19 Burst results for "Ptsd Anxiety"

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:18 min | 7 months ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"A you know the legislature gotta be hard to be a conservative christian on this particular matter because these things are one hundred percent natural if guide if there is a god who created everything and who is in control everything then that god put these drugs here yep and designed them and us in a way that we could use them and experience awesome things. God wants mushrooms. Yes saying that they should be illegal. Is like literally saying that. You believe god made a mistake. I think this is a great way that they went about it. Says the group decriminalize nature had been tabling at nearly every farmer's market in arcada leading up to the meeting to educate people on what they argue are the benefits of the psychedelic. Plants and fungi. Well there are. Many benefits are tremendously helpful in. Ptsd anxiety depression things like that. There are constantly studies coming out showing the benefit of doing psychedelics and no real downside to it in the thing about the psychedelics is. They can actually cure your depression whereas antidepressants. You'll have to be on them for your entire life and they come with really really bad side effects yeah. I think it was ten years ago. That i read the wikipedia article on suicide and cubans us and they had a steady back then showing that it wasn't just treating people's depression it was actively curing it like making it go away forever. Not giving them some sort of medication to make it just subside or to make them go on a killing spree or to kill themselves but actually we curing their depression. It's new studies like this. Come out all the time. And yet we're still not seeing legalized suicide cubans across the board. Despite how the medical benefit for them has been made abundantly clear but at least some small cities and larger states are at least decriminalizing them so there is progress being made just not. At the rate i would expect to see for something that is known to actively cure depression. Yeah i don't have an article about it but michigan has been on a roll Ann arbor where our co host. Nobody is from actually the they just Maybe like a month ago. Voted unanimously in the council decision to decriminalize plants. Empty entheogen plants in florida. Oh nice i did it. I did not know that. Ann arbor did that and they had the biggest Festival ever called in the oh fast or something and they were like out doing things like that in the townsquare. We're continue talking about shrooms. I think it was timothy leary. Who says psychedelics inspire fear people who have never tried them. So if you're afraid of you've never tried them give us a call six zero three two eight three six one. Six zero lunar observatory detects radio broadcast originating from proximus and tori the nations of earth discovered. Their first contact with an alien race may also be their last with approximations facing extinction level. Disaster earth must choose between sending a ship on a multi year journey or allowing nature to take its course saving proxima a hard science fiction thriller by travis s taylor and less johnson from bain books dot com..

depression Ptsd anxiety depression legislature Ann arbor timothy leary michigan florida travis s taylor johnson
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

04:26 min | 9 months ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on I'm Not In An Abusive Relationship

"So i just wanted to acknowledge that you know whether you can relate to my story you've been something similar or you're listening because you have loved ones or friends who are survivors. It brings up a lot of feelings and self care is so important so please take care of yourselves and sharing a bit about my story. Really the first thirty years of my life I was just trapped in this cycle of abuse. Lots of physical sexual emotional and As i got older financial abuse as well and i think worse than the physical wounds of the trauma where the emotional and psychological wounds because the invisible wounds of what i went through as a survivor of domestic violence and sexual assault in human trafficking. Where the hardest ones for me to deal with. Ptsd anxiety depression nightmares. Having full blown. Panic attacks in public place. Says i think people who haven't been through this sort of experience really can't understand how debilitating the invisible wounds of trauma can be about. Nine years ago. I was at the gym. And i saw a man that looked eerily similar to the one that traffic me. It wasn't the same person but he just had a lot of the same physical characteristics. And i had a full blown panic attack and it's one of the most frightening things that happened to me. I physically froze. I couldn't move. I went blind for minutes. I didn't think when it was happening. The my site was gonna come back was so scary. I couldn't see anything. Mike hearing was all fussy was like hearing this static for radio or tv but like lasting in your ears My heart was pounding out of my chest. I started hyperventilating..

Ptsd anxiety depression trauma Mike
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on Women Who Sarcast

Women Who Sarcast

03:32 min | 10 months ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on Women Who Sarcast

"Lead the way and i was lucky to go and see an action on the beach and they took this young young boy out surfing and it's not about getting into ride the wave. It's about giving him the tools to finally that brings joy to de stress to know that there are adults. That really have been back. Yes really lovely really kind really. Caring and the lots of overlap in terms of the place did it. They had a beach clean boards. Because we're all looking after the ocean because he asian softer is. Is that simple. So yeah the to fundraise for really wonderful chart. Yeah amazing work for both of them. And i think that's amazing that they have a foundation that will help kids get on the water because i know there can be a lot of fear around that especially the ocean. So yeah yeah now. It's really really see. An action was really amazing and some of the children carries some of them have gone through really difficult situations. Maybe have ptsd anxiety. You know mental health issues. And i think now more than edwards cave it Young children they put a rough time. So yeah yes amazing. So while you're on this journey how was it for you. Emotionally and physically unfit. Kate was fine. I mean i'm never said that. I'm the strongest possible. Durham no fittest. The bestest by think i do have the element of greenwich unburied goods. Probably being a mother a just doing the same old thing day after day after day. All the watching you know all the dishes declining some pretty good at just bribing myself on the going gets tough to. Just keep going so physically. It was hard but but emotionally. It was hard. It was self belief at one point. I did go wrong on the canal. And you know all the demons of what i've ever done wrong in my life came flooding back in at the time in nineteen eighty seven when you went to this consists in. You said this and you're upset personal. You didn't quite understand this or two thousand one in this went wrong. In those moments obese things come funding that that was probably the hardest in overcoming doubts. You know when. I was tired and wet and hungry and thinking gone. I can't do this. Am i literally bitten off. More than i could share in those one night when that really happened and i was awake at two three in the morning and thinking whom is is just identified. I can do it. And i just had to say to myself look however long. It takes as long as you physically do this. Just take as long as it takes. You can ask the more time off work. You can say to people. This is harder than i thought. I'm just gonna keep genius. Step by step and in the end i did take. I think i had planned to arrive in the end Maybe twelve asian. I arrived at five isssue. Five hours across days wasn't too bad by just to give myself that grace just to say. Just keep drunken. Just keep peddling. You've got your chuck that guy you peanut butter sandwiches this guy It's a good lesson that sometimes it's just the grind grind out ready. Yeah so you were powered by chocolate. That's not a bad thing..

ptsd anxiety edwards Durham Kate
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

The Forward with Lance Armstrong

08:17 min | 11 months ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

"Ptsd that he didn't know that had You know people would ask me are journaling donkey and i was like no because when you're out there it's non adrenaline you're very communism in your ear in the moment and it took me a few years and then hit i was like oh my god. That's why i'm doing this. Because i'm in the moment like i don't want ousama sharks to be in the moment. And that's what. Set me on the mindfulness path of meditation and other tools to get to a place where i'm sitting here with lance armstrong at this table. I'm okay you know everything's gray. You're totally okay. It's good surfer a greyhound but I got the point where i'd patagonia making different colored wetsuits to see like guinea pigs to see if they are attracted to colors or chernoff they were. I'm out yellow yellow yellow dangerous and make fanny when he got a surf contest. You know a shark came in the back of his board. The bottom of his board lillo. Yeah they were coming at me like i. Six eight hundred to go swim. You know had on at them and you know listen. You're still i have. I visualize two weeks prior to going on expeditions. Away church expeditions. I visualize shark not banking off. And what i'm gonna do an homage to rotate my body and hit the side of its nose. 'cause everyone's heard you you push the news the shore. Yeah you know what happens next mouth opens and you're done but no one ever touches a short nothing nothing swings towards it. Everything's ones away a minute or so smart the minute you start there like on a like you and then if you go up in touch one of those things. They swim bike. Well this is what i you know. I'm over when i'm out there in the open water years always going through your and i'm always looking around because obviously beautiful. But i'm like all right. Where's the dude in the grey suit And i'm alone. Is you have no choice. I mean i. I i wouldn't. I wouldn't personally panic and start flailing. I would just sort of just just chill. Don't know what else to do. But i wouldn't. I certainly would dive underwater and swim towards him yet. Well that's the thing if you ever see. Sharpen the ocean if you act like pray if you fear. They're gonna come the they smell like a dog. So if you stand your ground you watch it. Make sure listen. All you have to do is a little punch on the side of things swim off. But if you start trying to get away and kickin flail they're gonna keep coming most likely so you know. Fear you that's where you have the if you're hearing this and you're out swimming you see a short. Just remember my voice saying hey stay calm. It doesn't want you just so many around but it's interesting. It's checking you out. I don't get scared. Yeah in the hammer heads. I don't know why. I always thought i mean people scalloped or great hammer heads. There's the big boys are like for the people always short lambert union. They're they're lions man on them but people always told me that you know. These are the worst. And they're the most violent like you're fucked if you see one of these things and yet well. I'm they're sick looking but they finally for the first time. Ricky can't see them you see them they. I mean they're so hard they don't by humans are individuals. Scalp him ads law schools of five hundred. I've swim into a school of five hundred hammerhead and simultanously. They all turn off away from me. Which is why you have to use like a rebrith breather like they see the bubble five hundred trucks. Swim away from me right. So great hammer heads and binnie. Scientists found in. They started dropping food and then they started getting in and they started getting into shorts. Sort of comfortable with humans. And so that's where we go to see great hammer heads and it is the coolest thing to swim at those and there's tiger sharks there as well tiger beach it's like it's it's phenomenon i look at those small once. You see once you've with great whites. I'm like i don't see any big tiger sharks in late morning thing with fifteen feet. I'm like it just seems so get no-shirt so what if you like ev- i we're going to be fast friends and you've got an empty seat on the boat and you're going out there because i i I take a boat every Every year with friends. I and i'm saying this now. I got some tough guy. But i think i would go. I'd get out out of the cage. I wanna do a couple of where. I'm just going to have a permit to be outside of the you're not allowed to go outside of the cage. I i got permission. You know. I started working when i started this. Vr project with a. I mean it was like the universe. Transpiring i literally was done with sharks matt lax. I'm on my way antigua. Because i was like okay made my book i did. I did everything trying to change people's perceptions photos aren't doing it and i'm starting my horse project my next book my horse book because i want to about saudi arabia. That's all other story but he did nolde. Yeah going great whites till kony's now no onis men beautiful beautiful like arabian nothing with teeth. Nothing i'm scared. Horses a kick in the hanno shit. I you're right about that like i. I think you're exactly right about. I am not down with risk. Assessment advocate don't jump out of planes. You know what i mean like. I mean diameter. i'm not as bantu. I assess things but joe out of planes. I've never i wouldn't. Why would you would you go. Parish is pulling that not were in point that not working and then having that but and by the way why jump out of a perfectly good airplane right it is flying. I'm not scared to fly. Because when i was a kid an airline p et engine was engulfed in flames and they turned around landing back in athens and the adults went and ripped the cages off the barnes to get drunk at that point. I knew i will never die in a plane. So what was what you were there. Oh the end yes. Oh so. I'm sitting there at at the airport and i'm like vr. I'm never put goggles on. And that's the future where people want to explore space nasons underwater. I own that patriots. Phone co. media 'cause i did in my head. I'm like wait. It's a ball of cameras. I put in a pool. I can take you with me. And then i can maybe change perception because if you go with me so i call in guo this media company. I work with us. I want to make the blue player of vr. But i want to do it now or just want to moun- call the five. Prussian company seems to be back in three weeks. So get back. They all want me to make okay good. That means it's a good idea. Now was on a wednesday as are making the appointments. Two days later on saturday. A phone call from this guy named andrew uber man who's had a neuroscience at stanford. He's like my own interested in your short work. I'm like okay and he's like were you scared of sharks and like yeah petrified. He's like now you swim with them with no cage. No medals nothing. Just your camera. Mcgee you say okay. Well what you've done in the neurosis is like the free climbing of neurology. And you've rewired your brain. And i want to bring you up here. 'cause we wanna start using. Vr technology to help people with ptsd anxiety. Totally believe that. And i'm like andrew. I'm starting to be project right now. And i have no way so we i flew up there. We serve working together. I brought five scientists down and then sort of made a proof of concept Which the only way to shoot underwater is with six go pros. And i'm just like i'm not making this go pros. Monica pick flat. I wanna stereoscopic. See see the depth so i found a company that code virtue that literally made one hundred twenty pound housing with thirteen black magic cameras. A science hundred and twenty moving that thing underwater but i knew me more and brock could do it and so did that and then i had to raise the money well known was putting really big money into vr. That went up that facebook and My character dennis colonnello. Who's one of my god. Just love that guy. He's really helped. My body has my book in his office. One of his client side skjei mike..

lillo lambert union lance armstrong patagonia guinea nolde binnie Ricky swimming kony antigua andrew uber saudi arabia athens ptsd anxiety joe patriots stanford Mcgee
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The Bernard Bergan Podcast

The Bernard Bergan Podcast

02:53 min | 11 months ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The Bernard Bergan Podcast

"And at times. You know we send a text you place a call. Maybe it's not well received but still do it. Because they are encouraged by your president. They're encouraged by knowing you're there and available without knowing it. We expect to the brother who mentioned social media. A lot of us are are Lawyers were walking other people's relationships not understanding their investments. You know like they. There's something else some people talk and joke you know. I've seen those types of father son relationships. Yeah me and my daddy. Don't joke like we're very serious people. We talk about books and subjects and and the presidency and leading country leading businesses. Like we have more serious conversations. And i watch him joke with my my brothers. They have different relationships whether hot is pretty good here so We had to start. Come through yesterday. And i think i think sometimes without knowing that we have kind of taken on what the world has said our relationship should be versus just being as available as we could be. My father in law is a super busy man. He owns his own business on a very Disciplined work ethic. But like i said he. He called his everyday sometimes. It's in the morning while she's driving to work sometimes. This when she's driving home sometimes is while she's at home right before he goes to bed. But it's it's something he wants to do something he wants to do to let her know. She loved to let her know. You know that he's always available to her and as a man who is her husband man transformational for me because my wife doesn't have any issues she doesn't run from the voice of a man. So if i say something to my wife weather harsh or with the tone of a man. She didn't flinch in because that is so present even still talking to turn forty this week even still. He's so president. And i think sometimes i listen to zero to eighteen as as the most efficient and i get it train up a child in the way they should go. I get it. Don't forget that much. Like the prodigal son your children might not be in their right mind nc seasons of their life. I know. I haven't been. But every time. I came to myself. I was when i went to war very war weary and i was just wasn't really depression. It was just this high. Ptsd anxiety and i remember sitting with my father and he was talking about his time in the military and it went perspective to me going to therapy getting counseling dealing with my trauma and healing in that area. And i was like wow. It's so powerful.

Ptsd anxiety depression
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

06:51 min | 11 months ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Is it gonna take a turn and we lived that way for almost nine years and you know february comes around. January january comes around and he contracts cova and because of the damage to his lungs and everything else He took a took a turn in a matter of a couple of weeks He was gone. And so you know dealing with the reality of the loss now It is a again a different kind of how one that is difficult as it was in as much as you weren't able to live your life in the way that you wanted to when you were always worried that things were going to get worse when they do get worse You know you only want to go back to to the difficulty of of dealing with it every day when they're not here so you know it's been A crazy journey One that were still trying to break the spiral of just spiraling down and and when your life is consumed with treatment and doctors appointments. And you know you're it is your life and then all of a sudden it's gone Thank god i know what might not negotiable are now Because i can promise you. I would be in much worse shape than i am and Even with that you know. I'm not in particularly good shape right now mentally Just dealing with the loss. But i don't know how anyone would would be able to come out the other side. If they didn't do the work to discover what they're non-negotiables were and live their life by them because there's too many other things swirling around my head right. now that are easily Distractions to to something much much worse. You know so. Somebody once told me that when you when you lose somebody you love. They say you don't ever actually get over it I think it was either my remains mom or somebody said you know. Even though she had lost a parent ten fifteen years ago she said there's not a day that goes by that you don't think about that person right correct Getting over is not the right Praise you you learn to move forward But you will never get over it. It is not That's not possible nor nor should it be the goal to be quite honest You want to honor and cherish those memories and for me now. The work that i do in the talks that i go out are all part of the os legacy you know. He designed the cover of that book for me and The lessons learned in and the whole concept of black. Sheep stemmed out of the difficulties of dealing with this over the last nine years and You know it's my job now to to honor that legacy so i don't ever want to get over it. I just want to be able to cope with it. S i think the best case scenario that anybody could really for so. This is something. I've asked people in one form or another. I mean and i i know the super fresh so feel free to not answer the question better. I wondered with something as tragic as as losing a child. What decisions you know. Come out come out. In terms of you. Know how you're going to live your life going forward as a byproduct. Because i think you know we've had people who faced near death experiences and I can't help but think of this essay that was in. There's an author Tim kreider who wrote this collection of essays and he talks about how he gets stabbed in the neck and you know he says you think you're going to start making all these decisions and change the way that you live your life when you have this sort of tragic experience and then you know a year to later you go back to sort of normal but i wonder for you know what decisions you've made about your life going forward as a byproduct of losing your son so there's a i think i have a couple of thoughts on that one is is that In my experience of coaching people dealing with thousands of different people helping them discover their their values. I would. I would venture to guess without exaggerating. That ninety nine percent of everyone on the planet is winging it They don't take the time to discover. Truly what are non-negotiable. Values are prove that they're real and program them into their day to honor them with liberty attention on a daily basis. The difference of what happens when you go through something like this. Is you have a choice to make. Are you going to allow the emotions to drive the bus Allow the hurt and all of the things that you're feeling to take you off course and continue to wing it in your life. Hopefully you get through this. In a way that is manageable or do you begin to act with deliberate intention to begin to these things into existence on a daily basis Controlling when and where these values appear. So that you feel like you're living a life of fulfillment in the face of the greatest loss you'll ever experience. And so i. I think that's the biggest change is that you've got to make a decision to live with deliberate intention and if you don't the chances of you falling off into the abyss of depression and Being filled with ptsd anxiety and all the other sorts of things that come along with a loss of this magnitude are almost insurmountable. If you do not live your life with delivered attention. What i mean i think that makes a perfect segue to talking about the ideas in the book and i wonder how you actually came up with the term black sheep to to discuss this like what prompted that. I was forty seven years old before somebody sat me down and explained to me why farmers don't actually value black sheep like the rest of the flock. And when i heard the the truth it just sort of rattled me to my core in such a way that i felt like i had to tell everybody about it and so the real reason that farmers don't value black sheep is because of black sheep's wool cannot be died So in effect every black sheep is one hundred percent authentically original. And when i heard that and knowing the generations of people who have grown up feeling like a black sheep for whatever particular reason that they're outcast. The truth is that they should be aspiring to that one hundred percent.

cova Tim kreider ptsd anxiety depression
S6 E11 - This is what it's like living with someone with PTSD. . . - Full Episode

Courage to Fight Again

29:01 min | 1 year ago

S6 E11 - This is what it's like living with someone with PTSD. . . - Full Episode

"All right you ready. I actually hit record this time here. We go so in the most recent episode of the podcast season six episode ten. I sat down with my wife patricia. I talked to her about the challenges. She has faced in dealing with multiple mental health diagnoses over the years and right after we published that episode. We received an excellent recommendation from a listener. Asking us to tackle the topic of what it's like living with someone with ptsd. And i think patricia. And i are uniquely suited to tackle this since both of us. Have this diagnosis in in. Its for completely different reasons. This episode is going to be an unfiltered. Look at what. It's like to live with someone with post traumatic stress disorder and by way of introduction. This is the we served now. What podcast where. I do my best to answer the questions. Veterans and their families are already asking so you can make your post military life. Your best life money erin perkins. I'm a. us army combat veteran daddy to two amazing kiddos host of this podcast. If you hadn't guessed. And i am joined today again by my beautiful bride patricia. Welcome back to the show thank you. I'm so glad to be here. Well good good so it's been a couple weeks right and last time we talked about the treatments. You're getting and things like that for depression. Talk to us a little bit before. We're gonna dive into the. Ptsd topic talked us a little bit. About how those are going those are going. I'm not going to be very honest. they're painful. I think Winning expecting almost a miracle. I mean you you let somebody shock your head for twenty minutes a day. You expect something but it's actually made my depression a little worse. They said that's normal. It can get worse before it gets better. So actually they're going to re map tomorrow and see if there's a different place. They need to put the magnet. But i think it's gonna go all right. Yeah we hope we hope and pray as well trained for this for that. This works in putting you through a lot of distress but like you said pain to try to to address the depression right. And so that's that's just one part of what can be a result of ptsd another city but the actually brit really brings up our our first thing to talk about is. Let's talk about ptsd a little bit. What it is. And how. I understand it. How do you understand. ptsd how. I understand it is. I mean we all know it stands for post traumatic stress disorder and that can be from your childhood from your teen years from adulthood. Something you went through something. You saw something you experienced. That was just traumatic for you. And i know that it can you know make you. Have you know nightmares it. Can you know how you can have memories of that trauma and then you avoid situations that you know make you think of that trauma and you know a lot of even soldiers you know. They get like hyper vigilant. You know because of how it makes them feel and it can call anxiety and depression as well. I think the hyper vigilance was one of the i. I realize that i that something was wrong right. I knew i had a lot of anger in. I was like i don't know why angry like i'm i'm not in the army anymore. I thought you the anger was just part of just being in the army. You're just mad something every day. And so i thought that it would go away and it didn't in fact he got worse and it. Was that hyper vigilance piece. I always felt. I still do. But i always felt ready. This constant state of readiness hyper vigilant. That's one of the behavioral parts because there's behavioral parts psychological mood in general sleep. And then you know it you can break them all down like you know behavioral is like you know you feel agitated or irritable or hof style or hyper vigilant like you were saying or you know you start doing self destructive things like you know. Drugs are becoming an alcoholic or or if he just completely isolate yourself. That's me raise my hand right there myself psychological as you know flashbacks which i don't have those fear that comes from nowhere severe anxiety failure to trust other people. Because you don't know what's going to happen the mood part of it. You know you lose interest or pleasure in doing stuff that you used to enjoy doing right or you feel like the severe guilt or you are incredibly lonely like you have tons of people around you. You have a family that loves you but you are so lonely and it messes with your sleep. It can cause you to sleep too much. Not enough to have horrific nightmares and a lot of people have detachment from other people and like intrusive thoughts that they just can't get rid of you know that you know. They go through their day and i guess to some other people they might look like legitimate list crazy but they just have these constant like thoughts and some people have to talk it out. You know there's so many parts to ptsd. yeah. I think that's one of the challenges with even realizing that you might have it right because there's so many parts to it. Depression anxiety intrusive thoughts avoiding situations. Not sleeping sleeping too much having horrific nightmares having too much emotion having no emotion at all. There's so many things and so what i was told. People especially veterans is if if something feels off. Don't try to figure out if you have. Ptsd anxiety or depression go to mental health right and talk to the professional about it and let them figure out whether you use the va or you go out to out to in the civilian sector. You go get it checked out. Because there's there's nothing that's not going to hurt you to go get it checked out right and that was a question that i was going to ask you. Is you know like when did you realize you had ptsd. I think it was what year wise was twenty seventeen. I got out and twenty. Fourteen of twenty seventeen anger progressively got worse. The hyper vigilance. And what. I say hyper vigilance. I i don't mean just like you know on edge all the time and i guess that was part of it but for me it was this feeling like i'm about to go into a fight like just ready like i mean you know kind of like almost kind of like a sprinter would be at the starting line. Okay here we go all right. I'm ready. i'm ready and it was like that all the time. That sounds exhausting. It is it really really is it took i say i want to say it took a long time to get past that but truth is i'm up past that no the pd. Has these not a broken limb. You know you can't cast on it and wait six weeks and go back and get the cast off and you're good to go. No i mean people can't get past it it's it. There are stories of people who you know they had. Ptsd and to you know after a few months few years depending on situation you can't get past. It depends on the person. I think it's post traumatic growth right where you know after your trauma you become a stronger person. A bigger percent better person. I don't know if i would. I would say that people ever get over their trauma. They just they build one right in that instead of letting the letting it crush them they use it to to fuel becoming a better person in the end and the thing is it's not always a choice. I don't think this is my opinion right. I don't think it's always a choice whether you get to say like oh. I'm past the worst part of my ptsd. And i'm only headed for post traumatic growth now. I don't even think i've heard that term post traumatic growth. So i don't know. If i would be i don't know if my opinion i mean i hope that's a real thing Veteran futterman talk to me. One time so you're doing it basically you're doing to post traumatic growth thing like you like you know you start a company like you've got a great career you've got a great family you know you've got a beautiful home cars dog you've got all this stuff going for you you're doing life right you're in your a great church like you're doing all these things right and hosting this podcast you're getting so much stuff done okay and i'm like okay cool why don't it feel better yeah really i'm like okay. We'll see if this post traumatic growth. I number one. i'm happy i'm growing. I'm happy growing getting better. getting smarter. Faster stronger whatever it is. I'm happy about that part but like it is this like is post traumatic growth a destination or is it just this constantly journey. Yeah i think it's a journey in. It reminds me of what we heard in church on sunday about walking wounded. And that's what that means is like. Es your wounded mentally sometimes physically but you know ptsd is a mental disorder and your your wounded mentally but you continue to walk. Wounded is when you stop that. There's no growth And so the post traumatic growth is continuing to walk. Even though you're wounded i love. Obviously you we're in the same service. Same church service right and we were both talking about how great it was so we can ask each other. This question okay. What's it like living with me especially within. What's it like living with me. Especially when i'm experiencing some sort of triggering episode so you mentioned 2017 when you first realized that you had p. Tst then it was. You're angry and you know we tried to give you a little bit of space and like you know. Let you breathe calm down. But i think i think you have grown because now you take that space for yourself. You're like i'm going to go run or i'm going to take the dog and we're going to go hike for a few hours. I think that you know living with you. I've able to watch you grow. And and learn how coping mechanisms coping skills. And i think with. Ptsd you have to learn. Those people might not always understand them like. I'm not hiking ninety degree weather with a dog. It's not happening but three you that works that would trigger trigger something not. Ptsd that would trigger anger. It has nothing to do with. Ptsd you you. You've joined small groups that you guys run and you know for exercise in general for you just really helps you a lot of that. Is you know twenty seventeen. We had just moved to alabama and things weren't going the way we wanted them to and life was just really stressful right. And you hadn't even been diagnosed yet. sure sure. So you've you've grown okay. So i don't even ask this question. What do you like living with me. It's amazing it's amazing. I love it. Let next question experiencing some sort of triggering episode. Well i've told you this before but as a man as a husband i feel. It's my duty my job to keep you happy. You know and so a lot of times i think. Ptsd manifests itself in your life as overwhelming depression and crippling anxiety right. And there's not a single thing i can do about it so for me. It's not that living with you is better or worse. Y you know with a triggering episode. It's that my hands are tied right. And so i think it's super frustrating. Because i'm like. I see a problem my wife is in. It's not just unhappy. You know it's like she. Has this a legitimate mental diagnosis. A mental condition that. I can't do anything to fix Frankly doctors can't do anything to fix every single part of that right and that conversation we've had many times because you're like i just want to fix it and i'm like doctors i have and they can't fix it. Release yourself up that burden. You can't fix it and that is so tough as a man who says you know what i'm here to lead my family my wife and my kids and you know kind of you know take charge and we're going to go tackle life together and that is so appreciated but sometimes you just got. It's true it's true like it's nothing you can do. Well that's not true. Okay that's not true space. Give me space. You know like like you did tonight. I had that treatment today and it made me sick today. I was actually really upset stomach today. And i'm just chilling in the bedroom lennon bed phone and you just made dinner that i did that helped i did. I logged off my computer at work and went and made dinner. It was amazing. I don't know if the dinner was amazing. But it's good good good so coming up after the break tricia and i are going to ask each other one more question. We're going to ask this question. Is there anything good about living with someone who has. Ptsd and we're gonna share several takeaways with you. Stay with us. Many americans today don't realize the stress and anxiety they feel is most likely because of their finances according to bankrate.com more than six out of ten people couldn't cover a one thousand dollar emergency seven out of ten. Don't budget regularly. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck to these describe you. Are you ready to live like others. Can't too many make the mistake of budgeting their lifestyle instead of budgeting their basic needs. I my friend. Marco over at mc business lab has a simple process to automate the basic things. You need to live and then never looking at one of those bills again. Head over to live like can't dot com to get on the wait list for his own line course to learn this automation skill that will significantly reduce your stress anxiety. And if you think one on one attention could be the way for you. You can also schedule your free consultation with marco once again that's live like others can't dot com get on the path to your dream life today all right and we are back and as promised. We're going to talk about ptsd or would keep talking about ptsd right but the question that we have for each other. Do you wanna ask it. I want me to go go ahead. Is there anything good about living with someone who has ptsd. I wrote this question. I still think it's a tough question you know i would not wish. Ptsd on anyone true. I'll start with that so with that in mind. What the good that has come out of it. It helps me to understand other people abso win. I hear about a veteran struggling with. Ptsd or a a veteran's family member or or family member or friend who is struggling with ptsd. I'm like i get it. I know how you feel. I completely understand and so for me. It's if there's anything good. It's that i can better relate to people who are going through the same frustration and anguish and honestly emotional pain when they see their loved one going through this right and i know not everyone copes. Well that's true and so this question might be difficult for some other. Some people listening you know like they're their loved when ptsd is raging alcoholic. Who's angry all the time. In what would you tell that person. That's an even to that. That in itself is even tougher. I think what. I would be telling that person is i. Can't i cannot tell you what you should be experiencing if you're living with someone with ptsd and you're like you know my spouses a raging alcoholic as a result of pd. St how do i find good in that. I can't tell you what good you should find. I i'm in no place to tell you that the only thing i can do is point you to the one that is jesus christ the principe who can give you peace in the situation and and the bible even says you know piece that passes all understanding basically piece. That doesn't make sense. So i can't tell you. This is what you should be feeling. This is what you should be experiencing. But i can recommend you to eat a formula so to speak of how to live better in that situation right and and i would add onto that to a more. You know just. I don't know. Do we say worldly. Come that. Try to under try to understand. Don't don't try to fix but like research. See how you can help your one with ptsd. Because i think not. Understanding is a part of the problem right for years i had. Ptsd and you did not. You didn't understand it in in mind would manifest in depression anxiety in the soldier new said just go exercise pushups drink water burpee strength water and i'm like you so don't get it and it was true i didn't you act totally asked you to research it to better understand it and you you did better understand it but now that you have experienced for yourself it's completely different really it. It really really is just just so different when you experience it for yourself. So i'll ask you the same question. Is there anything good about living with someone who has ptsd. I think it teaches you. How similar to what you said compassion. I mean i've always had a big heart. And i think it's because it's been broken a lot and you don't hurt anybody else because you know what that feels like you know you have more compassion. Because you know what it's like to fill abandoned or left out or or or thrown away so you're not gonna do that to anybody because if you're not a monster you're not gonna do that because you know what that feels like me and so i have probably too much compassion. My heart's honestly probably isn't too big for people. There are worse things that people not for pets. But that's a whole different. That's a big for people. Pets you can have one. That's my ocd. Am sorry that's okay. But yeah i would say me. It's compassionate and i've seen more compassionate you as well 'cause i was saying earlier when you didn't understand it you just dislike. Oh burpee and water. But now you're like. Do you want to go take a nap. You need to lay down like there's way more compassion than there was before so if if anything good can come out of such a horrific diagnosis like ptsd. I mean if you can just you know. Be patient and be kind. You can learn compassion. Sure yeah that's a really good point. So that's it for the questions right now. We honestly united had these types of conversations for year really really long time and and this is just another one of those conversations of how to how to live with someone with ptsd. What it's really like. i. I'm going to go out on a limb here. What's the worst part about living with someone with. Ptsd not knowing how they're gonna react something and so you know there's times when not recently but you know there were times i'm like oh i don't know if i want to tell him this 'cause i don't know how he's gonna react. I don't know where he's at today. You know mentally like you know. He's already got a lot on his plate. I'm kinda it's almost like an egg shells kind of thing like the. You wanna be really careful. You know so so those can be a little. And i'm sure i'm the same way i'm sure you and the kids stay away. Well i think for me and maybe for the kiddos too. I don't know but for me. It's the the worst part you know other other than the obvious of you. Know seeing my spouse going through this right but you know how it how it affects. Your frustrates me is the inability to plan. I love planning. I'm like okay. What are we going to do tomorrow. Six weeks from now five years from now and like i don't know win and might depression depression. Yeah and you're going to be like. Oh sorry man like as much as you would love to go do that. Depression is just crushed. You for that day or week or i mean there are many many times to. I'm going to say through the years that i've pushed myself. You know because. I i wanna do fun things at the family like you know. I think a lot of people feel that way. Like yeah wanna goaded disneyworld and make memories you know and you feel like that that depression creep over you and you just got to push through it as hard as it is. You just gotta you can't quit. You got to keep moving gonna walk wounded speaking of which so i know we. We referenced. The walk wounded message right. So so for those of you. Who don't know this was a message from church. The highlands with A great jura tear in this region of the country. One of the biggest in the nation as i recall got twenty plus camp twenty two twenty. Three i don't even know now. We got a bunch of campuses anyway. The the one of the pastors nikon carter. He spoke any told the story about a guy that will testament by the name of jacob who ends up wrestling with this angel and this angel as he's wrestling with jacob he he knocks jacobs jacobs hip out of socket right but jacob keeps wrestling. He's like hey. I am not going to let you go until you bless me. And so he. He eventually wins the wrestling match. The angel blesses him. And then jacob has to go meet his brother. There's whole back did this to me his brother and as he's going to meet his brother he's limping like crazy. And so even though the angels blessed and basically god putting his hand on him and saying hey like i you know i i love you. I approve of what you're doing. You know i'm blessing right now. Even though god did that he didn't heal him completely soup but jacob still had to keep moving and he had to walk wounded. Right into put in real world speak is like yeah. You can have blessings you can have all these great things in life you can have money. Houses cars land lakes pools vacation homes. But that doesn't mean you're not going to have wounds right from other people from yourself from life itself. Ptsd is usually a a life itself kind of thing so what you gotta keep walking for. Sure for sure so what's another takeaway back to. What we're saying is be patient and educate yourself. If you want to help your spouse or even yourself like okay like read just read read. How other people are doing it and that have been successful and and see how it actually manifests in your own life. Because just saying it's ptsd. I bet there some other things surrounding it that maybe you don't even know. And so educate yourself and be patient with yourself and your spouse if it's your spouse right right and somebody said this is another great takeaway. Here is give your spouse space if your spouse was the one who has the. Ptsd right give them the space they need. I will say that with the caveat if you believe. They are in danger of hurting themselves. Get the appropriate help. Absolutely this is not the your spouse said. Hey i'm gonna take my own life and then you say okay one. That's giving them space. No no no. That's not a time when you need to give them space. That's a time when there needs to be an intervention right. You know so when we're talking to give give your spouse space. it's you patricia. Saying yeah take your dog for hike. Its ninety degrees. go ahead. i'm not with you. I'll be in the pool right. Yeah right yeah gopher run go go do something to to just relax to take that. Take the edge off so to speak. Then so give your spouse space. I think is a really really great takeaway there so anything else any other takeaways. We should share with our audience today. I don't know. I think we've covered it. I mean just to walk wounded. Hold their hand while they're walking did. Oh may that's the that'll pre treat there. that's good. That is so good well patricia again. So much for coming on the show really really appreciate. I know you didn't feel great today but you muscled through it and i'm so so glad you did. I know our listeners grew be happy as well and obviously on this show. We ask a lot of questions that we do our best to answer a lot of questions and we all have a lot of questions but the most important question we can ask ourselves is this. Have i accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith. In jesus christ will thank you so much for listening. Be sure to follow social media. Facebook occurred to fight again. Same thing on instagram and twitter ad courage again. You can pick up. A copy of my book resolve at courage to defied again dot com or also on amazon. It has been such a pleasure sharing our hearts in this conversation with you today until next time. Thanks for listening.

Ptsd Depression Patricia Erin Perkins Depression Anxiety Ptsd Anxiety Veteran Futterman Army Us Army Jacob Bankrate.Com Tricia Wrestling Alabama Depression Depression Marco Jacobs Jacobs
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Offer's expired November 30th Arizona's morning news, the Valleys on Lee All news morning show. It's 7 23 and for Jamie West Good morning. I'm Peter. Same or looks like the sun is coming out, but it's covered by mostly cloudy skies over the valley. We've got 58 Degrees and Paradise Valley 53 Buckeye, and then we've got 55 Gilbert Phoenix Clinicians are learning a new rapid treatment for trauma, PTSD anxiety and more accelerated resolution therapy. Art, for short is a psychotherapy that Phoenix clinicians are now using to help treat phobias and mental health conditions were able to target specific memories and the parts of the memory that trigger these trauma response is yes, Tiffany Johnson. Which is a treatment inclinations and says it's especially helpful during the pandemic. Since art provides those dealing with trauma anxiety from Cove, it was strong, emotional and physical relief in as little as one session, he barreled Dominion. Katie Our NEWS Arizona Vote America to county supervisors certify that there was no fraud as they certified the general election results, County elections co director Scott Jared says. Record crowds of party representatives watch tabulation and even tested equipment well before the election and independent assessment to confirm that the software had not been changed throughout the process and that the ballots that were run through on October 6 the results that were tabulated from that match, the results that were tabulated we can have after the election, a near record 2.1 million County voters cast ballots. About 8500 of them left President Blank. Katie, our eyes on the economy want to shop safely and shop local during the pandemic. That's thanks to the shop pairs in a marketplace a one of a kind. E commerce website showcasing items for more than 50 local vendors across the state local first Arizona is putting it on and says in a press release that it's an all in one place, making it easier than ever to shop local and keep dollars an easy, the organization says it's been a long time goal to create an online marketplace to go along.

Gilbert Phoenix Clinicians Arizona Jamie West Katie Paradise Valley Buckeye Tiffany Johnson Scott Jared President fraud director
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

14:00 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"Enormous amount of literature has come around over the last thirty or forty years especially especially to show that without a doubt touch is changing the milieu of the way that our nervous system. `Haves thank you. You enjoyed researching gene. As you've said this chronic sort of stress response that People experiencing affects the whole person. As you said this I think help take you to Western psychiatric Gatwick Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Could you briefly talk about your decision to go into psychiatry and you really seem to focus on treatment of resistant. Mental illness mental illness. Where re treatment was difficult? Yes when I was focused on studying resilience in chronic stress in my ip Hda realized that probably about three years in that. I well as much as I enjoyed working on these. These mechanisms the cellular and molecular level. I very much enjoyed exploring this with patients and on the whole person. Level because stresses so many so much more multidimensional than it is in for people then for cells and even if I can fix their sells their emotions may still be just regulated related. So good am I doing so. I started exploring other ways to do that. And the thing that always caught. My eye was treatment resistant mental illness. Because if you really look at the at the literature her that's coming out the epidemiologic literature that looks at how populations are responding to illness. You know we see that more and more people diagnosed with depression. PTSD ANXIETY DISORDERS OCD schizophrenia particularly mental illness. But then also stemming into things like chronic pain and insomnia more and more of these people percentage wise are being diagnosed as is treatment resistant every year and treatment resistant. Means that you've tried at least two gold standard of care treatments and not achieved sufficient symptom. Remission where you're still still symptomatic even though you've tried to at least two things that the doctors told you most of the people that I see in my practice Have tried several different things sometimes more than ten different interventions full courses of intervention and not had relief and What was really interesting? was that when I asked them. I said you know. I know that you don't feel the medicines are helping you. What helps you? And they said things like music and touch right so they it all comes back to this fundamental thing these natural ways for people to to induce safety in their in their bodies and so ultimately that that led to my work at Western psych. Where I was studying actually was able to put these theories to the test and in the lab we could expose people to different touch sensations using electricity vibration and put them in stressful conditions? And see are we changing your body with different forms of touch. Are we changing your body with different stimuli to the skin not not only help you say you feel more calm but also help you perform better under stress and recover better from stress. I wonder if This accounts for some of the positive benefits associated. It was massage absolutely and that was a massage. Was something that I that I looked at quite a bit when I was building the foundation. For this for this work I can imagine i. I read a paper about massage elevating oxytocin as well. It makes sense an lymphatic STU. I'm sure So Dave while at Western you began doing research with Gregg Segel. Can you talk a little bit about this research and how it leads you to become serious about studying consciousness and altered states of consciousness and also that potential -ties these altered states to facilitate healing. Yes that was a really big turning point for me in my in my training because up until that point I had worked with scientists who had been for the most part very traditionally reminded greg was very open minded and in is very open minded and always encouraged me to to look into any literature that I wanted any body of research as long as it. It was legitimate good quality research that I could pull in. If it helped inform my thought process of the development of experiments or studies. I was allowed to bring that into the lab. And that really was a empowering opportunity for me and I started looking at the common ground between touch sensations and other sensations like music different frequencies at music and why they weren't and I started asking my patients and I said you know why is it that these things actually work for you. And of course at that time I'm always seeing patients in my residency at Western psych and and I've seen a lot of patients who are treatment resistant usually with depression. PTSD anxiety disorders. They all almost invariably I believe the same thing which is that. I use these things because they make me feel safe in the regular my regular day to day life and that safety word really resonated with me and stood out because has safety and a lot of ways is the opposite of this sympathetic fight or flight fear or threat response that I seem to be observing in my patients clinically and also in their the metrics looking at their heart rate and their vitals. You know we saw these correlates. That were the opposite of safety and they are saying that they feel better when they do things that help them feel safe. And and so I started looking at other other techniques that induced this radical sense of safety seem to correlate with profound healing. And so thanks to Greg's open-mindedness I pulled in a lot of research from the field of PSYCHEDELIC assisted psychotherapy which included at the time using MD.. which is the a methamphetamine derivative? Actually comes from Sassafras grass that is currently the leading pharmacological treatment for PTSD since phase. Three trials with the FDA right now in one hundred subjects and has shown greater promise for retreating ptsd than any medicine that we've ever had what was really fascinating about that. was that the way that it seems to work. And now since then I've now received my md May Psychotherapy training through the maps protocol. which is what's used in the clinical trial and I've seen firsthand that the way that this treatment works it works by I providing a sense of radical safety radical self acceptance non judgment? To the patient that is facilitated by the therapists in the experience and it's an lengthy experienced eight hours hours and the two therapists create the safe experience. It's augmented by medicine. That capitalizes a change. Response in the individual by dramatically enhancing the sense of safety and and similarly we saw something. We saw something very similar to that with the Civil Sivan studies that were being used for people with treatment resistant. Depression in England at the Imperial College Group with David and Robin Robin Card Harris and so looking at that work and seeing how those medicines were inducing with just one two three doses an impact that was changing people who had treatment resistant illness. Four years. Five years out with PTSD steady sixty seven percent of people are symptom free or no longer meeting criteria for PTSD. That's pretty miraculous. And it's all all believed to be through the safety pathway through really training people to open this safety pathway and learn how to generate their own safety and so that spurred a lot of the research that I did with Gregg ragging figuring out how to create frequencies that we could deliver to the body that could replicate that experience. MDA's been shown to facilitate as we mentioned earlier. Their the release of Oxytocin and is everyone knows this hormones involved in associated with mother child bonding but also involved in much else. oxytocin seems to increase the levels of empathy and closeness and damp in fear related della activity and this causes a decrease in stress response ascended decrease in social anxiety so in addition to ptsd which it seems remarkably effective in that instance. Can you talk about the potential of 'EM MDA to be used in the treatment of other disorders. y'All think there's a huge potential for MD MA in other illnesses is an other chronic disorders. Where there is this imbalance in The autonomic nervous system or there's an imbalance between the stress response nervous system and the recovery response on system and people don't feel safe similarly. I think we don't. We don't necessarily understand yet. How much mental illnesses mental illness is due to trauma? We attribute attribute a lot of it to to you know we call it. PTSD when there's known trauma that can be identified. But I think in a lot of cases who we see. Is that a lot of mental illness on this actually stems from one or multiple traumatic experiences over time and it may even stem back into ancestral trauma. which is particularly really interesting because we know now that trauma causes changes to gene expression that are inherited over time and so empty may in the way that it works? Like you said with oxytocin to be able to facilitate. Bonding is critical. When we're talking about the ability to build and form meaningful relationships with one another without fear without Oh judgment and that actually lead to constructive outcomes whether it's with family or with friends or partners or community you know one of the things that people are talking about for instance an MBA is to be used for people in the? I know there's a little off topic. But but similarly in the Israeli Palestinian crisis you know people are using WASCO WASCO MBA May to facilitate bonding experiences. Between people who normally couldn't see eye to eye traditionally in the path of MBA. Before it was it became a substance of of recreational abuse use in the eighties. It was actually used for couples therapy for people who just couldn't see eye to eye in their relationship and it had dramatic results and so now it's being tested in kids with autism doesn't with Charles grow but UCLA and It's gradually working. Its way into other groups I think clinical trial for alcohol dependence that's starting up with MGM as well. And so. I think there's a lot of potential for this medicine but also for the way that it shows us how the brain works right burst activity of Serotonin helps us build more meaningful experiences by helping us feel safe enough to interpret those meaningful experiences. Mba helps facilitate that by creating this burst. Activation at the five t to a serotonin receptor in the the emotional cortex which leads to like. You said the increase in empathy and introspection or looking inside ourselves feeling the body interception and then also also leads to this downstream secretion of oxytocin. And all these other bonding and relationship based Nurr transmitters. Do you see a elevation or improvement in Heart Rate Berry ability post md.. That's a great question and I don't think it has been assessed effectively enough for me to give you an answer from the literature. I think that that is a great question though because patients with PTSD particularly are known to have a low heart rate variability. And so. I think that you know looking into the future of how some of these studies will be done. In larger populations we will have an opportunity to measure variability before and after particularly using wearables and see how it changes over time up until this point particularly for the folks doing those studies. It wasn't a priority for them because they didn't realize the importance of hurry. Variability will be interesting to know Made me think that Might be the cases. It elevates choksi toasts in we discussed OXYTOCIN intranasaly elevates heart rate -bility. That's fascinating SEDAV. You're part of the world's largest controlled. Studies psychedelic medicines and these medicines such as LSD IN MD and even Solo Siobhan which comes from mushrooms. We're used to treat mental and emotional trauma especially from the nineteen fifties to the seventies Wendy's but there were abuses during this time and the US as well as research on PSYCHEDELIC. Medicines in this country was essentially shut down. So now there's renewed interest particularly as a consequence sequence of the study. That you're involved with SA- can you give us a little bit of background about the different PSYCHEDELIC medicines and the study itself. Sure so so. The main psychedelic medicines. That and PSYCHEDELIC. I think it's important to note the word means mind manifesting. It doesn't mean crazy seventies dance party So Oh you know this this word is is. It's very important to understand the way we use. The language described these medicines because mind. Manifesting is literally the goal of what you take Out of any psychedelic experience whether it's with suicide dinner. LSD MDA ORION WASCO or any of these others would it does. It helps reveal and very much from a combination Asian of a Freudian and a young and understanding of psychology. It helps reveal parts of our subconscious. That may have been not disclose to us. We might have forgotten about for a long period of time time so that we can understand and learn from our subconscious and manifest what we want from that in our in our reality in our conscious experience. I I say that because that is a characteristic of all psychedelic medicines whether it's MD.. Ama Syl Simon or Iowa the those are the three main medicines that we're studying in in our study with maps and with Yale and Mount Sinai and USC. But also what's very interesting about these. Medicines is is that traditionally if you go back you know five ten thousand years into ancient tribal culture. We see that suicide and mushrooms and Iowa have actually been used used for treating trauma that and that's actually the way the native the native people describe it. They describe the ceremony and the what they they actually call it. Emotional channel blocks their energy energetic blocks that they they feel are blocking us from achieving our full human potential and they call those blocks trauma and that when they work with the medicine to relieve those blocks from our energy that we are more able to manifest our goals and to achieve our human potential. And so I think that is sort of where all of this comes from originally only which is really important take into account because MD may use in the setting of PTSD with two therapists for eight hours in large part is like a modern tribal ceremony with this less people and a curated space with a couch and a bed instead of a tent or shack and the jungle but either way you have a ceremony is in some ways curated intentionally by the therapists. Who are there to create this foundation of safety that helps you feel like whatever comes up during that experience you can work on on and work through and I think being somebody who's always wondered about this kind of thing and how do these states work why are they also similar? Why do people who experience? MDA to treat trauma in one two three doses have similar outcomes to people who use Iowa Osco or sill Sivan or LSD..

PTSD oxytocin MDA Depression LSD MD Western psychiatric Gatwick In Western psych Gregg Segel greg MD MA Iowa Ama Syl Simon MGM SA Dave University of Pittsburgh Medic
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

13:54 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"Enormous amount of literature has come around over the last thirty or forty years especially especially to show that without a doubt touch is changing the milieu of the way that our nervous system. `Haves thank you. You enjoyed researching gene. As you've said this chronic sort of stress response that People experiencing affects the whole person. As you said this I think help take you to Western psychiatric Gatwick Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Could you briefly talk about your decision to go into psychiatry and you really seem to focus on treatment of resistant. Mental illness mental illness. Where re treatment was difficult? Yes when I was focused on studying resilience in chronic stress in my ip Hda realized that probably about three years in that. I well as much as I enjoyed working on these. These mechanisms the cellular and molecular level. I very much enjoyed exploring this with patients and on the whole person. Level because stresses so many so much more multidimensional than it is in for people then for cells and even if I can fix their sells their emotions may still be just regulated related. So good am I doing so. I started exploring other ways to do that. And the thing that always caught. My eye was treatment resistant mental illness. Because if you really look at the at the literature her that's coming out the epidemiologic literature that looks at how populations are responding to illness. You know we see that more and more people diagnosed with depression. PTSD ANXIETY DISORDERS OCD schizophrenia particularly mental illness. But then also stemming into things like chronic pain and insomnia more and more of these people percentage wise are being diagnosed as is treatment resistant every year and treatment resistant. Means that you've tried at least two gold standard of care treatments and not achieved sufficient symptom. Remission where you're still still symptomatic even though you've tried to at least two things that the doctors told you most of the people that I see in my practice Have tried several different things sometimes more than ten different interventions full courses of intervention and not had relief and What was really interesting? was that when I asked them. I said you know. I know that you don't feel the medicines are helping you. What helps you? And they said things like music and touch right so they it all comes back to this fundamental thing these natural ways for people to to induce safety in their in their bodies and so ultimately that that led to my work at Western psych. Where I was studying actually was able to put these theories to the test and in the lab we could expose people to different touch sensations and using electricity vibration and put them in stressful conditions? And see are we changing your body with different forms of touch. Are we changing your body with different stimuli to the skin not not only help you say you feel more calm but also help you perform better under stress and recover better from stress. I wonder if This accounts for some of the positive benefits associated. Ah massage absolutely and that was in. The Sasha was something that I that I looked at quite a bit when I was building the foundation. For this for this work I can imagine i. I read a paper about massage elevating oxytocin as well. It makes sense an lymphatic STU. I'm sure So Dave while at Western you began doing research with Gregg Segel. Can you talk a little bit about this research and how it leads you to become serious about studying consciousness and altered states of consciousness and also that potential -ties these altered states to facilitate healing. Yes that was a really big turning point for me in my in my training because up until that point I had worked with scientists who had been for the most part very traditionally reminded greg was very open minded and an is very open minded and always encouraged me to to look into any literature that I wanted any body of research as long as it. It was legitimate good quality research that I could pull in. If it helped inform my thought process of the development of experiments or studies. I was allowed to bring that into the lab. And that really was a empowering opportunity for me and I started looking at the common ground between touch sensations and other sensations like music different frequencies at music and why they weren't and I started asking my patients and I said you know why is it that these things actually work for you. And of course at that time I'm always seeing patients in my residency at Western psych and and I've seen a lot of patients who are treatment resistant usually with depression. PTSD anxiety disorders. They all almost invariably I believe the same thing which is that. I use these things because they make me feel safe in the regular my regular day to day life and that safety word really resonated with me and stood out because has safety and a lot of ways is the opposite of this sympathetic fight or flight fear or threat response that I seem to be observing in my patients clinically and also in their the metrics looking at their heart rate and their vitals. You know we saw these correlates. That were the opposite of safety and they are saying that they feel better when they do things that help them feel safe. And and so I started looking at other other techniques that induced this radical sense of safety seem to correlate with profound healing. And so thanks to Greg's open-mindedness I pulled in a lot of research from the field of PSYCHEDELIC assisted psychotherapy which included at the time using MD.. which is the a methamphetamine derivative? Actually comes from Sassafras grass that is currently the leading pharmacological treatment for PTSD since phase. Three trials with the FDA right now in one hundred subjects and has shown greater promise for retreating ptsd than any medicine that we've ever had what was really fascinating about that. was that the way that it seems to work. And now since then I've now received my md May Psychotherapy training through the maps protocol. which is what's used in the clinical trial and I've seen firsthand that the way that this treatment works it works by I providing a sense of radical safety radical self acceptance non judgment? To the patient that is facilitated by the therapists in the experience and it's an lengthy experienced eight hours hours and the two therapists create the safe experience. It's augmented by medicine. That capitalizes a change. Response in the individual by dramatically enhancing the sense of safety and and similarly we saw something. We saw something very similar to that with the Civil Sivan studies that were being used for people with treatment resistant. Depression in England at the Imperial College Group with David and Robin Robin Card Harris and so looking at that work and seeing how those medicines were inducing with just one two three doses an impact that was changing people who had treatment resistant illness. Four years. Five years out with PTSD steady sixty seven percent of people are symptom free or no longer meeting criteria for PTSD. That's pretty miraculous. And it's all all believed to be through the safety pathway through really training people to open this safety pathway and learn how to generate their own safety and so that spurred a lot of the research that I did with Gregg ragging figuring out how to create frequencies that we could deliver to the body that could replicate that experience. MDA's been shown to facilitate as we mentioned earlier. Their the release of Oxytocin and is everyone knows this hormones involved in associated with mother child bonding but also involved in much else. oxytocin seems to increase the levels of empathy and closeness and damp in fear related della activity and this causes a decrease in stress response ascended decrease in social anxiety so in addition to ptsd which it seems remarkably effective in that instance. Can you talk about the potential of 'em. MDA to be used in the treatment of other disorders. I think there's a huge potential for MD MA in other illnesses is an other chronic disorders. Where there is this imbalance in The autonomic nervous system or there's an imbalance between the stress response nervous system and the recovery response on system and people don't feel safe similarly. I think we don't. We don't necessarily understand yet. How much mental illnesses mental illness is due to trauma? We attribute attribute a lot of it to to you know we call it. PTSD when there's known trauma that can be identified. But I think in a lot of cases who we see. Is that a lot of mental illness on this actually stems from one or multiple traumatic experiences over time and it may even stem back into ancestral trauma. which is particularly really interesting because we know now that trauma causes changes to gene expression that are inherited over time and so empty may in the way that it works? Like you said with oxytocin to be able to facilitate. Bonding is critical. When we're talking about the ability to build and form meaningful relationships with one another without fear without Oh judgment and that actually lead to constructive outcomes whether it's with family or with friends or partners or community you know one of the things that people are talking about for instance in its potential? MDA is to be used for people in the. I know there's a little off topic. But but similarly in the Israeli Palestinian crisis you know people are using WASCO ALASKA MBA May to facilitate bonding experiences. Between people who normally couldn't see eye to eye traditionally in the path of MBA. Before it was it became a substance of of recreational abuse use in the eighties. It was actually used for couples therapy for people who just couldn't see eye to eye in their relationship and it had dramatic results and so now it's being tested in kids with autism doesn't with Charles grow but UCLA and It's gradually working. Its way into other groups I think clinical trial for alcohol dependence that's starting up with MGM as well. And so. I think there's a lot of potential for this medicine but also for the way that it shows us how the brain works right burst activity of Serotonin helps us build more meaningful experiences by helping us feel safe enough to interpret those meaningful experiences. Mba helps facilitate that by creating this burst. Activation at the five t to a serotonin receptor in the the emotional cortex which leads to like. You said the increase in empathy and introspection or looking inside ourselves feeling the body interception and then also also leads to this downstream secretion of oxytocin. And all these other bonding and relationship based Nurr transmitters. Do you see a elevation or improvement in Heart Rate Berry ability post md.. That's a great question and I don't think it has been assessed effectively enough for me to give you an answer from the literature. I think that that is a great question though because patients with PTSD particularly are known to have a low heart rate variability. And so. I think that you know looking into the future of how some of these studies will be done. In larger populations we will have an opportunity to measure variability before and after particularly using wearables and see how it changes over time up until this point particularly for the folks doing those studies. It wasn't a priority for them because they didn't realize the importance of hurry. Variability will be interesting to know Made me think that Might be the cases. It elevates choksi toasts in we discussed OXYTOCIN intranasaly elevates heart rate -bility. That's fascinating SEDAV. You're part of the world's largest controlled. Studies psychedelic medicines and these medicines such as LSD IN MD and even Solo Siobhan which comes from mushrooms. We're used to treat mental and emotional trauma especially from the nineteen fifties to the seventies Wendy's but there were abuses during this time and the US as well as research on PSYCHEDELIC. Medicines in this country was essentially shut down. So now there's renewed interest particularly as a consequence sequence of the study. That you're involved with SA- can you give us a little bit of background about the different PSYCHEDELIC medicines and the study itself. Sure so so. The main psychedelic medicines. That and PSYCHEDELIC. I think it's important to note the word means mind manifesting. It doesn't mean crazy seventies dance party So Oh you know this this word is is. It's very important to understand the way we use. The language described these medicines because mind. Manifesting is literally the goal of what you take Out of any psychedelic experience whether it's with suicide dinner. LSD MDA ORION WASCO or any of these others would it does. It helps reveal and very much from a combination Asian of a Freudian and a young and understanding of psychology. It helps reveal parts of our subconscious. That may have been not disclose to us. We might have forgotten about for a long period of time time so that we can understand and learn from our subconscious and manifest what we want from that in our in our reality in our conscious experience. I I say that because that is a characteristic of all psychedelic medicines whether it's MD.. Ama Syl Simon or Iowa the those are the three main medicines that we're studying in in our study with maps and with Yale and Mount Sinai and USC. But also what's very interesting about these. Medicines is is that traditionally if you go back you know five ten thousand years into ancient tribal culture. We see that suicide and mushrooms and Iowa have actually been used used for treating trauma that and that's actually the way the native the native people describe it. They describe the ceremony and the what they they actually call it. Emotional channel blocks their energy energetic blocks that they they feel are blocking us from achieving our full human potential and they call those blocks trauma and that when they work with the medicine to relieve those blocks from our energy that we are more able to manifest our goals and to achieve our human potential. And so I think that is sort of where all of this comes from originally only which is really important take into account because MD may use in the setting of PTSD with two therapists for eight hours in large part is like a modern tribal ceremony with this less people and a curated space with a couch and a bed instead of a tent or shack and the jungle but either way you have a ceremony is in some ways curated intentionally by the therapists. Who are there to create this foundation of safety that helps you feel like whatever comes up during that experience you can work on on and work through and I think being somebody who's always wondered about this kind of thing and.

PTSD oxytocin MDA Depression MD Western psychiatric Gatwick In Western psych Gregg Segel greg LSD MD MA Ama Syl Simon MGM Sasha Iowa SA Dave
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Too can be a stressor for most people but can Duckworth medical director for the National Alliance on mental illness says people with severe mental illnesses are hit harder than most the summertime heat waves are risk for people with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia schizoaffective disorder and bipolar one of the main reasons is medication drugs used to manage severe mental illnesses can have dangerous side effects in the heat like dehydration or heat stroke they reduce your body's ability to modulate temperature for Andreae Landry brown the side effects hit hard when she was living in California on one particularly hot summer day she says it got up to a hundred and ten degrees she was driving with her kids in the backseat when she started hallucinating I'm driving down the street and I literally saw people walking in front of my car it was a side effect of the medication she took for PTSD anxiety and bipolar disorder she been sensitive to medications in the past but she thinks the heat center over the edge he would just make it worse whatever the side effects were it was just that much worse NPR and the university of Maryland's Howard centered looked at connections between heat and health in Baltimore the Howard center analyzed emergency response data from the summer of two thousand eighteen and found that calls for psychiatric conditions increased by nearly forty percent when the heat index spiked over a hundred and three. Baltimore crisis response and receives hundreds of calls every day he sat kind of systems are you currently listening here we says their founding executive director at your weekends says although many of their patients experience mental illness.

Andreae Landry Baltimore schizoaffective disorder Howard Howard center medical director Duckworth PTSD executive director National Alliance university of Maryland NPR California forty percent ten degrees
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can be a stressor for most people but can Duckworth medical director for the National Alliance on mental illness says people with severe mental illnesses are hit harder than most the summertime heat waves are risk for people with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia schizoaffective disorder and bipolar one of the main reasons is medication drugs used to manage severe mental illnesses can have dangerous side effects in the heat like dehydration or heat stroke they reduce your body's ability to modulate temperature for Andreae Landry brown the side effects hit hard when she was living in California on one particularly hot summer day she says it got up to a hundred and ten degrees she was driving with her kids in the backseat when she started hallucinating I'm driving down the street and I literally saw people walking in front of my car it was a side effect of the medication she took for PTSD anxiety and bipolar disorder she been sensitive to medications in the past but she thinks the heat center over the edge he would just make it worse whatever the side effects were it was just that much worse NPR and the university of Maryland's Howard center the tech connections between heat and health in Baltimore the Howard center analyzed emergency response data from the summer of two thousand eighteen and found that calls for psychiatric conditions increased by nearly forty percent when the heat index spiked over a hundred and three. Baltimore crisis response Inc received hundreds of calls every day he sat had sometimes are you currently listening here we says their founding executive director Edgar weekends says although many of their patients experience mental illness.

Andreae Landry Howard center schizoaffective disorder Baltimore Duckworth medical director PTSD university of Maryland National Alliance executive director response Inc NPR California Edgar forty percent ten degrees
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Be a stressor for most people but can Duckworth medical director for the National Alliance on mental illness says people with severe mental illnesses are hit harder than most the summertime heat waves are risk for people with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia schizoaffective disorder and bipolar one of the main reasons is medication drugs used to manage severe mental illnesses can have dangerous side effects in the heat like dehydration or heat stroke they reduce your body's ability to modulate temperature for Andrea Landry brown the side effects hit hard when she was living in California on one particularly hot summer day she says it got up to a hundred and ten degrees she was driving with her kids in the backseat when she started hallucinating I'm driving down the street and I literally saw people walking in front of my car it was a side effect of the medication she took for PTSD anxiety and bipolar disorder she been sensitive to medications in the past but he thinks the heat center over the edge he would just make it worse whatever the side effects were it was just that much worse NPR and the university of Maryland's Howard centered looked at connections between heat and health in Baltimore the Howard center analyzed emergency response data from the summer of two thousand eighteen and found that calls for psychiatric conditions increased by nearly forty percent when the heat index spiked over a hundred and three. Baltimore crisis response and receives hundreds of calls every day he sat has so you currently listening here we says their founding executive director Edgar weekends says although many of their patients experience mental illness.

Andrea Landry schizoaffective disorder Baltimore Howard center Duckworth medical director Howard PTSD university of Maryland National Alliance NPR executive director California Edgar forty percent ten degrees
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KCRW

"Too can be a stressor for most people but can Duckworth medical director for the National Alliance on mental illness says people with severe mental illnesses are hit harder than most the summertime heat waves are risk for people with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia schizoaffective disorder and bipolar one of the main reasons is medication drugs used to manage severe mental illnesses can have dangerous side effects in the heat like dehydration or heat stroke they reduce your body's ability to modulate temperature for Andreae Landry brown the side effects hit hard when she was living in California on one particularly hot summer day she says it got up to a hundred and ten degrees she was driving with her kids in the backseat when she started hallucinating I'm driving down the street and I literally saw people walking in front of my car it was a side effect of the medication she took for PTSD anxiety and bipolar disorder she been sensitive to medications in the past but he thinks the heat center over the edge he would just make it worse whatever the side effects were it was just that much worse NPR and the university of Maryland's Howard centered looked at connections between heat and health in Baltimore the Howard center analyzed emergency response data from the summer of two thousand eighteen and found that calls for psychiatric conditions increased by nearly forty percent when the heat index spiked over a hundred and three. Baltimore crisis response Inc receives hundreds of calls every day he sat had are you currently listening here we says their founding executive director Edgar weekends says although many of their patients experience mental illness.

Andreae Landry schizoaffective disorder Baltimore Howard center Howard Duckworth medical director PTSD university of Maryland National Alliance executive director response Inc NPR California Edgar forty percent ten degrees
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Yeah i'm like i'm also a little ptsd anxiety from my last relationship 'cause like every day it felt like when we're together i felt like stressed like something bad's gonna happen right or nothing else 'perfect arose like all her fault of something but i just felt like anxious all the time that she felt the same thing right man i just feel like gosh i'm like if something happened bad in the future like i don't know well you're you're sticking yeah i'm so used to the mike this is unbelievable leave a ball and it makes me emotional just like when i talk 'cause i'm like i've never felt so much love and my security is what surviving she super business oriented like what's very she's you probably where she's got a movie coming out next month she does tv show five days a week and then she just theater six times a weekend so she has no days off literally just a shelf somewhere everyday and you guys are on the same page i mean she's she's very independent in got her on saying she makes her own money she just bought her mama house last month she's like giving a caring and she doesn't need any me for me that's the bass she's got she's had every major slyke latin popstar billionaire offer planes and this and that and taking all the world she's not into any of that you know and so she doesn't need it she could have easily and that's what i really appreciate about her she's just like i know we've raised light mathon hashing it latino but she's also telling you man super calm and loving and a great listener somebody saturday's drawing women it's weird i've never been but i've also when i broke up with my a when we broke up last year i had like a month and a half was reflecting on my whole life was like okay who all the women that have been with and what do they have in common and i realized wow i've never asked myself this i've always kind of repeated the pattern of kind of dating the same girls and i don't even know why widely all break horribly you know they all end horribly end i had a moment was like oh my gosh they all were super beautiful to me i was very attracted him sexually they all had some type of talent a gift that is different then the person for like mullah's the doctor most tarver dancer a singer is like oh it's like a thing.

tarver five days
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Thirty five team signed up for for tournament. That's the thing it's so unfortunate. But everyone listening right now either is related to or know someone who committed suicide, and that's why it needs to be talked about. I remember in high school. There was someone that took their own life. It was. You didn't hear about it. Everybody kind of brushed it under the rug. And then I feel no one talked about it. So no one got help. Right. Absolutely. And I think one thing that's unique about this tournament. Is if I rewind the tape a little bit is, you know, the first year of the tournament, it was just kind of a memorial tournament right after that is, when we stabbed the vineyard foundation, and we realized that we could actually use this as a platform to do just that to make to bring out the awareness and, and bring out. You know, the fact that yeah. We, we lost Jake to suicide. But we have the opportunity now to raise the awareness to talk to the kids to talk to the coaches, which is phenomenal. Just from receptive standpoint, the support and the comments that we receive after the tournament, I'll get emails or text messages from players coaches parents, that participated in the tournament and just said, we need more of these, we need this topic talked about you're not the first person that I've heard used the phrase we need to raise awareness, and we do. But let's get specific with that. What is the awareness? We all know that suicide exists in it's horrible. But what, what should the awareness, be of signs to watch foreign people what do you think it should be? Absolutely. And I talked to this one thing that's unique about this tournament. Is I, I have a chance or my wife or our family has a chance to talk to so many people one of the coolest things is we, we after an elimination game for team. I'll try to talk to as many teams as I can. And I'll talk to the, the signs that things to look for, you know, everybody will associate suicide with depression, PTSD anxiety, stuff like that. And I've learned not everybody that has depression, PTSD, anxiety will die by suicide, everybody that died by suicide note may not necessarily have depression, PTSD, you see the signs in school kids, with bullying and the exclusion, getting worse day by.

depression PTSD Jake
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"I'm Scott Peterson on this anniversary of the parkland, Florida shootings, which left seventeen dead local gun reform advocates are at the Minnesota state capitol calling on lawmakers to act Muna Gilbard goes to high school in Eden. Prairie and says I wish I could stop being so afraid, but no one can look me in the eyes and tell me that I'm safe at school, and that is terrifying. Democratic state lawmakers are proposing universal background checks in a red flag law this session, but Republican leadership have expressed opposition to the measures state. Lawmakers are considering next steps after today's legislative auditor's report detailing multiple causes for problems with the state's troubled vehicle licensing and registration system. Or men. Lars, we asked Republican Representative Paul Torkelsson from hands about prospects for fully fixing the system in a reasonable amount of time. My confidence level is not very high. We've had a long history of disappointment here. I'm looking for better results. But a very cautious and frankly, a little bit pessimistic governor, Tim, walls and state Senator John Dzerzhinsky are in Fairbault today. Seeing firsthand how specialty license plate transfers are working in men. Lars, there were serious problems with that function in the past. And the Minnesota department of corrections is being sued by a parolee who was denied the right to use medical marijuana. The lawsuit filed by Daryl Schmidt of chaska alleges his probation officer unlawfully prevented him from taking his prescription for PTSD, anxiety and depression. This is an. Have you ever wanted to speak another language whether you want to speak Spanish, French or German? Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons can get you. Speaking confidently in your new language within weeks. I just started learning Spanish with babble in. It's really helping you my pronunciation Cuomo Cuomo. Did on the this. They don't they Edis. Got it. I'm amazed though confidently. I speak Spanish now. I wish I tried babble sooner. Babbel's award-winning technology gets he's speaking right away. And best of all. You'll remember what you've learned. No wonder babble is the number one selling language learning app in Europe. Try for yourself and see why babble.

Babbel Lars Cuomo Cuomo Muna Gilbard Daryl Schmidt Minnesota Scott Peterson Minnesota department of correc Prairie Eden Florida auditor Europe Senator John Dzerzhinsky PTSD chaska Edis Paul Torkelsson marijuana
"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:36 min | 3 years ago

"ptsd anxiety" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Five and twenty nine at the lakefront, I'm David Jennings in the WGN newsroom ready to join the conversation. Whenever a story changes on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN thinking big thoughts. So you don't have to. Here's John Williams. Fake out. John Williams out today. John Hansen in until three o'clock. So I want to get some things straight before we start the show today. We're awaiting the sentencing of one of the most hotly watched trials in Chicago the century, and that ruling could split the city, our longest serving most influential alderman facing corruption charges are executive branch of the federal government in a spitball fight with the legislative branch of the government's all this. Well, the government is shut down with no end in sight, at least a quarter shut down. The bears are done pulled residents of the United Center. Can't find a win. I got the cubs convention starting this weekend with a little controversy about a billionaire family isn't willing to spend a couple of million on some new players. The White Sox got an offer on one of the biggest free agents. They haven't heard anything back. But at least the sky, isn't falling. Well, wait falling from the sky ever. So shortly up to ten inches of snow, so happy Friday guess, but we are here to get you through it on WGN three one ninety one seventy two hundred. If you'd like to join the conversation, we're gonna start things right off with the big news story of the day at least here locally in Chicago. Of course, the sentencing sentencing trial for Jason Van Dyke, and we're gonna go to Eric run right now. Eric rung is on the line. And he's been covering the courthouse all day, Eric. Thanks so much for coming on this morning. You still there with us right now. Eric. Actually, we're gonna Stacey. Stacey you're on seven twenty WGN. Stacey Sinclair from the Chicago Tribune, I think Eric had to run back into the courtroom. Stacey. Can you hear me? Yeah. Thanks so much. Yeah. We had arrogant for a second to run away for a bit. But Stacey I wanted to ask you where we are kind of we've had some emotional testimony testimony so far today, and I wanted to ask you walk us through a couple of the witnesses prosecution. Witnesses have they've been bringing up in the sentencing trial. So so far there have been four witnesses called by the prosecution all of them filed complaints about away Jason Van Dyke treated him treated them while pulling them over for a minor traffic violation, and it has been really emotional these. They're all men has cried on the stand. It could be nervous. You know? It's very hard to be a witness case, no matter which side, you're on TV, though, the whole world hearing your story. I it's it's rough. I also wanted to ask you though. So obviously, these witnesses painting a not a great picture of officer Van Dyke alleging racist comments being made were any of these witnesses. Brought during the original trial. And that's because they're allegations have nothing to do with the shooting of a quantum McDonald? So they wouldn't have been allowed us witness says during during the phase of whether he was guilty or not 'cause McDonald's because you can bring in so called prior bad acts before sentencing sort of a broader picture of the prosecution started Jason Van Dyke is that the role they play right now. One of the men that they brought in was was arrested by Van Dyke for a DUI. And I noticed the defense attorneys trying to mention what was a how drunk were you? What was your blood alcohol content? One of the men has been taking many pills for PTSD anxiety things like that. And the defense attorneys talking about what was the PTSD really related to Van Dyke prayer have something that happened in the military is that the defense is. I mean, that's their. That's their goal right now is to try and just poke holes in the credibility of these witnesses, right? Right. And they're trying to they're doing it, though, very very gently there, but they're trying to show the judge that, you know, hey, you know, maybe more to this story that you realize, you know, nothing just black and white that kind of thing. So so yes, they did you know that the gentleman had the UI they said, but you did have a DUI you did get plead guilty to that. And you know, the gentleman with PSE they he did acknowledge that. Yes, I had been diagnosed PTSD because they're incident that happened when I was in the military, but I didn't have to start taking medication right PTSD until after my encounter with Jason Van Dyke. And that same gentlemen, talked about how he had what sounded very much like panic attack on his way to court this morning and had to take swing. Diety medication in order to get on the stand and his nerves and his exiled was so evident during his testimony. I mean, he was crying before he even said his name when he was called as a witness. It was hard to watch. Stacey wanted to bring you back to the testimony earlier in the day, the arguments back and forth, more legal in nature. This idea that the prosecution is trying to convince the judge that in fact, what does it aggravated battery with a firearm? Arm is worse than second degree murder. Walk us through why they are making that argument. Right. So it's not that they're just trying to convince the judge that is the way that the statute reads in Illinois that aggravated battery with firearm is a higher level felony Eleanor. Then second degree murder. You know, you, and I would probably more commonly referred to as manslaughter, right? And so they're saying you have to send him for the aggravated battery, which you know, carries a longer sentence. And also means he has to serve eighty five percent of the center. Right. It's mandatory. Right. Right. Right. And the defense wants him for the second degree murder. And that has a lesser, you know, impediment time, and it's a sticky percents therapy percent of your your sentence under second degree murder. That's why they want the second degree murder. Standard. And their argument was actually pretty thoughtful argument today, and it was that the jury found that in time that all the standards of first degree murder, which is what they had to do as president during traction at, but they found there was a circumstance that knocked it down to second degree. So they're saying he should be sentenced a second degree as being the the more significant primary crime. And with that the judge could rule as low as probation. He could rule as low as probation. I betting everything. Van Dyke will not get probation is you did the judge fire back with questions that might indicate which way he's leaning deciding pretty straightforward and just taking in what the arguments are and letting them play out. The long time. The veteran guy did not ask any questions. I am sure he has researched this topic for you know, ever since probably the verdict came down. I'm sure he knows what he's going to do. Both both sides wrote very long brief outlining their arguments early this week. And I showed the judge has read those as well. So he didn't really ask a lot of questions or or show his car to which way. He he is leaning. We're seeing another witness taking the stand now, and I'll let you get back to work Stacey. But I just want to know is there any indication how many more witnesses there will be do. We have any idea at all of when this might wrap up, and if we'll have a sentence by the end of the day. Everyone expected a sentence today. And I think that could still happen. But the defense is going to have a lot of witnesses. There have a lot of witnesses come antiquated Jason Van Dyke white and his daughter, and they will talk about his good qualities, and and the contributions he makes society tag on well into the snowstorm, right? Is there is there an German time or can can the judge extended? I mean, I imagine the the goal is not to go into the weekend, not knowing. But I mean, certainly, it could wait it could be. I mean, he he the judge can do whatever he wants. I the court is closed Martin Luther King day. Although he he could call a special hearing on that day. The judge is one of the hardest working judges it Cook County. So I think we could be here late into the evening. And he he's not one to. Yeah. You have to call the lunch break. He just he just constantly keeps everybody working. Well, Stacey admits that you're going to be doing your job a lot longer today. We appreciate you coming on here on WGN. Maybe we'll have a little later on if we get more updates. But thanks for your time. We appreciate it. Thank that Saint Clair from the Chicago Tribune quick commercial break, by the way, we're going to break this all down a little bit more with Lance north cut. He'll be coming in a little bit. Former could county prosecutor and law enforcement officer a partner right now. GW see that'll be coming up at one thirty. But I a commercial break. Karen, seven twenty WGN. Chicago.

Jason Van Dyke Stacey Sinclair WGN Chicago second degree murder Eric Jason Van Dyke white Chicago Tribune PTSD John Williams United Center cubs first degree murder officer White Sox John Hansen David Jennings executive Martin Luther King
Mel B clarifies she's not an alcoholic or sex addict but is still planning to get treatment for PTSD

Sean Hannity

01:17 min | 4 years ago

Mel B clarifies she's not an alcoholic or sex addict but is still planning to get treatment for PTSD

"Let's do a couple minutes on Melby. She saying now PTSD which suggests trauma. She's had some alcoholism? In there and now sex addiction she's gone for some form of treatment I I'm hoping it would be. A way for awhile, it sounds like even the constellation. Problems what are you saying there is a treatment center in, the UK that I know is, popular, for people to go to the, I don't recall it but it is a hospital, setting so, she sounds like. She, talked. About alcohol and sex addiction, but then, backpedals out and said really this is post traumatic stress disorder and you know likely at the root of all you know addiction is trauma yeah PTSD's anxiety disorder exactly it it's a consequence of drama. There is that something, clinic there in London I forget. The name of it but friends of mine have gone to, observe their treatment of alcoholism I, must, tell you this prehistoric and so, yeah though they claim great expertise they're not so, great and, in fact yelp? Reviews The fact that they're pushing her. Back towards. Trauma at this stage sort of. Misses the point yes dramas areas traumatized. Of but first you got to, treat the alcoholism and address this accident

Alcoholism Louis C. K. Ptsd Alex ISM Melby UK London New York Yelp Attorney Four Minutes