18 Burst results for "Psychological Disorders"

"psychological disorders" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:16 min | 8 months ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Just got. If you if you have a dream chiang grab it if you can be anything you can do anything you want to do. The world is roster and these very motivating and kind of wonderful one level but also incredibly toxic. Because what happens. Individualists is that we could giving ourselves the credit process which is actually the successful accessible so people in the communities of people. Jimmy like steve. We tell you. The steve jobs invented the that steve jobs just whipped Other really key people to invent the iphone for him. So we're very good at doing that but but the dark side of that is also very good blaming ourselves when we fail Why we don't do that east. Asian thing of while this this this and this and this is the reason why failings instances like i'm a failure. I'm a loser. I'm an turns in an ourselves. So when you look at all these things that have been been rising especially since the global financial crisis in two thousand night self harm eating disorder. Body this morpheus suicide all on the up since two thousand two nights one of the things that will continue as communist perfectionism perfection stick thinking and one of the kind of academic technical definitions of perfectionism is somebody that has unusually high expectations for success and kind of repeatedly fails to hit those marcus for success so they can continue. Their are losing their failure. And that's what culture does these days. Each sets unusually high marker for success. It presents us with this perfect self on tv on radio on the incident and social media and says if you're not this person you have failed so if you're not be on hey is the message. If you all know. Steve jobs than you doing something wrong. And not as incredibly toxic it really really is incredibly toxic. Because he's not true and and and what will happen. Is the people blame themselves. I think what. I'm fadia an an. And then that's when you get this whole raft of terrible psychological disorders and between the first edition of self eight. Mabul couldn't the second one between the uk edition in the us edition. There was published a study. Wa- forty thousand young people across the us canada uk since nineteen ninety and It it confirmed my hunch. That levels of perfectionism are rising rising significantly since that eyesight Is that people are thinking more and more that they have to be perfect in order to be an acceptable human being.

two thousand Steve Jimmy steve first edition two thousand night canada two nights iphone Each uk forty thousand young people steve jobs second one one level one Mabul self eight ninety Asian
"psychological disorders" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on 710 WOR

"That we're supposed to believe your respective of politics. I don't mean a few hours and a handful, but you know, there's just some that come to mind. Where you're supposed to have some degree of reverence for them, And it's beyond politics, right? You think Washington Jefferson Lincoln. You know the kind of guys that you have Cities or or schools or streets in a major American streets, named after Whether it's on and then there's all these other heroes were passed to Babe Ruth Einstein Martin Luther King Jr. People, but It's not supposed to be political. They just were great in their time in their way, and we celebrate them, right. And you would think You could start with the founding fathers on this. The people of Mount Rushmore you as I said, you could add some of the names to this. But you would believe that Abraham Lincoln was certainly one of them. That Abraham Lincoln would be free from cancel culture. This would be a guy we could all agree did something pretty extraordinary and no one saying that he was perfect. The end the day he was on the right side of a critical issue for this country for this republic. He was the commander in chief of a military that held the union together and ended slavery once and for all in the United States to pretty remarkable thing. We tend to give him a lot of lot of credit for this understandably, and as we know he was assassinated for this after achieving that victory in the Civil War. But Lincoln would be one of those names where you'd say, Well, the greatness that he accomplished that greatness. Would at least make him somewhat immune to the efforts to destroy historical figures. Based on some perception of what they should be judged by today's standards, right the constantly changing Woke nous standards as we call it of the current moment. But now with the modern American live the left the Democrats. They have this psychological disorder. Notice. Trump Derangement syndrome. But it's not only trump. They're deranged about that they go much. Further than that. They want to attack so much. Maura of America and our history. It's not even about just this current moment. That's why you have Abraham Lincoln. Name that you would think would be somewhat immune to this. This San Francisco High school board said they want to rename them. I mentioned this to you yesterday. This story's I talked about this last night. And now today got a lot of play all across. The least the conservative Internet people are really focused in on this one. The mayor of San Francisco. I believe her name is London Breed, the mayor of San Francisco has said, Let's focus on covert and other things that we don't need to be focused on this right now. Yeah. No surprise. Let's get our schools back Open. Let's not worry about what the names are of the schools right now. But effectively they were saying that that Abraham Lincoln. Was insufficiently committed to, uh to the smattering of black lives. And for a man in Lincoln that ordered hundreds of thousands of Americans to their deaths to extreme, uh, wounding mutilation on the battlefield all to end slavery. You say that he was insufficiently committed to black lives mattering that that would seem to be borderline insane, right? Especially when you're judging this man by his time, but I'm telling you this because there's a reason behind all this. We need to start examining what's really going on in this country. We're the point. How are the Democrats are pretending to call for unity? Got Joe Biden and his and his would be Cabinet telling us all unify which, as we know really means Bend the knee. Do what I say they'll call that Unity. While they're calling for it, they we see time and again. That they don't really have any sense of unity to American history into American Ideals and the narrative of our past and what a great country this is. There's something very different going on right now with them. Um And look, I'm not somebody that carries any any water for keeping up Confederate generals or statues. I frankly don't care. I think that's up for communities to determine if they want to get rid of a statue of a Confederate general than that's that's their call. But I know the destroying statues and pulling them down. That's wrong. That's illegal that's destroying public property. And it was never going to end with Confederate generals. That's the part of this. I think everybody has remember it was never going to just be Confederate generals that were coming down. No. Now it's it's much more than that. Actually, Donald Trump himself. Said Back in 2017 during a press conference. You know, it's what about Thomas Jefferson. You like him? Well, he was a slave holder. So do we have to get rid of do we have to get rid of all Jefferson? Things is the Jefferson Memorial have to be replaced. And then what would it be replaced with? You start to wonder about all this. I mean, we're just gonna have statues of Jimmy Carter and Barack Obama and nobody who's allowed to be celebrated Bill Clinton. I think Bill Clinton stature. Yeah, You know, it's statute. Maybe maybe get some of those lady Greek gods. But those statues real close to me and you know there sometimes, you know, the little toga slip slips down a bit, and, you know, Hey, look ancient Greece. That's the way it was. Yeah. I mean, who are we allowed to? Who are we allowed to celebrate? Anymore. You asked that question right here in New York City, and then I see this in person. When I walk past I live pretty close to Columbus Circle, not far from in a midtown. And you know, there's a very large statue of Christopher Columbus. That's why it's Columbus Circle. There's an army of NYPD officers who are deployed night after night. In a huge circle. Their barricades erupt. They got all these cops that air there on watch. At least they did as of a few weeks ago. I've been back in a few weeks. All on watch to make sure that a bunch of maniacs don't deface and try to destroy the Christopher Columbus statue. I mean, it's crazy. I talked to the cops with the center. You guys really here. Because a bunch of radical Biden voters may destroy this really rather beautiful statue. They said. Yeah, that's whether deployed there. This is in a zoo, You know, a pretty well off prominent part of men of Manhattan. It's right outside the Time Warner Center. So even Bill de Blasio, I guess realizes that this would be a bad look. If that statue got destroyed. They say. The left says that Columbus was a genocidal maniac who was engaged in the exploitation of indigenous peoples and so on. And so they don't care that Columbus discovered the new world for Europe and the rest the world they don't care about that. That's not enough, and we see this with Lincoln. It's not enough that he was commander in chief and the president of lettuce. Into a war that did end slavery in this country. Called for the freeing of the slaves during that warrior, a man Sameh Emancipation Proclamation. So what's really happening.

Abraham Lincoln Christopher Columbus Washington Jefferson Lincoln Joe Biden Ruth Einstein Martin Luther Ki Bill Clinton Columbus Circle Mount Rushmore Lincoln Bill de Blasio San Francisco Donald Trump San Francisco High school Time Warner Center Thomas Jefferson Jefferson Memorial Manhattan
Surprising Facts About Rejection Sensitivity

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

07:10 min | 2 years ago

Surprising Facts About Rejection Sensitivity

"Welcome back to savvy psychologist August. I'm your host Dr J. Boop every week I'll help you meet life's challenges with evidence based research a sympathetic ear and zero judgment. Remember the first time you ask someone out whether it was a middle school or well into adulthood I bet it was at least a little. Bit Nerve racking what if they say no worse what if they make fun of you or show pity would if they make it seem like it was ridiculous even for you to ask these hypothetical nightmare scenarios make even the bravest of US fear rejection but in general. We don't walk around around expecting people to reject us. We're also not constantly on the lookout for clues that rejection is about to happen but for some people L. Rejection appears to be around every corner. They anxiously expect readily perceive an intensely react to rejection or possible rejection psychologists call this high rejection sensitivity rejection sensitivity might seem like a phase that all middle schoolers go through as they awkwardly navigate. Puberty trying to figure out more adults like social relationships but turns and so it can happen to people of all ages and it's not the same thing as being just a little shy or emotionally sensitive. There are specific ways days that our brains and bodies behave when we're highly sensitive to rejection and they're often very real consequences so let's let's talk about what neuroscientists and psychologists have learned about rejection sensitivity including some clues into how to maybe get over for it or get out from under it so first thing to know. Is that your body and brain physically manifest rejection sensitivity like every psychological phenomenon rejection sensitivity has a place in the brain. What may surprise you is how much and how specifically it takes on on shape in our biology? So first of all. Everyone's brain response to rejection. During brain imaging study participants emotion processing brain areas. Where activated when they looked at pictures showing rejection compared to when they looked at pictures showing acceptance or just random abstract shapes the brains of participants with high rejection sensitivity didn't activate the cognitive control areas as much as their pierce? It's not that the brains of less rejection sensitive people were immune to rejection cues is just that they were better able to regulate accumulate. Those cues and keep them from running rampant in the brain for rejection sensitive people. It's not just that their brains respond more to unpleasantness. In this in general its rejection specifically that lights. Those neural fireworks different brain. Imaging studies show that only pictures. Church of disapproving faces and not of angry or disgusted faces activated their emotional threat processing brain areas. And then when it comes to the body we can see that highly sensitive people are physically more on the lookout for rejection too in another study people also also looked at pictures some of which showed rejection scenes and then they got puffs of air in there is to see how much they startled highly rejection sensitive. People startled more rotter viewing rejection images. So this shows that the idea of rejection makes her body's automatically glee shift into a higher defensive mode so we know that rejection sensitivity very much activates the body for defense and and we also know that it's associated with more than just social anxiety. So when we think of people who are sensitive to rejection we probably think of someone who's who's socially anxious perhaps someone who is shy afraid of public speaking or nervous about making the first move in social situations and rejection sensitivity is indeed associated with social anxiety now may be less obvious that rejection sensitivity is also also more common among people who have other psychological disorders including eating disorders body dismore via ADHD borderline in personality disorder and Impulse Control Disorders like online gaming addiction. This doesn't mean obviously in the someone with high rejection sensitivity tippety necessarily has these disorders. It's just that among those who do experience these issues rejection sensitivity seems to play a role for example if someone is already socially anxious their level of rejection sensitivity can drive their irrational thoughts about their body now. These thoughts can snowball and become severe enough that they end up being bodied Disorder so then. How does this play out in daily life while another thing we know about rejection sensitivity is that it feeds a vicious cycle that makes you actually more rejected? So that's the toughest thing about rejection sensitivity. It feeds itself. Think about this if someone is always on the lookout for rejection and has a bigger physical and emotional reaction to rejection cues. They're more likely to be tense. Defensive Sad angry or withdrawn on would you rather hang out with someone like this or with someone more relaxed and more able to have fun. This is a vicious cycle that highly rejection action sensitive. People find themselves in the more they're sensitive the more they illicit actual rejection from others and that fulfils a rejection PROPHEC- see and leads to more rejections sensitivity. One study tested this vicious cycle hypothesis. The researchers found that among couples Relationships involving highly rejection sensitive people were more likely to have broken up a year later. They also found that rejection sensitive of women specifically and gauge more negative behaviors after relationship conflict such as being hostile denying responsibility possibility putting their partner down or making negative assumptions about their partner. The partners in turn become angrier than the partners of women who are low on rejection sensitivity. This shows how conflict can more easily escalate if one partner is sensitive to rejection. So how about for men. How do men act when they are highly rejection sensitive and they're in a relationship conflicts?

L. Rejection Partner Disorder United States Dr J. Boop Impulse Control Disorders Adhd
"psychological disorders" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Thirty K. H. O. W. ABC news I'm Byron picks on to the question Senate members say they have a lot of them after hearing six days of opening arguments from both sides and president trump's impeachment trial minority leader Chuck Schumer what we are doing is sort of organizing things in other words we don't want the same question ten times and second we want them in some degree of order questions start tomorrow Democrats are already focusing on the face after that if senators will allow new witnesses to testify Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he does not have the votes to block additional witnesses dylann roof white supremacism murdered nine black church members in South Carolina in two thousand fifteen has appealed his death sentence alleging he was suffering from schizophrenia and other psychological disorders two sources confirmed to ABC news they were briefed by the White House on the possibility that airlines may need to suspend all China U. S. flights omit the corona virus outbreak this is ABC news late night remembers and honors Kobe Bryant Jimmy Kimmel dedicated his whole show Monday night to Kobe Bryant he was a bright light and that's how I want to remember and there's no audience and can we use the hour to play old interviews tonight show host Jimmy Fallon talked about meeting seventeen year old Kobe Bryant when he first came to the Lakers only run into each other over the years we laughed about that night we first met for all the good things that happened since I went generous Conan o'brien and James Gordon also paid tribute to Brian playing clips of old interviews chasing Evenson ABC news another state is considering banning the controversial practice of conversion therapy if past Kentucky would join nineteen other states in banning the discredited practice we're trying to make gay people straight salad fans take note there's a national arugula shortage is due to the unexpectedly cold and wet winter weather in the southwest Byron Pitts ABC news balance of nature changing the world one life at a time I'm very very athletic I like play ice hockey two or three days a week you know I'm in good shape for my age no I keep up with the young kids but I get tired muscles get sore and achy so I noticed just by taking this product.

Conan o'brien ABC China president Senate Byron K. H. O. Kentucky Brian James Gordon trump Lakers Jimmy Fallon Kobe Bryant Jimmy Kimmel White House schizophrenia South Carolina
"psychological disorders" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"You there's got to be some serious psychological disorders populating many of these people on the left in Seattle trump supporters are starting to come out of hiding the Seattle times column by Danny west meet now the Seattle times is not the Seattle post Intelligencer the Seattle post Intelligencer is The New York Times paper in Seattle but never the less I'm surprised that they publish this the latest federal election reports this is about donors and let me tell you about this this tells you as far as people in politics professional political people the money the people behind the money how many people are donating them that's what matters to them that's how you find out how strong a candidate is look at the stories on drugs statement about Biden fundraising is falling out on biting the bottom is falling out his fund raising level off and it's dropping and you couple that with crowd size can you add to it the gaps and it's not a pretty picture but you can see Adil San Francisco north with nearly fifteen months to go before the election trump has drawn more donations from Seattle addresses than he did during the entire twenty sixteen campaign in Washington state trump's approval rating is twenty eight points under water even with that he has racked up far more donations than any of the democratic candidates in fact more than the top six Democrats combined state of Washington what twenty eight points under whatever that means trump's approval number is twenty eight points lower than his disapproval number and despite that and that's just a poll which could have been Jews than any direction the poster once but in terms of donations trump has drawn more donations from addresses in Seattle then the entire day the twenty sixteen campaign in the whole state trump has racked up more donations total big and small then any of the democratic candidates in fact more than the top six Democrats combined that's not to say trump gonna win the state of Washington that's not the point the point is the influence he has some believe these people live in the world where nobody likes trump anymore they have destroyed trump they have made an older and a trump they've made a joke out of nobody likes trump everybody's embarrassed of dropping out they're faced with the fact that trump is out raising the top six Democrat candidates in the state trump has no hope of even when people.

Seattle times Seattle post Intelligencer Seattle Adil San Francisco Washington trump Danny west Biden fifteen months
"psychological disorders" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"You got her husband who's a lawyer and a professor, and whatever all and he spends every waking moment attacking? His wife's boss, and the latest is he's tweeted out a couple of definitions of some some psychological disorders claiming that Trump has narcissist deflection personality, and some other crazy thing his wife is one of the key communications employees for the president of the United States. This guys out there. Attempting to sabotage undermine his wife's boss now, the never Trumpers are looking at this. And they're saying this doesn't compute there's no way this marriage can continue unless something that we don't know is going on. Well, this is not Carville. And Madeleine neighbor not undermining each other not not like not like Conway is undermining its on wife, and she doesn't she doesn't reply to what you know. Mary would they get back and forth a serpent head and so forth in a friendly, humorous, sometimes cutting, but it wasn't anything like this. This is not can Carville. And Madeleine I'm sorry Madeline. And Carville now in never Trump Ville, the theory is are you ready for this three to one? That George Conway is only doing this because Kellyanne wants him to that Kellyanne thinks Trump is crazy, but can't say it because she works for him. And so she is using her. This is what the never Trumpers believe the never Trumpers are out there thinking they look at this. And they said there's no way that this marriage can continue. There's literally no way put yourself in this marriage. And imagine your spouse undermining you publicly. Three to four times a week like this and undermining your boss who just happens to be the president. I mean couples have gotten divorced for far less than this. This marriage continue. So a never Trump Ville, they're telling themselves that this couldn't possibly be happening. Unless Kellyanne wanted it to happen. All really if Kellyanne really thinks all of this crazy stuff that her husband is tweeting out there. She could quit. What do you think CNN would pay her? To come on every day. They give her a three hour block. They pay her twenty five million dollars for three hours to come on. And explain all of this on a never ending loop that they would run she doesn't need to have her husband. Do this is the point. If this is what she wants to do. Plus, if you look at the the the there, there aren't very many, in fact, she may be in the whole White House communication shop. She may be the best consistent explainer defender of Trump that he's got. And that would be a tough thing to fake. But I think I think this is I'm just telling you, I don't know George Conway. I've never met him. And I didn't even know what he looked like until all this began. So I I have no, I know Kellyanne a little, but. Not not. Well. But I can't as a husband. I cannot possibly relate to this. I can't imagine doing this. I can't even conceive unless I was so angry in so consumed with bitterness over things that had nothing to do. I cannot conceive of this. I think it is immature is. Silly. And I am a Georgia's all excited because Trump finally wrist, but Trump has been ignoring him for two years. Now Trump's finally responded in Georgia. Oh, wow. Oh, wow. I finally got his attention is tweeting, even more psychological disorders. Copying them and pasting them into into tweets. I don't know Kellyanne puts up I've I've mentioned a tour. I I saw her at the Trump rally in Cape Girardeau. She was there. Am I tried to express little sympathy? Little under issues laughed off all Georgia's just Georgia don't pay any attention. Georgia's. Okay. I'm just trying to. Let you know here that I feel for you. And she just waved it off like George was one of her. Wayward children over whom she'd lost some control and and nothing. The book deal could get if if if Trump theory of this is is accurate anyway, you'll probably see that theory..

Trump Trumpers George Conway Carville Kellyanne Georgia president Madeleine I United States professor CNN Cape Girardeau Mary White House Madeline twenty five million dollars three hours three hour two years
"psychological disorders" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"And with wire. Wow. You really, you know, I got concerned when I hear you say the targeting young kids and even children who have mental or emotional or psychological disorders because boy that's a that's going to be tough on cover. Yes, it is. It's about ideas. It's about thing with the mine. So it's very difficult to be on. You know, it's not a physical manifestation if they're not telling these young people to pick up a gun into. Those grants are available what they're doing this subtly as a very carefully, and Dr Nathan them hate for other people, and you know, you teach children hate easy for them to harm the target of that date. So we need to be able to reach out and turned into something else. We hate to provide an alternate narrative. Children who are be taught, and they need to be able to deal with this, emotional and psychological issues. So you know, it's a very short long-term projects, but someone has to start somewhere. And so we are taking this on to at least provide. Education create the awareness hand over the period of time provide the tool sexual health patterns and educators to be able to do. Well, thanks so much heels first and foremost for bringing it to my attention, and then I can help to get it out there in the public sphere. So that people can do at least check out the website to see for yourself. If some of these things are are manifesting themselves in your own homes, your own schools you own communities. Thank you so much. Always a pleasure. Thank you. You to always a pleasure. All right. We gotta take a quick break. We are. We have confirmed now that jussie smollet is in custody. He'll have a bond hearing at one thirty which I guess is taking place right now. And we'll keep you updated with any news on the story. Listen to news talk. Eight fifty W F T L live on Alexa. Hey, alexa. What's the south Florida morning show? Like, it's the news..

Alexa Dr Nathan south Florida Eight fifty W
"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lot of things. But some of the most consistent findings about them is that they're very bad at recognizing fearful facial expressions. So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex call the magdala that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear has people who have lesions in this area show. Very specific selective deficits in recognizing other people's fear. And what is the middle? Look like in psychopaths. So and people are about they get tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than that of healthy people. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation in the amac delegate when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic dont. Okay. So that was your baseline. And then what was your theory that you came up with? Well, over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else. Yeah. Psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exist on a continuum or you can have people the very far end to our maximum psychopathic, and then people who were just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly psychopath. But that continuum suggests that might be only half the equation. It might be that the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other hand, you have people who are anti psychopathic who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually carrying and so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic their brains would look like.

twenty percent
"psychological disorders" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A common approach to understanding basic aspects of human nature like the desire to help. Other people is the study people and whom that desire is missing and psychopaths exactly such a group. So they are characterized by a lot of things. But some of the most consistent findings about them is that they're very bad at recognizing fearful facial expressions. So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation, they doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex call the magdala that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear as people who have lesions in this area show, very specific selected deficits in recognizing other people's fear. And what is the middle look like in psychopath. So and people who are psychopathic it tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than that of healthy people. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation, and they make a lot when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic dont. Okay. So that was your baseline, and then was your theory that you came up with. Well, over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else. Yeah. Psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exist on a continuum where you can people the very far end to our maximally psychopathic, and then people who were just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly psychopath. That continuum suggests that might be only half the equation might be that the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other hand, you have people who are head Pathak who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually carrying and so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic brains would look psychopathic.

Pathak twenty percent
"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A common approach to understanding basic aspect of human nature like the desire to help. Other people is the study people and whom that desire is missing and psychopaths are exactly such a group. So they are characterized by a lot of things. But some of the most consistent findings about them is that they're very bad at recognizing fearful facial expressions. So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation, they doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex, call the image. Delilah that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear has people who have lesions in this area show. Very specific selective deficits in recognizing other people's fear. And what is the middle? Look like in psychopaths. So and people who are psychopathic it tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than that of healthy people. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation and the della when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic dont. Okay. So that was your baseline. And then what was your theory that you came up with? Well, over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else. Yeah. Psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exists on a continuum where you can people the very far end to our maximum psychopathic, and then people who are just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly psychopath. Great. But that continuum suggests that might be only half the equation. It might be the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other hand, you have people who are anti psychopathic who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually caring. And so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic their brains would look like antipsychotic.

Delilah twenty percent
"psychological disorders" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A common approach to understanding basic aspect of human nature like the desire to help. Other people is to study people, and who desire is missing and psychopaths are exactly such a group. So they are characterized by a lot of things. But some of the most consistent findings about them is that they're very bad at recognizing fearful facial expressions. So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation if they doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex call the magdala that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear has people who have lesions in this area show. Very specific selective deficits and recognizing other people's fear. And what is the middle? Look like in psychopaths. So if people think it tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than of healthy people. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation, and they made a lot when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic dont. Okay. So that was your baseline, and then who's your theory that you came up with. Well, over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else. Yeah. Psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exist on a continuum where you can have people that very far end who are maximally psychopathic, and then people who were just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly psychopath. That continuum suggest that might be only half the equation. It might be that the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other hand, you have people who are anti psychopathic who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually carrying and so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic their brains would look like.

twenty percent
"psychological disorders" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"It was the day after Christmas when the Brooklyn truck driver says he did what he always does. Got five dollars in my pocket. I take it out. I said let me get one bar one. A lot of man. Kilifi dollars. I'm getting a mega he says he plans to invest most of the cash, but he's going to treat himself to Johnson says he's looking forward to trading in his truck for a red Porsche thirteen-year-old, Ohio boy who stole a handgun from his grandfather's gun cabinet and fatally shot his eleven year old brother is sentenced to seven years on youth prison in a youth prison. A judge in northeast Ohio Sportage county opting not to classify the thirteen year old is a serious youthful offender, which means he cannot be sent to adult prison because of rule violations the shooting occurred last April in streets borough. The boy was subsequently diagnosed with multiple psychological disorders, psychologists said the disorders were rooted in the abuse offered as a toddler before. He and his brother were adopted the boys said in court, he didn't realize he loved his brother till he was dead. Britain's Daily Telegraph newspaper paying the first lady, but on your Trump substantial damages after publishing an article that made false claims about her family and career. Here's the AP's. Karen Shammas telegraph, which is one of prisons leading not papers and is aligned with the governing conservative party made a statement announcing it was unreservedly sorry for reporting false claims about the first eighty the cover story was published in the newspapers weekly magazines supplements. The paper said it full sleet, characterized MRs Trump's father's passed nalty falsely reported the reasons she left an architecture program falsely reported her career as a model was unsuccessful before she met Donald Trump. Karen, Sabbath, London. WBZ newsradio. Norwood newsradio..

Donald Trump Ohio Karen Shammas Trump Daily Telegraph Johnson Brooklyn Sportage Britain Porsche London thirteen year thirteen-year five dollars eleven year seven years one bar
"psychological disorders" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation, did they doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex call the magdala that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear as people who have lesions in this area show. Very specific selective deficits in recognizing other people's fear. And what is the magilla look like in psychopath. So in people who are psychopathic it tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than that of healthy people. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation and the amac. Delo when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic don't. Okay. So that was your baseline, and then was your theory that you came up with well over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exist on a continuum where you can have people the very far end who are sort of maximum psychopathic, and then people who were just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly like about that. But that continuum suggests that might be only half the equation. It might be that the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other end, you have people who are anti psychopathic who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually carrying and so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic, their brains would look. Kinda like anti psychopathy brains. Abby wanted to test this theory out. So she gathered a group of people you might call extraordinary altruism. It's put a bunch of recruitment advertisements out on living. Kidney donor list serves basically people who had donated a kidney to eight complete stranger and we flew about twenty of them into Georgetown and put them in that Marai scanner and she tracked their brain activity, all well, showing them the same photos that they had used with the group of psychopaths showed them pictures of fearful facial expression, and then you measured how they're MacDill reacted or the activity. Exactly. So that from right measures blood flow in the brain. And so we we looked to see if there is an increase in how much blood was recruited to the Magdalen. And did you see wildly active levels? We saw increases in activision..

Abby activision MacDill Georgetown Marai twenty percent
"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I enjoy and treasure thinks there are all kinds of things getting in the way of our listening. Just think about all the sounds around you every day. In Europe, where Julian does most of his work something like eight million people having this league seriously disturbed by traffic noise at night, and a lot of people ride the subway every day. Including Julian, and I wear airing hearing protectors every time I go. Yeah. I'm shocked every day. I see people standing on the tube station as the screeches happening at one hundred and ten hundred and twenty decibels, and they're just standing there. And once you get to work. Well. Researchers have actually tested people in these noisy open plan office environments, and they found that productivity dropped by two-thirds. Sixty six percent, drop in productivity and open plan office opposites the bosses, of course, they're all in field offices. So they're not even aware that this is a problem. Yeah. But there's a lot of research now showing that noise and the lack of quiet working space is one of the biggest issues for all office workers. What does it do to people? It creates stress hormones increases your risk of heart attack. It increases your risk of stroke and there's a whole range of other issues sexual dysfunction, bowel dysfunction, depression, psychological disorders, which research associated with living in noisy situations day in and day out. Okay. So that's the environmental.

Julian Europe Sixty six percent twenty decibels
"psychological disorders" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"With news of other addictions, and overdose deaths spreading for it stopped advocating cocaine's medicinal benefits, but continued to use the drug for migraines, depression, and nasal inflammation for those who don't know snorting cocaine through a nose. That's inflamed by cocaine is a bad idea to the degree that it can cause tissue death or necrosis Freud treated this tissue necrosis with more cocaine his writings on the benefits of cocaine been called into serious question as he referenced successful outcomes of patients who don't seem to have existed. He published a scientific study on the physiological effects of cocaine on reaction time and muscle strength. His only experimental subject was himself in his right up. He tried to explain away his failure to test other subjects and then claimed he had confirmed his results by testing colleagues. Which also cannot be proved the study was riddled with methodological flaws, and as one biographer commented may rank among the most careless research studies ever to see print Freud was trained as a scientist. But didn't live up to its principles in the article on coca he demonstrated poor scholarship omitting crucial references, citing references from another bibliography without reading them and making careless errors like misstating names dates and places of publication. There were numerous instances where it also appeared that his own drug use was affecting his judgement. He even prescribed cocaine to a patient with diptheria and often fatal bacterial infection of the mouth and throat which most of us thankfully have never encountered owing to the D T A P vaccine were given his children for more on cocaine and some surprise. Zing theories about sex and the human nose, welcome. Our next guest presenter. Thanks for having me moxie. I'm maranda from interesting sex podcasts where I interview people that aren't defeted kink and Bedia them and learn about what they're into it sex positive. It's fun. We'd love to have you stopped by when you're done with your brain on facts. I thought healthcare was a wreck now but imagine going to the doctor and the late eighteen hundreds Vienna. Freud was coming into full swing with his ideas and studies of dreams talk therapy. And yes Freud worked with cocaine as a local anesthetic as well. As talk therapy, which honestly might not have been half bad of an idea because people do talk a lot when they're on coke no personal experience just saying so over one hundred years ago neurological reflexes emanating from the nose known as nasal reflex neurosis where considered to be the cause of many symptoms, including some dumps related. To the detail ya Dr Wilhelm Fleiss found Ford through his papers on cocaine. He was an auditor Lalla gist. I can't say that word, but he was doctor dealing with the ear nose and throat head and neck, but he also took an interest in human rhythms and sexual cycles. Fleiss thought the nasal passages had an effect on sleep and chest pains, but then he started linking along with Freud. The nasal passages with menstrual pain, miscarriages and psychological disorders. And thus nasal reflex. Neurosis was born Freud being a patient of Fleiss started sending his own patients to him as well. Unfortunately, ending in an almost deadly incident with Emma, Eckstein, Freud diagnosed her with hysteria and compulsive masturbation masturbation was not considered proper or even safe for women of that time for it sent her to Dr Fleiss within a month of seen. Dr Fleiss, Emma was near the point of death. A second opinion doctor checked her out and found gauze left inside her nose. She went into Freud's office with nervousness and a tendency to masturbate and left Fleiss is with half of her face collapse to surgery and infection. I appreciate all the work and discoveries. These guys made through trial and error. But thank the good Lord. They aren't might doctor 'cause masturbation rules. And like I said guys, I'm Miranda. I'm with interesting sex podcasts. I'd love for you guys to stop by. Visit me when you're done with your brain on facts. I talked to people that are into like kink fetish beady SM about who they are why they're into what they're into. And what makes them take? How it makes them feel good and how it's affected their life. I'm always curious in. I'd love to share my curiosity with you. Thanks for having me back to you moxie sakes. Miranda. One of the best known forty and theories is his identification of the parts of consciousness Freud thought that all babies are initially dominated by unconscious instinctual and selfish urges for immediate gratification, which he labeled.

Lalla gist cocaine human nose Dr Wilhelm Fleiss Miranda psychological disorders Vienna scientist Ford auditor Emma Eckstein one hundred years
"psychological disorders" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"With news of other addictions, and overdose deaths spreading for it stopped advocating cocaine's medicinal benefits, but continued to use the drug for migraines, depression, and nasal inflammation for those who don't know snorting cocaine through a nose. That's inflamed by cocaine is a bad idea to the degree that it can cause tissue death or necrosis Freud treated this tissue necrosis with more cocaine his writings on the benefits of cocaine been called into serious question as he referenced successful outcomes of patients who don't seem to have existed. He published a scientific study on the physiological effects of cocaine on reaction time and muscle strength. His only experimental subject was himself in his right up. He tried to explain away his failure to test other subjects and then claimed he had confirmed his results by testing colleagues. Which also cannot be proved the study was riddled with methodological flaws, and as one biographer commented may rank among the most careless research studies ever to see print Freud was trained as a scientist. But didn't live up to its principles in the article on coca he demonstrated poor scholarship omitting crucial references, citing references from another bibliography without reading them and making careless errors like misstating names dates and places of publication. There were numerous instances where it also appeared that his own drug use was affecting his judgement. He even prescribed cocaine to a patient with diptheria and often fatal bacterial infection of the mouth and throat which most of us thankfully have never encountered owing to the D T A P vaccine were given his children for more on cocaine and some surprise. Zing theories about sex and the human nose, welcome. Our next guest presenter. Thanks for having me moxie. I'm maranda from interesting sex podcasts where I interview people that aren't defeted kink and Bedia them and learn about what they're into it sex positive. It's fun. We'd love to have you stopped by when you're done with your brain on facts. I thought healthcare was a wreck now but imagine going to the doctor and the late eighteen hundreds Vienna. Freud was coming into full swing with his ideas and studies of dreams talk therapy. And yes Freud worked with cocaine as a local anesthetic as well. As talk therapy, which honestly might not have been half bad of an idea because people do talk a lot when they're on coke no personal experience just saying so over one hundred years ago neurological reflexes emanating from the nose known as nasal reflex neurosis where considered to be the cause of many symptoms, including some dumps related. To the detail ya Dr Wilhelm Fleiss found Ford through his papers on cocaine. He was an auditor Lalla gist. I can't say that word, but he was doctor dealing with the ear nose and throat head and neck, but he also took an interest in human rhythms and sexual cycles. Fleiss thought the nasal passages had an effect on sleep and chest pains, but then he started linking along with Freud. The nasal passages with menstrual pain, miscarriages and psychological disorders. And thus nasal reflex. Neurosis was born Freud being a patient of Fleiss started sending his own patients to him as well. Unfortunately, ending in an almost deadly incident with Emma, Eckstein, Freud diagnosed her with hysteria and compulsive masturbation masturbation was not considered proper or even safe for women of that time for it sent her to Dr Fleiss within a month of seen. Dr Fleiss, Emma was near the point of death. A second opinion doctor checked her out and found gauze left inside her nose. She went into Freud's office with nervousness and a tendency to masturbate and left Fleiss is with half of her face collapse to surgery and infection. I appreciate all the work and discoveries. These guys made through trial and error. But thank the good Lord. They aren't might doctor 'cause masturbation rules. And like I said guys, I'm Miranda. I'm with interesting sex podcasts. I'd love for you guys to stop by. Visit me when you're done with your brain on facts. I talked to people that are into like kink fetish beady SM about who they are why they're into what they're into. And what makes them take? How it makes them feel good and how it's affected their life. I'm always curious in. I'd love to share my curiosity with you. Thanks for having me back to you moxie sakes. Miranda. One of the best known forty and theories is his identification of the parts of consciousness Freud thought that all babies are initially dominated by unconscious instinctual and selfish urges for immediate gratification, which he labeled.

Lalla gist cocaine human nose Dr Wilhelm Fleiss Miranda psychological disorders Vienna scientist Ford auditor Emma Eckstein one hundred years
"psychological disorders" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on Ologies

"Yeah, this is definitely one of my this is probably actually when you asked about like, the the myths about cats driving crazy this, okay? Okay. So cat ownership is not considered to be a risk factor for Moses by the CDC. They don't recommend that you get rid of a cat. Now. What is true is that cats digestive system is the optimum environment for talk supplies, most is to reproduce. So they are definitely associated with it. How people typically get it is not from cats directly, but from eating contaminated meat or vegetables that have not been cleaned or prepared properly, which is probably from feces being you know, so garden where there's cap oop. There may be talk show in it. The best way to protect yourself from toxic plasmas is to cleaner cats litterbox every day because of the. Boasts need over twenty four hours to hatch, basically. So if the poop is fresh it's good you can just handle it washing hands after in. You're not going to be exposed to talk. So, of course, keeping your cats indoors is probably the other safest way to avoid it, the research associating it with you know, psychological disorders has, you know. I'd say it's mixed. And there's a pretty lengthy publication. A couple years ago out of Britain that showed with longitudinal study knows Asian of cat ownership with and talk plus Moses with mental health disorders. So I think those stories get a lot of hype. And it really feeds into this idea that cats are somehow fucking with us trying to control their minds, and you know, certainly people who do have taco, you know, for example, men finding odor of cat p pleasant which is weird. And and you know, rats that are infected with it also are not afraid of of cat urine, which is not normal. So so we know that it can have the effects on the brain. I don't question that at all. It's really the the direct link from having a cat to getting supplies Moses. That kinda drives me crazy because again, the CDC is not considered a risk. The of course, if you are compromised or pregnant than you have to take extra care about handling cat feces. But again, if you clean the box every day, you are zero risk, basically..

Moses CDC Britain twenty four hours
"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"psychological disorders" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On for more than a couple of minutes. You would literally cease to hear it we listened to differences. We discount. Sounds that remain the same. I said at the beginning. We're losing our listening. This is not trivial because listening is our access to understanding conscious listening always creates understanding a world where we don't listen to each other. At all is a very scary place. Indeed. Enjoy and treasure thinks, there are all kinds of things getting in the way of our listening just thinking about all the sounds around you every day. In Europe, where Julian does most of his work something like eight million people having this league seriously disturbed by traffic noise at night, and a lot of people ride the subway every day. Including Julian, and I were airing hearing protectors every time, I retire you go. Yeah. I'm shocked every day. I see people standing on the tube station as the screeches happening at one hundred and ten hundred and twenty decibels, and they're just standing there. And once you get to work. Well. Researchers have actually tested people in these noisy open plan office environments, and they found that productivity dropped by two-thirds while sixty six percent drop in productivity in open plan office type inside offices, the boss, of course, they're all in medically sealed offices. So they're not even aware that this is a problem. Yeah. But there's a lot of research now showing that noise and the lack of quiet working space is one of the biggest issues for all office workers. What does it do to people? It creates stress hormones increases your risk of heart attack. It increases your risk of stroke and there's a whole range of other issues sexual dysfunction, bowel dysfunction, depression, psychological disorders, which are associated with living in noisy situations day in and day out. Okay. So that's the.

Julian Europe sixty six percent twenty decibels