptom but i mean just because you have ptsd doesn't mean you're depressed right and and again i think there was you know some some clinical basis impacting that actually does help but it was it was not super compelling super compelling evidence so you know what you've got is is to establish treatments either prescription drugs or psychotherapy that work but don't work for everybody and that's why you have the proliferation of all sorts of other stuff you know swimming with a dolphin their dog wilderness retreat pile magnets you know just like you said and i'm not saying that those things aren't affected too but their scientific basis they're they're actual evidence is even shakier so you know i think the athens of some really compelling pective one treatments opened the door for for studies of ptsd.

ptsd depression
"ptsd" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"I mean i i've heard of all kinds of weird treatments for ptsd from like magnets to you know of course medical marijuana's and other one that gets talked about a lot and now walk in magnets how do they work magic that reference did you get the rapper now someone listening does know there's a there's there was insane clown posse song that had to lyric fuck and magnets how do they work dirt in magnus how do they work and not i wanna talk scientists y'all the client piss and it became just like this giant meam on saturday night live anyway sorry i haven't listened to icp since i was in high school in neither did a lot of people will remember but i mean yeah currently they've done some studies about using 'em d m a to treat ptsd that's too many acronyms but none the less the is the is the ac full drug ecstasy and which by the way should be talks about using a dm tea which is all in which is basically acid to treat ptsd so it's i don't know like how legit some of the stuff is and how much of it is just like different people different doctors or firms or whoever there is like oh ptsd is a big problem you know it's in the lines let's just throw whatever we have at it so we're going to give vets dm and a and see what happens i think it's important though as i was going to say to specify 'em dna because also from what i've read a lot of peop what people get with the street drug ecstasy is like not really ecstasy it's laced with other things.

ptsd marijuana
"ptsd" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"That welcome to the brown chicken brown cow show for this tasty nugget this is laura here i'm with monkeys giggled through the whole show that's fan just giggle so i thought you said i have skittles not true no skittles here today we are talking to a guest that we've actually had on our podcast we're here with juliet christianson again and she's here buddy and on this nugget i think we're going to talk a little bit about ptsd so truly can you tell us a little bit about what ptsd id quick before it very short version stands for post traumatic stress disorder often developed when you've been exposed to something very life threatening and you can have symptoms said as a void vince hyper vigilance being kind of frayed of things nightmares flashbacks reeks perienced whatever happened and feeling disconnected from others disconnected from yourself something called disassociation there's also complex ptsd which is more like years of being an unhealthy relationship or sexual abuse for years and sometimes it's pts's can be very aware that you have it you could also have repressed memories in not even know you were ever a.

laura juliet christianson ptsd vince
"ptsd" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"How many siblings do you have have she's four sisters and brother so she made all of you guys all all but one the one sister was from my father yeah yeah she's man that's tough yeah i can definitely see where you're coming from and i can hear it in your voice and so it's really cool to hear that you've been able to continue to build that relationship i really admire that about you hey let's let's talk about ptsd for a minute all right because i know everybody talks about it i know it's it's a big topic and a big term but from somebody who's in this thing like what's your perspective of ptsd how do we address this if we need to address it i mean i just want to get your thoughts and ideas about it yeah i was on another podcast i answered this question in a way that i wish i i wouldn't have because i was just not having the best day so i'm glad i'm going to get a chance to fix that but i think that we have some real serious systemic issues with the way that we view ptsd and the reason for that is the discussion is being driven by well meaning but ideological clinicians and people who don't have it i'll give you story i i was in a va sort of what they called it but anyway several people in a room talking about their problems ptsd problems forget what they called that but we all sat there while this one guy told the story about hitting an id in how did messed him up in a all this and i'm not diminishing hitting an id because it ain't good i mean most of the guys you see amputations of the hit id's so it's not i'm not diminishing that it's just i'm sitting here listening to a story about hitting an id and thinking oma hill let's get get on with it and that's part of my own ptsd.

ptsd
"ptsd" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"Kids special needs and military with ptsd is the main people with disabilities so we we have a program called ways of empowerment and basically it's bringing the kids with special needs together with the veterans with ptsd and having a day of swimming surfing paddle boarding playing and the servicemember veteran to act as mentors to the children and basically they create a bond between the challenges that they both have and it becomes very strong and very healing and an empowering it's bringing together two groups disabled significantly autistic children and ptsd veterans who otherwise probably wouldn't just run into one another yeah i mean they have a lot of similar traits when there's you know the social anxiety is shared between kids with autism or families with autism and and veterans with ptsd hyper vigilance hypersensitivity there's a lot of the same type of symptoms and such so they can relate to each other and yeah you're right it probably wouldn't come in contact with each other otherwise and then add an empathetic dog into the mix there and you really do have something yeah for sure i mean having the dog be able to be that that focal point and reduce things iety while having fun really and helping others like i really believe that when you help others you help yourself so when somebody is sick or has some disease or has ptsd or autism or whatever it may be helping someone else helps them.

ptsd
"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"Reminders of that state that state of being in an i really fond of this word existential terror you you know know i think that's that really captures state of being an existential terror and i don't know i hope that integration the work that i would be helpful for that and i haven't been able to work with those cases yet and i myself i'm still learning about how to approach that kind of picture you could say symptom picture because some level of of ptsd treatment has to include exposure well there's actually evidence against that but a lot of treatments us exposure as somewhere in there even them therapy for ptsd there's some aspect of the najera exposure where the person when they're going inward they may be rectal they often almost always ptsd recollect the trauma in some way and relate to it in a new way but how the heck do you do that with a psychedelic experience it's not like i can show you a photo of the vietnam jungle or like heavy right i guess maybe they could write a script about their experience but that's that's very invasive so there's this real conundrum around like because people talk about how psychedelic experiences themselves difficult to express in words flynn how then do you kind of work with that and i've been receiving some guidance from one of my mentors andrew to tar ski who runs the center domoling where the psychedelic program is housed he's been helping with with me without a little bit but it's a challenge and it's something that we just don't talk about.

ptsd vietnam flynn andrew
"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"It's very semantic people i've been hearing from more more women that small sample here so i'm not making any kind of genderbased conclusions or sex based conclusions but they persad they may not have their period anymore there's like hair loss there certain kind of somatic symptoms then coming with that is sort of intrusive symptoms that you you part of ptsd which is but their psychedelic it so whereas that veteran would return back to vietnam they're exposed to a stimulus that brings them back to that place but for then that's that can be concrete right it can be the jungle or it can be it can be so many things depending on what kind of trauma is but the thing that i've noted in terms of people having a heart kind of psychedelic ptsd is that often it's in response to that kind of if i could call it ego death or the kind of like intense fear response with a person under the psychedelic really believes that they're going to die which is one of the kind of criteria connected to ptsd they come out of it they're not psychotic it's not like that have had a break with reality in some way not necessarily delusional but say particularly when they're about to fall asleep they they're kind of mind is maybe a little bit more at ease the sort of intrusive kind of psychedelic things come to maybe maybe patterns or just sort of different.

ptsd vietnam
"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"And i think we need to have more conversations around these topics and one of them if i may is something that few people have touched on but hasn't really been catalyzed or formula yet which is the potential for psychedelics to be traumatic dare dare i say please don't hold my word to this maybe kind of psychedelic induced ptsd and now why do i think that people don't have this conversation well because they're so much now there's a psychedelic renaissance where the media and the public is willing to gauge in this kind of idea that maybe md psychedelics could potentially be helpful but that wasn't the case what like six years ago seven years this is relatively new so i think there's a lot of fear around having a conversation about the potential harmful effects of psychedelics when used in not ideal or or when the conditions aren't right and the reason why i'm saying this phrasing this ways because i think there is a difference between the most mental health professionals would think of of a when they hear about these cases they would think of a psychotic disorder like a substance induced psychosis or a acute psychotic disorder or maybe like a catalyst force schizophrenia and not to say that that doesn't exist i think that that potential is there to seeing that with patient units cannabis but there's this question of pre existing predisposition to that but i think the the psychedelic ptsd is is different it looks different.

ptsd cannabis substance induced psychosis seven years six years
"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"A physical embodied meaning kind of hard to describe but feeling in your body that you're back in that traumatized place and so that could be something like person ptsd their their boss may walk behind them and they associate to an abusive partner or parents and they tense up because they're expecting to get hit right and that's very subtle and for some people that that may not be clear that can be part of ptsd symptomology and so this is that's you need in order to criteria for ptsd you need to have various clusters so there's there's reexperience there's changes in mood changes cognition they're different kind of symptoms that when you meet certain number of them to come together and you can say okay you're diagnosed with ptsd there's a whole nother conversation that i wanted to touch on that we don't have to have but there's an important question of what is the outcome of trauma aside from ptsd because in the dsm the only the diagnostic manual for psychiatry psychology the only disorder that really acknowledges trauma is ptsd but trauma leads to so many different kinds of symptoms that aren't ptsd and there's this open question i'm getting ahead of myself but open questions will could md may assisted psychotherapy also be helpful for different kinds of disorders and symptoms that are related to trauma but aren't necessarily ptsd so to md what is dna so md may if my memory is correct thing is nineteen twelve was when it was first discovered or synthesized by merck and they were looking for blood clotting agent i think i don't remember what they're looking for but simply that this was an intermediate component in the reaction working towards another drug it wasn't something of interest it was just a guess almost a waste product on the way.

partner ptsd merck
"ptsd" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

Mentally Ch(ill)

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

"It's for ptsd and i be i've talked i did like one episode i think on trying to talk about ptsd and my ptsd is unlike the super smallscale of like i'm i'm a girl end oh my god and i was bullied n nail polish but there's legit pete and i think like to an extent some of my ptsd is legitimate like i have things that i cannot get through in my brain that i could leg flashback yawn about people heating me everywhere i go and uh anyway so this is real deal shit though these people that you're working with have seen a lot or not because the are looking at me leads me to say maybe not or in a in a couple of days because because for me i mean i the the reason of the veterans saved my life and i guess edgar of as an indoor ju and and i encounter them a time when i just i was in a fog so heavy that i just couldn't seizure in house right and i was like all right as will start over because has got to be a better than this and and they were the ones randomly through a random set of circumstances like i encounter them and i think i'd say a couple of these one is traumas trauma right it so it's relative to the person and and i don't know if you've ever red victor rankles book man search for meaning i don't run and abroad you or you i you have to because i brought you a copy of it and your book vowed struggled arbel's are bucks called struggle odds i may have want in the meantime i brought the big franco's book and he talks about a trauma is like gas in a bolt it will fill the space no matter how much our little there is no who you know don't underestimate or undermine your own it because when i was saying.

ptsd pete arbel franco
"ptsd" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Kind of insightful given the next thing we're going to discuss yeah because i think it is time to talk about tetra's in traumatic memory formation so a lot of people probably know this but it's worth explaining a little bit sometimes when people have a traumatic experience they can form a kind of recurrent toxic memory pattern that can cause serious trouble for them after the dramatic incident incident is over and done with so you mentioned a combat zone yeah imagine you're in a combat zone whether you are a soldier or just a bystander whatever you're at a place where people are fighting and there's a sudden eruption of gunfire and that leads to intense fear may be a maybe too personal injury to the threat on your life to witnessing a the death or injury of others and this can lead to post traumatic stress disorder a ptsd one of the main symptoms of ptsd is the presence of what are known as flashbacks heard these distress singh intrusive memories of the traumatic experience that come rushing into your mind like an irresistible torrent and can have debilitating effects and obviously you you don't wanna be you know driving the kids to school and suddenly just utterly possessed by memories of the time when somebody shot you in the shoulder yeah i mean it's the one of the worst moment to your life is suddenly gis popping up in your day in the course of your daily life during what should be that the best moments of your life at times right so there has been a lot of research into ways of treating ptsd and people who already have it so some treatment courses involve cognitive therapy and others can be talk therapy or exposure therapy exposing yourself to the problem some include drugs leica antianxiety medications are antidepressants and they're even some kind of weird and controversial therapies that have been suggested like i have you ever read anything about i movement desensitization and reprocessing or em d r.

ptsd
"ptsd" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Injury so that alone but later on the they started figuring out that or sides were not protected so snipers which shoot in our sights class in both are lungs and blowing at our hearts so they saw that was a soft targets of the designed another set of uh of uh of armor for the site plates searches gets heavier and heavier has got heavier and heavier and sell it was it was tough eh you know i uh uh it was it is a tough time to give me some some moments that you think have contributed in addition to that one or was at the worst one oh no no no no no i boys shaking their heads rigorous now i mean that would that was because they don't ever want to minimise somebody's at ptsd and say that's fallen pack this would be great time for you to to jump in sonia and talk about the myths about ptsd well i i think there there's many many myths about ptsd um i think one of them is um um it is that in a within the military you have to be deployed to actually have ptsd but ptsd can be from any type of trauma oftentimes n deployment we do see more traumatic events but a car accident can cause ptsd sexual trauma i can cause ptsd of fact a majority of our research actually comes from rape survivors within the military we have a lot of military sexual trauma meaning that there's some sexual assaults that happen within the military marchers to women yep yep well in and when we talk about sexual assault it's it's really about power and control and so that power and control can be towards a woman and or can be towards a man and it it's not sexual in nature it is really about that dominance that power and control that's needed for our anger and violence from control absolutely absolutely um.

car accident ptsd assault rape military sexual trauma
"ptsd" Discussed on The Overwhelmed Brain

The Overwhelmed Brain

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on The Overwhelmed Brain

"That's an entirely different experience i'm just telling you from my i'll level avoiding situations that remind you of the event uh absolutely don't go near they're having more negative beliefs and feelings yes i believe that's exactly what happened i i'll just the way i thought about the world and our and that area of the body and my body definitely changed my perception different lens of the world hyper aroused or hypersensitive absolutely so it in my small case in my minor case even though as major to me but minor in comparison to a lot of other ptsd i can say yes i probably had ptsd from that event so i can probably speak on ptsd from vat level now your question however goes into the overlap of ptsd and narcissistic abuse now narcissistic abuse is when you abuse some one for your own our gratification for your own self esteem i mean it's a huge topic and probably has more definition the that but how can i if i was narcissistic how can i increase me feeling better by abusing you uh so that you can you know fill myself esteem fell myself worth so that i am important and make me feel loved in nurtured in the way i want you to maybe loved and nurtured isn't the right terms there but uh you get the idea how can i abuse your how can i do things to you that one my call abuse so that i feel better about myself.

ptsd
"ptsd" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

Mentally Ch(ill)

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

"So i could talk about like the ptsd in a school kids heads that i see young children i guess anti from this perspective and as i don't think it's only children but what i find interesting as i went to a training once like ruling six years ago the talked about how ptsd or traumatic events affects your brain and the same way like adhd affects your brain or it does something your brain that makes you had the same symptoms as someone with adhd so the lack of being able to concentrate so lot of kids you know that adhd is very i would say overly diagnose these days the everyone has adhd and i think that some kids i'll see like i can't diagnose but um ali you will eventually though yeah i will when i get there but i can classify kids with learning disabilities and i can say they have symptoms of a student who has adhd goes to your doctor but i'll see a lot of kids you know the the teachers third they can focus at can concentrate they must have adhd radioed upper and finding out there history like they had some traumatic events that's probably right in what's in that what stinks as they're not treated for p dst they're treated for adhd so that's where it gift kind of resi so then can you recommend to go get treated for piteously incidental i haven't really had that situation yet where i had to be that person it's just kind of like i'm like thinking in my head what if they had a dramatic man i'm never really i i guess one example i can say i don't think she would mind me saying this is my sisterinlaw on.

ptsd adhd piteously six years
"ptsd" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

Mentally Ch(ill)

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

"Um slit his throat and shadow in the head basically like when the whole thing happened she to the cops was like she called and was like i want to help solve this for you guy you know i want to help out so it's like she wanted to be is the free i always find it interesting when people do that like when they go search for the body in yeah it's like they get so much satisfaction from seeing singlet their work or something like that but anyway in her defence they tried to use that she had ptsd from killing him because it was like she had a few things in her defence so at first she was like oh it was ninjas like there were literally men dresses ninjas and they killed him and let her go and then i don't know what nother story was that she made up it eventually it got to that she admitted that she did kill him but it was in selfdefense but there's no selfdefence when like you kill when he steps on thursday times and shoot them in the face and that's us rage killing right i mean you could be raged from being like b n but that's still like no longer selfdefence hell or whatever that way but she couldn't quote unquote lake remember killing him from what she claimed to be was ptsd from killing him and so they use that in her defence but then the psychiatrist or whatever that diagnosed her with ptsd admitted that he found out that she lied about details when he was diagnostic ptsd so i think like he eventually kind of i think this was posttrial though withdrew his diagnosis of having p jesse but that's the problem like with all this mental health stuff is that like people use it as a crux or they'll use it as i could go to if they do something wrong right yeah and like to someone who acted it's like screw you rate yeah i have ptsd from you saying you have ptsd low that ripe super.

selfdefense ptsd jesse