35 Burst results for "Psychosis"

"psychosis" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

02:39 min | Last month

"psychosis" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Whisper. I know what your name is. But it was like she. Things are really going wrong. You're listening to all in the mind. I'm sonic qatar. And today when giving birth leads to psychosis.

Dr Randall White: Hearing Voices

Look Again: Mental Illness Re-Examined

02:31 min | 2 months ago

Dr Randall White: Hearing Voices

"Today. I'm very happy to introduce you to dr randall. White doctor white is the medical director of community mental health in vancouver and the clinical director of the bbc's psychosis program at ub hospital. He is also a clinical professor of psychiatry. Ub and on the medical advisory board of the schizophrenia society and dr white is also being awarded the status of distinguished fellow by the american psychiatric association. This year randall. Welcome to look again so you know before we really get into things. I want to kick things off by sharing some thoughts from our panel. We're going to hear from some people with lived experience about what it's actually like to hear voices. So let's take a listen now. I have experienced auditory hallucinations and olfactory loose. The nation's physical hallucinations i don. I was in labor ban. That was very interesting to say. The least i need to say go to the hospital. My family were with me and they said is just a your imagination which i accepted and then old factory hallucinations where i smell things. I started hearing audio auditory loose nations again and actually work van hallucinations of actually one of the segue. And i don't know if you already know. And i don't feel like i've not to listen to this this nations so but yeah i did have them anyways just them so i went to the segue. Go put on where medicine do much better. Yeah there's really really anxious. When i checked myself were dr white. We just heard from people living with mental illness and the fact that many of them hear voices. but not all people with schizophrenia. hear voices in your clinical experience. How prevalent is this symptom. Hallucinations are one of the five main symptoms listed in the diagnostic manual. We use to diagnose schizophrenia. they're very common. But as you said. They're not universal. I would say that. Probably three quarters or more people with schizophrenia experience. At at some point it can be episodic so at a given time somebody with this diagnosis might not be having that. But then when they have relapsed to their muskets worse it may come

Dr White Dr Randall Ub Hospital Medical Advisory Board Of The American Psychiatric Associati Randall Vancouver BBC White Schizophrenia
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 4 months ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
Vampires in California? Of course. It's Richard Trenton Chase

Ominous Origins

05:48 min | 4 months ago

Vampires in California? Of course. It's Richard Trenton Chase

"At the risk of this podcast. Turning into a true crimeline. I felt the need to find a case. That was a both interesting to me in a realize sense but still holds an air of legend about it monsters. Don't just stocker nightmares. In fact the worst of them live right next door. Yeah think about that the next time loan at two. Am in your apartment. Your sorry nevertheless anybody who has listened to this cast for any length of time will know that i have a love for vampire lore and stories that mix with my recent really vigorous fascination for serial killers. It was only a matter of time. Before richard trenton jays popped back into my memory. He was a terrible man. Just a poor poor soul in all honesty and parts of his story might even make you feel a little sympathetic towards him. But don't they call him the vampire of sacramento for a reason but starting at the beginning chase was born on may twenty third nineteen fifty and by all accounts. He was raised in a very strict household. You know the tape. Some of you probably even lit belt. Beatings verbal assaults. The bar soap for dinner. That sort of stuff. I'd imagine. Richard went through as a child. It was through this abuse. And probably something that was already loosened his head that he began starting fires and torturing and killing small animals traits that were once thought to be the surefire sign of a psychopathic killer. As richard grew up and started the old dating cycle. He was never able to maintain a girlfriend and apparently he had a few in his pyu peasant years because he wasn't able to keep little richard up for very long all his girlfriend's eventually dumped him for it. Obviously this would be frustrating to a young man and surely all kinds of thoughts flew through his head. Maybe he was gay. Maybe he was afraid of being gay. I so many men in sixties must have felt when the problem persisted into his late teens. He decided he'd better go get his head checked out and so we met with the psychiatrist. Who told him to. Cause impotence likely stemmed from repressed anger and that he was likely suffering from a rather serious mental illness though he was not suggested to be committed likely suffering from mental illness and repressed anger. Look no shit sherlock. I mean how much this shrink actually knew about. His past has to play a role. When somebody like chase walks into your office. You should know almost right away that this guy is going to be bad news. It's not like he was had bundy not overly handsome charismatic. Not the type where once convicted people will be like. Oh no no rig. They'd be more like yeah that makes sense see. There are different types of serial killers out there. There's organized killers who plan stock and meticulously performed their kills to perfection and leave nearly nothing behind. That would have been ted bundy in his early years. Then you have. People like chase who fall into the disorganized killer portfolio there's sporadic they don't generally plan and there often messy yet. They're still difficult to catch due to the randomness of their crimes. I mean that's the barebones explanation of these types of killers but should be enough read understand the motives or lack thereof for chase's crimes which will get to shortly as chief ruled or. It was clear that he was becoming more and more unhinged. He moved out of his parents. House at one point and rapidly went through a number of roommates. It no not like that more like. They just couldn't stand him. He was odd to say the least and heavily involved in drugs hard drugs when he was stoned. He was paranoid actually. He was probably pretty paranoid when he wasn't stone to one report has it that he nailed his closet door shut because quote people were invading his space from in there and yeah clearly a mind that is not okay that that was just the start our boy. Your development do quite hypochondriac. He always thought something was wrong with him and he would pursue it until he was either cured or fixed or whatever. His mind told him was okay. There are reports of him entering the emergency room saying somebody had stolen his pulmonary artery and he was there to find them the person who stole the artery that is he claimed that bones were coming over the back of his head and that his stomach was backwards and his heart was stop beating. I'm guessing because he no longer had a pulmonary artery. Make sense after one of these shows that say trysts diagnosed him as a paranoid schizophrenic. But thought that some or all these psychosis was due to his drug use was put under seventy two hour surveillance and it was recommended that he stay under supervision but it was ultimately completely up to him. See i've always heard that in. Some people don't know that they're insane. So why would they seek help and state of acidity if they don't think there's anything wrong with their brain just that its stomach goes backwards. You don't supervision for that. So naturally he left facility when he was able. He moved back in with his mom after a little while. But he was so deep news hypochondria and drug use that it began to take a toll on everybody's life including hits. of course.

Richard Trenton Richard Sacramento Chase Ted Bundy Bundy Paranoid Schizophrenic
Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 9 months ago

Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

"President Donald Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus joining a small group of world leaders who've also been infected the president is not alone among world leaders to get could be nineteen Britain's Boris Johnson got sick in April and in hospital spent a short period in intensive care than Brazil's president diables tomorrow announced his illness in July and used it to public extol hydroxy chloride Quinn the unproven malaria drug that he promoted as a treatment for Kevin nineteen I was taking himself another Belarus's Alexander Lukashenko who dismissed concerns about the virus as a psychosis and recommended drinking vodka to stay healthy said in July he contracted it himself but was a symptomatic I'm Charles and the late that's my

President Donald Trump President Trump Britain Boris Johnson Brazil Kevin Belarus Alexander Lukashenko Charles
Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 9 months ago

Trump joins growing list of virus-infected world leaders

"President Donald Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus joining a small group of world leaders who've also been infected the president is not alone among world leaders to get could be nineteen Britain's Boris Johnson got sick in April and in hospital spent a short period in intensive care than Brazil's president diables tomorrow announced his illness in July and used it to public extol hydroxy chloride Quinn the unproven malaria drug that he promoted as a treatment for Kevin nineteen I was taking himself another Belarus's Alexander Lukashenko who dismissed concerns about the virus as a psychosis and recommended drinking vodka to stay healthy said in July he contracted it himself but was a symptomatic I'm Charles and the late that's my

President Donald Trump President Trump Britain Boris Johnson Brazil Kevin Belarus Alexander Lukashenko Charles
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 9 months ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
Belarus strongman president faces strong election challenge

GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

Belarus strongman president faces strong election challenge

"The pond. There is an election test today. For a man sometimes called Europe's last dictator. Belarus holding a general election with authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko, seeking to extend his 26 years in power, But he's facing an unusually strong challenge amid anger over his handling of the Corona virus outbreak. Lukashenko has dismissed Covad 19 as a psychosis on recommended vodka and soldiers as remedies ahead of the vote. France, Germany and Poland jointly calling for a free and fair election.

Alexander Lukashenko Covad Belarus Europe President Trump Poland France Germany
Scientists warn of potential wave of COVID-linked brain damage

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists warn of potential wave of COVID-linked brain damage

"Of of a a potential potential wave wave of of Corona Corona virus virus late late related related brain brain damage damage as as new new evidence evidence suggested suggested Cove Cove in in 19 19 can can lead lead to to severe severe neurological neurological complications, complications, including including inflammation, inflammation, psychosis psychosis and delirium. Researchers at University College, London described 43 cases of patients with Koven, 19 who suffered either temporary brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage or other serious brain effects. Covert 19 is largely a respiratory illness, but neuroscientists and brain specialists say emerging evidence of its impact on the brains. Eyes very concerning. After

Inflammation Cove Cove University College Koven London
Ellen and Yvette In Lockdown

Mentally Yours

05:17 min | 1 year ago

Ellen and Yvette In Lockdown

"Hey if it's been like a long time since you've just had like just one on one chat. Offset. Bits of the country and. Fire laptops and things. It's really strange, isn't it? We thought would dip in different episodes this week because we didn't have an expert on talking about you know the bigger picture. How people being affected across the country? If they have mental health issues during the pandemic we thought well. Why don't we talk about how we've been affected? Just so that people consider I. Guess get like a first person kind of. Account, because as I feel like a ban on this by about constantly, but you know I've got bipolar disorder and you've got the. Seating his. Fun But. It's nice to like maybe this hour. Bet as well and say you know when not experts here's how we're doing. How you guys doing is all. Like come chat. Please do as well because obviously. This is just a punk cost between two people right now, but like talk to us on twitter facebook again definitely. Correct! Yeah, so affects great, which is mentally ill, also mentally Juarez's the twitter. Absolutely I feel that. Give out advice about. We'll stick to routine and do some exercise, but like. Is Hard radio sniff. I mean white sticking tour routine. Because I. Know I would have done though is off to speaking to all these experts said constantly. How good routine is fuel mental health I have Rishon out my routine and on Sundays. Yeah, it isn't. It isn't 'cause, but the thing is like most days I managed to stick to it, and then I feel like a loser because I haven't done it, so the thing is the moment like my sleep is very bad, so even had a sleep expert on gave his tips it still like. It hasn't managed to stop me from I. Wake Radio early now, so my routine. It's like get up at seven o'clock but. My. But I'm actually waking up like three am. Four am five am. And really full of adrenaline Sir I. Don't feel I can go back to sleep at that point. So you get open. Do stuff or do you just stay in bed? He has an. Varies an I it something I really am trying to keep an eye on and keep track of because. Some days I wake up without of energy I'll be really creative rows of style for like writer. The song like. I'll just at one point Nephew's birthday and I made minimum. A. Birthday, cake and a list and very helpful, but at the same time Hossam is just dislike I. Really need to be careful because the fight. What I'm describing is like. the the initial phases of potentially a hyper manic episode. So so all this creativity is great, but possibly is always thinking I. Really need to translate down. So what I do is already do one thing at a time, so even if I woken up at the a goal is ideas I'll be like well or so I'm Gonna I'm going to. Write, this thing I'm I'm going to do this of cleaning. I'M GONNA. Do but what can happen, is I want to do lots of stuff in between like I'll start doing the washing up. Then I'll start doing something, but what? I'll try to slow down as like. I'll do the washing up and finish it, and then all right some hurt tree, and finish them or like is is a bit. Crazy. You? You were going into hyper mania. What would? What would you do like? Are you able to kind of okay? This is what I need to do or is it I need kind of emergency urgent. Help at this point well, I mean the things like hyper menu mania. That's the thing like I'm not I'm not actually even that. Maybe. I'm maybe not even that worried about high mania because menu was manulife manual. When I've had it before is actually losing touch with the vanisi psychosis oldest gagged and stuff where you could potentially sections. Mania is things like to me is like spending lots of money impulsively being creative. Big Very talkative like so Yeah, it's not ideal, and in terms of I mean to want to question in terms of like how how do I deal with that I mean? The things I've escaped like trying to slow down. Do One thing at a time I mean I have friends in my my mom said of checking checking off mate, not like in a way that they really ever talk about disorder, but they are regularly checking. Who May which is useful? Because if I stopped telling them that I think I can fly or something. They'll. Hopefully they'll nice young hopefully. Things I mean like my mom's sort of been through this with me before like so she. She knows like in my voice. On Hammond Speaking Mike where I am pretty much emotionally and I've identified you. I've been supreme much through all through the pandemic anyway like I've had at the moment I'm going to high, but in the post of being a bit of depression.

Twitter Manulife Hossam Bipolar Disorder Manic Episode Juarez Writer Facebook Hammond Mike
Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'

The Book Review

08:34 min | 1 year ago

Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'

"Us about the Galvin family. Let's start with the parents. Don and Mimi there. The subject of this book Don really lived through the greatest moments of the twentieth century. He was a World War Two veteran and the two of them put down roots in Colorado after the war and raised a family and had twelve children. The twelve children's span the baby boom the. I was born in nineteen forty five and the last in nineteen sixty five and they were known in Colorado Springs. Colorado is sort of a model family. Everybody knew the Galvin's with their twelve children and the oldest was a football star and dated the general's daughter at the Air Force Academy and all of the boys were Jock simplisafe on every hockey game. They played they were sort of legends at the time but nobody really knew that privately. The family was suffering that that in the end six of the twelve children were diagnosed schizophrenia. And it was at a time in America where there was a lot of shame and stigma around mental illness. Even more than there is now where the parents were often blamed and so it was a secret for as long as they keep it a secret and that just lead to more damage and the youngest children in the family really suffered the most from living in that house full of secrets before we get into their stories. It's interesting that you say everyone knew the Galvin's in Colorado Springs. My cousin actually grew up in an air force family in Colorado Springs and had never heard of them and so it might be that. She's she's younger. She's in her forties now. But I'm curious how you came across this family and their story because you're not from Colorado Springs. Yeah their heyday was in the early years of the academy. Right after the academy opened in the mid fifties that was when the family really started to rise up so they were best known in the late fifties. I know about them because the youngest two children the only girls were friends of a friend of mine. And for years. These two sisters Margaret and Lindsey had been talking with one another about the best way to let the world know about their family but they realized they couldn't do it alone. There was a lot about their family. They didn't even know. I mean a lot of these brothers were fifteen or twenty years older than they were and then of course a lot of the medical records. They didn't have access to and a lot of the stories that their parents told they couldn't necessarily verify on their own. A lot of legends going around and in fact they some of the worst things that happened to the family had been kept from them kept secret from them because they were too young when it happened and so finally they decided to turn to an independent journalists to to cover the family independently to take the story wherever it would lead and they were confident in doing this because they felt that the there was scientific value medical value in focusing on this family and they knew that researchers had been talking to them for decades and they wanted to know what those researchers learned as. Well okay all families. Don't get along perfectly. And I imagine a family with twelve children. Probably even more so where they unanimous in their willingness to collaborate with you to answer your questions be interviewed well aside from being completely gobsmacked by the story and and really could not believe all. This happened to one family. I was pretty convinced in the beginning that there couldn't be a book about this because of medical privacy laws that all all it would take was one sibling standing up and saying what you WANNA book about this family no way and then suddenly it would get very impossible so I worked very Slowly and really took it very easy and over several months I would get on the phone. Maybe once a week with different family members saying so you know your sisters are interested in having a book about your family. How does that make you feel and sort of got took the temperature of the entire family and to my amazement everyone was interested in. Everyone was ready including Mimi. The family matriarch who had been so determined to keep everything secret for so long. She was in her nineties. Ready to talk about it too. She died in two thousand seventeen after you interviewed her. And I want to talk about that interview a little bit because as you mentioned earlier at that time schizophrenia was often blamed on mothers. Yes and and so. She was thrilled to be talking about it from a genetic perspective. You know. We're in the Arab genetics. Now so it it made her feel good to be able to say yes. Well now. We know that it couldn't have been bad parenting that it was genetics and so two that part she was happy but she was really part of her survival instinct and part of what made her so functional for so long was that she could really move past a lot of the unpleasantness in her life. So getting here to talk about unpleasant subjects was not easy and of course. I didn't WanNa get a ninety one or ninety two year old to to do anything. I didn't want to traumatize someone who was clearly in such frail health. So what proceeded was me sitting there at the kitchen table with her and her two daughters were at the table too and every time she would try to deflects the conversation. One of her daughter's would go. Oh Mom and and try to kind of cajole her gently back to talk about the unpleasant stuff and eventually she she was able to really open up about some very difficult things and I was really grateful to get that kind of clarity from her. Twelve children is difficult enough. I mean twelve children. Ten of them were boys even if they did not suffer from mental illness even during the baby boom. That's a lot of kids. Why did they have twelve children? I spent a lot of time sort of looking into that question for dom father. He was Catholic and he was looking for a distinguished life and he wanted to to stand out in some way and it made him feel good to be a pattern familias and so it pleased him to have so many children. And then Mimi who was like a lot of women in her generation a little frustrated that she couldn't intellectually really achieve dreams. She really gave up her college education and gave up and he sort of independent life to be a mother and she gave up a life of culture and sophistication moving out to the boonies which is Colorado was in the fifties to her as a sophisticated New Yorker and so she liked the being having a certain amount of notoriety and fame and accomplishment of having such a large family but more than that I think she was binging on family in a way because of a lot of the losses she had had in her life. She had lost her father when she was younger and a scandal he sort of became divorced from the family and she never really had a relationship with him. She now was in a marriage where the husband was increasingly absent. He was a career military guy who really created a life of the mind and was not an active parent like a lot of fathers in that time period and so really having so many children gave her a lot of company and I came to appreciate that aspect of it. So six of these kids. Six of the were ultimately diagnosed with schizophrenia. Which as I understand it typically emerges in adolescence or young adulthood it. Correct me if I'm wrong but we're there earlier signed. How did they first find out about the first child to be diagnosed? They suspect something was wrong. Well five of the six of them really followed that pattern. They were all twenty twenty one twenty two in late adolescence. When they had their first really visible psychotic breaks. There was one peter who was earlier he was fourteen he. There was real trauma right before that happened. He watched his father suffers stroke but the they were warning signs for for some of them for Donald. The oldest son he really was a very troubled teenager despite being out early so successful and so popular and he would do things like smashed dishes while washing the dishes out of rage or be overly almost gratuitously abusive to his younger brothers when he was left to take care of them. There are certain ways that he should have demonstrated that he wasn't connecting with the world in a traditional way in that it's almost like there is a barrier between him and others and that was very visible even in his teenage years. But it only devolved into psychosis. Once he was in college he would do things like run into a bonfire during a PEP rally or be cruel to animals. Th they were difficult moments that suddenly were wakeup calls to him. That something was really wrong and he started going to see therapists and his parents started shopping for a medical opinion. That could keep him in college and keep the family away from scandal.

Colorado Springs Colorado Galvin Family Mimi Galvin DON Schizophrenia Air Force Academy Jock Simplisafe America Hockey Football Donald Trump Margaret Lindsey
"psychosis" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"We know that your and accomplish therapist and you understand this of course from the medical side and helping people but this is also something that you went through. Personally I imagine that these myths and misconceptions from both society and whatever lived in your brain made the treatment and the acceptance of it very very difficult. Oh My Gosh. It really did so. I was already a psychologist fulltime job. You know I was helping other people and I got pregnant. Pregnancy was fine fine but very quickly day one. After my daughter was born in body was there. I was so hyper vigilant. Not your normal checking on the baby like I could not not watch her because I was so afraid she was going to die and she was fine physically. She was fine looking back on it now about was the first time but. I want to say before I go into the rest of this is that I was a therapist and I didn't know what was going on. It took me a full year to figure it out and I myself have history of depression but it felt different in part because of those miss that you mentioned it was crying all the time. I felt really alone. I felt like I didn't what I was doing everything that I was doing wrong. I started having interest thought that something bad is going to happen and I had them all the time. But because I had this idea of motherhood or maybe like an incorrect idea of motherhood I thought to myself why I guess this is what it's like. I guess this is normal. I guess is what I'm supposed to be marrying and it didn't fully register until later that it was depression and anxiety and then. Ocd and it went on for a year a good year. I feel horrible the whole time until I figured out what was happening. I had read about one of my symptoms in a book and immediately had immediate really. Like Oh my God. It's not just me. And then I started researching a little bit more and realize there's this whole world a mental health condition. But I had never learned about in Grad School. I never learned it out in any of my training anywhere. Maybe there was like a one page in one book that described it but really no education on it so I didn't even know that postpartum anxiety was a thing certainly not postpartum OCD. I'd heard about post-partum depression but I thought oh no no no no not me. I'm a therapist. I've gone to therapy. You have done a lot of work on this stuff. So that's not what this is and looking back on it now. I can see how started and all the factors that contributed. But at this time when you're in it it just feels horrible and it just feels like if only you and it's incredibly embarrassing and filled with shame. When did you finally realized something was wrong? And what steps did you take to get help? Yeah As about around my daughter's first birthday it was almost like after I made it to that year or something just Cra- in me and I knew something was wrong for sure so again. The therapist and I was working in a major medical system and we give out the Q. Nine at ten item questionnaire which is a mental health depression screening and I said okay. I'm GonNa take this and I'm GonNa be on it so that I can see objectively really. How bad off. I am my. I had taken this nine several times and just regular doctor visits and my postpartum visit and I lied. I lied on those I didn't want to be about office. It was because I was like I know what this is asking. I know like nobody else needs to know about. I feel so anyhow that day where I just sat down and had an honest conversation with myself and that was the turning point again it was around a year so I went back to my therapist and I talked with her about what I thought was going on. And unfortunately she didn't have training this so she disagreed with me that. I was having postpartum depression so I started doing my own reading and really learning as much as I could and then not help a lot. I wish I would have known at that. Time to seek out a specialist. Who could you know what I was talking about but yeah I went to therapy? Did a couple of other things like I went to get my thyroid checked out and I started a bunch of supportive types of things to help me get back so I took that Kinda route I had taken antidepressants in the past again. I didn't really know enough about antidepressant during this period of time to feel okay about it but knowing what I know now I know that they're largely faith so I did go to therapy. I did reading and I taught out whatever kind of supportive thing they could. And you've described it as very scary and as as you pointed out. You're a mental health professional if a mental health professional is scared to seek mental health treatment after the birth of her child. What are the odds for the rest of US? Which brings me to my next question. What are the odds for the rest of us? And that's kind of an all encompassing question. How many people have postpartum psychosis that never get help in it? I guess it naturally goes away or of course. Something bad happens once you get help. What percentage of people get better? I know it's kind of a big question. But what's the relevancy rates of Postpartum Psychosis Headline Fevers Postpartum? Psychosis is difficult one to two percent which is very low very roo. Yeah very rare but for postpartum depression and anxiety. It's in and around twenty percent. The huge number so one in five people will deal with apparent mental health condition. Some talking about like the umbrella things that can happen. Twenty percent is a lot and when you put that out into like the population of the United States. We're getting into hundreds of thousands of people every year we're dealing with the so it is super treatable and there are a lot of people who are specializing in this area. Perinatal mental health so when people get help symptoms resolve relatively quickly. All of these conditions are treatable so if we can get somebody who is at risk for postpartum psychosis into the right psychiatry and the right therapist or the right support team then symptoms can resolve relatively quickly but the longer it goes on the kind of harder to deal and recover so the sooner that we can get people in and seeing the sooner it will resolve and people go on to be fine the absolutely fine and also people who come in for therapy sometimes there are some underlying things that have contributed to the invitee or depression or the CD and if people are getting the right kind of help. I really here. Sometimes that they're better off than they were before because they've caught something and gotten help for something that was actually had been bothering them for years. Let's say invited. For instance a lot of people just live with anxiety and don't specifically know that they have it but if there's a peak in symptoms during this period of time and it finally bringing them in for help then we're able to help them not only in the postpartum period but also just help them much life skills that can benefit them for years. It sounds to me like while. Postpartum PSYCHOSIS IS SCARY. It treatable and it's most treatable if you get help immediately. And one of the reasons that people aren't seeking help immediately is because of a lot of myths in shame that isn't really relevant to the disease that you have the illness that you have the disorder that you have and that we'd be in a much better position if people got it checked out before it became you know bigger and bigger and bigger or before the worst case scenario happened. Absolutely the sooner you get in the better and I'm also a really big fan of prevention so if you are planning on getting pregnant or get pregnant and you know that your family have the history of any mental health condition. I would say just find somebody who specializes in perinatal mental health. Go Talk to them about your concerns and develop a plan. I think really when we can get ahead of it even better so there are things that we know how to protect sleep and negotiate that within the family to help with the baby. And how meals broaden. There are so many things that we can do to help. Prevent it and also sometimes. It's not completely preventable. But we can help reduce the intensity by quite a bit if we're ahead of it so although I know people kind of don't want to think or believe that these kinds of things could happen and therefore sometimes don't get preventative.

PSYCHOSIS Ocd US depression Psychosis Grad School Cra
Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs

The Psych Central Show

10:04 min | 1 year ago

Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs

"We're going to discuss postpartum psychosis and you were drawn to the specialty after you yourself went through postpartum depression postpartum anxiety and postpartum. Ocd after the birth of your first child or act yeah. There's a lot of things again. Happen in the postpartum period. I'm here to talk about one of the more severe conditions in the interest of full disclosure. I'm a forty three year old male. I've never been pregnant and I do not have children. I'm really really entry level. When it comes to understanding what post-partum anything is so thank you so much for helping to educate people like myself. It really is an important topic. It's absolutely important and a lot of people have that same feeling. I don't know anything about it. It seems like this weird thing that happens to other people and chances. Are you know somebody who has suffered through some form of perinatal mental health condition? Even if they don't talk about it which is very common a lot of people. Don't talk about it because there's so much shame around kind of not feeling well or not feeling yourself even during pregnancy and postpartum. There's all these ideas out there that it's this wonderful magical time and hopefully it is but for a lot of people in and that's one of the things that came up while I was trying to do research for the show so that I could talk somewhat on this subject. I was shocked at how many times I googled. Postpartum psychosis or postpartum anything and the articles. That came up. Were M I a bad mother M I abide parent. Am I harming my child? That really Kinda spoke to me like in a visceral way. This idea that you also have the illness. And there's all this stigma and shame surrounding it. Is that what you found working as a therapist? Oh absolutely hear comments. All of the time I feel like a bad mom. I'm not good enough for my child. Feeling Shame and the blame and confusion around. Why do I even feel bad? We are just not educated on what can happen. I think it's a great disservice to everybody who goes through any kind of perinatal mental health condition. Because they're mostly blindsided by it right. You like here supposed to be having the best time of my life. This is what my body is supposed to quote unquote and here. I am feeling like a failure and just to be clear. None of this is true. You are an excellent parent. This is just sort of the illness. And societies misunderstanding of the illness. Taking hold in an unexpected way over. Sorry this is a very treatable and very temporary condition if you get the right help and if you get it as soon as you know even if you're getting a little bit later down the road you still can feel better. And there's not a huge impact throughout the life course of you or your child however again in the more severe cases are not treated. There are some long term effects and I know that might sound really scary to people so I wanted to sell the myth that if you have a condition you're going to be like messing up your kid in some way like I said this is very treatable and also when it was very very severe there can be really life threatening consequences. So let's talk about postpartum psychosis. What is the definition of postpartum psychosis typically oppose artem? Psychosis isn't very rare Wanted to out of every thousand delivery and it is not postpartum. Depression or postpartum. Means -iety the onset of these symptoms are usually in the first two weeks but certainly can show up a little bit later. There's a really rapid onset. Meaning symptoms start quickly and it is characterized by the mind is kind of going off on. Its own in part because of hormonal changes in part because of your mental health history and in part because of sleep deprivation so people who are if postpartum psychosis are having rapid mood swings they are potentially having delusion or strange beliefs about themselves or their child or people around them they may be having hallucinations feeling very very irritated. The difficulty to sleep inability to sleep sometimes paranoia And what's really hard about postpartum psychosis is that the symptoms waxed and waned. Meaning they come and go so sometimes people can sort of the feel like themselves and appear to be like our normal cells and then sometimes people around them might observe that they don't look like themselves are sound like themselves so it can come and go for quite a few people and then for some people that symptoms on the onset is. They're just continue. So I know all that probably sounds pretty scary and Syria and it actually is pretty scary. And the're Like I said before. It's very rare and people who have a history of bipolar disorder are at high risk or if there's bipolar disorder in the family. They're at higher risk. Oftentimes psychosis in the postpartum is an indictment bipolar disorder. So let's talk about that for a moment. I myself live with bipolar disorder. And I understand psychosis from a lived experience because I I have experienced. Psychosis is it. The same is postpartum psychosis and for lack of a better phrase Gabe Howard's psychosis. Is this a similar thing or is it completely different? There's certainly familiarity in terms of symptoms of psychosis are the same. What what's very different here. Is that there is a new baby involved. And sometimes they delusions or hallucinations are in relation. To the new child is new very vulnerable child and also the perinatal person also very vulnerable. They've just given birth of had massive changes in hormone both during pregnancy at delivery and then in the Postpartum. They're really really rapid and kind of swings in the in the hormone during that time and sleep deprivation. Is You know when it's sort of like just you quote unquote. You have capacity to possibly sleep. In these cases there's Abadie involved and babies cry and they wake people up And that's what they do and that's what they're supposed to do But for somebody who needs sleep and isn't getting it and can't get it a whole other layer of complexity into into the life and into the simpsons because you're in relation to a baby a while having psychosis for some time that means that. There's like a hyper vigilant around the baby. Like it's really hard to not be around them or to let anyone else support them or sometimes it's like a kind of a total disregard like people in some psychoses. They will kind of forget the baby there so it brings this whole other level of danger and complexity also then. There's additional layer. That people around them are thinking. Oh well she's kind of baby. She's not quite herself or giving some other explanation for odd behaviors or strange behaviors. And it Kinda put people in a more of a dangerous situation because symptoms are explained away because they're not understood and it's not expected that these kind of symptoms will show up. I'm kind of assuming that the way that postpartum psychosis has played out in the media as well as How motherhood is played out in the media those two things combined because like you said we want to defend new parents. We don't just want every new mom under the bus and say oh well. You have a serious mental illness. That's the problem but of course this can be dangerous because it lacks care. I suppose my specific question is how is Postpartum? Psychosis played out in popular culture. It actually in very dangerous ways so in ways that further stigmatize apparently period. So mostly what we're seeing in the media while you see on. The news is postpartum psychosis that has led to infanticide. And this is a really really hard topic for people to hear about and also. This is a very real possibility with postpartum psychosis. I know that one to two percent of people who have term psychosis four to five percent of those mothers will kill their children. They killed their baby. It's really a hard reality to hear. And what I want people to know. Is that when this happened? Women are not in their right mind at all. They are not themselves. Do not know what they're doing. They're often being told by their delusion to do something. Sometimes there are delusions that the baby is possessed. So they can't be here although this might not make any sense but most of the time it's really out of love a lot of love like the world is too harsh for the child so they have to go and misses a very severe departure from reality. The Mon- who are in the situation do not know what they have done if they come out of it and get the medication that they need. They can't even thousand. What has happened people thinking say? Oh what a horrible person. I can't believe she done this. I would never do this to my child. And the thing is is that if she were in her right mind she wouldn't either. So what we're seeing in the media is usually the mob who have done something like this and who are being handcuffed or going on trial so there's most severe. This is the most of your consequences of perinatal. Mental Health Condition Postpartum Psychosis in infanticide. Is How postpartum psychosis is viewed. Most people are postpartum psychosis are experiencing hallucinations or delusions or some kind of waxing and waning symptom. That does not reach that level. Typically they may need hospitalization and medication. But it's not always the people who go on to have their children in this way.

Postpartum Psychosis Psychosis Bipolar Disorder OCD Syria Depression Artem Abadie Gabe Howard
Schizophrenia in Women

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

07:57 min | 1 year ago

Schizophrenia in Women

"This episode. We are exploring schizophrenia. In women next episode. We're going to focus on the men but this whole episode is for the ladies often. We don't really consider gender dynamics in treatment or medication and this is a chronic across all health. Not just schizophrenia. A lot of medications etc are only tested on men because of risk they don't want to impact a potential pregnancy etc and on one hand. This sounds good. We're protecting pregnancy but on the other hand this means there's whole drugs that have made it to market. That may not have ever been tested with women so I think that it's exciting to consider how schizophrenia impacts the genders differently. Obviously we want to state unequivocally that if you meet two people with schizophrenia. You've met two people with schizophrenia. You know there tends to be this idea that all people with schizophrenia are exactly alike and and we hope that. This show has done a lot to dispel that misinformation. Just like if I meet two guys named gave that probably both different probably probably repeatedly you hear the difference between men and women with schizophrenia. The biggest thing is the age of onset. Women are said to develop it later than men on average. They say four to six years later than a man would be diagnosed. Let's go be diagnosed with schizophrenia. And that's one of the things I've noticed repeatedly in research across the years is that women get schizophrenia. In life later sometimes you know late twenties. They'll even say it's interesting because as you said it's diagnosed with we know from research. That people are born with schizophrenia. So the question becomes and we don't know the answer to this because research is ongoing. Do Men and women become symptomatic at the same time but men get the diagnosis faster or do women. It not develop the symptoms of schizophrenia. Until later and it's difficult to discover that and some of it is social engineering. If a woman is behaving erratically. Well of course she's a woman and this is the kind of thinking that we have to prevent and get over to make sure that everybody gets the best care but it's on one hand. It's interesting to think about when we're diagnosing people and how we're diagnosing people but on the other hand it's kind of sad if men and women are showing symptoms at the exact same age but it takes women extra four to six years to be diagnosed. That's also scary. Yes and they do say however that it's less detectable in women which I could totally see because I grew up having hallucinations but I didn't even realize myself that was weird until my late teens than I thought. I stopped talking about it so I didn't get a diagnosis either till my twenties so I could easily see you know yeah. Women tend to be more social. They tend to be more active than men. Who Have Schizophrenia? So yeah could probably fly under the radar much longer. It's interesting how you put that Rachel. You said that as soon as you notice that you were having these hallucinations and issues you hit them remained social. You remained engaged talking to the people around you whereas men when they notice them. They tend to retreat. It's that retreating that I think makes people realize that. Perhaps something is wrong you know. Why is this person? Stay in their room. Why does this person not have a job? Why is this person talking to themselves whereas because you remained social people? Don't say well. Hey we like it when Rachel comes over Rachel is Funny Rachel is Nice. She must be hearing voices in her head and experiencing psychosis elucidations. And and all of the other symptoms of schizophrenia. I can see how it could mask it especially to our friends and family who are not trained psychologists or psychiatrists and the flip side of. That coin. Is Families that schizophrenia tends to run in. There actually is no difference in the onset of age between men and women so like brothers sisters. And that's because yeah if grandma had it if mom has it you know so so cousin has you tend to be looking for those symptoms and recognize them earlier. Whether it's a boy or girl growing up Houston to notice that. They have acknowledged that if the family and friends are aware that there could be a potential problem on the horizon. They are noticing it much much sooner. There's also a study out. India that is found no difference in the average age of onset between men and women and I think that really does speak to the social dynamics between cultures because if people in India are all having the onset of schizophrenia at the same time it it would really be unusual to think that there's some sort of genetic difference between Americans and Indians. It's it's sort of speaks to this being a social construct and again research is ongoing. We're not one hundred percent. Sure of any of these things. In a lot of countries having a mental disorder is looked down upon even more so than I would say the Western world. They don't have statistics on those kinds of things because unfortunately it will go. No one is diagnosed until much later in life where they can't function at all so it is interesting. We look like how people grow up. What's expected of men and women? I do think women could fly under the radar longer. Sometimes just because you're not like well a guy at eighteen. He needs to get out. He needs to get a job he needs to at. Yeah I feel like my family. They're going to be a little softer on the girl in the Family. And the boy so. I can't easily see like that flying under the radar to your point Rachel when we talk about the social differences between men and women Which there's a lot I really think of. People who have battled schizophrenia for a long time and when I work with those people they say hey look i. I haven't had a job in five years and all of the men very much want to know what to do about their resume. They've got a five year GAP OF FIVE YEAR GAP. A five year gap and many of the women are like well five year. Gap is no problem. I was raising kids. I was a caretaker for family. It just nobody is questioning their five year gap whereas people are questioning a male's five year gap and all of this is just a tie in in some cases the differences between the treatments and the symptoms of schizophrenia. Have Considerably More to do with our society than it does with the actual disease now all that said there are disease processes and symptoms processes that work differently in women versus men as we get into the symptoms. Saying this you know like well Rachel. I'm a woman and I don't experience that that way or I'm a man and I totally have not just like across the board which tend to flare up in different genders women actually like we said are more social so different things like the flat effect. Pretty much where you don't experience emotion. You have a very dull. Expression is not seen as often in women. Women tend to even have more emotions and I know that's like Oh of course. Women are motion but with schizophrenia. A lot of times people have a blunted emotional response so they don't really react the same way quote Unquote Normal. People do but women we come off still acting more emotional to those around us inside. We might not aware able to kind of fake it much better. Our speech isn't reduced and I found this interesting. Gabe women with schizophrenia are actually more physically active than men across the board and also under that they can be more hostile. You know past episodes where he's talked about violence and schizophrenia. If you were to picture a violent schizophrenic I don't think anyone pictures of woman

Schizophrenia Rachel Houston India Gabe
Minding Mental Illness with Esmé Weijun Wang

Unladylike

09:14 min | 1 year ago

Minding Mental Illness with Esmé Weijun Wang

"I really wanted to be able to be seen as high functioning and I wanted to be able to be seen as normal and if people found out about my diagnoses. I wanted them to see me as like. Eah The person who had this serious diagnosis but who also graduated from Stanford with a three point nine. Gpa So it scared me that. I had these symptoms that I couldn't control ninety minute. All and welcome to One lady like they show that finds out what happens when women break the rules. I'm Kristen I'm caroline. And that was today's guest as May wage and Wang author of the New York Times bestselling essay collection. The collected Schizophrenia Carolina. I've been wanting to talk to as may for a while now. I stumbled across her a couple of years back when I was going through a scary mental health period of my own. As I mentioned before on unladylike I have generalized anxiety disorder and at that time like on paper. Everything looked good. You know but I was spiraling on the inside and it was honestly so unsettling that I didn't know how to talk about it and I didn't WanNa talk about it or not. I think I was scared. That talking about it would make it feel even more real and it felt like a burden. I didn't WanNa put on anyone else like. I just desperately wanted to figure out how to get myself back together. And that's actually how I ended up on as May's website. It's called the unexpected shape as basically all about getting your creative work done while also living with mental or physical illness and I was just so struck by how openly she talks about having a serious mental illness. Yeah in her. Mid Twenties as May was diagnosed with schizophrenia disorder which she describes as the fucked up offspring of manic depression and schizophrenia is almost like a demon that takes over a person The schizophrenia causes a person to no longer be themselves whereas depression and anxiety think are often considered to be quite awful but they are more considered to be things that are layered on top of a person. You know there's something that somebody is dealing with. they're not something that takes over or empties out a person or places. The spirit of a person in the collected schizophrenia is as may details her journey to what she calls the inappropriately crazy end of the Mental Health Spectrum Aka. A the most unladylike end and she's far from alone there an estimated one hundred thousand five. Americans live with serious mental illness or SMS. The most common ones are schizophrenia. Spectrum disorders severe bipolar disorder and Severe Major Depression. But as may also occupies a very particular space on that unladylike end of the spectrum. She doesn't fit. What we think schizophrenia. Looks like you know. She's not visibly unhinged or unkempt. She's a Yale and Stanford educated award-winning writer. Who's married her? College sweetheart has plenty of friends and frankly dresses. She gives fog. She does and I was really drawn to this idea of someone who is killing it on the outside all the same time. Her mental illness is sort of escalating on the inside. So today we're talking with asthma about navigating serious mental illness. How it shapes her ambition and why wanting to be seen as high functioning is so important to her and quick note. Y'All we're getting into serious mental health issues in this episode including psychosis in suicidal idealization. So heads up. If you're sensitive to those topics only as I grew up in Michigan and was raised by her Taiwanese immigrant parents. She started reading at two and wanted to be a writer by the time. Most kids are learning to tie. Their shoes. Baby was not messing around when she was about six as me. Sent a letter to the publisher. Little Brown asking how she could get her works in print already and they actually wrote me. Back I remember. They wrote me back the types letter typewritten letter and they said I needed an agent. So yeah I I've I've wanted to be a writer for a very long time. That's funny to tell a child that you need an like yeah. I've imagining some kind of like intern or assistant just thinking like you know. How should I respond to this kid? But alongside her big writing dreams. Sba had to deal with extreme evolving and often completely mysterious mental health issues and they also started when she was really young. When I was four or five I remember having issues where I would just filled with anxiety in compulsion. I remember this one evening where I was going to get up and get a drink and then we go to the bathroom and then I would feel like I needed to go to bed and get a drink and then go to the bathroom and I did this over and over again. Compulsively fan ended up standing at the top of the stairs and I just burst into tears and my mom said why are you crying and I just said I can't stop with puberty. Came depression anxiety and insomnia. By the time she was a teenager as me was having suicidal thoughts inserted seeing the high school counselor and at some point. She told me you're going to have to see a psychiatrist. This is getting really serious and so one morning. I told my mom before school. I've been seeing a counselor and she thinks that I need to see a psychiatrist and Mommy yelled at me. She was so upset so angry. She said we've always given you everything you've needed. You have close to where you have food. Who have a roof over your head? How could he do this to us? And I. I remember crying in the car on the way to school and crying I skipped first period and I was just crying in the art room. Eventually as May and her mom went to see the psychiatrist together he was a white man and he asked my mom in front of me. Is there any history of mental illness in the Family? Which is a very ordinary question to ask in this kind of like diagnostic meeting. And my mom said no. There's no history and I learned years later that there was quite a strong history of mental illness. My family and I asked my mom. Why did you tell that first doctor that there was no history of mental illness and she said In Chinese essentially wall? It wasn't his business and I think that kind of cultural stigma was a lingering factor throughout all of my diagnoses. Her diagnoses plural started with clinical depression and anxiety then the summer after as graduated from high school. She was exhibiting enough signs of mania that our psychiatrist diagnosed her with bipolar disorder. And my mom was just like okay. She didn't know what it meant. Really she told me years later that if she had really understood what it meant she wouldn't have let me go to school especially not across the country and not by myself as May was eighteen and a couple of months later she left home in California to start her freshman year at Yale. Now as many psychiatrists recommended that she wait to start taking her new bipolar medication until she got settled. Yale and could start working with someone there. This meant that there was a stretch of months whereas may was dealing with the stress of starting college and experiencing bipolar symptoms. That delay was the first domino to fall. That ultimately resulted in as May being hospitalized at the Yale Psychiatric Institute twice her first year there after the second time Yale sent packing then in her early twenties after she'd restarted her college career at Stanford as me began experiencing intermittent symptoms of psychosis. Psychosis is either hallucinations. So false sensory experiences hearing bang seeing things feeling things physically in the actually hearing things like you hear them as though they're actually there and then delusions are false

Stanford Writer Psychosis Collected Schizophrenia Caroli Yale Anxiety Depression Bipolar Disorder New York Times Kristen I Wang Yale Psychiatric Institute School Counselor Intern Little Brown SBA Michigan Publisher
Hey Baby Whats Your Predisposition For A Variety Of Possible Genetic Disorders?

You Did What Now?

08:16 min | 1 year ago

Hey Baby Whats Your Predisposition For A Variety Of Possible Genetic Disorders?

"Hey everyone thinks listening on your host Stephanie Educator in Science Aficionado Afficionado and I'm like Oh programmer tech guy. I'm still not an algorithm here on still not a computer driven eight or host. That's the goal that I will successfully generate an and I can do this for me. We are real life. non-genetically modified humans so anyways Michael I think we've talked about this before. But you are happily married. Is that correct. How many years weird nine and a few nine years in a couple of months? That's wonderful how. How did you and your lovely wife meet each other? We actually met in high school. We went to high school together. Kept in touch through college and stuff. Yeah so yeah my husband and my husband and I we also met in high school. So it's it's probably been awhile since you've been on the dating scene. Is that accurate pretty much. Never so yeah it's been probably since nineteen ninety-six since I was last dating anyone but and I'm very thankful for that by the way. Hey Hey don't have to. He don't have to participate in the the psychosis that is dating world speaking of Algorithms. I think Tinder and all those those Al those Dating sites are all generated on some very interesting algorithms. I'm sure yeah well do you know anyone who's You know maybe met their significant other through dating out such as like Tinder e harmony. Maybe one or two friends of Matt that way. Yeah Yeah My. My brother-in-law met his wife on E. Harmony. And they're very happy together so But what if we took that a step further So that you could actually just use your DNA to find a match. How would that work? Yeah so there are some researchers at Harvard medical the school who are creating a new dating APP that matches people based on their DNA. No they did. What now right? So so the goal is to create a system it screens out matches. That would result in a child with an inherited disease. Okay sure I guess us. Why can't we just care the focus on carrying that disease rather than he'll be crisper them in in in utero? Whoops you guys are not that compatible genetically Taylor just flip switches here and make sure your baby doesn't get this so that better than just like rolling out people? Well I guess this is just too tight us in the meantime until all the genetic diseases diseases have been wiped out. But yeah the reason why I definitely wanted to do this articles because I feel like it exemplifies that scene in Gatica which we did a whole episode so on she kisses a boy and then she goes to the booth and she submits the DNA so that the The booth Heller can run quick check and secret dealer Jackass. Yeah how how perfect. This guy is. What is Gatica rating so? This is true life now apparently or will be soon. It's a it's a it's a start. Start up called digit eight which is kind of a play on words. I think I'm I'm too old to really know a lot of Internet slang and but D- A it is the slang for date that's like pre stomas license plate territory there. Yeah so that's kind of what they're what they're basing it on is if they can you know everyone's sending their DNA in to have it tested for ancestry the street or for food intolerances. So why not. You're looking for a made out there. Why don't you send your DNA and this company? Digit eight can run aunt and then they can give you some based on your DNA. Some potential viable mates out there that you can try dating going into the first date knowing doing that. If you did choose to marry and have children with this person that your children would likely not be born with any of this seven thousand inherited diseases that that people are susceptible to. Yeah okay. Sure I guess that's good I I just seems like so far down the line and you just like you're not going to be there that's gutless. That's how many other people i. I wonder how many suggested to have does even example. How many I guess it depends on your own genetics? Like new car. You're carrying something and mashed with somebody. That's also carrying that. Recessive has a trade. But like I it's going to block out so many potential matches that you could be happy with well. It says it claims that you you would still be compatible with probably ninety five percent of other people out there and so that's I guess my my confusion about this is it claims aims to that. It's just going to tell you who you're compatible with instead of telling you who you're not compatible with but if you are compatible with ninety five percent of the people that are you know in this world then is it just GonNa give you a list of here are five million people that you're genetically compatible with Good Luck Doc. I'm sure it's going to be built on top of one of the existing algorithms for dating and matching wherever. This could be like talk switch like this. This feels awfully a lot down the road to eugenic yet. eugenics okay so yeah. That's the major concern that everyone is screaming about right now is is this a form of or will it lead to a form of EUGENICS. I can't see how wouldn't so so I so I wanted to look up. What exactly is the definition of eugenics and? Let's see if it applies here. So here's what I could find. eugenics is the science of improving a human population by controlled breeding to increase the occurrence of desirable heritable characteristics. I mean it's not controlled breeding it sort of the opposite. It serve exclusionary. But it's you're you're luminated possibilities right. So that's that's the fine distinction. Is that the the Professor who is Who is behind? This says that this is voluntary. You know this is just an option for you to find a mate. Nobody is going to force Chris you to participate in this dating APP in order to find a mate so it's not controlled breeding necessarily accept by you. You were your desire to find a mate that you're not going to have trouble with this terry aspect of it does display an I wonder so. I hope at least that they're going to match you whether or not you're GINA is on file or is submitting your DNA to the stadium app sort of the requirement of using it. Yes you would have to submit limit your DNA and they would run all of the test and say and they would you know give you probably some sort of print out that said you. You have a recessive disposition. POSITION JEANS TO X Y and Z diseases so for example tastes ax is a disease that your babies can inherit. It's recessive so both partners partner's needs to carry this gene in order to pass it on to their offspring rights so if you're genetically A He plus cer- Gatica or whatever term. We want to use your probably. Finally you'll match with everybody because all your recessive genes are not going to everybody. Else's recessive. Dreams are not going to trigger yours. Yeah I mean most of US probably have recessive genes for for something and as long as we. Don't you know find a partner. That is the other point one percent of the population that has this then. Our children are going to be for the most part pretty healthy but it's that rare occurrence when you know it's a perfect storm of this person has heterogenous for this gene and the other person is Hetero. I guess and there's a if they'd get together. There's a twenty five percent chance that the child is going and get both forms of the recessive gene.

Partner Gatica Programmer Tinder Michael E. Harmony United States Harvard Utero Matt Taylor Heller Gina Professor Chris
Family of man stabbed in Hanukkah attack says his condition is "dire"

Rush Limbaugh

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Family of man stabbed in Hanukkah attack says his condition is "dire"

"Looking back on this weekend's Hanukkah celebration stabbing at a rabbi's basement in Rockland county in which five people were hurt the family of one victim says they're losing hope that help regain consciousness Joseph Newman was stabbed multiple times he has a skull fracture and doctors say he'll suffer from permanent brain damage and partial paralysis at the least Newman is among five orthodox Jews wounded in the Hanukkah attack act that rabbi's home in Muncie on Saturday night where the suspect Grafton Thomas quite chillingly allegedly entered and said no one's leaving before he took out a machete and launched his attack meanwhile we're learning more about Thomas the suspect the Greenwood lake man's attorney says his client suffers from schizophrenia has been in the state of mental decline for the past decade and had been previously prescribed three medications for psychosis and depression Thomas faces federal hate crime and attempted murder

Rockland County Joseph Newman Muncie Grafton Thomas Schizophrenia Mental Decline Psychosis Greenwood Lake Attorney
Is high-potency THC linked to psychosis?

WBZ Afternoon News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Is high-potency THC linked to psychosis?

"An alarming new report in USA today is warning of the mental health risks associated with high potency marijuana products and the potential for psychotic episodes here's the visit Jimmy you Chris Jane Donald co authored the USA today article titled in part is marijuana link to psychosis in the nineteen eighties the marijuana that anybody that smoked marijuana was using often had a far less than even ten percent THC content it is very common for people to be smoking something with ninety percent THC content now the article cites one study that found a seventy seven percent increase in suicide deaths in Colorado among ten to nineteen year olds with marijuana in their systems

USA Jimmy Chris Jane Donald Co Psychosis Marijuana Colorado Seventy Seven Percent Ninety Percent Nineteen Year Ten Percent
"psychosis" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

10:12 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"Personal experience with psychosis. I have the little baby ones all the time. Like I said earlier in the episode like to be around Mirrors. And and if you're like Okay Rachel you know. Be careful brushing your teeth. You don't realize how many mirror there are in real life until you like China. Avoid them so think about your reflection shen in things in windows where I work. There's like multiple rooms that have these giant mirrors on them and I always like kind of position myself to the side. So that that I'm in between them so I can't see my reflection 'cause it just starts to mess with me and those are just like my little baby ones that is Kinda always floating around one of the really intense wants that has always stood out in my mind was I was walking through Walmart and suddenly I was like Oh my God. Can they see my wings. And do I have wings. I think I have wings. Okay are they hidden should should they see my wings. And I'm like sitting there in the middle of Walmart like having these just like huge crisis in my mind about my wings and you know I'm like why should I ask someone. Can they see my wings. Do I call someone and I mean this went on. I'm not sure. How long would it felt like hours of me? Being confused about me having wings or not and eventually I just went to my car and I and I sat there until I was kind of stable stable. Sometimes when I get in that situation and I don't get stable. I'll call my parents to come and get me. So they've had a few situations they had to pick me up at a job once and I was hiding hiding under the table. She's very for me. That was embarrassing. I hated for Co workers to see me that way but I just. I don't know I just crawled under the table. And Okay okay. This is where I live now so and if you let Rachel that stupid you know why would you suddenly want to be under a table. Why would you think you have wings? I I don't know but that's what I thought when you thought you had wings. Could you see the wings or did you just believe that the wings were there that case I I I was confused. It was going to say it wasn't like I was like. Yeah let's go run and jump off the top of the Walmart and fly away. It was more of a confusion was like do I have wings. I think I have wings wings. They should be hidden. It was more of just like this crisis in my thoughts of. Oh my God what do I do so. That's really the difference between a hallucination in which you can see it and a delusion which is you. Feel that it's there but you can't see it. Am I explaining the Difference Between Hallucinations and delusions correctly. Yes yes and and both of them can be present in psychosis like you can just have hallucinations. You can just have delusions or you can have both yes happening at the same time I'm which can really feed into each other even last night. I had a pretty bad episode where I was just laying in bed like I was just trying to go to sleep and there. There was something in the ceiling above me running around now I know in real life. There was not something in the ceiling above me running around but I just kept hearing an just went on and on just back and forth back and forth back and forth in the meantime. There's also like this weird crackling noise outside of my door and I can tell you exactly where it was like. It's out the door to the right about about two feet. That's where the sound was coming from. And then I have this radio. That wouldn't stop playing and it's caught between stations so I can't make out what they're saying on the Radio Jio but that's what it sounds like and I'm just like this goes on for a while last night until I finally took a sleeping bill because I'm like this is. This is a lot a lot in. It was just kind of all that stuff together just going on. That was like I don't know how to make it stop and I knew the crackling noise wasn't real because my dog would have like been searching for a tree like anytime the here like a bag or something. So it's like I know that part's not Rio. Because he was passed out when we talk about hallucinations and delusions. Let's let's talk about what makes a hallucination because that can affect any of the senses rates sight sound smell taste and touch but I understand that one of them is more or common in schizophrenia than all the others. Yes so. Two thirds of patients with schizophrenia. Have Auditory Hallucinations. That does not mean they only have auditory auditory that just is like the predominant one the voices and whatnot and I used to think like Oh God. I don't have those because I didn't have like a voice that just talked to me all the time minor very subtle. It's more like a set. A radio is playing like talk radio in its caught between stations. So I can't like make out what they're saying but they're like there's talking nonstop again no clue if it's about me or what is just on and on and on and I'll hear my name being called Salat which is usually my mother's voice which is kind of freaky because like she won't be home and I'll here and I'll think she's like something wrong with her so I let go through the house searching and usually end up texting extinct like hey where are you at. And he was like. Oh at starbucks Mike. Okay obviously didn't hear you screaming my name but kind of freaked me out a little bit. I worry that she's hurt or something. That's very very interesting to me because my understanding of auditory hallucinations are that you hear it inside your head but what you're describing you would have to hear it outside side your head because you said that you feel like you hear that your mother is calling you from other rooms so yes Gabe and fun fact. Is that people with schizophrenia. Usually here audio hallucinations outside of their heads. Not Inside so usually schizophrenics people schizophrenia here their audio hallucinations. Like around them. So for instance they might hear something in the wall behind them. It's not inside your head like Oh my God where is it. I hear a lot of times that I'll be like yet that came from upstairs. It's probably the kitchen area by the way it sounded so the sound kind of like my mother's voice calling out it comes from a specific direction. Not just this booming voice inside. Hide your head. Let's move onto delusions. Because that's the other common symptom of psychosis and I understand that there are two main types but can you define delusions simply for us. Delusion is a strongly held belief that is false and to me. There's so many things that you could apply that to. The two main ones in mental disorders are paranoid delusions and delusions of grandeur and the one. Most associated shaded with schizophrenia is paranoid so that's where you think like someone after you you're suspicious of individuals organizations somebody's plotting leading against Shu tracking you I've never had like to the extent of the FBI is after kind of delusion. But I get very paranoid in work work situations and it's something I have to watch because I'll just start thinking that people hate me for no reason and that they want me gone. They're plotting against me he. You know it's just like I. It's the same thoughts through the years. I've noticed so I've kind of gotten used to noticing like okay. Oh that's the same thought. I had back when I worked here in here. That's not real Rachel and I'm Kinda learning to just notice when that comes up. And then delusions of grandeur rancher that is where like you have authority power that you really don't or you think you're some sort of like savior and I once had a friend who had schizophrenia. It's a free Neha. And she believed she was an Aztec God and like bought a plane ticket and was GONNA go straight up. Go to South America and her family only stepped in but she really thought that no this is yeah. This is real and to get a little personal so the past two years. I have been dealing with a rare flesh-eating bacteria because just because you're schizophrenic doesn't mean that physical health isn't an issue right and it's been the the biggest issue with it has been going to different doctors and then them seeing the diagnosis of schizophrenia. On there then seeing that. Oh she's been on anti psychotics and and the fact that I was so healthy the flesh eating bacteria like wasn't tearing me apart the way it would normally because I was healthy and it was kind of scary because I I start to not believe myself. Either I had some doctor saying that. Okay because she's on adderall. She's doing the source yourselves. kind of like Meth addicts and and I was just Kinda like I. I'm not doing this to myself but maybe I am. You know if the doctor this doctor says I am. Maybe I am and my psychiatrist. I actually set up like a special meeting for them to evaluate me because I was like I. I don't know am I causing this or not and they went through and it was deemed. That was not causing it. It was not because of my you know psychotics antidepressants and different things. Like that. Bit can kind of freaks you out because I'm dealing with the physical thing but I'm not sure if it's real or not and it caused a lot of pain and what had happened. Was the bacteria got into my facial nerves on my right side side so I'm Lyn so much pain but I'm like Oh crap. I don't want to go the hospital if it's a hallucination you know they're going to crazy and I'm like is it real or not and ED turns out it was real. I did have bacteria eating the side of my face. But it's just like I. I doubted myself. I had no clue like I was scared. If I'm making this up. Oh God like I'm gone. I need to be like impatient now. And obviously having schizophrenia on your medical record made people well look in a different direction. So you weren't sure if it was a hallucination or delusion. They weren't sure if you were doing it to yourself and just forgetting so so. This was another barrier to getting the correct diagnosis. Which of course is another barrier to getting the correct care? These are real realities to people and to be fair it was a rare blushing mcteer. That is not a normal everyday thing. And you had someone who says they're schizophrenic. Like yeah well clearly you doing this to yourself is the most just realistic answer. We'll be right back after these messages. It can sometimes feel like another schizophrenia. Episode is just around the corner. In fact act a.

schizophrenia Walmart psychosis Rachel China starbucks Co South America FBI adderall Gabe Lyn Shu
"psychosis" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"PODCAST I'm your host Rachel Star withers with my co host gave Howard last episode. We explored the kind of boring symptoms of schizophrenia lack of motivation. Today's episode we're flipping it and we're going to be looking at psychosis so hallucinations. Delusions all the fun stuff and we actually have an awesome guest Dr Joseph Goldberg. Who's the clinical professor of psychiatry at the Mount Sinai? School of Medicine and he. He actually specializes in researching. What goes on in the brain? When someone is experiencing psychosis this is like the popular one right? This is the one that people think about. When they think of schizophrenia? They often refer to it. As going crazy you're schizophrenia. Your psycho this is the language that people are using. And it's this psychosis who says that they're thinking about when they're talking about it. I'm not saying that those are great words. I'm just saying this is what the public has the most knowledge of. Oh Oh yeah. And then whenever someone's like a college student and they'll always be like yeah. I WANNA majors ecology like this is the stuff they're thinking of. They Wanna like majoring crazy. People like all all this exciting and then they get stuff like our last episode lack of motivation. They're like oh maybe I'll switch majors. I mean lack of motivation of course is very important as we learned. But Oh yeah you are right. This is when when I first heard Rachel Star has schizophrenia. I didn't wonder if you were motivated. I wondered if you hallucinated. Elucidated Rachel do you hallucinate I do I hallucinate. I always tell people I mean. This is just my guests like ninety percent at the time just because it's like constant little things like I can't just look into a mirror. I have to be real careful with my reflection because my mind will just kinda start manipulating lighting. It little things I constantly like. I'll hear ticking and scratching noises. That aren't really there. I've had it since I was a kid. So I've learned to kind of live with these little ticking hanging clocks and stuff that I can't see they just exist and just to clarify these hallucinations exist even though you are medicated indicated under the care of a psychiatrist and are living well in recovery. They're still just that little bit. That for lack of a better phrase bleeds through. Oh Yeah And I've had much worse which will talk about in our episode today but yeah even being someone who would like you just said is recovered or very stable high functioning. My psychiatrist. The other day told me that I was the most high functioning patient she had and not just the schizophrenic. I was just the most high functioning period and I'm like well thank you I think. Alright Rachel what. What exactly is psychosis and what are some common misunderstandings that pop culture creates? Let's get those right out of the way right up front. Kind of like the word schizophrenia. Psychosis also is one of those like cool words that you just want to throw in for like effect I think and that's what's happened with our culture because even I like when I was looking at this episode I kind of was like. What exactly is it but psychosis is an umbrella term okay? So that's for anybody who who is having experiences that are not based in reality and psychosis is a symptom. It's not a disorder so I can't go to the doctor and be diagnosed as psychotic. It's a common symptom though many mental disorders and especially schizophrenia. And just to be very clear. Psychosis has has nothing to do with psychopathy or being a psychopath which I also was kind of like. I had to look that up because I'm like what. What is the connection psychosis a symptom while psychopathy is an actual personality trait? We hear psychopath a lot and again in pop culture but I don't think that psychopath and psychopathy go path is something that the medical establishment spends a lot of time on rate credit. The only reason that it's permeated our society is because it's a storytelling device not because it's an actual mental illness that we all need to worry about right. Yes yeah again. has nothing to do with schizophrenia. Or psychosis if someone is psychotic or psychosis than it just means that their mind is losing grip on reality whereas when we think of a psychopath it's somebody that doesn't have feelings leans for others and could be violent or reckless or act and antisocial ways so to drill it down. What is psychosis psychosis is used to describe conditions that affect the mind where there's been a loss of contact with reality so you might also hear psychotic episode period of psychosis assist but it's one of the defining criteria for diagnosing schizophrenia? Is You have to have had some sort of episode of psychosis in some way and different symptoms of what that is so delusions believing things that are not true hallucinations experiencing things that other people around you do not and I find this really interesting. Is that also kind of what falls under that is incoherent speech or nonsense speech so like that for for family friends who might be kind of worried. That's what they see so people on the outside you might see a schizophrenic kind of saying things that don't make sense. I even saw one thing that was like slurred speech which my speech slurs all the time and people will think I'm on drugs or I'm like super drunk at work and no it's just something gets off in in my speech and I didn't realize like Oh that's a sign of starting to lose grip of reality. This is really important for friends and family members or any sort of support people in your life because what they see is the slurred speech. The depression the anxiety the social withdrawal. The word salad it. It looks off but obviously psychosis has happening internally so this is what they see right all of those symptoms that you just listed did is what the person will see from somebody that is experiencing psychosis correct correct. Yes I stay with me sometimes. People actually will tell me that my eyes look wild and I don't really know what that means but my mom said it multiple times I've even I teach modeling and acting classes. Sometimes two kids and I've had kids like Kinda raised their hand and say that that something looked odd about my face and they can't really tell me what but I don't know if maybe unlike more expressive recipe and I don't realize what's happening but yes so if you are like a loved one out there my mom always asks should she pointed out or not like she's afraid of making me self conscious I I want to know. Give me a heads up that maybe things are not correct because I need to know. Yeah when my mind is starting to slip so for me it. It definitely helps to those little triggers if you kind of start to notice them in your loved ones with schizophrenia. Kind of point that out to them so they can be aware okay. I might be starting to lose as grip with reality. It's also important to know though if they argue back. This is now not the time to plant your flag and be willing to die on the hill for for example. If Rachel says it's snowing inside my room I will point out say Rachel. It's not snowing in here now. She fires back. Yes it absolutely is is a I will say something along the lines of okay. Well how cold you think it will get. And that way I can try to gauge her reaction to get her the best help possible without angering her and setting myself up as our enemy now. That's kind of tough because people feel like no. I must convince the person experiencing during psychosis that what they're experiencing is wrong but remember medical condition medical help. So you know that. That's a little tough right because depending on where you you are in your recovery. That pointed out may work or it may not so it pays to be nimble when they try and stress to people to help them understand Dan about like how intense hallucinations and delusions can be. You can tell me something isn't real but that doesn't make me stop experiencing it in my like logical mind right now. I know that. Let's say there isn't a dark figure standing beside me but I'm still seeing it so all the the logic in the world doesn't make me stop seeing that figure. I just have to kind of keep reminding myself. It's not really there. It's not really there and do my best. It's not to react to it Rachel. Let's move onto types of psychotic episodes. I I was really surprised that psychosis is not just one thing. There's actually like subcategories subcategories of psychosis and I thought this was so cool that there are subcategories because that a lot of people experience most of the normal world. Oh thanks okay. Only people that are super mentally ill would have hallucinations delusions but one of the subtypes is a brief reactive psychosis and that occurs during times of extreme stress so for instance the death of a family member going through something like a traumatic car accident or some sort the big event like that a surgery and someone can. Yeah go through a psychotic episode. It can be anywhere from days to a few weeks but you. You usually come out of that with time. Then you have drug and alcohol related psychosis so obviously ravers out there. That's what we think of but even you know if you've ever been under anesthesia and you're coming out and you're in that kind of loopy phase where you're like little bit Giddy but also you're not sure what's real or not right and it's very typical not just of we understand that people do drugs or get drunk and they can experience these things but it's also important important understand that it can happen. The pain medication. It can happen via surgery. It's not a one size. Fits all one of the things that we're trying to establish the psychosis psychosis is a lot more normal than I think. People want to admit as you said it's not just the severely mentally ill but then of course the last one is organic psychosis which is due to disorder right so organic psychosis that is due to some sort of mental disorder or injury. Great so for instance different types of brain injuries. Yeah will then call a psychotic episodes. That could be temporary or last forever. And that's really what we're talking about out mostly into this episode organic psychosis as it relates to schizophrenia and mental illness right and can either have a slow onset which is actually good a slow onset. You tend to have milder psychosis whereas something. That's very like quick and dramatic. Nick so just suddenly being thrown into losing grips of reality. Those pretty bad psychotic episodes If someone stops taking their medication location they usually will go into a pretty rapid transition of psychosis and those are kind of like for schizophrenics out there and loved ones who live with with them. I feel like those are the most noticeable when someone goes off their meds. Is those quick kind of dramatic transitions for me. Unfortunately that has happened in the past where I thought I was you get in this mindset of Oh I'm I'm better now and you'll just stop taking your meds. Don't do that bad but I did in. Yeah I spin out of control. Pretty quickly Rachel. Let's talk about personal experiences. As you said you have hallucinations. You have delusions. Let's talk about your Rachel's.

psychosis Rachel Star hallucinations School of Medicine Dr Joseph Goldberg Mount Sinai slurred speech Howard incoherent speech Nick Dan
What's the Science Behind Bullying?

Tai Asks Why

09:52 min | 1 year ago

What's the Science Behind Bullying?

"Assuming all of you've been bullied at least once in your life. These are my friends piper fin cayden and zoe. We're all kids here and we all have dealt with it at at some point in our lives for me. Oftentimes i feel like my friends needed knee for their entertainment. It would weird because if they would be like teasing me or something and i would be like a but these are my friends. These are nice people. Why are they bullying me for me. It's something that i'm like credit. Experiencing is just someone at high school in my class who like they'll just jokingly journal show me. I think they take it too far. Sometimes they just don't really know when to stop. I just think like for me. There's just like the little things that kind of like build up like there's this one person who kind of criticizes me like about. Maybe my grades or something like fattened say like that. I'm not doing well just like making up stuff. Which i don't think is very nice young not nauta good feeling at all. It sucks you know and really bad blink can actually affect your life for a really long time. I took a listen through some recent c._b._c. A._b._c. stores on bullying and made me really really sad to hear from grownups who are still haunted by these heroin blink experiences that they had when they were a young small kit and being a small kid. I was bullied a lot. I was an easy target. I constantly get pushed around punched kicked bookstore on the hallway floor. I changed schools. A couple of times about the bullying followed me and i dropped out of school at sixteen eighteen years old but three of them <hes> after school would pin me down on the ground <hes> and push me down and hit me and kick me. I really became a shell of who i probably could have been. I was quite an emotional wreck. <hes> i think it's something you just never really recover from so i think you you know in a way we're we're sort of playing with fire when we think that this is just something not everybody goes through or many people go through and there are consequences <music> if popular and more popular. That's going to be a lot different for you than if you target somebody who's weaker. It's just you're. I don't wanna pick on someone. That's low risk high rewards yeah exactly that's that's a perfect way of putting it wouldn't be really effective if a grade twelve winning and sort of beating up a great one i mean nobody would be impressed by that because that's not a sign that you're tough for that. You can defend yourself so it's really a way of intimidating others bash putting on a display that on the one hand shows that you can be dangerous tough but on the other hand is not likely to cost you anything for humans in particular it helps us get a few different goals either resources so things that you need like <hes> food good luck money <hes> the best spot in the playground scholarship <hes> it can be your reputation or your popularity and then reproduction which is is dating and <hes> mating opportunities that allow people to pass on their genes so unfortunately the evidence suggests that bullying works and getting all three of those things so it sounds like the reason people are bullying is because it helps them get stuff you know they take advantage vantage of these people that have less power than them and they use them to get ahead in life but that's not really right because it seems like it's making bullying. Elect a good thing which i know it's not because my moral compasses decent. I'd like to say and that stuff eight right. Tony agrees that it's not as great as it seems. There is a flaw in this whole scheme. The problem with it is that as with everything has a cost so it has a downside and the downside is that you're burning bridges for cooperation later in the future so in many ways. It's kind of me first right right now. Strategy <hes> in that while we know bullies are rated as being more popular. They're almost always rated being less liked and that makes sense right. You don't wanna mess with them. But do you really want to have them as your homework partner. Do you really want to go and stay in their hotel room. If you go on a class trip you know so you can respect their power and that allows them to do certain things but in the long run <hes> especially if they lose their power then they're not very appealing for other people to be with so it's a strategy that has some benefits but also some costs as well for me is a person on the bullied side it hurts and it makes explorer life frustrating sad hard all these negative emotions so yeah there are costs for bullies and so many more costs for the victims which sucks the most because you know their victims like they didn't even want this and they're interesting experiments that neuroscientists have don to show that being excluded being socially rejected or ostracized have particularly intense effects effects on young people. This is super chowhdury. I'm an assistant professor. In the division of social i and transcultural psychiatry at mcgill university support thinks the cost of bullying not just socially but also in our brains especially especially when we're young which is great because i'm young in the last say twenty years neuroscientists have demonstrated how the brain goes goes through a really pronounced period of development around puberty and adolescence and the brain is especially responsive to the social the environment during adolescence probably because since you're like totally changing as a person you know you have to kind of be a little bit more aware yeah. I'm thinking about your question question about bullying. It's not surprising that harmful social experiences have especially deep effects on the developing brain and we know that you know being bullied. Persistently is a really stressful experience that ah is a predictor of later development of psychosis so psychosis being <hes> the experience of losing touch with reality in quite a disturbing having way so that you may see things that other people don't see or hear things that other people don't here and <hes> bullying can be a risk factor for the development of psychosis this so this psychosis thing seems kind of scary. What are some other effects that can happen if you're chronically bullied or just you know if if you're bullied really hard or yes oh well that can lead to depression and anxiety it can lower young people self esteem so it it it can be a part of childhood trauma of adolescent trauma and the outcomes can be enduring in one person's lifetime and they may even be transmitted into the next generation.

Psychosis ZOE Mcgill University Heroin Depression Assistant Professor Tony Partner DON Sixteen Eighteen Years Twenty Years One Hand
"psychosis" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"It's just I'm so I just I am euro CD OCD with this. And we sit there watching movie, and I'll notice that halfway through the movie, I haven't even looked at the screen. I'm looking at the damn tree Gordon that ornament has to be moved that has to be moved. I'm doing everything I can not to move it. It's bad. That's borderline. Psychosis is one that is anti all enjoy the Christmas season psychotic way here. Three. And then when you go to bed that's gonna move them. All no that won't even work there won't even work. No, it's depressing. Yeah. It's depressing. That's weird. When your kids get to an age where they understand that, you know, dad's psychotic. Look Christmas psychosis. Yeah. But isn't that what the holidays are all about crazy relatives that gums? You know, you're just like, oh, dear God, we have to do this again stepped in your case that crazy relatives. Of every day. The alone in this. I can't he can't just be me. Autonomy was so she was so because we have so everybody just stopped then in one by one they just kind of stop and it started because I said, wait, wait, wait. You don't put the ornaments on yet. We haven't fluffed the tree because you know, how you have if you have a fake tree sitting in a box. So everything is just flat. And I'm like, look see you can see right out to the patio through the tree is because you have to kind of bend the branches. And so we are bending the branches. All my gosh. That did not sit. Well, well that has to happen with you. If you have a fake Trina box. Thank you. Thank you. Pretty pretty Fank you now we solve this problem. A few years ago when I started advocating for us making it Christmas all year around in our garage. So if you go to our garage in July this trees just up Pat has. A friend who has a. Great you walk into their living room is beautiful liver. And the there's a full wall that slides down the the the room and in it are all their Christmas decorations all set up and all they do is roll them out. Oh, my go- Ken shut. Decorated in. Yes. Centrally decorated year round all they'd and it's on a rolling thing. And they just bring it. It's ready. We are this why we didn't sell because I want to build a house, and I'm put that Christmas you need to do you see the onset here. Yeah. Okay. Those were all in a property cage. They were just they just had plastic on top of them. And somebody said, hey, we gotta decorate studios for Christmas, blah, blah, blah. I come in the next day. Everything's decorated. I'm like, how did she do this so fast now like, wow clan is just we just took the plastic often wheel the trees out, and I'm like, oh my gosh. I forgot we did that that is the greatest thing ever brilliant. Sorry house every house. It's like every it's like every Jewish house needs to dishwashers every Christian house should have a Christmas tree room. Yes. And where it just disappears. Pull it out beyond that, they they they kind of designed her whole house around the Christmas decorations because they also have an elevator goes up to the second floor one on the elevator. They've got they've got the Christmas decorations for the second floor, and they take the elevator up to the second floor role everything out, and it's all in place. You know, you have sweet gig. If you're thinking, I'm gonna get an elevator from my house because somebody's triple. But because I don't want to all the ornaments up and the retired. So yeah, it's pretty sweet VIV a billionaire. Need to be a billionaire. Christmas is about too much material. We.

Psychosis OCD Gordon VIV Pat Ken
"psychosis" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

And That's Why We Drink

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

"We can talk to blaze's about this to which I'm sure he'll call bullshit. But there is a medical term that is actually called windows psychosis. All right, which is a condition that actually is a real condition, and it is said it's a condition that creates an intense craving for human flesh and the fear of becoming a cannibal. We'll think about Armand my this. Yeah. From last week. So apparently, he lived his whole life though. He will. Yeah. He was it's a condition where you're afraid of the chance of becoming cannibal. And then you just like, I guess because you are so afraid to become a cannibal you're thinking about it non stop that you end up develop. Ping less for for flush anyway. Right. Like this like a player annoy that builds a self-fulfilling prophecy. And so I really this coasts happens mainly to people living near the Great Lakes of Canada and northern United States, which is good where the wind goes comes from. Yeah. And it happens when there's there's this little clause where the wind to go. Psychosis only happens or is only defined as when it goes psychosis. When the sufferer thinks that they must eat human flesh survive when other food is accessible to them. Well, okay. So it's not even like first survival. Right. It's like I'm afraid of being a cannibal. Hey, christine. You're looking pretty yummy. And then there's AAA literally sitting right next to me. But I'm going to eat you. Anyway, the actually very real about what's actually happening in this room. So I'm a little nervous. It's like who does if I actually developed and I'm actually looking really delicious. Kind of confused. I mean Christine's lost five pounds recently like yum, e can I get a slice. So. Okay. So wanted to go psychosis usually occurs for people in the winter when they are alone for a long time. And so I guess they're isolated with their own thoughts. Right. I mean, they could still literally have food within reason like within distance of them. But because they're by themselves and thinking, these slots, they show signs of cannibalism. So they apparently become delusional. And they think that they're becoming accountable, and they see others as being edible or as I called Christine, yummy. And they fear. They will have to eat them. Even though they currently a food next to them. Right. So natives believe that this is actually a psychosis that can be cured by traditional native. Healers. However, if it doesn't work, they'll just kill you. Good. 'cause they're like, okay. Well, the cure isn't working. So you're just going to become a cannibal nip it in the bud. So let's just let's just get this out. Okay. One example of this was an eighteen seventy eight. There was a tribe member from the Cree tribe named swift run. Honor the exact opposite of what I am by the way, and she was a trapper and trader and he was married and a father of six, okay. So during the winter swift runner and his family were starving. It was really really cold out. Right. Didn't think we could get anywhere and his oldest son had already died of starvation in all know at some point swift river developed when to go psychosis when he actually knew that there was emergency food available only twenty miles away. Well, okay. So he knew the risks food that he could get to. But instead of going to get the food. He butchered his entire family fuck and ate them. All oh my God. It is said that when they found evidence of these bodies he had even sucked the bone marrow out leaving nothing. Untouched on all six people humidity being so hungry eight six people in your family. It took Arman literally ten months to eat that one guy. Yeah. Truly, I mean, he really feasted. So he another one is in nineteen twenty. There was a young doctor and his wife that just moved into a town called fort Kent. I don't. Know where this is. I'm guessing Minnesota that could be absolutely wrong though..

Psychosis christine Armand blaze Arman fort Kent United States Great Lakes of Canada swift river Minnesota Cree five pounds ten months
"psychosis" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

Whimsically Volatile

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

"Here's I have that whole side of my family going on, and I would come back and forth out here. Like growing up, my mom, just send me, and then I don't know in my heart one day. I was just like DC is not where I wanna stay still. As my dad had come out here for high school. And he was like fuck. No. So. That didn't work out. But I came out for college. And then I didn't leave that. So you seem like you had your heart set on LA. Yeah. I mean like people are so fucking lazy here. And I'm lazy. This. I was like I mean, I wanted to go to New York, but that just didn't seem it didn't seem to I didn't seem to have enough gumption. You could also say psychosis psychosis. Right. I didn't have the psychosis for New York, New York. I feel like it's it's a daunting task. And I don't know if it's necessarily worth it. I mean, I'm always kind of. Show. Yeah. I love that my friends who live there in love it love, it people from their love and everything but to move there is quite a thing. Absolutely. And I mean growing up like every time I tried to run away, you know, 'cause the Chinatown bus now, not I had a bad childhood at all let me clarify that for you people too. But the spirit of the spirit of adventure. Jim. And I was like, you know, this whole highschool shit is boring. I'm out, and so I would occasionally at least once twice a year just jump on the China tell it goes to your. And would find myself in like these really cool..

psychosis New York LA Jim China one day
"psychosis" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"The find a way to manage the psychosis dot is the basis of civilization is high to manage our fundamentally self-destructive drives, not our natural instincts but are unnatural drives. It's like an onion. Yep. And I feel like it's like I can understand the onion, but it sounds like what you're saying is like. One layer came before the layer before, like I feel like the like, what like paint a picture for me of what that looked like, because how would. Someone who is existing in psychosis or going through in unable to speak like, like if we came from less from more primitive versions of ourselves. And I, I'm sure you're gonna have a great answer for this, but I and I'm maybe I'm just like dim and I don't. I'm not getting it, but like. If you have this site psychosis that's happening, how in the world would that be able to reproduce and therefore survive at all yet the individual born in that state is would be unable to. So if it happens and in my understanding of Lucians at tends to happen on a generation slash population level. Then you know, I mean, it it happens. So let's throw that out the window. So somebody maybe because that's let's get way too too in the weeds, but like but say the individuals born into psychosis. That is the next stage, right? That's an evolution in new adopt is a derailment of evolution. Well, okay, it will. Yeah, because the two nuts. Yeah, it's like a as a, everything's going straight. And then there suddenly terrified like everything's like, I'm smart enough to get here. I'm smart enough to use the tools, I guess, what's the time line here like, or you saying that we don't know this, and that's, that's the problem that we're looking in the. Yeah, we do except except we see it in every infant. So we kind of like, you know, not that I'm saying it's a one to one comparison, but the from birth to childhood UC exactly. This conflict arising. And so in the same way that some scientists will say that you, if you look at an embryo, you can kind of see that it goes through, you know, almost like various it replicas..

psychosis Lucians
"psychosis" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"And I know what you're saying when you use the term derailment. But I do feel like that implies that evolution is this sort of it's on a track and it's a train. It's going toward a particular destinations not in yet, so so evolution or nature does not care if you experienced psychosis nature does not give a crap. So I think that like there's nothing wrong with organism existing in a state of psychosis. It's just it may not survive as well as someone who puts a cap on it or it's do. Yeah, exactly. It's not a derailment of. Some sort of progress to real -ment of evolutionary theory self. But what you're saying is very important, which is this Ness within abolition. So it's called Naumann reductive. I e it arises of the abolition reprocess, but at Connaught be adequately addressed by that process. And so you're absolutely right. It's like this is this derailment is not something either that deals the kind of the the, the momentum listen creates thought, continues on also this hop within evolution. The simple the difference is evolutionary theory cannot aquifer address this derailment, really. It sounds like what we're saying is that because that I agree with, it sounds ultimately like that joke where the scientist is like we science all that matters. We don't eat philosophy than the philosopher says, you know, why do you think that? And then the scientists before he star. Stocking loss related doing philosophy. I, it sounds like this is the core of philosophy versus science like, it sounds like you're going to be human is cannot be explained by causes of nature that are biological causes of nature. It sounds like, is that what you're saying? It's just that's a that will explain a lot that'll actually be ninety percent of human action and interaction. But as a theoretical position on Tillett advances and expands, it won't be able to adequately express what actually makes us humans to it. And this is where it kind of connects with the Islamic Jewish and Christian kind of notion of of a full because one sense the lacob is saying not human subjectivity derailment. It is a full. We full into self consciousness. It's like it's like the first step is not a one day. You wake up, look around and go is beautiful. It's onto shock. Yeah, it's this moment of like terror. It's it's, it's it's a byproduct of evolution. Doesn't help navigation function psychosis. As you say is, is actually a problem for like honorable at us, how psychosis will not survive as well as one that doesn't. And so we know right. Yeah. Well, psychosis was through into we see it because we knew psychotic people they were able to, but very hard to survive. It's your, if you if you so from psychosis, you need institutions to help you survive. You need a lot of help because your instincts are icy. Okay. So even if you if you're suffering from psychosis or you're at that stage in human development when your baby and your are like, you're not going to be your instincts are not going to to help you provide. In fact, that's psychosis in the sense is the perversion of your info can now now I'm kinda back onboard cocoa I Gotcha. So instinct draft, let's let's full. Yeah, full and the subjectivity. Yes. Okay, it's it's a very depressing kind of like instead of this kind of, oh, we we more complex and then we began gone to speak. That's all wonderful. Like, oh, no levels were. Here's Vic. That's a good point. 'cause we talked about this last relic..

psychosis scientist Naumann Tillett ninety percent one day
"psychosis" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Did your iheart triple. Triple-x wings, shirt, go over all it was on Friday Caught a lot of eyes? And got a lot of thumbs up Right yeah mostly me really cruising for dudes at this thing A spicy Your dream which is, totally. Cool man, I mean. I, don't yeah. That's fine worked. For middle. All right so we saw, the here the two things that. I. Liked, okay well mommy I liked I saw. Tosh. Sultana, okay She's an Australian woman goal girl and she does that thing where she. Plays. Everything. Herself and. She loops it okay. Sure, really. Good. Really. Good, guitar. Player oh cool Razi good yeah nice. And she. Has a pretty interesting. Backstory She's a Bit of a drug addict, and she Somehow Ended up with psychosis Really from from too many hallucinogens from whatever. Drugs she was taking she, then you kinda go. You get to touch. You, don't, come back. Well yeah she was. She was in treatment she had to go into treatment and I don't. Know, psychosis, but there's. Another word that goes. In front of it I wanna say Drug psychosis but it's a it's, a drug induced psychosis yeah anyway she was really good. I thought and That. Was. One, of those things where. You know Greg Kaut, said. Not. To miss her and I was like, yeah right okay fifty year old telling me about. Music but. Turns out he was right, about, that, one all right and and then Lauren O'Neil she. She she Instagram that tash sultana will change your life then I wrote watched her in hashtag red bull channel meant to say, on blew me away that. I thought that was lame but I said it anyway Hashtag Taj sultana, hashtag couch palooza nice and she liked it Lauren, liked it very cool yeah Yeah So it was a drug induced. Psychosis so then when she got, out she just began busking and, she I don't know if she posted the video or somebody posted a video over busking and a guy like millions of views and like one of those, deals. Right so she was really. Good but then the other band that I that I ended up liking a. Lot Was Portugal the man yes Most? Cats. Is like. Geniuses really? Yeah I thought I mean it was really different and cool and had a sweet, kind? Of I don't know like jamming kind of vibe to you know nice and I read a little bit, about, them, and I guess they, were having trouble writing and one of their. Dad's from hey man I was at Woodstock people just got. Up. There and did stuff, so they just went into the studio. And started, doing stuff. Yeah and this Woodstock album there's is the one that caught. On no. Kidding really good and they. Got. A guy, that's a, paraplegic in a wheelchair all right you can play guitar man nice Oh yeah that's that's the guy was telling. You I. Cornered at the the backstage. Show Rolled away Season corridor.

Taj sultana psychosis Lauren O'Neil Portugal Greg Kaut Tosh busking Woodstock fifty year
"psychosis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the room and how we might try and find the people who get overlooked yeah definitely thought that's the way life is this is maliki whittling i just thought you know i'm i'm a quiet kid i get good grades i don't get in a lot of disputes anything and so it just felt like well that's just how it is malaysia grew up in atlanta with two loving parents and siblings and just had a wonderful enriching childhood my sister is actually my best friend i have two sisters so i'm the younger sister bratty you know i always get him away type of person but when she was growing up militias family actually struggled with homelessness i remem member having trash bags and sleeping on couches and i remember a lot of on dark nights but i also remember my family really taken a lot of care to make sure that we will will nurtured in love during that time the doormat teenage years though my mom does win psychosis mania really escalated she would be on medicine sometimes and that would pull her away from all the other aspects of progress the and then when she wasn't on medicine is blow and so it was kind of like a lose lose either i don't have my mom in this way i don't have my mom at way doormat teenage years is when it really hit a fever pitch because everyone else had moved out of the house and i was the last danny scapegoat and it just became unbearable and just a little bit too dangerous for me to be there and so i had to flee melika whitley picks up her story.

malaysia melika whitley maliki atlanta psychosis fever danny
"psychosis" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"This is a mazes well the first thing you were thinking this will be my next show this is my next art this this material life thank you jesus nothing was happening i needed some life was to boringly predictable just finishing my taylor swift manek's taylor swift joking i got a lot of writing to do for sheriff man good times in terms by like there's lots of people he struggled with psychosis nothing wrong without like if someone stroz psychosis just means the hot their sense of ego is very frag either fragmented or lis anelle everyone likes void of body experiences but if you suffer from psychosis you want in body experiences because you can have either body experiences super easy you know fact you're out of your body all the time but so it's actually very very it's like everybody has their issues but for families psychotic the issue is their sense of self is fragmented or weak or threat and if they are under deep stress a site presently stover someplace psychosis under deep stress that might brick and they might have a psychotic brick which means that they suddenly detached entirely from reality they think the f b i r after them they think people have implanted chips in their teeth i mean all these things even if they're like super intelligent i would never believe that normally but again this is just the truth psychotic tells the truth of everybody that is we're all constructing things like whenever someone things there's a there's a murderer in the cupboard i mean not as a fantasy that that has new connection with reality and you can be a genius and still think there's a murderer in your cupboard so there's a there's a certain sense which is called a tells us certain tripped of by what it means to be a subject but they suffer from not being able to solidify their sense of self and then an extreme kisses it puts in extreme cases you become the presence.

manek psychosis taylor stover
"psychosis" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I mean i am calm and when i think about it now i think how did i not notice this but i didn't i had no ability to see it at all the next question that when asked you is many of our audience members they don't know what schizophrenia is it all they know what they've heard on the news they know what they've seen on television they know a lot of the stereotypes in you know we have certainly done our best to explain it but normal to hear it from you a person who lives with schizophrenia what's a good lay persons definition of what schizophrenia is how would you explain it to somebody well there's different types of schizophrenia i can't speak for all different types of schizophrenia but i have paranoid schizophrenia diagnosed with and so what happens with me is that always think negative thoughts any motions like people are always trying to harm me or people always saying bad things about me behind my back and some makes me become more like withdrawn and depress of a lot of anxiety from an paranoia you know and so like what happened to me when i was really brought down with the illness that i would get stuck in a way to where i would just sit there and just not say anything not communicate you know kinda just hide myself away from my own feelings because it was it was too much for me you know i was like i was just sitting there coma toasts or having some type of psychosis because i couldn't accept the way that i.

psychosis
"psychosis" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"In irvine he was part of a two thousand twelve study landmark study that studied stevie d in as a treatment for psychosis and it it it came out exactly the same results with reduction in psychosis high very high doses eight hundred milligrams a day but this was there was no side effects from cbd but here's where the politicians have it backwards they all talk about how they wanna get research so that they can figure out how they're going to deal with quote quote marijuana and the medical community the problem that dr danielle ep molly told me he'd been working on the for ten years prior to even when i talked about it with him he said that we can't the universities can't get funding because it's a dangerous substance it set schedule one problem and that causes it it makes it almost impossible for them to get funding because it's considered dangerous by the government and there's only one place in georgia where they can they can universities can get the pro you know to get the cannabis to look at and he said the government is standing in the way of the research so therefore when dr p meli did this study most of them like that study was done in germany most of these studies are done in europe summer done in brazil some industrial a couple of other played israel absolutely israel that's one of the founding centers of where cannabis research has come from so you know the thing is is that that's the reason why we need to be in favour no matter what time of the aisle we're on we need to be in favor of getting cannabis office schedule one so hopefully john boehner will help us with that because he put that in his statement that he thinks we have to get it off the schedule one i mean i i is obviously he's cashing in right john boehner you know i'm sure he's you know he's in retirement i'm sure he's looking for some money.

irvine psychosis marijuana dr danielle ep georgia cannabis dr p meli brazil israel john boehner stevie germany europe ten years
"psychosis" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"That would be a different thing correct sure yes yes that would be a different thing so if it doesn't fit with your values than the likelihood of you acting on the fought is almost nonexistent because you don't you don't want to do it right you have these thoughts that are grows and shame falling guilt ridden and you don't want to do it so therefore you're trying to get rid of the fought whereas a person website postpartum psychosis the thoughts nothing half fit with their value system they believe in the thoughts as real as fitting their world view to do they fit fit in their value system outside of their source analogy disorder or psychosis well they can't tell the difference that's the thing about psychosis aside you can't tell the difference between real reality everybody else's that everybody else experience versus the reality that you experience so that's i should that's like the hallmark of psychosis so a mother having intrusive thoughts like i'm getting messages that you know god is telling me that if i don't drowning kill my babies than the double will take his soul and therefore in order to save my baby i need to drown him and kill them touch so heavy and that thought is a thought that the mother would believe in as if it is a real far as imposed wits scaring her exactly as opposed to oh my gosh waya my having this fought with us this mean about me what kind of mother mi for having such a thought i want to get rid of the thought this thought makes me feel awful as a person as a mother should give me a couple more examples of obsessions in than the the compulsion coupled with them and then look to talk about ideally how a mother and even her partner could help.

psychosis intrusive thoughts partner
"psychosis" Discussed on Sword and Scale

Sword and Scale

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Sword and Scale

"It leaves in his house and kept kept pointing out the little girl the victim there uh half a peculiar set of behaviors uh and i don't think that i can recall other crimes where there is uh thomas similar to mention associated with the murders or the sexual crimes so yeah yeah i think there is every possibility that there's something very uh uh are going on inside of scotch uh at that fits separate from from the idea of is more blood and blood loss to the dichotomy between sicopp at the end psychosis comes up again and again on the show but for any new or forgetful listeners out there said cop if he is a personality disorder characterized by narcissism and a lack of empathy psychosis on the other hand is a mental illness often characterized by delusions or hallucinations a psychopath operates within the bounds of reality whereas someone's suffering from a psychotic disorder might break from reality altogether sicopp at the end psychosis are not related to each other but in this story it seems to dr burrel that there may be elements of both no deserve it has who combination of both elements through the classic cut a psychopathic coast psychosexual killer and to leave things that meeting was well i mean invest with people pro russian quote right both slipped about because leaf seem so weird been on the and it is owed been third odd so it's you know it opens the door up to uh.

psychosis
"psychosis" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Interpret a lot of various especially if you don't have a lot of input so i think that might be one of the reasons why we don't see that yet where we're going to cut driverless cars i or handwriting analysis by computer i handwriting on earth that's that's my prediction so we we have one thing left which is your physical and emotional state all yeah and right year person changes a little so here actually is a really interesting thing it turns out that handwriting can be a really good way too seat early onset symptoms of certain diseases so people change the way they right um when for instance um they are developing psychosis and this is because so there was a study in 2013 about psychosis so it we know that seiko says his often preceded by movement abnormalities but those can be really really hard to spot because you have to be trained to see them and you have to observe someone for really really longtime and basically it's really time in labourintensive and difficult and not altogether accurate but it turns out so disccan ija is one of the markers of that and disconnection means that your voluntary movements are abnormal so when i wanted to do something there something slightly off about that movement that happens because basically are dopamine becomes old uptake becomes impaired and so the study showed that people who are at risk for developing psychosis started showing more disloyal and pen movements so became a very good proxy for detecting psychosis before you could actually see it and that's one of the earliest symptoms so you can actually see some of that in handwriting parkinson's so a lot of times.

psychosis labourintensive dopamine