24 Burst results for "Psychological Stress"

Using Meditation to Overcome Toxic Thoughts Featuring Amelia Adrien

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

07:08 min | 3 months ago

Using Meditation to Overcome Toxic Thoughts Featuring Amelia Adrien

"Amelia's thank you so much for being here to talk with us today. So welcome I'm really happy to be here. So this is a topic that I think can be intimidating for some people. So how can I approach meditation as a beginner? Yeah. I agree I think it can. It can feel like it's something that is other people who that other people don't well, and maybe we can fill that. We don't do it so well but really the the the best thing to now is you can't really get it right? You can't really get it wrong. If you would just to take one long in hand. Exhale with me right now focusing attention on that `grats. comes. Into your nostrils. and. Out. Again. In that moment in that one breath, you'll meditating you reset your body. Your brain your nervous system. Some meditation. Media simply focusing your mind on one thing, and you can meditate when anything can be positive or negative. I was looking at the definition of meditation on it's shown to be the act of giving your attention to one thing. And we associate with being common relaxed actually you can meditate on absolutely anything it could be that you meditate on your brass. It could be that you have more of an active meditation and you meditate on nature as you're going for a walk, it could be quite meditate on the beauty of a flower. So it's a thought or a study on one object. And really one of the simplest things you can do as a beginner. The simplest types of meditation that you can do is accommodating meditation and this is really what you just watch the grass just like we did right at the beginning. So you become aware of the sensation of the breath is it comes into in through the nostrils. And then down into the belly on the inhale. And then on the ex how the breath travels up and out through the nostrils. and. You just watch the breath. The sensation of the breath is it comes into the body and then as it comes out to the body and you can do this for three breaths, you could do it for three minutes. You could do it for ten minutes. You can do it for sixty minutes. It's really just you know it's really a how long is a piece of string but what I suggest people who just starting out Is that you create a little habit of meditation practice. So you make maybe a little promised yourself. You're going to do it for seven days say and see how that goes. That goes. Okay. Then maybe up to eleven days then maybe up to twenty one days and you just see how you go rather than say I can now be a meditative for the rest of my life you set yourself something that's achievable. Something that feels that you can do right. At, the way to really make it part of like a routine I find is to do at the same time every day. So then when that time of day comes around you like offices, my meditation time, and so then you kind of it almost becomes automatic. So for me, the best time for me to do it is in the morning. So it's literally get up go to the unsettled meditation cushion and stop. Don't turn on your phone tummy not definitely don't go downstairs on leading the dishwasher. You know the the world will start to come at you with many many different things to do will tell you a more important than than taking time with yourself than just taking time with your own with your own being. Prioritized baton for me the way that that works if I just fussing the morning. Now I know if if you've got little kids that can be really hard to the kids will get out probably before you now be asking and demanding for your attention. So if that's the case, then you just located in a different part of your day but choosing a time so that when that time comes around, you're like, okay, that's your trigger. So then it becomes more habitual. and. I love how simple and how really customizable you make that I think that's beautiful because I think in my mind meditation has be this very strict long. Thing that I'm. Doing. But I think it really is what fits your life and I think that's a beautiful sentiment. Yes a show. So, what are the benefits that I can gain from meditation sesame we it gives me a great understanding of who I am. It helps me understand who I am away from the different roles that I play in my life mother daughter wife friend business not helps me move away from all of these other roles and it helps me connect to that true quieter nature actually within within me. There's a quote that I really love from. Colin Young, which says the welcome ask you who you are and if you don't know the wealth will tell you. So in this way, what I love about meditation is that it's not something spaced out. It's not something dreamy. It's something very centralizing and very clarifying in in in identifying locating. Understanding more about who you really are. You're able to own your position in the world. You're able to take in an empowered way your position in the world and feels really that feels really positive and not doesn't come with your fast meditation oil second or your said even your fifty, it's something that's may be cumulative. So you might experience that end the first few times on. That's wonderful but it's something that you become familiar with like Oh. Yeah. I remember this is the calm of of me. This is who I really can be. This numerous scientific studies on the benefits of meditation and these all have great value. But I've kind of had a look there seem to be five main benefits that we can get from meditation. The first one is it calms UNAC- stabilizes us so. One of the main benefits that it can bring us is this sense of stability and calm. It can help center US stablest into this present moment rather than projecting into the future or ruminating over the past set keeps US keeps US present moment away, which then helps to common stabilize us. That's kind of a one of the fundamental benefits really of meditation. So. The second thing is it improves focus. The practice is helping us focus our attention on one thing. So we can then translate that three to many different aspects of our lives. That that thing that it seems to do is increase resilience to stress. So it's shown that meditation lessons, the inflammatory responses to those who are exposed to psychological stress. What it actually has been shown to doing studies is the dump activity in the Magdala and increases connections between the Magdala on the prefrontal CORTEX CORTEX. So both of those parts of the brain help us to be less reactive to stresses and significantly I think they help us to recover back from stress experience. It stresses pot of life. It's not something that we can eradicate or eliminate. But we can do is train on south through meditation to recover quicker from it. This becomes baseline. This becomes more who we are. Throughout the day. In in particular moments after meditation.

Psychological Stress Amelia United States Colin Young Unac
"psychological stress" Discussed on Live Your Own Fit Podcast

Live Your Own Fit Podcast

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Live Your Own Fit Podcast

"The idea being you, you spend more time in the Para sympathetic state, which is this rest state in in that enables face dilation. And you mentioned the nervous system and the talk about the impact of if you Ramping up your nervous system regularly whether it be through on purpose whether it be true. Very a stressful high intensity workouts and releasing hormones that way or whether it just pay emotional stress and people. Accustomed to living a stress life in their they brains working overtime and. And the. Effect of that on? Insulin Nelson's. Yeah, yeah and beyond. So it is interesting to note the the the similarities between a Physi- an emotional or psychological stress versus a physical store physiological stress like exercise. Because they do have some similarities namely, the release of the stress related hormones most especially, cortisol and catecholamines are the main one being epinephrine sold to see that one cortisol and epinephrine. During exercise, there is a it. I, guess there's a few points to bring up to compare it with a chronic stress. Emotional stress. With exercise catecholamines epinephrine. Cortisol epinephrine. One of their main actions is to stimulate the release of glucose from the liver. So the Liberal Starts Spilling his glucose into the blood. But during exercise, there's a way to deal with that, which is these really greedy hungry muscles that are pulling in almost all of that, glucose. And importantly, during exercise insulin is extremely low, which means as the glucose is flooding the bloodstream. While the muscle is exercising, it doesn't need insulin to tell it to pull and glucose. It has an insulin independent way of pulling in glucose a back door if you will. So insulin is low, but the muscles still gets all wants because the moment of muscle contracts, it can pull and glucose independent of insulin because insulin is low, it means the fat cells aren't pulling in the glucose. So fat cells aren't being fed, they're sharing their fed because insulin slow, they're breaking down fat in, so you have this muscle that's working in, it's swimming in a Sea of glucose and fat that's getting all the energy needs. In. So once the exercises ended the stress hormones come down, everything else comes down and indeed the body is better prepared to the same thing next time because it continues to adapt to that stress, which was acute nets such an important distinction. In contrast with emotional stress, that is a chronic stress..

epinephrine psychological stress cortisol Nelson
Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

"More than half of people who received hospital treatment for Covid nineteen were found to be suffering from a psychiatric disorder a month. Later, a study has found. Out, of four hundred, two patients monitored after being treated for the virus, fifty, five percent were found to have at least one psychiatric disorder according to experts from San. Rafael Hospital in Milan found. The results based on clinical interviews and self assessment questionnaires showed post traumatic stress disorder in twenty, eight percent of cases depression in thirty, one and anxiety in forty-two. Additionally forty percent of patients had insomnia and twenty percent had obsessive compulsive symptoms. The findings increased concerns about the psychological effects of the virus. The paper published yesterday in the Journal Brain behavior and immunity says PTSD major depression, and anxiety. All high burden. noncommunicable conditions associated with years of life lived with disability, the study of two, hundred, sixty, five men, and one hundred, and thirty seven women found that women who are less likely to die from Cova than men suffered. Suffered more than men psychologically patients with previous positive psychiatric diagnoses suffered more than those without a history of psychiatric disorder. They said, psychiatric efforts could be caused by the immune response to the virus itself. All by psychological stresses, such as social isolation, psychological impact of a novel severe and potentially fatal illness concerns about infecting others and stigma outpatient showed increase anxiety and sleep disturbances while perhaps surprisingly, the duration of hospitalization inversely correlated with symptoms of St Depression anxiety and OCD.

Psychiatric Disorder Covid Rafael Hospital Sleep Disturbances Journal Brain Behavior Social Isolation Cova Ptsd Milan SAN
How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With  Dr. Donn Posner

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:45 min | 6 months ago

How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With Dr. Donn Posner

"Don't know about you guys, but my sleep has suffered at times quite badly during the last few months. Today's guest really got me thinking about this issue in a whole new way I. he normalizes the sleep problems. Many of us are having. If you're sleeping poorly right now, he says don't freak out. It's natural and normal. Second he has a whole bunch of tips for how to deal with insomnia. Some of which I had never heard before, and I'm already starting to operationalize my own life. His name is Don. Posner he's one of the leaders in the field of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Titles are founder and president of sleep, well, consultants and Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Not only did done patiently answer all of my questions, but we also played him. Some listener voicemails from you guys. One last thing to say before we dive in here, you'll notice over the course of this week. That are episodes this week. Have a theme which we're calling primordial needs today. We're doing sleep. Wednesday it's sex, so it's fun week here on the show. Stay tuned for all of that I. IT sleep and on near here we go. Great to meet you and thanks for doing this. I appreciate it sure thing good to be here. You gave a talk recently. That got some attention. deservedly. We'll get now more attention now that we're putting you on the show about acute insomnia. Can you tell us what that means and why? You're worried about it right now especially. Let me clarify a couple of things. Let me maybe work backward. The best way to define acute insomnia is to define chronic or long term insomnia, which we in the field called insomnia disorder. And the way we define that is that a person is having trouble initiating sleep to begin with. Or they wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep. Or they wake up sort of at the end of their night and never get back to sleep, right? And so those are really three flavors of insomnia if you will beginning middle and end. We like to say chocolate, Vanilla Strawberry, and then there's neopolitan which is a mixed bag right so that's insomnia. If that is happening and we say what's problem with to sleep or staying asleep, it's if you take longer than thirty minutes to get to sleep on average if you are awake for some combination of thirty minutes in the middle of the night, or you wake more than thirty minutes earlier than your desired time. If that's happening three or more nights a week for longer than three months. And you have associated daytime symptoms, that's insomnia disorder and I want to underscore that last piece which is. Really, a twenty four hour disorder. It has to have impact on your day. For us to say that this is really an insomnia disorder problem. You have to have something like fatigue sleepiness. Concentration problems, performance, problems and so forth. So chronic insomnia is those symptoms more than three months. So now going back to your question about acute insomnia, acute insomnia is all of that. Less than three months when I give talks, and when I asked the audience how people here have ever had a bad night's sleep I know I'm going to get a laugh and one hundred percent of the hands go up. We've all had that experience. And all of that is normal nothing to concern ourselves about it, and we don't even talk about anything as diagnostic as acute insomnia until we get to at least three days. But then anywhere between three days and three months is considered acute insomnia, and that means that you're having those problems either initiating or maintaining sleep. And you may or may not have daytime symptoms yet. And it's usually due to some stressor, and we say anything from the Bio psychosocial spectrum. I now say to my trainees. You could probably open the dictionary. Put your finger down on a word and find something that causes insomnia. Whether. It's an illness physical pain a change in your environment, a psychological stress like stress at work tax time those sorts of things and I also hasten to add that. The Valence of that does not have to be negative. Right change is stressful so getting married and getting a new bed partner in your bed. Can Change Your sleep patterns. Having a child. Is a precipitate for an acute insomnia until you can get that kind of straightened away. The thought process is absolutely very much that that's a normal reaction distress. Maybe even a good one because. If we go back evolution narrowly speaking. Sleep is a dangerous activity. Right if you're asleep, you're vulnerable. It must be important for that reason because every species, does it. And so, it must provide very important function, but it's dangerous, so we always say that sleep is deferred when the lion walks into the mouth of the cave. and. Therefore, we could say that acute insomnia is adaptive. If, you understand so even now in our culture. It's adaptive in the sense that you're making changes. You're trying to deal with. Whatever's coming down the pike. But we always expect that. If you then adapt appropriately or the problem itself goes away, or you get on some medication or the stressor itself remits then we expect the acute insomnia to remit, and so all of that we consider to be normal, and it is for a smaller subset, but yet epidemic numbers that sort of gravitate into this chronic insomnia realm, which is where people like myself and my colleagues come in terms of helping people to treat that.

Insomnia Adjunct Clinical Associate Pro Founder And President DON Psychological Stress Posner Stanford University School Of Partner
Dr. Allen Berger: Overcoming Anxiety And Fear During Quarantine

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

11:40 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Allen Berger: Overcoming Anxiety And Fear During Quarantine

"Dr. Berger what can you tell us to help us cope with these massive psychological challenges in these massively weird times? Well I think the first thing that want to say is that Were all experiencing anxiety to some level right now. That is the new normal today. We make a distinction between fear anxiety and a lot of feeling fear. Because there's a real threat out there Dr Taback and really help us understand that. So our reaction to this. The fearful part of it is quite appropriate. That's the reality of it but I think what will be important today. Bill is for us to make that distinction between fear anxiety in to talk about the anxiety. Part the fearful part. We need to do what everybody's telling us to do in order to to stop the spread of this thing in into you know decrease our risk of being able in getting the covy nineteen and that's different from anxiety. Well no that's that's the fearful part. That's the appropriate. Reaction of fear is taking the steps necessary to protect yourself. The anxiety gets in in when we start imagining. What's going to happen so when we leave right now? We go into the future. You see as soon as you start imagining catastrophic outcomes. I'm going to be in in bad shape emotionally. How does this get all the worst for someone who might be home these days? Who's already been struggling with some kind of addiction or challenge with alcohol or drugs? How did they get through this? Yeah that's such an important question. Look in and we're all trying to mobilize as many resources as we can to reach out to people that are isolated. And it's a weird thing. Isn't it where isolated but in some way were even more in community now than before and I think that's an important thing for us to realize were really connected right now and we really need each other more than we've ever in addiction and recovery. We talk about. I can't but we can and that whole idea is so important at this moment more than ever. I mean if we can remove ourselves really from this particular you know terrible crisis that were in in just sort of look at it from a bird's eye view there's an amazing message in the global nature of this disease. Right it's to me. The message is one of humility mean. It's really right sizing us in an incredible way. Isn't it Dr Data? And also just how universal this is we are all human beings. We're all going to be vulnerable. We all need to take care of each other and take care of our planet. I mean you can debate back and forth global warming this or not. There's no debate here when it comes to corona virus and it's almost as if the forces of nature have said Wake Up People. You need to be banding together to work for a common goal. Not just corona but the health of the world's for your own sake. I love that. It's it's almost like nature is saying. Hey everybody wake up waking up a wake up call. It's a big wakeup call for some of US. Like myself or watching. Cnn All day long and and you know watching those numbers on the right hand side of the of the screen continue to go up and this is. The stress gets more and more overwhelming. You you do find yourself even if you're not struggling with things like depression normally or addiction You find yourself kind of different. It does something to you just listening to. What's going on in the world and then dealing with the am I gonNa get it or any of my family members going to get it. What should I be doing to protect myself at home? And this is weird because my business could be falling apart. Can you give us some ideas on steps? We can take personally to try to manage that kind of thing in. How can we recognize if we're not managing it? Well yeah that's a very important question. Bill American Psychological Association came out with some guidelines and one other top guidelines was limit your exposure to the news right now. Now that's not the same as saying you know. Become an in on ostrich. Stick your head in the sand in and don't pay attention to what's going on but we've got to find a balance between being informed but at the same time taking care of ourselves and so limiting exposures important thing. That's what I started to do. A give myself a ten minute quota. Ten minutes I get to watch news a day and that's it and then the rest of the time you know. I'm engaged in other things. So that's the first thing right is really pay attention to limiting your time. That's GONNA help people with their anxiety a lot. So tell me what what are some of the other things? I've heard about diet and exercise and sleep but Maybe you can kind of help part listeners. Understand what are the steps that they should take to try to keep as healthy as possible? Let me put it in the context of this concept in addition to our physical center gravity. There's an emotional center gravity and when I keep my emotional center gravity over my two feet. Then I cope a lot better. Try Give this virus by emotional center gravity or what's going on in the world my emotional center gravity then my wellbeing depends on what's going on around me and today that's really bad news. Your it said it's pretty common. It's critical Woodson. It's what we're all doing and see this. Is the opportunity. See if we used. This is an opportunity to become aware of ourselves in how we function. What's our habitual ways of thinking and feeling we've got an opportunity to really do some phenomenal growth. So you say that. The there's a difference between fear anxiety you alluded to that. Would you say fear would be the rational perspective of the challenge that were under at the moment and that the anxiety irrational portion of that? That's correct so if I stay grounded in in in respond to my fear appropriately. What am I gonNA? Do you know the steps that we need to take to stop the spread of this and to protect ourselves. You know. Finally we're talking about everybody putting a mask on before you leave the house you know if there's no host for this thing to to survive in and we're going to be able to stop the spread of this thing so that becomes an incredibly important thing and I think that's what they did to finally get control the Spanish fool back in nineteen eighteen so from day to day perspective to sort of move in the moment and realize that right. Now you're fine. You're not sick this focus on what's good. Let's do what I can do what I am in control of. Let me take control of that. What is what is your recommendation for. How the average person who may have just low level anxiety and even more so those people who have a heightened level anxiety. How do you keep people away from delving into that? What IF SCENARIO WELL. That's such a great question. Let me tell you how I work with that. My office right. There's a rational part of me that you just referred to. There's a healthy part of me that that responds appropriately situations takes care of myself from a rational basis will. There's also a part of me that I call my anxious self. Now that part of me can take a situation like this and come up with all kinds of catastrophic outcomes. I'm GONNA get this. I'M GONNA die in a hospital loan although saint. That's possible outcome whether that's going to happen for me or not is yet to be determined so when I start to project into the future. I've got to start to think about that. The side of me. That's projecting into the future is the part of me. I need to deal with so I need to start separating myself from the part of me that's making me anxious and see. This is a very important step in terms of being able to now manager anxiety. Well or would I would say in the way I'm talking about now. Manage are anxious self. But do you think that on some level that the human being with our existential reality that to some extent this anxiety you put yourself through the what if in a way to try to prepare yourself in the event that it takes place thinking that maybe that may cushion the blow to try to put yourself through the potential horrendous aspects of the future so that you will not be shocked in unprepared if were to take place? We call anticipatory coping. And you're right on. We do that right. We anticipate these situations was it. How NEAT WELL. It is if you do it once maybe twice but when you do it a thousand times in you run through a scenario over and over again. You're no longer preparing. Now you're throwing yourself into a big into a panic right. You're going to have a panic attack. I do go down that road of what if and then I have a real myself back To rational thought how do you really yourself back could tell us what you do. The first thing that I do say okay. You know what you got a job to do. Focus on what's going on right now. Number one Suai become try to become more philosophical and I say it's here now anyway we all know that we're dying eventually We don't want it to be tomorrow. We don't want it to be two weeks from now but we all know. We've been preparing for this in many ways our whole lives and so. I try to be philosophical about say it's GonNa Happen. But let's focus on what's good. Let's focus on what we can control. Let's talk about the psychological stress on medical staff who have to deal with this every day. Not only do they have a concern. They have to even if they claim they don't they. They have to have a little bit of concern for themselves in this case multiplied by just an overwhelming feeling of lack of control because this virus seems to have its own trajectory and they get surprise suddenly. There's there's a patient he was doing well a few minutes ago. And all of a sudden now they're crashing and need to be put on a ventilator. How our healthcare workers supposed to deal with that kind of stress? You guys are all in my prayers right now in terms of what you guys are facing here. Here's what we know bill. Is that when you let the situation control you? Then you're GonNa have the best possible response to it. No let me explain it. Because intuitively that seems what do you mean? You're abdicating any responsibility for letting this situation control you while the opposite is true. You see if I go into a situation thinking I'm GonNa Control Everything in Dr Steve. You know this better than most if I think I can control everything. That's going to be happening in front of me. I'm setting myself for for some big trouble because then I become fixed in my response if something has to be a certain way if it's supposed to look like this then. I'M NOT GONNA be able to respond to what it is and what we know. Is your coping increases when you let go of what's supposed to be happening and you start to deal with. What is if I let go of all of my rules of what's supposed to be happening bill? I can respond much better inside every one of us. In every one of those M- those healthcare professionals right now is an incredible ability to adapt into deal with situations as they

Bill Bill American Psychological As Dr Taback Psychological Stress Dr. Berger United States CNN Dr Data Dr Steve Woodson Suai
"psychological stress" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Even if nobody else out, there is telling you, I'm cursing you yeah, because as we've discussed many times in the show before our brains are just pattern, recognition engines, and will often make connections that are not really there and and this is where we see so many different magical ideas about how the world works emerging right Even outside of traditional beliefs and the developing world. Who I mean who out there has encountered the the the negative people get cancer model. Kind of western new age thinking this like you know what it's like the secret kind of yeah, and and I can see why this is attractive to because in the same way that if one doesn't have access to like a modern scientific understanding of of disease, they might be susceptible to to to some sort of magical explanation. I can see where even with access to To medical understanding of the world, if the if modern medicine is not able to. Provide the level of treatment that you would require. I can see where you might turn to some of these natural ideas, or you might sort of stumble back into the Marines and sort of have them at the same time. I mean are are. Capable of having to conflicting ideas in our head at the same time. We're on one level you know. What cancer is, and you know that has nothing to do with your personality or your life decisions, but still somewhere in the back of your mind. There's that old bit of magical thinking sort of client at the door. You know trying to to to tear you down into believing some other bit of nonsense about you brought this on yourself with like you say all that negative thinking. Yeah, now that being said. Said psychological stress can does have an effect on the body. In many ways, stress can cause a number of physical health problems, but the experts say you can find the answer if you look at cancer dot, Gov the link between stress in cancer is weak at best though I. as we explained earlier. Of course, we know all about no CBO,.

cancer psychological stress CBO
ESA studies human hibernation for space travel

KCBS 24 Hour News

02:15 min | 1 year ago

ESA studies human hibernation for space travel

"Well there is to it and now astronauts may soon be doing it hibernating the European Space Agency says that if astronauts are put into a state of suspended animation such as hibernating they could sustain the strength needed to travel to other planets to find out more KCBS anchors Jeff Allen Patty rising spoke with Mike Walton senior writer for space dot com why would hibernation make it easier to travel in space yeah yeah like a lot of reasons actually one of them is just that if like gas spots actually within the whole way that you would have to launch quite as much stuff without and that's a big deal because it costs a lot of money to watch each count the stuff of the space so you can cut down on on all the gear that that you need to launch like the size of the vehicle which enabled me to be as big if they're sleeping that they don't need to have as much space to kind of move around and then they will be as much food and all that stuff thank you can the debt that you get significantly cut down on the mass of the spacecraft and still be cheaper and if if they're hibernating then they will say they will feel the psychological stress of being out in space by themselves in a small group of like five or six for six months that's going to be a pretty stressful thing for them to deal with mentally and if they're sleeping through that you know that's that's also a plus okay my call that makes sense and we certainly see that done hibernation in the movies but we're not there yet right I mean this this is not something that humans can do get no no and that's that's a really important thing to consider to keep in mind yeah yeah this is something people have been dreaming about for a while being five five phones are are full of the stuff you don't need spacefaring civilization you can just didn't your little pot and then go with the hyper sleep and then can you just wake up like law yeah there are far away from earth and it's still pretty sci fi we don't know how to do it yet people are making strides you know there there are some therapies where people can be put into hibernation for a couple weeks at a time basically you get a really cold and they they go into and torpor and that's that's actually helps treat some serious yes your injury but to do it for six months straight yeah we're like we're not close to that and then in the near term like what you might see your kind of typical stretches of like two weeks at a time when they hibernate and then it will pick up and kind of go about their business and then go back under for another two weeks that's that's probably kind of more likely in the short term anyway this is Michael senior writer for

European Space Agency Six Months Two Weeks
A Functional Medicine Approach to Treating and Healing Acne with Dr. Robin Berzin

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

08:38 min | 1 year ago

A Functional Medicine Approach to Treating and Healing Acne with Dr. Robin Berzin

"So i was one of the lucky ones in high school who never had acne and you know felt like i'd exited that age teenagers unscathed and then i hit medical school and everything unfortunately changed so early in medical school also i was around held was i spent like twenty five because they went to med school a little late i went to undergrad and then i worked for a little while and went back to to school to do my premium ed studies and so i- landed medical school ready to go and over the course of the first year developed really horrible cystic acne and it was super confusing to me like where did this come from i was seen dermatologists we tried the birth control pill we tried sperone unlock tone which is a heart medication heart failure medication and blood pressure medication who's a secondary effect has been discovered to block certain male hormones to block acne we tried that i had peels had creams i had make-up's i had products i had tanning beds i even and at one point had a dermatologist who was injecting my zits with cortisone steroid to get them to go away and that was a really bad idea because when you use steroids on your face especially in an injectable format it actually leads to scarring and so familiar i have a little scar tissue still left over from bad acne and those experiences brady's continue yeah so you've been there and davis has been there i never i never ended up on accutane eventually i do credit the sperone unlock tone with kind of shutting things down temporarily but it really didn't fit six the problem and it was through learning about functional medicine that i learned where the acne came for and i was ultimately able to completely resolve it without any medications peels creams et cetera and that was such an amazing experience yeah wanna unpack doc because this is a topic that so many people have asked us to dive into and i can relate to the story mine is reverse i had really bad acne when i was in high school hey and i want you to talk about how acnes different for men and women mine was pretty straightforward i figured out that i had food sensitivities dairy and also to wheat and around my senior year all the way at the end louis right after prom i was in los angeles for conference in somebody said oh this lecture that i was at sometimes dairy can be inflammatory for some people if they have got issues if they were annabel addicts and they said why don't you try to go dairy free is like my first version of hearing from the limitation diet so i went dairy free for like two months cut out also wheat as well in minimize sugar and my acne completely cleared up and i haven't had a flare up since that time so i can relate but also imagine it's so much tougher dealing with it as an adult because you were like my skin is amazing when i was younger and now all of a sudden it's challenging so what did you find out and help us get a little bit of the lay of the land what is you discover are some of the root causes that are there that could trigger an adult acne or sister doctor yes so there's there's quite a few of them and you and i actually have a lot in common because wheat and dairy ended up being kind of at the core of my expense france and clearing my acne ultimately but it was first of all there's a lot of misinformation out there that hormone uh-huh cause acne and i see this all the time i see women told it's your hormones at your hormones and the reality is that oftentimes it's really not true you can get breakouts before your period because of shifts in the balance between church testosterone and progesterone and so p the who are already acne prone may get that sort of pre period break-up breakout you also can see what i call post birth control pill syndrome where after going off the pill as the female body is resetting hormones going back to its natural menstrual cycle which has been suppressed for however long we're on the pill you can start to see breakouts in somebody acne prone and the reality is though for a lot of these people for whom we blame hormones for acne the underlying cause isn't there hormones at all and if you think about it doesn't make sense because there's plenty of people who have the same hormone ones so the question is why what's the underlying driver and so there's a couple of things that we see driving acne and breakouts in general that really go missed so number one is food sensitivity so i'd eaten meat and dairy my entire life growing up wasn't an surly a help we were a healthy household but we weren't like health foods focused i mean i think about like you know goldfish in twizzlers as being my like after the school snack growing up and so i wasn't necessarily aware of these things and i had no idea that you can become sensitive to a food dude later in life and that was a huge moment because we think oh you're either allergic to something or you're not but these food sensitivities can really develop in for me the food titties had developed in that first year of medical school in a period of high stress so when you're under chronic stress in very high chronic stress psychological stress you actually break down the barrier in the guts you can break down the proteins that hold the cells that line the gut together and you can get something called intestinal permeability and end up developing allergies to some of the foods at your commonly eating that you didn't use to have because all the sudden when that gut barrier breaks down your immune system seventy percent of which is right behind that gut lining living in your gut is only exposed to things at it didn't used to see and you can develop some of these food sensitivities and so when i go back impatience history and i ask a win this acne start you know you didn't have agnew your whole life maybe developed in your teenage years maybe a developed it in my case twenties or as an adult what was happening around that time and oftentimes there there's a there's a trigger it could be a surgery for some people it was an accident or or the loss of someone close to them a major break a major raikov i was in that mode i was going through a really bad break up transitioning to medical school you know having all of those details of like oh my god the next seven years of my life for here and you know but didn't recognize the impact of that stress and in that time developed food sensitivities that ultimately be name the call underlying cause of my acne so the reason that the pills and the prescriptions and the topical in the antibacterial 's didn't work and the steroid injection certainly didn't work was because of the inflammatory root of the acne was coming from the inside and that's what drives me nuts out dermatology general is that were kind of told this myth that oh you can fix it from the outside when generally speaking you have to fix it the inside so going back to the couple of things that we see really commonly driving acne one you see food sensitivities and dairy wheat are the two most common that we see but there can be other ones eggs soy for some people nightshade vegetables so doing these elimination diets and here's the here's the acre people say well i cut that out and i say well how long did you cut it out for and they're like oh week or two we'll takes at least three weeks for the antibodies meaning you're an inflammatory reaction to kind of shut down so if you're kinda sort of eliminating a food or you're only doing it for a week or two you're not going to see that i need clear up and you mentioned you clot out dairy for two months and i for my case when i cut out wheat and dairy i really didn't see the benefits until about week six and that's when all of a sudden everything went away and now all if i really want that pizza like hey i just have to decide a zip worthy because i know what's gonna happen but at least i'm in control

Two Months Seventy Percent Seven Years Three Weeks
Women Who are Stressed During Pregnancy More Likely to Have Girl Child

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Women Who are Stressed During Pregnancy More Likely to Have Girl Child

"So if you are having a stressful pregnancy you're probably having a girl according to Katherine monk director of women's mental health at New York Presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center studies show that women who are having a boy are less likely to have a stressful pregnancy she says those with higher blood pressure and other signs of physical stress are more than twice as likely to be having a girl the same is true for those having psychological stress by a margin of two to one as for why well that's

Director Physical Stress Psychological Stress Katherine New York Presbyterian Columbia
"psychological stress" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"I think we're going to adapt to the stuff just as humans were in this early phase of all of this technology, really the internet broadly. But particularly social so, you know, maybe our children will use the stuff in a much better way than we do MS were addicted and we do stupid things, and maybe we will figure out how to use a better. So when I'm feeling optimistic. I think exits not social media. That's problem. Awesome will adapt somebody what we're seeing with online bullying, and you know, to your point flexing, which is having real world repercussions in you know, under service communities. I'm not at all certain that the the next generation is using this better than us. I think that they're using it far worse than it because they swim in it. They don't even see it. They don't they don't know where the boundaries are between that in real life. I mean, we all grew up not on the internet. The flip side of that though is you have people finding their communities. It's the transgendered kit overhaul. And so on totally. So that's that's really challenging. I mean, you talk about like the bullying, and the sort of elevated suicide rates in these sorts of things like there's an open question. Those just stay where they're at. Or is there it's going to it's going to increase. I think I think the amount of psychological stress that social media puts on we're Goltz who are successful in this incredible industry. We know how technology works. We get an and I think all white male. Yeah. Unbelievable. Act. This is the wet welcome to this week and white male privilege. I'm standing out got as come around the horn. I mean, you know, you're absolutely right, right. You don't you don't get to be in a better position than than the position that we talk you buy that thing that is also heartbreaking to me is people used to. Have a little bit more independent thinking, they would look at a situation say, okay? Let's think about this Mueller report on the bar. Dang Louis, though. I felt like it was when face-to-face as we're never as good as we remember them, you know, it just feels. So like if feels like everybody's reaction is so tribal now and in order to get outraged points like the name of the game is to be outraged and how much outrage points can get like this kid who did the fake attack in Chicago. The empire ender is now six hundred just exonerated. So now, there's a whole nother outrage on the right? And there, you know, after everybody was outraged that he was a gay man who was. Anti mega mega went after him. And then it was fake. And now he's released..

psychological stress Mueller Chicago Louis
"psychological stress" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on 1A

"And I think when you talk to farmers and correct me if I'm wrong here. I don't really I feel like most farmers don't debate climate change. Just is a thing. I mean, it's a thing. They have to deal with it depends on where you are. But it depends. But yeah, I mean a fair number. Yeah. Have to contend with the fact that the weather has changed a lot over their lifetimes. Right. And so. It's not. And you know, you already mentioned that. A lot of these folks have already been hit by the tariffs. And that's something that I'm talking politically both the representatives from those areas and the president is going to have to contend with going into twenty twenty and not only that I mean there have been subsidies for a lot of these farmers who have been hit by tariffs. And when you talk to senators from those areas, they say that farmers don't want government money. They wanna be able to sell their product and make it themselves, but they feel like they have to take it. So will there be more money? Appropriated to these places that have been hit by the floods most likely, and again, this is something that congress is going to have to contend with and largely those up for reelection in two thousand twenty are going to have to explain also something that I think voters are going to have to contend with on one level or another new tastes writes on Twitter. When do we start taking responsibility for climate change? Why don't we take measures to use renewable resources? When will we end our quest for big SUV's? Why are we always? Waiting for the government to tell us the interesting to see how these kinds of natural disasters affect the electric going into twenty twenty. Well, this is a real rubber meets the road moment in terms of the political conversation that we're having I did a story with farmers for vice news tonight on HBO seven thirty pm weeknights like like, I did it. I did it last year. And it was about farmers who are going through intense, psychological stress because of the decline in this case dairy prices that farmers having the sort of form these ad hoc support groups to try to keep it from killing themselves. I mean, there's a lot of really tough stuff going on in the farm country right now. And suicide support you aside support groups in in this case, Wisconsin to try to prevent people from, you know, you're alone on your out in your farm..

psychological stress Wisconsin congress Twitter president HBO
"psychological stress" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome back to working like dogs on pet life radio. Hello, dr. Hi. And welcome back. To be back here. Yeah. Well, we're so excited that you could be with us today to talk about your latest research around canine stress. So tell us about your hobby. What is canine stress canine strategies, phenomenon that we know is human human stress and every animal undergoes stress. The concern really is developed in recent years with with the widespread, you know, and really expanding use of dog in these sort of therapy situations emotional support animals as well as it systems dogs for a different kind of category. But all of these dogs are working with humans and the concern by some of us a few dogs, scientists behaviors and so on really is coming at the point of view of the dog. I mean, obviously, the dog is a tremendous help to the humans in whatever tasks they're doing, but we do need to be concerned about how much stress they're experiencing and stress is simply something throws the dog. Dog for loop. Whether it's just being tired, whether it's being hungry, or whether it's more, psychological stress, anxiety thinks that producing Zaidi in fear, and I'm really interested in making sure that people know more about this and are well aware of how to monitor it and what to do about it. And how really how much it can really affect the health of your of your dog. Yeah. Well, I am just so excited that you're with us today to talk about this, especially from the perspective of working dogs because I've seen people out with their assistance dogs, and I've seen dogs who look so stressed out in a working environment. And I see that I talked to their handler if I can and ask them and they say, oh, no, no, they're fine. This is just how they are. But that's not necessarily the case. These dogs can be experiencing severe stress that can have lots of negative impacts. So tell us a little bit about that. Like, what are some of the common causes an indicators? Well, the common cause in almost all of these cases. Well, there's a couple though, the one is over work. The research is going on now published research papers, and so on out there, very few very little science. But but more and more science is out there. And it's and it's telling us that there is a limit. And then there's some surprises in terms of what stress. Is a dog in terms of working and sort of things about the session length the number of sessions. It depends on the work. The dog is doing of course. But but it turns out it does affect a dog to work long days. Some of these crisis intervention situations and things like that. I it stresses. The firefighters EMT's the counselors and everybody else to and some stresses not bad. It's simply a matter of too much stress, and that of happens in humans, you know, there's stress disorders compassion fatigue. All those sorts of things that happen in humans. And basically what we're saying is this can happen in dogs as well. And you need to be able to watch for it. And we see a lot of warning signs like I talk a lot and my public lectures about body language in watching very subtle signs of of stress in body language things like dogs becoming reluctant to take treat things like dog showing the actual signs of anxiety like averting their eyes. Panting. One of my favorites too. Watch for sweaty paws dogs only sweat through pause..

psychological stress Zaidi
"psychological stress" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Science for the People

"And at this is going to reduce inflammation. I mean, there are all sorts of bogus claims made for it. I had one guy tell me that it was going to super Nate your blood, which is just sort of physiologically impossible. But basically what it does is it makes you cold. So your body does shunt. It's blood sorta to the core. And then you get out, and you get warm again and your circulation increases a little bit. So you're basically sort of reducing circulation to the extremities for a short while. And then you're letting it open up again. And do we have any evidence that it works? Is there any evidence? Ginette your blood? There's absolutely no evidence for that. There's evidence that it makes you cold. There's evidence that some people like it. You know, there is a little bit of evidence. When they give it to people may ask them, how they feel, you know, the report all kinds of great things. But in terms of any quantitative reproducible data. No, it doesn't it doesn't seem like it. It's a pretty nice placebo had say, well, and it sounds kind of I don't know exciting. I guess, and you also try things that we're a lot I suppose it in another way though, it's equally exciting to me. You tried something less exciting. You try sensory deprivation tanks. I did. I did. And I. I agree. I agree. I was really dreading this because I'm a little bit claustrophobic. I do not like to be under water. And so in the sensory deprivation tank, you're basically in it's only a few inches, but this very salty water. So you float, and I just thought I'm gonna hate this. It's going to be dark and quiet and going to be alone with my own thoughts. It sounded terrible. But I fell in love with this. This was probably the number one trick that I tried a while researching this book that I have continued to do and still in love with and do we have any evidence that that works so in terms of like, helping exercise recovery, etc? It there are some small studies suggests benefits in terms of something. That's like a foolproof absolute certain like a hot. This is the the magic bullet. We don't have that. But we do have is. Pretty good understanding now that an important part of recovery is just relaxation. It's letting the body unwind. There's a huge psychological component in recovery that I think is really underappreciated. So we we really think of a lot of this stuff in terms of physiology. Like, what's happening with your blood? You know, what sorts of things are happening in a muscle. But so much of this is your body's sort of overall stress and a huge component of successful recovery really is stress reduction and by stress, I mean, not just physical stresses, but also emotional and psychological ones as well. Your body will process, psychological stress much of the same way that it does physical stress, and so anything that you can do to really relax is going to be helpful. And part of that is you know, the relaxation, but sleep is important as well. Right with something. We're very quick to dismiss. But it is Britain. Oh, absolutely. I mean. When people ask me. Okay. So what do we know for sure works for recovery? It's sleep and sleep and sleep sleep is like the top fifty things that work like the probably the second most effective thing is like fifty times less effective making up these numbers. But sleep is just it. There's just nothing else that comes close. It really is your body's way of repairing itself of recovering of making repairs to all the little things that you damage to your muscles, your heart resting up all of these things happen during sleep and what I found. Really funny is that there are people out there trying to improve your sleep experience. And I'm not just talking about a podcast ads from mattress companies..

psychological stress physical stress Britain
"psychological stress" Discussed on The Scathing Atheist

The Scathing Atheist

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on The Scathing Atheist

"How weird it is to be sitting in some guys living room talking to him about beating Judah death. This ice tea is good is good. All right. So let's talk about the messiahs. Dick, was it mutilated or relaxed describe it exactly because this is our job. Now explains though that he chose this guy because he was so dispassionate because Lee, quote, one of the facts to speak for themselves without the hyperbole of charged language that might otherwise manipulate emotions, and quote this time in this because the facts actually are on his side for once. Right. But but it doesn't mean that he didn't find a guy with a decree from the university of Miami. Sitting in his office. Hey, skew your diploma has a dolphin sticker on it. No, no, no. It is eight dolphin sticker. Give you. And by the way, dispassionate doesn't extend all the way to finding a guy who wasn't a Christian. He admits before he's done talking about. How silvery has hair is that the guy has already? Religiously obligated to agree with the book's thesis. Right. Right. And apparently, this is the only Christian who can talk about the crucifixion without literally fighting off tears. He's dispassionate Ben. It's amazing. And that makes me happy because it means Lee Strobel was just balling. But. Curled up in a corners are now it, of course, it's just not a Christian book until you dig into the details of just how tortured Jesus was. So we're going to dive into that for basically, the chap. Well, any case you are wondering how long it would take for the expert to completely lose your confidence here. He's two paragraphs into the interview before he argues, the Jesus literally sweat blood day before the crucifixion like like medically. Yeah. But it's a parent's blood sweating from psychological stress, apparently, the son of God, just, you know, didn't have the spoons that we couldn't even. Yes. Wedding blood is is a real thing. Apparently, it's what we learn. It's a condition called HIMA to dro- sus. And sure honestly, I was just excited to learn about a medical condition. I didn't have well there. There yet ever mind. He points out that the blood sweating when a mated Jesus skin extra sensitive when he got flogged. So, you know, which is didn't just get regular flogging a people he had sensitive. Dana rash. And then he goes the food torture porn with his description of the whips the Romans used using terms like quote, quivering ribbons of bleeding. Ill. And quote, the bowels of the victim were open to exposure. Bowels open to exposure sorry. I'm just customizing Jesus. Fuck pot at real. Call forward actually three recording this for after that episode comes right? So it's a it's a callback callback forward. Quick break. Okay. I just had something if we repeat this and somehow figure out how to call up a start. We will get thirty life. How do we? This seems obsessed with pointing out minor extra stuff that Jesus suffered through to he's constantly going. Sure being whip sucks, but with all that blood loss. Imagine how thirsty he was. Actually says that and he like really had to. Quivering ribbons of flesh super-duper had. Yeah. If we're doing the whole, you know, one of those things like your dick feels numb you have that. You're like oh pee myself. It was like that. And it can just reminder. This chapter is to convince us that Jesus didn't survive in their book. I feel as though I'm being yelled at as I distantly slim my head into walls at Charing Cross looking for platforms at nine and three quarter. All right, but enough of that savage pre beating it's time to get to the agony of the cross. And he starts this off by explaining that. He's got no issues with the good capital punishment. Like we have in the US. He's like, look I've love state-sponsored murders as much as the next guy. But only if they're sanitary. But most importantly was have a medical examiner right there. In case, we murder the messiah again, and then pedantic truth start asking for death certificates. And not that it matters to this story of this chapter. This part's not true. There's actually a tremendous amount of evidence that we fucked up a bunch of execution. Right. He's just like, and then they just go to sleep. No, TIMMY, it's fine. It's time. Right. We actually just drive them. Upstate to. All they want. So at this point lease Christian bloodlust really comes to the voice like tell me more about the size of the nails..

Lee Strobel Dana rash Dick Charing Cross university of Miami psychological stress US murder three quarter
"psychological stress" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"You don't want to do something that's going to increase people's risk of negative health outcomes right so talk about weight stigma in your rationale for why you're not discussing the socalled obesity epidemic and you can explain it instead of focusing on body size you're going to focus on all the other reasons why changes in the built environment are helpful for people's wellbeing independent of body size and that there's actually a robust body of research on this you know supporting people's health and all kinds of ways that have nothing to do with body size so you know you can talk about like for example food insecurity and lack of access to food right that's a huge social justice issue and a source of psychological stress which in turn is a risk factor for chronic disease and same with lack of access to reliable transportation for example because that can cause people to ms or be late for work that can cause a lot of stress and we know that work related stress is a risk factor for chronic disease so you know these aspects of the built environment that are disparate between people who have privileged and people who don't people marginalized is one contributor to the health disparities that these people experience you know it's like not just one thing of course and i think in the obesity epidemic rhetoric around the built environment it makes it out to be just one thing that makes it out to be people would not be fat if they had access to fruits and vegetables or people not be fat if they could walk to work a ride their bike instead of you know driving or whatever but it's like a people being fat is not a health problem in and of itself as we're always talking about on the podcast and of course i'm using the word fat in a fat acceptance spirit and the spirit of fat acceptance not in the spirit of anything pejorative and we we know that it's more complicated than the socalled obesity epidemic rhetoric makes it out to be in terms of the built environment is just one thing contributing to health disparities among people in larger bodies or people in marginalized identities of all kinds so you know you can talk about that too can really bake that into any papers and research that you do on you know the.

psychological stress obesity
"psychological stress" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"No and so so what i talk about is that in the future we might have probiotic cocktails to treat things like depression anxiety ocd and stuff like that i mean it's it's almost a given that we will eventually gets the point but it's very premature and there's really nothing prescriptive that we can say about it today but i just kind of talk about it in the book because i think it's very interesting it's super interesting and i'm gonna keep my eye on that science for sure lastly i would like to you know talked about ways of optimizing stress sleep we don't optimize stress you want to reducing stress optimizing sleep and getting the most out of your exercise you know the kind of the things that really interact with diet yeah definitely will actually stress you bring up i mean it's important distinction there are two kinds of stress one is the sort of chronic psychological stress that we're seeing so many people coping with today and that's bad that's kind of stress that you experience when you're stuck in a job that you don't like you're in a relationship that's gone sour military duty medical school i mean these are all things that are extremely stressful phd student stuff like what actually the brain benefits from acute bouts of intermittent stress so when we go to a gym and we have a good workout those workouts are beneficial in part because they're stressors on the body and so in the book actually i talked about the various types of stress that you.

ocd psychological stress
"psychological stress" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Long in the tooth with a with the length of the inner but i wanted to make sure that we we touch on this really quickly because it's super relevant and it's something that a lot of people i think no but haven't seen the science behind and that's this concept of the stuff called method methadone which is a quarter so like drug that's typically used to suppress the immune system and you state that win you give dexsa method sown to folks you see like kids for example they start to eat like crazy when they get this this quarter so like drug put into their body and that there's something about stressing quarter saw the causes overeating what exactly is going on in terms of cortisol and excess calorie intake yeah absolutely so as he said the cortisol lake drugs can cause overheating in fat gain and particularly gain of abdominal that which is the kind that you really don't want to gain and corresponding deteriorations in a bolic health those are all things you see in high court is all states whether it is induced by a drug or whether it's induced by a tumor in your a to terry actually is the most common cause and so uh i think the thing that's really interesting about this is that it relates back to the relationship between psychological stress in eating escort salzone really important stress hormone and what you see is that people who experience psychological stress when not so is different types of people in all of our bodies respond a little bit differently to uh environmental inputs in challenges and so certain people when they're psychologically stress they secrete a lot of course all other people don't secre quite as much.

methadone immune system cortisol psychological stress terry
"psychological stress" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"And deplete certain vitamins and minerals your bvitamins become a critical tactic in the strategy of using supplements to manage dress and stress is associated with all kinds of events we were talking to rene a moment ago about the wildfires in california where she lives and she had to evacuate from her home and under threat of the fire i went to this is an evidencebased show of your new to the show i went to pubmed here's the title of the study gary wolf throw it up onto the screen a randomized trial of nutrients supplements to minimise psychological stress after a natural disaster how 'bout that you can't make that up and it turns out that those consuming the be complex supplement showed significant league greater improvement in stress and anxiety compared to those consuming a single nutrient or not consuming the supplement so there are data they are studies there is science to support this particular tactic and using b vitamins to help manage stress rene welcome back uh there are other studies associate with natural disasters as well but i thought it was timely and fitting to use that as an example we are evidence pay i know your new to the show but it's evidencebased this is a sciencebased show up half of oil evident this great so can you talk about what makes country likes sop dietary supplement the cohen's made it be a supplement so special and why i said that it's one of the best be complex supplements on the market a b conflict is great uh every once you take one country like the complex is a little bit different than most of them on the market because it's a coins and made it and the only one in the market is fully coins and made it on which sets it apart becau in what coins admission means basically um if it's in a simple way to kinda explain that you taking your bvitamins your body hastert look at what you've taken in and has to decide what it is breaking down into a reduced form and then assimilated see worth bioavailability um with a coenzyme made it be complex your body it's already review so your body already takes it in and.

california gary wolf psychological stress rene cohen hastert
"psychological stress" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"And these are women who they're not just driving their parents to the doctor there's they're administering bed they're doing lots of medical tests their queuing in a wound care and injections and changing feeding tube in i mean this stuff you it kinda like to think that the medical industry is handling this stuff but you've got family members who are handling well that was one of the things i found so fascinating in your article for the atlantic called the crisis facing americans working daughters is that when it comes to being a apparent there's no kind of shifting of understanding of rolls when it comes to childcare responsibilities because when you have a kid you understand that you are a parent that is going to involve giving medicine changing diapers and all of that but when you're talking about being a working daughter and taking care about you know weapon aging parents noone really talks about what that actually looks like changing diapers administering medicine giving shots wound care things that can be kind of heavy and emotional there is no sort of corresponding emotional weight associated with doing those things for a child yet here we are not talking about that extra sort of layer of of heaviness and emotions when it comes to that that very real role reversal yeah right talk about stuff mom never told you seriously it's such a psychological moments when you have to recognize that your parents who uturn to you on rely on for support emotional and otherwise are now not in a position to support you but beyond that are in need of your supporting returns so you write about this sort of added psychological stress that can come with navigating a role transition like that can you tell us about how that was presented in your life while while you were starting to tackle these issues in the public domain is speaking very personal free didn't it.

psychological stress
"psychological stress" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"No i'm telling me to grow you grow up nigger use your word you no other conversation i did hey unless slow you that right come on come on is me museum today though you must not followed the quan anyway i also for those who are in relationships married or not um another another form is like if there is something that you're while you're talking about you know said being sexually inappropriate in that context you know for those who are in relationships if you're in a relationship and your partner may want to do something that you don't want to do and i think i've said this before but your partner wants to doesn't he wants to do something that you're not down with and it's not because again europe rude it's something that you're not comfortable with them trying to coax shu or tell you that your prude because you don't want to engage in whatever activity this is that's not okay they need to respect tell you feel about things as well and yes there's compromising conversations with there's also knowing when somebody's not okay with something and if you try to continue to chris somebody even within a relationship in that manner you are then infringing upon the line of of fan i mean he just to bring the point home for circles we talked about before that this these kinds of dynamics can also exist in like familiar relationships as well um i have learned in negotiating issues with my family members 'cause i mean if you think about a motion abuse in the sense that it causes or induce the psychological stress or anxiety i have had to be i have had to become very strategic about the ways what i communicate in the ways that communique wombs the my family um in there you know there are certain things that i know they cannot handle and if i if i talk to them route bowie is faring ways or you know at certain points than i am opening myself up to anxiety as they will be anxious and they make me inches acid on twitter a few months ago right.

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"psychological stress" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Today with high school students having the same anxiety levels as the average psychiatric patient in the fifties my goodness we have put tried to put too much into the vessel at once in it's overflowing and i think some of this has to do with the technology that we have now i mean we we just talked about the great things that you can do on youtube whatever yeah that your phone but we while we are simultaneously probably have access to this mountain of information out there we at the same time or becoming last connected to other people and our happiness come at some level through the connectedness we feel to our community to our family to other people yeah i think if we could build some of those communities back again it would be a much healthier thing for all of us for our kids especially let's piggyback on that one with the next one has been proven that religious activities like attending services in prayer result in lower levels of psychological stress i would add a little bit here probably wasn't the case during the inquisition in were there protestants into steak or anything like that however i do get it know place of refuge a time to reflect singing together being part of the community remembering that you're part of what you're just one cell in a larger body yeah well kept paraphrase monty python you never expect the spanish inquisition ray really don't they were absolutely brutal i've got a series of books i want to send you my friend did i talk to you by the pillars of the earth world went out and it will out and you mentioned m yeah i'm gonna have to send him to you okay okay i i'm out of my mind with glee in fictional glee right now reading the third instalment and i've never the f i've i've seriously had to stop reading during the second book because i was developing too much anxiety because i knew in a few pages something oftel's going to happen to somebody that i loved i know even though they don't even exist other than a pitcher in in my mind my own creation is that cool about reading how you have your own pictures of someone else's creation and they become your own yeah i love it okay active fourteen amazing psychological psychology facts that you should keep to yourself although money could provide you with happiness study show that after 75.

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"psychological stress" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"On the commented number there would be heavy metals that's rarely ever seen even in literature so we have people coming union all stages of a disorder in all stages of also psychological stress here's the people that have the disorders at the other doctors either haven't been able to help poorer you know can't treat you know it's difficult for some patients turbe push that anxiety in that stretch the side to be able to focus on how to create it proven and repair so are certainly a good percentage of what i do it to try to get people to relax a little bit take a deep breath and then focus on creating result getting some knowledge creating a benefit to your body so we can help to change the picture i don't think i've ever seen a patient who came in with a you know significant medical problem who didn't have some psychological override in some anxiety and stress from it you know and anxieties extremely comments one of the things we see the most because as we get older we don't produce these are hormones as well as we did that could create anxiety people as well but a lot of carbohydrate in their blood sugar drops low blood sugar causes anxiety heavy metal exposure so there are lots of things that you know or playing a role behind the scenes so that's why this approach is so important i called the comprehensive medical nutritional approach so if you're like to cohen tested question you could do so right now one eight hundred eight four eight wabc one eight hundred eight four eight.

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"psychological stress" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Entire mighty 90 essential stuff i've got emails that have been coming in but i do want curiel to know that carol i'm going to get ben this long email you sent me because it's very complicated and i want him to address it and look could over so for you carol trust me we'll get we'll get it in the benz hands and he can get it in the dock wallich sans if need be signed will take care that now i do have an email in from betty who says i've got problems with my adrenal gland's what do i do go and joined the crowd every we all have prompt and what what are they what are the draft plan there the glands that help our body handle stress and what's more important joy not only are are are adrenal gland are strapped lands that there are youth and for quality glands as well which means that the more resources you'd reno glante our founding helping us handle strap and i'm not talking about psychological stress an emotional stress i'm talking the strap calorie i'm talking about the stress of sugar i'm talking about the draft a prescription drug and alcohol and cigarette the more the adrenal rathore helping our body handle stress the left they're making youth and productivity hormone the last were able the uh the more resources were spending i've tried a few weeks straddling the older were going to get the more infertile weren't going to gap and the sicker were going to get handling adrenal strasser a d adrenal strap is the key to longevity and the key to productivity and the key to a long and healthy life i think so to gun we'll take calls and we come back in just a moment toms also taking texts and tweets many questions desist come rolling in for you pharmacists banned from criticalhealthnewscom and again the number to call not to get on the show here but to talk to a human being about giving you some information one 8559497234 185 five nine four nine radio we cherish that number you have helped so many people in your career been i can't tell you what an honor and a pleasure it is i that i get to do.

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"psychological stress" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"psychological stress" Discussed on KTRH

"Can get at the dock wallich sans if need be same will take your that now i do have an email and forbidding says i've got problems with my journal glance would why do we go away and joined the crowd everyone we all it promptly what what are they what are the draft land there the glands that help our body handle stress and what's more and this is so important choice not only are are are adrenal gland's or stress lands that there are youth and for till with glands as well which means that the more resources get reno glands are spending helping us handle stress and i'm not talking about psychological stress and emotional stress i'm talking about the stress of calories i'm talking about the stress sugar i'm talking about the stress the prescription drugs and alcohol and cigarettes the more the adrenal gland's are helping our body handle stress the left they're making youth and for killing eighty hormone the less were able the the the more resources we're spending ah uh trying to deal with stress the older we're going to get the more infertile we're going to get and the sicker we're going to get handling adrenal distract reduce adrenal stress is the key to longevity and the key to fertility and the key to a long and healthy life i think so to gun we'll take calls and we come back in just a moment toms also taking texts and tweets uh many questions desist come in for you pharmacist ben from criticalhealthnewscom and again the number to call not to get on the show here but to talk to a human being about giving you some information 18559497234 1855949radio we cherish that number you had helped so many people in your career you're been gets it i can't tell you what an honor and a pleasure it is i that i get to do it is the greatest gift that you can imagine every time i help somebody might oxytocin goes up my dopamine goes all my anti eighteen hormone goes the hormones go up and that's the beautiful thing about giving when we give we got we give her even when you were a kid i learnt at a young age that i would.

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