35 Burst results for "Psychosis"

"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"You're working on next. I mean, I hope to just continue being able to work with action on postpartum psychosis. I think especially with the pandemic and everything that's been happening with the NHS and for me, it's so important having experience. I mean, I could have, you know, there could be a whole other element to the book about what it felt like to be in the U.S. without health insurance and just kind of the terror of the logistics surrounding that and following through a net and I'm so grateful that I was able to come here and we live here and the fact that there is that support network and yeah, I had a glimpse of what it's like on the other side of that and it is very frightening and especially with the birth of my second child that kind of prevention, the conversations and the care that I was able to have. I mean, yeah, I think that's such a such an invaluable and important aspect. Definitely in the experience as well. So this is goodbye. For mentally

postpartum psychosis NHS U.S.
"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

07:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"I think because it is a very terrifying disorder and often when it's talked about in the media or when it's talked about on the news, it's very sensationalized. And it's horrifying. And I think it also breaks kind of that ultimate taboo of a mother who might harm or is not a safe presence around their children. And I think action and postpartum psychosis does a lot to kind of dispel that. There's no, you know, it's not something to be afraid of. It's not something to suffer in silence. And I think there is already so much guilt around motherhood anyway, but especially for mothers who experience something like that. And I think, you know, for me, what's really important is to show that even if it's not the extent of psychosis, so many of the things that women struggle with after giving birth is very shared and there doesn't have to be any shame or stigma. Absolutely. And can you tell us a bit more about what exactly the charity does? Yes, so they have research that they do in order to kind of help find ways to support they do a lot of education. There are resources for carers for partners. I think actually the reason we found out about actually in postpartum psychosis was my husband was trying to Google how to care for me and then he found the pamphlet that they'd done for partners and carers on how to support somebody who'd gone through postpartum psychosis. They have the forum as well, but also they do a lot in terms of lobbying for mother and baby units all around the UK and also just communicating with government officials as well about the need for mother baby units and the need for perinatal mental health support and education. So it's a bit more about the book now. So it's inferno a memoir of motherhood and madness. What challenges did you face when you were writing that? Yeah, so I started writing the book actually very during my recovery, very soon after the events of what had happened. And it started, I wanted to write an article about it just because I'd never heard of postpartum psychosis, but then very quickly, I realized that in order to understand a mental breakdown, you have to know what has been broken. And so yes, I actually, and it might be because I was on so many medications, but I was very, very focused on the book. And I wrote the first draft only in a couple of months. And of course, I had to redraft quite a bit afterwards. But the initial writing of it, it really just flowed and I felt kind of a compulsion to share, yeah, to share the experience and hopefully to give an understanding of what it might feel like to have your sense of reality blown apart and your sense of self blown apart and then how do you begin to construct yourself and what does that actually mean? If you had to it because it's been out a little while now, hasn't it? Yes, it came out in March of 2020 actually. But yes, it's been a really positive response. I've had that's been kind of the most moving part about it is that so many people have reached out to say that they'd experienced some of the emotions and, you know, I think that's the other thing is the loneliness of mental health. It can be very reassuring to see the other people experience the same kind of things. And I think that's my hope with the book was to show kind of how universal a lot of these feelings are. But yeah, and I think one thing that I found really powerful is that for people who have experienced kind of maternal mental health, you know, I heard from people who said that it helped them talk with their mothers about their experience that the family had never discussed. I was just a secret that nobody talked about and that for me I think is very important. Well, I loved it. Sort of just a really beautiful book. I thought, and it's also, it was very interesting to me as someone who didn't really know about it, but in terms of Korean culture, something I knew absolutely nothing about elements of that was sort of really interesting. But yeah, the language is just really beautiful. How did your family feel about it? Yet it was my parents still haven't read the book. I asked them not to. I think for them, you know, as part of the whole conversation about why it's important to have a conversation. But yeah, I think they're very private people. I'm actually, to be honest, a very private person as well. And I don't think they understood why I wanted to share something that was so private. And I think also definitely there's a cultural aspect of this is something that happened in the family, so let's keep it quiet, but I was trying to explain that, you know, that's kind of the point that when that is the point and so I felt really strongly about publishing it about having it under my name and I think for me that was really important. My brother did read it and it really meant a lot to me that he felt it was a very accurate and he really he found it very moving and so yeah I thought for me it was really I think I'd like to wrap up now in terms of the chat but I suppose there's two more things I like to ask. One of them is quite huge. So what do you wish people understood about postpartum psychosis? That's a really good question. I wish people understood about postpartum psychosis. Well, for one thing, I think if you're somebody who's experienced to know that that's really nothing that was your fault, I definitely spent a lot of time going over all the things that maybe led to what happened and how could I have avoided it and why did this happen and how could I have done that put myself through this and my family through such a traumatic event and my son through such a traumatic event. But it took me some time to really process understand that it was beyond my control and so much of the motherhood and birth and all of that, it is a shift of identity. It is a shift mentally, physically, emotionally, definitely a psychologically. And so, you know, that's why psychosis happens. So I want to show that it's nothing to be afraid of or ashamed of and I think that's what action on postpartum psychosis as well does really brilliantly. That's probably the most important element of the mission is to take away the fear of it. Absolutely. And finally, it's the only thing else you'd like to add just in general or about what

postpartum psychosis Google UK
"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

08:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Just before we get on to the book a bit more and also the charity. Do you mind telling us a bit about what it was like? I suppose the process of being with your son again, because that must have been quite difficult to have had sort of that delusion. And then go to a cyclist and then come back to him. Can you tell us a bit about the process of, I guess, bonding again with him after that? Sure. Yeah, so I was separated from my son and when I came back and he was my parents brought him with them and, you know, I really struggled to even touch him or hold him and now that I look back on it, I think that is probably a protection mechanism. You know, I wasn't a mother who could be trusted. So perhaps that's why that was such a physical visceral reaction for me. But yes, I had trouble even holding him I really couldn't do it for more than a few moments. And that was a big part of the recovery, which was just to learn how to take care of him again, but also how to somehow overcome that severance that happened the bond that was, you know, we didn't really have a bond when I came back out. And that was a very difficult thing as well to kind of admit to myself and also just to accept. And so a large part of the recovery was trying to spend more time with him, trying to, you know, do the things follow the steps that I felt like a mother would do. And it took a really long time. I can't lie about that. It really was a struggle. And something that I put a lot of effort into. That was very deliberate and I hope that when he's older, I can kind of explain that, you know, hopefully that's evidence of love, which is putting in so much effort to try to build a bond again. But yeah, it definitely was a church. But it's difficult. I mean, obviously, you know, it's never anyone's fault when they get old but I can imagine it you must have felt sort of guilt around it and yeah, it's just such a difficult sort of situation. Definitely. I mean, I think you feel guilt about so many things anyway. So feeling guilt about that it was a lot to kind of process and come to terms with it. Do you have other children now or are you thinking about having other children do you mind me asking? Oh, look at me. Yes, actually, so I do. I have a daughter. She's two. It was a really big decision. You know, I always had hoped that, you know, if we could have more than one child that we could. But yeah, it became a bit more of a complicated decision because the chances of recurrence in postpartum psychosis is 50%, which is very high. And funny enough, I found out I was pregnant when I was promoting my book. And so people were kind of asking, would you ever consider having another child and it was too early at that point for me to say, actually, I mean, I am, hopefully. Yeah, so I was really lucky, you know, I was referred back to the mental health team, I had spent so much time, I think, thinking about and processing what had happened that I felt very confident as much as I could, cautiously confident that I had recognized kind of all the triggers and the potential reasons for why I had psychosis. And so, yes, I was really lucky that I didn't have any complications when my daughter was born. I didn't have to go on any medication, which is usually preventative thing. But that was something I talked about with my doctor as well. And yeah, I felt really lucky to be able to avoid anything like that this time around. Well, congratulations on having another kid. And yeah, I totally understand the fear around that. I mean, it's not exactly the same, but with my bipolar disorder, it sort of childbirth and stuff is a huge question. It's not something that I particularly want because I know that I personally have never wanted kids, but if I was say a friend of mine, does very much what kids, if I was the kind of person who would that's always something I'd wanted. It would be a huge consideration because I'd know I'd have to be thinking about sort of coming off the drugs that I'm on and yeah wondering about whether I might go through postpartum psychosis or if it might trigger mania or all this sort of stuff so yeah, that must have been a really big decision for you to have a second child. But yeah, I'm so glad it worked out all right. Thank you. Yeah, it's sort of heavy stuff isn't it? In the morning. Could you tell us a little bit more because I'd love to hear a bit more about other things that have helped you mention sort of right off the bat, you know, the job that helped. Did you find that therapy helped at all or peer support stuff or is there anything else in particular, whether it's meditation or exercise or literally anything that you would kind of has been helpful on your recovery journey? Yes. I mean, I think, you know, yes, definitely I had therapy, which was really, you know, very, I think, helpful and kind of the later stages of understanding why something happened the way it happened and also just kind of examining yes, like what parts of the psychosis that had felt so kind of out of the blue were actually when you trace it back, you realize that a lot of these a lot of the things that led to it had been undercurrents through childhood or even through previous family traumas. So that was incredibly helpful. I mean, I will also say, you know, writing in general, not the writing of the book, perhaps, but I kept journals throughout and that I found really helpful to kind of because so much of the recovery process was so even within one day it was such an up and down, but to be able to kind of have a sense of being in touch with what I was feeling. I was really lucky that I had friends who would check in with me and I think definitely knowing or feeling that you're not alone that there are people who care about you and that even if it's a very, very low point that it's a temporary. I think for me like the depression was definitely the hardest part and I think I had to really just take it moment by moment and believe that it was not that it wasn't always going to be that way. And for me, when I see people who go through difficult challenges, that's really kind of the most sad and tragic part of it. Sometimes is that it does feel like it's never ending. And yeah, I think that for me was very important. Action on postpartum psychosis, you've already kind of mentioned them. But why did you want to become an ambassador for the charity? Yes, I mean, I think what I think I really value about what they do is the conversation, the fact that it is very much about having the conversation with people about talking about these experiences. I'm surprised that so much about postpartum psychosis after I experienced it is shrouded in a lot of guilt. A lot of shame. There's a lot of secrecy, people

postpartum psychosis bipolar disorder depression
"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

07:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"I was pregnant with my first baby a son in 2017. I had a pretty straightforward pregnancy and, you know, I guess a slightly complicated labor, but nothing too crazy. And then we went traveling all of my sons a couple months old to the U.S.. We went on this very long journey about 5 different cities. And during this time I wasn't sleeping. My parents and my in laws are Korean and there's a lot of beliefs about how you should behave with a baby and be safe and they thought we were being very risky in the way that we were traveling with our son. And so when my son was three months old, I looked at his face and his face looked like the eyes of a double to me. And that's basically the start of the psychosis. I thought I was a character in Dante's inferno. And I ended up being sectioned in a psych unit in New Jersey and I spent about two weeks experienced any mental health issues before that time. No, I mean, that's I think why I was such a shock. I was, you know, I had never experienced any mental health issues before then. And so it wasn't I wasn't considered high risk. What do you remember about that time because obviously you've written about it? Yes, it's a very fragmented and frightening time. I lost all sense of time and reality and I just remember I was so convinced that we were in hell and that I was experiencing every moment kind of in duplicate moments I was seeing like Devils and people's faces didn't look like their faces and you know it started my husband took me to the emergency room and I spent four days there and I wasn't sleeping and that period of time to me if somebody told me that was years, I wouldn't be surprised it really felt so prolonged and long. And when I wasn't getting better, that's when it was decided that I would have to be moved to the psych unit and the actual transfer I thought I was being euthanized and I remember seeing just like animals surrounding me and yeah I had my kind of most complete mental break at that point and apparently that's when I was being kind of restrained and I was eventually sedated but I yeah I fought for my life because I thought I was incredibly scary. Yellow it was very it was a very terrifying experience I think it was my first look into what it might mean to not be able to trust your senses and it was a very frightening out of body experience. Before you started to recover so I think they said it was a couple of days. I was given an antipsychotic called haloperidol and I was sedated so I slept for a long period of time and I think when I came to consciousness and I knew something was really wrong and I kind of had a sense of these very fragmented memories. So it took a few days and then when I was awake in a psych ward and knew what was kind of happening, that's when it was very surreal for me because I felt very much like an observer experiencing this place and just trying to figure out what had happened to me and also how I could leave. And how did you work towards getting better from having that sort of break with reality? To where you are now, I suppose. So it definitely medication, yes, there was a lot of medication. I mean, I have to say that the psych unit wasn't particularly therapeutic. It's not really a place, I think, you know, that is conducive to getting better. But yeah, I spent a lot of time writing. I had a notebook with me and I tried to write down all the things that I knew was true. And then the things that I knew that weren't true, so that helped me separate what had actually happened and didn't happen. And then by the time I was released, that was ten days later, we flew back to the UK, I was referred to a perinatal mental health team and that was really helpful because I also eventually, because of everything that happened, I had a very deep depression and yeah, it was just a continual it was a recovery process as I think a lot of these things are and I spent a lot of time just kind of trying to understand and also accept what had happened and also not feel I guess scared of what happened as well. What was your husband's response to what happened? Yes, for him, I think it was really a really terrifying. You know, for him, he, first of all, he didn't know what was happening to me. And he could tell that something was wrong, but also didn't know the extent of it. And I think there's something really horrifying and terrifying of watching somebody you care about, just lose their sense of reality. You know, he dropped everything for me and I really credit him with just doing everything he could to try to make sure that I was safe, but also that I could get better. And he was very creative. He was continually lobbying for me and talking with doctors and not arguing. That's not the right word. Lobbying for my care and making sure that I was on the right medications and he did his best to make sure that I had a quick recovery as possible. And since then, have you been able to find other people who've been through similar and has that been helpful? Definitely, so when I was starting to recover, I you know, I knew the name of the diagnosis was postpartum psychosis. There is a forum and a charity called action on postpartum psychosis. Which is based in the UK and it brings together women who have suffered from postpartum psychosis and I spent a lot of time reading those forums. I think that was really helpful for me just to know that this is a common, not a common source, a shared experience for people, it really helped me understand kind of that journey to recovery and it is a process it took, I think, a full year for me to feel kind of back to myself and to be off medication. And yeah, and also in the process of writing the book and getting the book published, I spoke to a lot of different women who had experienced this. One of whom was also Laura docker, who wrote a memoir. Called what have I done, which was actually constantly published around the same time as we've had her on the podcast.

Dante Devils New Jersey postpartum psychosis U.S. UK depression Laura docker
Selena Gomez Opens up About Her Struggles With Bipolar

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:10 min | Last month

Selena Gomez Opens up About Her Struggles With Bipolar

"We hop over to Selena Gomez. Selena's opening up even more about her struggles with bipolar disorder, she said she had suicide thoughts and checked into four different treatment centers, Jesus. She says, I think when I started hitting my early 20s is when it started to really get dark. When I started to feel like I was not in control of what I was feeling, whether that was really great or really bad. She didn't interview for Rolling Stone magazine and she recounts having extreme highs and lows for weeks or months before she understood that she was bipolar and she got her diagnosis. And at times she said she'd have symptoms of mania, like feeling the need to buy everybody in her life a car. So she could share a gift. I understand that people feel the way. I bought cars, not that I had one smidgen of the money. This girl has, but when I had a taste, I bought myself a car, but Joey a car. I mean, yeah, it was like, let's go. Let's have some fun before this runs out. Stupid shit. But plenty of stories to tell. And then she'd fall into a deep state of depression and not be able to get out of bed. And in her darkest moment, she said, I thought the world would be better if I wasn't there. And that's what one of my friends told me about who had thought about suicide in his life. Because I had used to have this attitude of like, how do you kill yourself if you have children? How do you want to, how do you do that? How do you lead your kids behind? Whether you do it with a gun or a bunch of pills or jump off a roof, how do you like the kids just know daddy gave up? And my buddy said, it isn't like that. He said, when you want to kill yourself, you really feel that everybody around you would be better off with you gone. And that's here what she's saying. That's what Selena's saying. And it's so sad for somebody so young to say that. And after a 2018 episode, she says she ended up on a ton of meds, which helped her psychosis, but made her feel unlike herself. I swear to God, nobody in Hollywood has a happy story to tell anymore.

Selena Selena Gomez Bipolar Disorder Rolling Stone Magazine Joey Depression Hollywood
"psychosis" Discussed on C.G.Jung Helpdesk

C.G.Jung Helpdesk

07:46 min | Last month

"psychosis" Discussed on C.G.Jung Helpdesk

"Overworked. They are all these external factors that are all meant to distract from what really the problem is. Approaching the root cause is extremely painful, so if somebody is giving away freely, what the problem is, it's likely not the problem. So here, with neurosis complexes and hysteria, we are still in the realm of things that are curable as all these things are still related to the person itself. You would say this all place in the personal and conscious. He structures the psyche in a certain way where he says, after ego, this is basically me as a person, experiencing the world, living through the world and my consciousness is everything that's related to the ego. This is everything that you know about you. What you've done, what you've what you can do, everything that's available to you. He calls this association. It's like a network that everything is connected with the ego and only as long as it's connected doesn't matter the pathway how long with the ego, it is conscious. And this means you can assert will and do things voluntarily and also can't do things voluntary that you abstain from doing things as a sign of willpower to intentionally forgo doing things. Everything outside of that is unconscious. And conscious meaning it's not connected to the consciousness, it's not connected to the ego, and this is a lot. Basically, everything in the world is unconscious. In the center, it's not really connected to you. So you can learn, you can evolve and improve by humiliating more in your consciousness. And this unconscious has two big areas he says one is a person unconscious that is everything that could be related to you, but isn't for some reason he says it's just an unlucky accident that thinks I'm the person unconscious. For example, we have bad qualities or bad experiences and all this complexes you don't want to deal with that are related to you because it thinks are you or happen to you or should be involved in your life, but you're pushing them away. Those get pushed to the personal unconscious. So both are all three things of complex neurosis and hysteria. All play in this field of things that are related to you and they can be brought back in the sense that in the talking cure and therapy and psychoanalysis, they are openly talked about and guess a connection brought to them. You reflect about them, you talk about it. And this is how you make the associations. And this is how you do the connections and bring them out of the unconscious into your consciousness. This is how you remove them off that power to be autonomous. Because they're only autonomous because they are in the person unconscious because in a dealing with them. So in a sense, all of this is still available. But young goes further, especially in his practice when he was closely, he got confronted this people, this very severe diseases, psychosis and especially schizophrenia back then called dementia, precox. And here it's different. And this is the other part of the unconscious. So you have to personal part, but in you have impersonal things and this can be described as human nature. This is a collective unconscious. These are things you're given a priori. Certain just instincts, motifs, images. He compared a lot of cultures, stories, mythology, religion, spiritual, happenings, to see commonalities, and he saw so many commonalities that he said, okay, there is something when you have a human being around and they imagine something and they fantasize that there are certain images that come up regardless of time, regardless of place, and you see this really in different cultures, especially in mythology and religion, yet certain ideals, they just pop up again and again, and he said, okay, this is in a this is something every human being has, and this is a consequence that this will pop up, especially in culture. But this popping up, he saw one of the main reasons for these other two terms of the name office event, psychosis and schizophrenia. He said that there are their contents that can come up through the psyche that are so strange and so unfamiliar that they either generate extreme fear or extreme fascination. And while neurosis or hysteria or a complex is like a little devil that bugs you and that like a little gremlin asset in the beginning, that's just messing with the things you want to do and messing with your life and messing with your emotions. There's something else happening with those other two psychosis and schizophrenia as that there are certain contents that suddenly come up and take the place of reality. And this strangeness and the panic it causes and the people bring them to isolate. And this is one big problem he saw in the modern world that, in the past, religions, mythologies, stories, culture. It was like a storehouse of images and that helped people to regulate this foreign influences of their own psychic coming up as showing something that is familiar because they said the biggest problem is people having suddenly visions and they are foreign and they are overwhelming and they don't know where they're coming from and they are strange and they're thinking that they are alone and they're the first people to really experience that and they can't talk with people about it because they say people will think I'm crazy. And he had such patience who said doctor young, I'm seeing this and that and it's crazy. It can't be real and but it's bugging me the whole time and I don't know what to do and he would tell them about mythology and religion and all the stuff that already happened in one case he even showed the guy an chemical treaty and said here this is not your idea, the honor of the first one to experience is here somebody who experienced 400 years ago and here's it written and his person sees it and he knows that they're not alone. This bringing back of people into the world into a society's Jung set is one of his main tasks because it's easy to get isolated because all these cultural safety nets might be still houses of images there gone and then taught and there are not available anymore. They also hold that they have to be regenerated, but that's a topic for another event. He saw there the main problem because when you don't talk about it, you don't bring them into a useful way, you're pushing them away in the same as with neurosis and with hysteria and this opening up is the problem. And this is how a psychosis can form being overwhelmed by these influences. And same as before, if you're not dealing with it, it gets worse or can become worse and then it's become sort

schizophrenia psychosis dementia Jung
"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

05:37 min | 5 months ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Case weekly podcast on all things mental health. I'm Ellen and I'm yvette. And this week we're chatting to hazel. She's a mental health campaigner, writer and podcaster. We're going to be chatting to her about non organic psychosis and the reality tourist podcast. So I definitely have psychosis symptoms. I have hallucinations I have delusions, but the psychiatrists can't decide. Where I fit so I don't quite fulfill the requirement of the requirements for instance the wrong word, isn't it? I don't quite feel the criteria for schizophrenia I don't quite fulfill it for schizoaffective disorder of a borderline personality disorder or any of the other conditions people normally associate with psychosis. So they don't know where to put me. Yeah. It's a little bit annoying because if I had a box, I'd feel like I could research it and it felt maybe more part of the community, so it's a bit outside looking in quite often. Also feel like non organic is such a strange term. It sounds like, you know, you're not homegrown natural psychosis. Well, in a way, it's the opposite. I'm lucky that I studied neuroscience at university, so I understand what the terms mean. And essentially non organic means there's no cause. So organic psychosis would be things like caused by drugs or caused by brain damage, whereas mine, they don't know what caused it. Interesting. Okay, that's a really good kind of helpful comparison because I think most people would be like me and not have any idea what non organic actually means. It's interesting phrases, isn't it? And did you say that you sort of first saw the term just from sort of seeing your notes like the or did your doctors actually discuss this sort of properly with you? I have had a very long journey to diagnosis. Because what I said because I don't fit in any box. So I was 19 when I first started seeing psychiatrists and to be honest, that was because I had an easy disorder not because of anything else.

yvette schizoaffective disorder Ellen schizophrenia psychosis
Dr. Naomi Wolf Discusses Substance-Induced Psychosis

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:03 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Naomi Wolf Discusses Substance-Induced Psychosis

"But what I really want to focus on is the idea here of the over prescription of antidepressants and these other interventions. And to help us unpack that, someone who I really enjoy having on, the author of the bodies of others, the new authoritarians COVID-19, and the war against the human, the author of which is doctor Naomi wolf, doctor welcome back to the program. Thank you so much, Charlie. It's really great to talk to you. Please call me Naomi. Naomi, thank you for joining us again. So give us your thoughts here, nihilism, mixed with these incredibly, let's say, powerful pharmacological compounds such as SSRIs and benzodiazepines, zoloft and Xanax, and how we are over prescribing them to our nation's youth, the latest study shows that 12 to 13% of our nation's young people are on some form of psychiatric drugs. What is the potential downside of that? What are your thoughts? Yeah, well, just, you know, I have to always start conversations like this by warning that I'm not a medical doctor. That said, I've written three. Non fiction books about health issues about the pharmaceutical industry. And I'm a mom and a step mom. And I really agree with you about your concerns. First, what I would say is we've imposed on children and teenagers in young adults in the last two years. Circumstances that the bodies of others points out are guaranteed to cause mental illness to cause anxiety to cause depression. And to cause other kinds of stress is that young adults have never been subjected to really in the history of human beings. Outside of places like North Korea or the Warsaw ghetto. And what I mean is this, just in the last two years, we isolated young adults. We isolated teenagers. We kept them at home, you know, chained to computers. We didn't let them go to school. We sent them home from university. Even now and the bodies of others starts with, and I've written about this a lot, you know, starting with my book in 2008, the end of America, which looked at the effect of isolation on political prisoners. You're not allowed to keep political prisoners isolated. You're not allowed to keep prisoners isolated or in solitary confinement for long, even one day of isolation causes permanent changes in the brain. And can cause mental illness and psychosis. So we, to my astonishment, at places like Ivy League universities, major state universities, kids who test young adults who test positive for COVID and these PCR tests are full of problems as I point out as well. They're isolated for up to a week alone in their rooms with not allowed to be outside with other young

Naomi Naomi Wolf Charlie Warsaw North Korea Depression America Psychosis Ivy League
Charlie Explores the Concept of Nihilism

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:36 min | 5 months ago

Charlie Explores the Concept of Nihilism

"Nihilism is something I want to explore with many of you. Nihilism is more than the belief in nothing. It's the belief that there is no harmony. There is no synchronicity. There is no design to the entire universe. Nihilism is a very easy conclusion to come to. When you are raised in a secular public government school system. Nihilism is basically the belief, it's even deeper than cynicism. That there is nothing but pleasure and pain and the darkness that you might be feeling, any happiness that people outside of you might be experiencing is nothing more than an aberration and a mirage. Some of the worst acts of violence have happened in our country. Under the false and the misleading, dangerous sinister and evil belief of nihilism. Now this is a very important point. When you actually look at what these people believed, many of these shooters, Yuval day, buffalo, very few of them have articulate doctrines or dogmas. Very few of them are like the psychopath, Ted Kaczynski, the unabomber, who wrote a long, dissertation and treatise on the downfalls of technology. Very few people are like that. No, this is something different. These are not people that are committing acts of violence for a reason. It seems they're doing it for no reason at

Ted Kaczynski Buffalo
Tragic Parade Was Not the Only July 4th Weekend Shooting in Illinois

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 5 months ago

Tragic Parade Was Not the Only July 4th Weekend Shooting in Illinois

"We're going to lead this program today with some unfortunate news out of highland park Illinois right down the street where I grew up, by the way. Terrible shooting yesterday in highland park seems as if 6 people are dead. And over 30 people are injured, highland park is in the north shore of Chicago. I grew up in wheeling Illinois, not far from there at all. It was at a July 4th parade where this individual we're not going to use his name, gets on a rooftop and starts shooting into the crowd. Now that's a tragedy, and it should be considered a tragedy. Inexplicably. We're not going to politicize it. The other side is trying to politicize it. They're trying to say, oh, this guy was a Trump supporter. There's no evidence of that. There's also no evidence that he's a far left wing activist. There's evidence that he was very deeply disturbed and used visuals from both sides of the political aisle for what reason we really don't know. But it's important that we add context that we remember all death that happened in Illinois this weekend. We're going to talk about the parade shooting. We're going to talk about what I believe is actually pushing young men towards these sort of violent acts. But also, 71 people were shot and ate fatally in the 4th of July holiday weekend and shootings across the city, Chicago police set. Last year, 19 people were killed and more than a hundred people were shot over the long 4th of July weekend. The toll was lower than last year, when 19 people were killed and more than a hundred people were shot. 9 of the wounded were shot into attacks on the west and south side, four people in the western Garfield park Friday evening, and 5 men in Parkway gardens on the south side and early Monday, so Chicago. Highland park is a suburb of Chicago. 6 dead in a parade, terrible, but in downtown Chicago, 71 shot and 8 killed.

Highland Park Illinois Wheeling Chicago Western Garfield Park Parkway Gardens
Hinckley says he's sorry for shooting that wounded Reagan

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Hinckley says he's sorry for shooting that wounded Reagan

"The man who shot and wounded president Ronald Reagan in 1981 has made a public apology I'm Ben Thomas with details John hinckley junior says he doesn't remember and doesn't want to remember the emotions he was feeling when he fired the shots that wounded president Reagan paralyzed his press secretary James Brady and also wounded a police officer and a Secret Service agent Ben 25 hinckley was suffering from acute psychosis when he undertook the assassination attempt Appearing on CBS mornings his first TV interview since his release from court supervision hinckley says he does feel remorse for all the lives his actions affected He says he realizes those people probably can't forgive him now but he still wants them to know he's sorry I'm Ben Thomas

John Hinckley President Reagan Ben Thomas Ben 25 Hinckley Acute Psychosis James Brady Secret Service CBS Hinckley
'Dear Christian: Your Fear Is Full of Crap' With Doug Giles

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:20 min | 5 months ago

'Dear Christian: Your Fear Is Full of Crap' With Doug Giles

"I have as my guest right now, my friend, Doug, Giles, Doug, you encouraged me, just seeing you and hearing your voice. Thanks for being on. Eric, good to be with you, big dog. You're looking very dapper, man. Okay, the title of your books are sometimes they're hard to read. I'm holding the book here. It is dear Christian colon. It's a business letter. Dear Christian, you are fear is full of, I believe, the Greek word is scuba on poop. Dear Christian. Your fear is full of crap. Now, did you know that where the term crap comes from? Because people think it's like a bad word. It's not a bad word. Thomas crapper invented the flush toilet. He was an English man. He invented the flush toilet, so we would say, where are you going? I'm going to the crapper. And it's kind of taken on this weird meaning, but that's what it means. So you do not pull punches. So your book is titled dear Christian, your fear is full of crap and you have second Timothy one 7. So I don't remember offhand what a second Timothy one 7. Why is the title the title? Yeah, it's one of my favorite scriptures, Erica, especially in this day of mass delusional psychosis. It's where Paul told Timothy, who was raised by his mom and his grandmama, and he had a church in Ephesus. He's like, hey, Timothy, God didn't give you a spirit of fear, but of power, love, and a sound mind. And I'm looking at the church and how they embrace like Mark McDonald said a mass delusional psychosis from 2020 to 2021 plus. I've got a buddy up in Ottawa, Canada. His family goes to church up there. They're still masking up. Eric, they're still acting like, you know, the Bubonic plague is unleashed, you know, and that we've got to cower and fears poor little Christians and stuff. And you look at the scripture, the injunction to fear, I think it's the most replete command coming off the lips of the prophets and the apostles and Christ Jesus himself. And yet Christians decided that they're going to adopt fear instead of live bold wild and free. And the only people that I see in the scripture, Eric that have fear on them, according to, again, the scripture. I hate to bring that into it. It is the wicked.

Christian Colon Doug Thomas Crapper Timothy Delusional Psychosis Eric Giles Mark Mcdonald Erica Ephesus Bubonic Paul Ottawa Plague Canada
Alex Berenson Talks About Weed and It’s Crushing Effect on Society

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:51 min | 6 months ago

Alex Berenson Talks About Weed and It’s Crushing Effect on Society

"With us right now is Alex berenson, who deserves a lot of credit for his research throughout the entire pandemic and kind of being a contrarian data focused voice, which I think he deserves just our praise because he became a great cost for him personally and professionally Alex welcome back to the program. Charlie, thanks for having me. Alex, I want to talk to you about a different book though than your commentary on COVID. And it's just interesting because our audience has mixed views on this. My view is pretty well known. I'm not a fan of marijuana or weed, I think that there's an untold story around the consumption of marijuana that isn't always highlighted in the media. You wrote a book called tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence. Tell us about the arguments you make in the book. Tell us why you wrote the book and did you come into like beginning with any sort of opinion before you went on your research journey? Sure. So tell your children came out in 2019 about three and a half years ago now almost. And I wrote it over the previous couple of years, my wife is a psychiatrist, a forensic psychiatrist, actually. So that means she deals with the criminally mentally ill. Mainly. And she had seen a lot of patients who had committed crimes under the influence of cannabis. And sometimes other drugs too, but and sometimes alcohol. But cannabis really was the thread that was common in all of these. So she encouraged me to look at this connection and, you know, I'd been a reporter for The New York Times for ten years and I'd covered mainly the pharmaceutical industry, but I really didn't have much of a view about cannabis legalization. I'd used a handful of times in my life, but it was not a drug that I'd used a lot or cared particularly about. Either way. And what I found was that she was right. You know, of course she was right. She treated these people. And knew what she was looking for and knew what had happened. But there's a huge body, a huge and growing body of scientific research that canvas really is dangerous to a lot of people's mental health. It's not just that it can SAP your motivation or make you sort of fat and lazy, these sort of these tropes about stoners. It's that if you use too much, especially at a young age, if you started a young age, if you start in your teens, your early to mid teens and you use heavily. And it is addictive, so people will, you know, a lot of people wind up using more than they think they're going to use. You can have psychotic episodes, and you can sometimes some people probably people with a genetic predisposition, although it's not always clear, may develop permanent psychosis, a permanent psychotic condition known as

Alex Berenson Alex Charlie The New York Times Psychosis
The Connection Between Violent Crime and Marijuana Usage

The Officer Tatum Show

01:36 min | 6 months ago

The Connection Between Violent Crime and Marijuana Usage

"I got Sean sent me an article about marijuana usage in its residual effects. And just because, you know, correlation denied always mean causation, but at least you have the facts and understanding, you know, according to an article called cannabis causes psychosis, a psychosis caused violence written by a gentleman, a doctor named Alex berenson on May 25th in an article he describes some of the correlations between marijuana usage and violent criminals. Mister, I don't like even like to say the guy's name, but it was confirmed that the shooter and Yuval di had issues with using marijuana. Don't know how much he used, but he was upset because his grandmother and mother allegedly would not let him use marijuana. Nicholas Cruz, which is a Florida high school shooter, was heavily used in marijuana, and that's what he told the police in the police interview. Devin Patrick Kelly, who shot up a Texas church and killed 26 people on 2017 before, you know, obviously killing himself had a THC in his system when he died, Darryl Brooks junior last seen allegedly racing through the walk of Christmas parade, self described as a stoner and here's some statistical data that may become relevant. It says, meanwhile, the cities like Portland, Oregon, have suffered an explosion in violence, following the legalization of cannabis.

Alex Berenson Yuval Di Nicholas Cruz Florida High School Psychosis Sean Devin Patrick Kelly Texas Church Darryl Brooks Portland Oregon
Rapper Zuby Gives His Take on 'Mass Formation Psychosis'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | 8 months ago

Rapper Zuby Gives His Take on 'Mass Formation Psychosis'

"Zubi in one of your most recent interviews, you give a catalog of all the places you've traveled in just the last few months, which is amazing given the travel restrictions we've all witnessed. And then you start talking about you talk about COVID. And you actually use this phrase that has become very triggering for many, which is a mass formation psychosis. As somebody who clearly follows politics and culture, will you give us your analysis of this peculiar phenomena of a disease of a virus that every nation has experienced in one shape or another. And how it has shaped thought in rather unhealthy ways. That's avoid the meds in for a second and talk about what it's done to mental processes in various parts of the world. Yeah, well, look, I'm not a we live in this age of credentialism, so let me say, first of all, I'm not a psychologist. I'm not a biologist. I've studied both on a basic level, however. But I'm someone who observes the world and I'm very, I'm very sensitive to when I see things when I see people doing and believing and saying things that they never previously used to. Now one observation I had back in 2020 and I maintained this position is that from the beginning I was far more concerned about the response to the COVID pandemic than the virus itself. I saw a lot of terrible precedents that were being set and which now people are seeing some of the fallout from. I'm talking about physical health, mental health, childhood development, the economy, inflation, unemployment, the disregard of civil liberties and the general relationship between the government and the people in various countries. All of these things were great concerns to

Zubi Government
If There's No More Emergency, Does the House of Cards Fall?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:51 min | 8 months ago

If There's No More Emergency, Does the House of Cards Fall?

"So doctor Malone, hear me out with this and I'm going to do my best describing this, but I kind of I worked this through in anticipation of our conversation. So if there's no more emergency, then does big pharma and the entire their whole apparatus? Is that House of Cards fall? In other words, if there's no emergency, then there's no EUA. If there's no EUA, then there's no liability protection for vaccine companies. If there's no vaccines, then no mandates, no vaccine passports, no social credit system, no digital currency, no great reset. Is that a step too far? I wish it was that simple. I agree that the if we no longer have the emergency mandate situation as declared by the executive branch, then many of the interventions that have been promoted will no longer apply social distancing the mandates, et cetera, the military mandates, for example. And that that House of Cards falls in that is the logic that has been presented by The White House for maintaining the mandates is that in the event that this thing suddenly grew new things, we would be remiss if we didn't have that in place. That's the logic I don't agree with it, but that's what they're promoting. And they wish to retain a lot of these measures and the extra constitutional authority by maintaining it. So that's in terms of the government. The in terms of this medical industrial complex and the deeper agendas and I think you mentioned great reset. My position is that this is only a skirmish, a first battle, we're up against an entrenched multi decade long program that is embodied in the young leaders program of the World Economic Forum. They have a lot of other strategies and the big issue here is what many in the economics community are warning me about which is that we're looking at some kind of major boundary event triggered by the hyperinflation and everything else in the Fiat currency, printing money, debt crisis, et cetera, not the least of which is the impending bankruptcy of the social security

Malone Pharma House Of Cards White House World Economic Forum
Dr. Robert Malone on the Emergency Powers of the Federal Government

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Robert Malone on the Emergency Powers of the Federal Government

Dr. Robert Malone on Where COVID-19 Is Headed Next

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:43 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Robert Malone on Where COVID-19 Is Headed Next

"Different directions we could go with this, but let's start here. Where do you think the virus itself is going to go next? Do you think that future variants are going to be more like the flu and not be as deadly or do you think that we might see an unexpected variant come around the corner? Maybe a midterm variant. I hate to be that cynical, but do you think something like that might be in the cards? So you're asking me to look at the crystal ball about viral evolution. There's the trajectory that says that most viruses over time tend to become attenuated after they've moved into a new host. So that argues for more infectious less virulent. Then there's the counterpoint that my friend gert vanden bass often rises. As a concern, which is that there are some situations where over vaccination can drive a infectious viral pathogen to become more pathogenic as well as more infectious. So the ants can I select both of the above in your tube first scenarios and say time will tell, but right now we are in a situation where most of us, if not all of us have been infected with omicron, essentially have natural immunity and are relatively resistant to the current sub variant that's circulating that slightly more infectious than the original omicron was.

Gert Vanden FLU
The CDC Is Withholding Public Data

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:53 sec | 10 months ago

The CDC Is Withholding Public Data

"Let me read this story, doctor Malone, not the whole thing, obviously, but just let me do a little bit of a snapshot. The CDC isn't publishing large portions of the COVID data. It collects. The agency is withheld critical data on boosters, hospitalizations, and until recently wastewater analyses, not sure how that's relevant. Doctor Malone, why would the CDC not be honest? I mean, come on, they're so transparent. Boy, that was a punch. Yeah, so the reason is that they give their explanation is they don't want to scare us. They don't want to cause vaccine hesitancy by actually giving us the truth. I mean, this is the total, this is completely paternalistic. Little children, you can't handle it. So we're only going to give you that, which we think you can handle. But you know what, even that's a lie. What they're doing is covering up the fact that these things aren't working.

CDC Doctor Malone Malone
America's Mass Psychosis of FEAR with Psychiatrist Mark McDonald

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

America's Mass Psychosis of FEAR with Psychiatrist Mark McDonald

"Mass formation psychosis is a neologism that was coined by doctor Robert Malone that has been largely repeated recently in the news, but what he's actually trying to say is mass delusional psychosis, which is a term that I actually began using almost two years ago in fall of 2020. It's also a pick up off of doctor Matthias Desmond's phrase, mass formation, which means mass psychosis, which describes the exact same thing, which is an entire society of people, all at the same time, essentially losing their rational faculties and following a fixed false belief, such as we're all going to die of the virus and we can survive only if we stay at home wear masks and stop working and stop going to school. That is the mass solutional psychosis of 2020 through to today. What are the where does it

Robert Malone Psychosis Matthias Desmond
What Is Fear? Psychiatrist Mark McDonald Explains

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:18 min | 11 months ago

What Is Fear? Psychiatrist Mark McDonald Explains

"Start with a really basic question and forgive me for this question. What is fear? Is any sort of fear good and why is the level of fear we're seeing right now troubling? Fear is not a bad emotion. It actually helps protect us in some ways. We're afraid of jumping in front of a bus that keeps us from jumping in front of a bus. We're afraid of burning our hand on the stove, similar to pain. When you feel pain, you pull your hand off. Now, chronic pain, of course, is pain when there's actually no injury when there's no risk when there's nothing wrong. That is not good. That is not helpful. So fear, in and of itself is not a problem. But when you fear things that don't exist or when you continue to fear a minor risk and it inhibits your ability to live your life fully, now we have a problem. So the problem I have with fear and why I wrote a book about it is not to castigate fear as a bad emotion in and of itself. There's no bad emotions. But to point out that when fear becomes exaggerated, when it becomes chronic, and when it becomes inhibitory, we wind up in a state of perpetual trauma. And I think that this country and many other countries around the world have been living in a state of perpetual, unending, chronic trauma, fueled by fear for the last two to three years.

'United States of Fear' Author Dr. Mark McDonald Describes His Book

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 11 months ago

'United States of Fear' Author Dr. Mark McDonald Describes His Book

"Well, with us for the full hour, is doctor Mark McDonald. He is the author of the great book United States of fear, how America fell victim to mass delusional psychosis. I'm so excited to dive into this. I have so many questions and we met when we did a doctor's panel about a year and a half ago and I can't wait to explore this with him. Doctor, thank you so much for joining our program. Good to see you again, Charlie. It's been a while. You as well. I remember that you were you and I were joking around because of their stupid mask mandate and you talked about how damaging it could be for children, especially we're gonna dive into that. So the floor is yours. Tell us about your book. So I wrote this book in November of last year as a way to encapsulate what I saw as not a pandemic of the virus, but rather a pandemic of fear. And that's the way I've seen this from the very beginning. We have not been largely speaking in a medical crisis, at least not a real one. The real crisis is actually been psychological. I am a child, not a lesson psychiatrist. So I see people with mental illness, especially young people, which is my specialty. Every single day. And since March, April May of 2020, it's been a complete mental health disaster. So I set out to understand why. What's going on? I began writing. I began speaking and eventually, I put it all together in a book, which as you said, is called United States of fear to describe really three things. One, how did we get here? What is mass delusional psychosis? And how did it happen? What are the cultural antecedents? This didn't just show up with the virus flying over from China. It has been with us for a long time. The virus simply just germinated the seed. The second part of the book is really about masculine and feminine and how male and female and attacks on the two sexes and the two genders has been a large driving force for decades really and will continue even after this pandemic ends. And then finally, I write briefly about the way forward. How do we move ahead?

Mark Mcdonald United States Psychosis Charlie China
Kira Davis: Novak Djokovic Is Being Vilified

The Dan Bongino Show

01:14 min | 11 months ago

Kira Davis: Novak Djokovic Is Being Vilified

"It's so crazy how he's being so vilified The guy isn't He's not a risk You know he's had COVID he has these antibodies This whole conversation has become an international conversation and we're talking about a tennis player And what blows my mind is that the people of Australia are mad at him They're mad at him They're not mad at their government They're mad at him because they're saying well you're flouting our laws We have to be vaccinated here in order to run around freely which is insane But whatever we have to be vaccinated in order to avail ourselves of our human rights and you're not vaccinated but just because you're a big star you get to come in without following these rules They're mad at him Why aren't they mad at the government that has two separate systems For two tiers of people that's what blows my mind is that there are some people who are so hypnotized who are so I think I believe the term of this year is going to be mass formation psychosis I believe that this is like last year it was gas lining This year is going to be mass formation psychosis There is such a mob mentality going on around this that people are willing to blame individuals rather than blame the

Tennis Australia
"psychosis" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

06:42 min | 11 months ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"I would try and share it with them. But when you're going through the middle of that and there's all these moving pieces, people don't really want to hear that. Well, let me just pause you. They were trying to remember where it was that we paused. Help me understand how someone can be experiencing psychosis, but not have an underlying mental illness. What the diagnosis was that he gave me was a stress induced psychotic episode. And that's not considered a mental. Well, it's not that maybe I shouldn't be getting into the labels because, you know, I don't want to be stigmatized. I just, I like to try doing the podcast. I like to try to be accurate in how we the terms we use and stuff like that because I'm not a professional and I always worry that I'm going to say something incredibly stupid. No, I'm glad you're bringing it up. I'm glad you're bringing it up. It was the first time for me that any kind of diagnosis actually fit. The other diagnoses that I had received did not fit. And like I said, I was alone. In that particular group, you know, of not have contesting the diagnosis. This time when he said, I said, that makes so much sense to me. And it's not that it's not mental illness. It's not chronic mental illness. It's not. It's not true. Yes, it's situational. Is that what they call it? That I don't know. I don't know the verbage. I am all shut and listen. No, it's all good. That was really liberating for me. It was circumstantial. So it's not like it happened out of nowhere. There were circumstances around it that were the stressor that created this thing, and it happened twice. And the stressors were exactly the same. So which were, I am not someone who can ever be homeless. I am just not somebody that can ever be homeless. You were for a year. And I was the first time for two months and I was the second time on and off for a year. Because I was in this. Experience of psychosis or whatever it was. I was there. Yeah. I was there and you would call me and you would say, I don't feel safe. I want to spend the night in the police station. Yeah, I remember that. And because you said you believed that I think the FBI was spying on you and people were breaking into your apartment and you were very, very sure about it and there's I tried reasoning with you and there was no way. So I thought, you know I'll drop her off at the police department, so she'll feel safe for the night. But then it just went kind of on and on for a couple of days where I could just see the writing on the wall that this really seemed like an untenable situation if you did not want to get professional help and it was well, I was getting it. That's oh yeah, here's the amazing thing about this entire situation in retrospect. On the other side of it, 1351 50s. 13. 13. Do they give you a trophy for your 12? Hi, yes they did. Psychiatrists psychologists. Once you're in the system, that's the go to. So I discussed it with some of the police officers and there would be times where they would lean at a 51 50 and I'd be like, why are you putting me on a 51 50? And they'd be like, my supervisor said to. And I'd be like, that's really not a good enough reason for me. You know, here's how I look at it. Like for me, it's really hard to look at it in the microscopic, without going to the macro view. If that makes sense. It does. You know, I think it's your story. Yeah, I think when you and I talked, what I'll say is, before it really happened, life was really good for me. I was doing really well in my job. I had had the best month I'd ever had. I was a senior loan officer and a mortgage person for 20 years. I had the best month I had ever had. I had a healing practice and that was doing really well. And I had gone to Philadelphia to speak for a weekend. There were amazing, really amazing things happening. I had assisted. I got my masters and spiritual psychology, which I know we talked about at depth. Last time I was here and I had gone to the university and I had assisted one of the programs for ten days and things were really good. And you know what I'll say about the first time is I made a couple mistakes. And I don't know, I think my stepmom and I got into a fight, my dad had undiagnosed Alzheimer's. And there's like I could go through all the details, but at the end of the day, we got into an argument, my dad said some things that weren't accurate because of his Alzheimer's, but he wasn't diagnosed at the time. It ended up being me leaving the guesthouse where I was renting. And I had had this phenomenal month, right? So I had a lot of money in the bank. So I wasn't worried about it necessarily at the beginning. But the way it happened, it was super traumatic. I mean, for me to be candid about what happened to me, I was good. I got in the fight with my family. I had to leave where I was renting, I had a job lined up, but here's the other thing. I also had all my business wrapped up with my family, so I lost my source of business. I lost the place I was living. This was all unforeseen. And then stress on Tapestry. Stress on top of stress, but I mean, I'd never been homeless. I mean, I'd always made incredible money. Self supporting. It's not something that I knew anything about. I went to a company that I used to work for and I was a top producer there..

Alzheimer's psychosis FBI Philadelphia
How Long Can the Left's Disconnect From Reality Last?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:49 min | 11 months ago

How Long Can the Left's Disconnect From Reality Last?

"Douglas, you talked about the disconnect. The year is now of the left and the media, which is, of course, the same. Being unable to deal with their mistake or their lack of understanding what was happening in the politics in 2015, 2016. So let me ask you, what are the scenarios for both the media and the left? Number one, as long as you have the Jeff Bezos of the world, drop a few billion here and there like they're buying a new picker knees. These things are vanity projects. The Washington Post is clearly a vanity project. Do market forces not apply, and they can do it forever. Or is there a moment of collapse? How long can the party the left, for example, be disconnected? How long can that disjunction between reality and that quote unquote political elite last before there's some kind of necessary self introspection or can they stretch it out forever? You know, you remember there was a famous law, Herbert Stein's law, Stein's law is things that can not go on won't. And it's a fine law, but often tweaked it slightly more cynical version is that in my experience, things that can not go on usually do. A moderate tweak there, Douglas, a moderate toy. It's an important one, though, isn't it? How many times have you I and many others looked at situations in government in the media and society and said, that just can't go on? And yet, you know, a few years later, you look back and you see that's what you said. And the thing in question is still going on, you know? Incompetence of this scale, that can't go on. And it goes

Douglas Jeff Bezos Herbert Stein The Washington Post Stein
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"To help people. Yeah, yeah. Too. But there seems to be very little maybe you know of flick books and stuff and testimonies or biographies of people who have experienced it, but I certainly struggle to find and was this podcast was really the only forum. That's going to find I think we are right here. This is the only thing out there. Sarcastically. But yeah, I'm serious. There's no other option. What do you think about like the way that people that don't actually understand this stuff talk about this stuff? Do you know what I mean? Yeah. There's not an awareness of this great strides have been made forward and mental health then public consumption of her discussion of her and recent years, but there doesn't seem to be that thing with psychosis like the hangover one thinks it schizophrenic or split personality or something. It's like a literal split personality because a lot of the mainstream mental health conversations just really boring. Yeah, yeah, it is sanitized and it's all linked into this sort of productive force, you know, it's all about to work. But what can we do to facilitate yourself speedy return to being a productive citizen? Even just a term mental health, I find really disturbing to begin with. Health to begin with is just a strange construct because no one is ever healthy ally, doesn't no one's healthy. Will all pathologies are determined by abnormality like it's always you define the normal and relation to the abnormal. So it's not that it's like the subject abnormal psychology where they learn about people like us. Yeah, yeah. But I think it's like a really natural thing to go through and I wouldn't be surprised if somebody is trying to work out what the evolutionary function is. It has to be something in the general ideas. It's like the stone dip theory. That is mind altering I've heard people describe it as luck is a manifestation of society's ills. I definitely thought that at the time as well that I was Martha and I said that I was too sensitive at the time to society basically. And..

psychosis Martha
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"Run away with the fairies the better you'll have these creative ideas and stuff. And that's almost like a mild form of psychosis, isn't it? But you come out of it quite easily. I definitely didn't like a spectrum of what's crazy. Warlike psychosis, if you want to use that concept, there's like loads of everyday things that could be classed as psychotic, but also everyone's got a little bit of it because everyone's kind of they're using their own sort of language to navigate through the world in a way. Yeah, and it's a creative thing as well that just everyone's just responding to external stimuli and stuff and they're creating everyone else create their own reality to some extent, anyway, surely this is making sense of the world around us so we have to tell ourselves little stories like piece together loads of random bits of information and think that it means something. Yeah, part of my work that I'm doing in the research got into the philosopher Paul recur, who was called Herriman phenomenology really grand titles. That one word. Turned into words. It's going to say it might be the biggest word on the podcast yet. But where was he. He does a lot of work with metaphor and stuff and how all human understand and is about the understand things in relation to one another. And then whenever you discover that and think that yeah, humans do understand everything through release and you realize that there's a falsity behind everything. And there is the potential to go down psychotic path than any sort of form of thinking to deeply on a subject or thinking about the constituent parts of the subject. Interesting. I think I could just think myself back to that state. Yeah, yeah, definitely which is why I'm a bit worried about drugs at the minute because I have quite. Insular if I was trepanned a lot of it would be internal and thinking thoughts in my head. So I don't really want to open myself up to that because I think that could lead back to an episode. But I swear the whole walk and around the rest of your life thinking that you might have another episode. It's a strange sentence. I'm sort of at the stage of think I'm not going to. It seems to ridiculous that everything was so crystal clear at that time and now you've had all this process and time and stuff. And it just feels like you could now go back to it, but I'm sure everyone thinks like that. Yeah, someone I met through the NHS who's like really nice..

Paul recur Herriman psychosis NHS
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"According to a new study, people's ears play tricks on them when they drink too much coffee. We all go a little mad sometimes. They try to kill themselves. Hello and welcome to another episode of coffee and psychosis, the podcast which has nothing to do with coffee, has never had anything to do with coffee and will never have anything to do with coffee. If that sounded like a thinly veiled warning to big coffee, it wasn't. I just have to put something at the beginning of these podcasts. So you, the listener has the right context and feels suitably orientated for what's to come. Speaking of what's to come, in this episode, I sat down with Sean on a wet and rainy day in London to not talk about.

Sean London
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"So all people under 25 or something. I think I was the only one there that I remember for mania and psychosis. So I was really up, up, up, and a lot of other people were there because they tried to kill themselves. And so they were not picking up what I'm putting down. I'm just trying to, like, I have, I'm trying to rile things up like, and that wasn't happening. And so it gradually set in on me that this is over, you know? Had a psychiatrist who I remember literally thinking that she was a reptile or something like she did not. She just had this sort of dead like vacant very matter of fact way of telling me like, oh, you're here because there's something wrong with your brain and they diagnosed me with bipolar one and then it's like that didn't make sense to me at the time. I was very resistant to that to being diagnosed. And my parents even were, they were like, they're talking about how symptomatically quote unquote. I was trying to bend the rules of reality and whatnot. And then my mom was like, oh, no, that's just Simon. Yeah, that's funny. That's what your mom said, because that's exactly what my mom was saying. It's almost like it's almost like you're yourself, but like a hyper intense version of that perfect pearl of your worldview. It's just like exploded everywhere. I didn't take it really seriously at the time. I didn't really internalize it. Oh, this is part of the process. Is there going to try to discredit my revelations, but yeah, I really hated that psychiatrist. I don't like thinking back on it. I don't know how much I want to villainize.

psychosis Simon
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"And I don't really remember what like a lot of what was happening. But at some point earlier on before this nighttime quest. I think maybe it was like the day before. I was really starting to freak out my girlfriend at the time and my father. With my dad, I remember I was talking to him on the phone and I was like, I was confused as to why he wasn't happy for me. He was like, it's like talking to a different person, something seems off, but I was telling him like, no, I'm good, you know? We're all like I'm God is what I told him. And I was trying to, I was trying to say, like, I'm God, and we're also all God, like we're all God just like together. But he really freaked out. Before I could even finish by saying, we're all like I'm God and we're all God. He started just like screaming like crying into the phone. Like, no, no, no, no, no. And that really stuck with me that memory. At another point to in the same sort of phase, I was talking to my girlfriend at the time, and she just got really upset by what I was saying. I don't know, she was a very rigid like rational scientific person, and I was suddenly talking about metaphysical bullshit and God and whatnot. And that really freaked her out, I think. And she just sort of took off. Just for her own sake, I don't blame her, but there was a point where she was like, I guess, just reached her threshold and couldn't deal with it. But that was like, I was totally unfazed by that. Like, oh yeah, that's part of the plan. I've got to freak people out, kind of. That means I'm doing the right thing. But she had left and I got back to the apartment and my friends had a little intervention. They were like, you're really starting to concern us. Boy, you got me really mature Friends. Yeah. Well, I would call us anything, but mature at the time, but they all stopped me on my way up to my room and they were like, we're worried about you, you know? And they said, this is kind of reminding us of what happened to so and so. And I'm not going to say his name, but I should have prefaced this whole thing with this aspect of the story. It kind of relates to the mrap, the mental health tank. But I had a friend, the year prior who was living with us, who had a very similar sort of brush with psychosis. And this was before we even really had that kind of language for it. I don't really want to divulge too much because it's not really like my story. And I think in a way that's different from my experience of all of this. He has moved as far away from it as possible like in his life. And so I won't really get into the details of it, but the first brush that I ever had with the mental health system was I was in my room late at night. About to go to sleep. And I got a knock on the door saying like police open up. I had no idea what was going on, but I went outside. I opened the door and there was a police officer. And he tells me we have to leave the house now..

psychosis
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"It was explicitly secular, but like the woman who ran the organization, she was like a former divinity minister and she mastered in divinity or something. And it kind of had this whole liberation theology approach to everything. And it was like it was not lost on me that this whole idea of the intersection is kind of like a crucifix cross thing. And there was one point when I was starting to just have a lot to say and ramble on at people. There was this one guy in the program who was talking about how it was like some orientation icebreaker question like, oh, where would you go in time back in time if you could, and he was like, I would go back to when Jesus was around to see if that was real. And then I was telling him, oh, you know, a while ago. And this really did happen. This was like a couple months before this episode. I saw these two chem trail things. The jets leave behind. I don't believe in that kind of stuff, but you know like chemtrails. I saw these two chemtrails intersect in the sky and it just looked like it was just a beautiful crystal blue sky and I thought that was like a sign even that was before any of this had happened to me like psychotically. It was just sort of profound. And then later on my balcony in Baltimore, there was this sunset and sunset right over D.C. kind of in that direction. And there was there were these clouds, and it just looked like this huge red mushroom cloud. And it kind of like this sort of vision thing like worked its way into my psychosis. It's not an omen. Yeah, or like an omen or like the stand or something. Like if you've read that kind of like, you got to read that, man. The forces of good and evil are coalescing for the final apocalyptic battle. That was kind of like it worked its way in there. I don't know. I think it was you on one of the previous episodes described psychosis as like a personal apocalypse. I've also been sort of thinking about it that way for a long time, both in the sense of like apocalypse, what people think of just being taken from the world you know and plunged it into chaos and then. Also in the biblical sense of the veil, yes, like something unseen. And then once that veil has been lifted once you see those edges to everything, it becomes very hard to let that go. But so anyways, there was this whole messianic thing happening to me where I thought I was channeling something..

jets Jesus Baltimore D.C. psychosis
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"Stuff like this. But yeah, no, I was struck by the third episode, I think. I forget her and it was like so fear someone. Sofia, yeah, she was just sort of talking about going to the Woods in a cabin with her family and everything. And that's like when I've talked to my folks and my friends about what ideally I would like to happen is basically like that. Like I would like to just be sort of sequestered away mental health tank. Yeah, I would like to ride around in the mental health tank. Yeah. While psychotic just plowing into everything, sort of GTA style. That's what I do. Yeah, that is pretty much what they do. But I was kind of just, I was taken it back by listening to that episode because that's just so unlike any response that I've seen, be possible. And you know, I'll get into this in my own tail, but in the most recent episode I had, my parents sort of did that in the extent that you can in New York City, which God bless them honestly. I do think that it's important to move toward something like that where people who are having this happen to them actually have some input and what happens obviously that is not really the case. Signed a lot of paperwork while I was on intense psychiatric drugs. And I don't think that's ethical, really. But yeah, I mean, I guess I was just sort of touched by that that story because it's possible, you know? And also before I get into it, I just want to like dispel any pretense that I have any idea what I'm talking about. Because I'll do the same kind of thing as well. Yeah, I'm speaking for both of us here. If there's one thing that having psychosis has taught me, it's that things are very dependent on perspective and they're not really like ontologically real all the time. Things that you experience, you know, so like, what psychosis is, has sort of like differed a lot between when I was actually experiencing it immediately after experiencing it now how I think about it, how it was to other people in my life. It's all, it's all a lot of different perspectives and I don't know, I don't know which one is the right one, you know? Yeah. I mean, what do you think because often I end up asking people like why do you think this happens? And then more, I think now, like, is that even a relevant question or was to dis obsession to understand why there's more important things to sort out yeah, that's a really good point. I think in the assertive medicalization of all of this, the diagnostic approach to it, there are.

Sofia New York City
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"According to a new study, people's ears play tricks on them when they drink too much coffee. We all go a little mad sometimes. They try to kill themselves. Hello and welcome to another episode of coffee and psychosis, a podcast that has nothing to do with coffee. My name is John. We made it. The big one, episode 20, what are milestone? If you were to tell me to start this venture, we'd reach these lofty heights. Would anyone believe you? Possibly. Anyone can start a podcast not about coffee, but to record 20 episodes of a podcast not about coffee. I don't know if anyone has ever done that before in all of human history. I know where you're thinking. Listen to him, gang or grandiose over there. He's been drinking too much coffee. Let me just temper that aspersion for a moment. It's not like I'm saying this is the best podcast of all time. Far from it. It's maybe only on the top 5 podcasts of all time. And we've given you 20 episodes of that and only a few years. That's all I'm trying to stress. That's an accomplishment we can all share. I need to thank you all for listening. All the people who send nice emails, weird emails, God will save my soul emails. You've all been part of this. Mostly though, this podcast wouldn't exist if it weren't for the people who come on here and share their stories. I know I always look forward to hearing what they've got to say. And I can't wait for you to hear what this episode's guest has to say..

John
"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"The only problem that I had that was coming up was from the respirator, I was getting these dots that would come up every week or so where I'd get these dots in my vision and then it would get a bit a bit trippy, not like psychosis, but I would get these kind of voices again talking to me. And my hand moving on their own, but it was God wouldy gook. It was like it was the computer was broken. It was like the psychosis machine was broken. And yeah, so then these would happen like every week or so with the promethazine and those night breakfasts are respiratory and I'll get these dots in my vision and then I'd also get a bit weird with voices and hand moving for a few hours, which is really annoying. We lowered the dose of respiratory into what it was before. Which is 0.5 mils the lowest dose, and I have been fine for like 5 weeks now without all any of that shit. That's good. But I was normal I must say so it's been February what's it now? Almost mate. I was totally honest. I have been normal. I was normal that whole time after the episode is just when these dot respiratory moments came up. It wouldn't be like going into psychosis. It would be just kind of like just it would be like a kind of like glitch where I just had my hands and move and shit. So it wasn't like a relapse. It wasn't a read ups. It was just like a side effect..

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

Coffee and Psychosis

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"psychosis" Discussed on Coffee and Psychosis

"According to a new study, people's ears play tricks on them when they drink too much coffee. We all go a little mad sometimes. They try to kill themselves. Hello, and welcome to another episode of coffee and psychosis, a podcast which has nothing to do with coffee. My name is John. It's been a while. Lots has happened. I've been a little bit fucked. The world's been a little bit fucked. You probably have been too. Let's be honest with ourselves. We can do that here. Much like the meat eaters will say, something has to die for them to live. For me, something has to be neglected for me to survive, which might be brushing my teeth. It might be this podcast. It could be both. Luke is back for another episode. You're gonna love him if you don't love him already. He's just so brutally honest. And it's hard to be honest about this stuff. You might remember him anyway. He has been on a podcast a few times. He was responsible for kickstarting this thing existing. We made a film together called being Jesus. You should watch that. I wouldn't say it's the best film ever. But it's probably top three. Anyway, I was waiting for Luke outside the tube station and just before he arrived, a guy rolled up with a big speaker. Gets on the microphone and starts bellowing out Bible verses. And to me, that was just the most fitting kind of welcome for Luke. It really did serve to highlight the kind of respect that Luke commands in this society. It was just one of those moments that makes you realize how big an impact is podcast is having. What a.

Luke John