32 Burst results for "Prussia"

NEW VISION FOR A SCULPTOR

Big Book Podcast

05:35 min | 5 months ago

NEW VISION FOR A SCULPTOR

"And now part two story twelve new vision for a sculptor. His conscience hurt him as much as his drinking. But that was years ago. I think that life. When i was growing up was the most wonderful life that any kid ever had. My parents were very successful every new luxury and every new beauty that came into the house was keenly appreciated by all of us. We didn't have things thrown at us. They came little by little. My parents were both jews and in my family life we were always keenly alive to the beauty of religion. Although we were not orthodox. I always saw god as a wonderful force. That was a great deal. Like my father only magnified to the nth degree. I wanna ask my grandfather. When i was little boy what god was like. He asked me what my dad was like. I went into superlatives about dad. Because i really loved him so much. He was such a friendly wonderful father. And so my grandfather said well. Your father is the head of your family. God is the head of the entire human family and of the whole universe but what makes him dear. God is that you can speak to him just as you would talk to your own dad. He's not only a universal father but an individual father too. So i'd always had that wonderful comparison of my own father with god when they found out that i could create sculpture at a very early age. It made both my parents very happy. My two older brothers were not artists but they were very good students. I was very bad student and very much of an artist instead of resenting that they encouraged my art so my childhood was really art and music. And i got along at school usually by leaving the day before examinations or getting measles or something else like that and being put in the next grade for trial. The teacher of the grade. That i left would never take me back. Under any circumstances i was ecstatically. Happy my brothers and their friends lived on horses as i did from six years old on. We did everything. All of our playing in wild games on horseback. This was up to world war one. I was about nineteen years old. Then i don't think i had any fears at all up to that time. We were very close family. Everything was very vital. Anything that happened to one happened to another when war broke out. All i could hear in my heart was the echoes of what my father and mother had me so often how grateful i should be to. The united states. Grandfathers had come over from the other side. One from bohemia and one from prussia because at that time there was persecution in those countries and they wanted to live and be part of the land of the free. They both had magnificent lives and were able to pull themselves up and live happily and die in luxury. I was very grateful to the united states for that. I loved my grandparents very dearly. And i had watched my father's great financial success so i felt that i didn't want either of my two brothers to go to war. They were both married but certainly one of the family should show what we thought and felt about the united states. So i told my folks that i was going to join the army and that scared them to death but after a while they heard that a nearby hospital was forming a unit and i think my mother had a picture of my going to war with my personal family doctor. Nothing could be more luxurious so they gave their consent that i should join the unit. Never realizing that you could transfer when you got to the other side. I was a terrible soldier. As far as drilling was concerned but i had been studying anatomy and dissecting for my artwork so a hospital was sort of a second nature to me. I got along very well in that part of the army. Very well indeed. I went through world war one without actually getting drunk. I did learn to drink heavily in france but it didn't do anything for me or to me. I mean to say. I didn't drink for relief or escape and i was always flattered that i could out drink almost anybody and take them home. Many of the patients insisted that when they got well they were going to take me down and get me drunk and appreciation. It was usually a hike of two and a half kilometers to get the patient back to the hospital. These were the walking wounded. I had one bad experience. In which a truck that i was in was blown up and i woke up in vichy a couple days later in a bathtub i thought i was in heaven. The whole room was full of steam. An enormous sargent came through the steam. And said don't move young fellow. I said where am i. He told me. I started to upgrade him. Why should i move. He said don't move. That's all i did and found. It was very painful. I had an injury to my spine when it was time to get me out of that bathtub that enormous guy just picked me up as though i were a baby and put me on a stretcher that was about three days before the armistice on armistice day everyone pushed all the hospital beds onto the street and had a grand parade of them. Everybody hugged and kissed us and gave us candy and drinks and the sergeant came along with a glass and said the doctor said your to finish this right away. I turned it upside down and believe me. The bed swam from then on. It didn't last very long. Because as soon as i got something to eat a god over that but i think that was my very first feeling of being dizzy or drunk

United States Bohemia Prussia Army France Sargent
Black Friday crowds thin as shoppers go online but many still show up in person

WBZ Programming

00:26 sec | 5 months ago

Black Friday crowds thin as shoppers go online but many still show up in person

"Black Friday, Sony's PlayStation five was drawing big crowds. Shoppers lined up both in person and virtually hoping to snag one of the consoles. Microsoft's latest Xbox is also hot. It looks like there will be lots of yoga pants under the tree this year with Lulu Lemon, a big draw among holiday shoppers. Long lines were reported at malls, including King of Prussia in Pennsylvania and Scottsdale Fashion Square in Arizona. US safety

Sony Microsoft King Of Prussia Scottsdale Fashion Square Pennsylvania Arizona United States
Visiting Frankfurt

Travel with Rick Steves

03:50 min | 6 months ago

Visiting Frankfurt

"Let's start the our in one of germany's power cities frankfurt in an interview recorded just before the global pandemic lockdown typically berlin. Munich can steal the show at the german city of frankfurt shines on its own as a modern city that also offers a great look. Today's germany devastated in world war two bombings and rebuilt with a new design. Today it's a gleaming city of towering skyscrapers and powerful straddling the mine river and the mine river is find riverside park lined with museums and taverns that are popular for their apple. Wine to learn more. We're joined in our studio by two german guys. Caroliina marburg and barbara ship kofsky barbara and carolina. Thanks for joining us. Thank you having us. Currently know when people think frankfurt in germany. What do they think. What's the reputation of frankfurt. The reputation is of. I think in english it's referred to as banquet but we more often call it mine. Hatton mind being the river that runs through it and mine. Hatton the reference to manhattan so skyscrapers banks and all that which however implies a certain lack of soul and therefore a lot of germans like well frankford so it's it seems to be just bank money trade however if you actually get to know it. Compared to at first sight frankford is a love at second side because it is it has a lot of local. Beauty has a lot of local charm. But it's something you need to discover. Yeah and it does have a shiny skyline. It's a city of skyscrapers. I think mine. Hutton is a good name because in germany. There's nothing so close to new york as frankfurt and it's a beautiful sky and they take care of how it is assembled so even though it keeps growing it's nicely assembled. There's a pedestrian bridge across the mine. River the irony. The irony is energy and when you stand in the iron bridge. You've got these beautiful parks on both sides of the mine river and then you've got this skyline and it just feels like a kind of a german new york. It's actually the recommendation for some a night is to go to the other side of the mine river and sit down on the green get. Maybe a fish sooner and napa valley and then marvel at. That's gallon i you know. Most americans they go to to old stuff. I love to see modern skylines also. I like modern architecture. London is great for that and in germany. You wouldn't find that in munich that's for sure to find it in frankfurt and the the big skyscraper that's open for the tourist as i understand is the tower named after the river and it's fifty four floors tall six hundred and fifty feet up there and the terrace on top is just an amazing view at the city. Now barbara one. We're thinking about frankfurt. It also has obviously a lot of history. And i know there was a big struggle in the nineteenth century when germany was being united. There's a small states that spoke german and there was prussia and there was and those were of the leading contenders to be the force behind which germany was united but apart from prussia and bavaria. You had a bunch of little states than looked to frankfurt talk about frankfurt in eighteen. Forty eight and how that was part of this german unification while you have in frankfurt. The famous poet skier it used to be an actual protestant church and if somebody gets the german medal of honor. I'm gonna macos going to give that to that person. In that church it goes back to that assembly in eighteen forty eight. The first national assembly democrats were getting together and saying this is what we want. We don't want the monarchy. Let's be democratic country so it was sort of the home of the german Feeling for democracy rather than autocracy. Yeah you mentioned pulse church. i think. The englishman repulsed. And that's a museum for that today. Essentially can go and see paintings and etchings that period. Our german tour guides to frankfurt on travel. With rick steves barbara schakowsky and carolina marburger.

Frankfurt Germany Caroliina Marburg Kofsky Barbara Riverside Park Barbara Munich Hatton Berlin Hutton New York Manhattan Carolina Apple Prussia Napa Valley Bavaria London
Cyberattack hobbles major US/UK hospital chain

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 8 months ago

Cyberattack hobbles major US/UK hospital chain

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting a cyberattack hobbles a major hospital chain a health care system that operates in the United States and Britain says it had an unspecified technology security issue Monday universal health services incorporated posted a statement to its website saying its computer network was offline and doctors and nurses were resorting to backup process sees including paper records people posting to an online reddit forum identifying themselves as UHS employees said the UHS network was hit by a ransomware attack overnight Sunday UHS based in king of Prussia Pennsylvania operates more than four hundred hospitals and other clinical care facilities Mike Rossi at Washington

Mike Rossi United States Britain Washington UHS King Of Prussia Pennsylvania
How to Pivot and Persevere with AJ Picard

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:06 min | 10 months ago

How to Pivot and Persevere with AJ Picard

"I wanNA. Do Asia is really focus on today's topic, which is going to be all about how to pivots in persevered, and these are two things that have never never been more important than this post cove in one thousand. Thousand Nine hundred world that we live in for sure there's a lot of pivoting going on. There's a lot of persevering going on and guess what fire nation if you are falling short and either of those categories, you are gonNA struggle, but if you are just thriving in both of those, then you can be thriving as well so less with your background AJ. Who the heck are you? Where are you from? And then what? The heck got you here to this point today? Man. I'm actually from born and raised from Philadelphia Pa. Living in Maryland and I kind of started my entrepreneurial journey back in two thousand seventeen when I started going full time on developing the social media at that I'm now pushing. Right now called Clara. And what club really does is just help. You feel more connected to your surrounding community by providing our users with a way to connect with locals in the area and discover things to do in their community as well, so let's maybe talk quickly about club, because I am curious like how you initially came up with this idea like I love talking about the Aha moment like that poor in like why that happened for you and then also sure just like one or two. You think are kind of cool case. Studies of people that are used Clovis excessively for one was actually sitting in the king of Prussia Mall. Near Philadelphia, it's it's massive mall and I was in the food court, and I was just people watching day, and it was around the time back in two thousand fourteen, when instagram started kind of picking up traction and twitter. We had snapchat as well and I was thinking to myself. Why couldn't I why can't I I guess? Hone in on a specific location and connect with people in that same location as me almost like a hyper local platform, so that's kind of how I thought of that idea of. Like. I want to connect with people that are in this mall right now. Correct correct and I was like you know this could be a great way. You know if I'm in college to meet New People at a party. That might be super crowded it could be used at a networking event or even at a sports game, just just to connect with people in that same location that you're currently that that was the goal. Is this for businesses to? Because like what kind of POPs into? My mind is like I'm walking into King. King of Prussia Mall and I get an alert on my phone, says hey, not sure if you're hungry if you are for the next ten minutes, we're going to have fifty percent off. Pretzels over at pretzels are us in like I would just be like well. I wasn't actually that hungry. Until you just kind of maybe think of Pretzel in my mouth so here off I go. Is that like one of those things that could happen? Man So these businesses can create a location based announcements or promotion so to speak so when users. Don't into that specific location where their promotion is located in. They're going to collect it, which means that you know if you did walk in through that King of Prussia. Mall Front door. You collect every promotion that that business in that King of Prussia. Mall's currently promoting. So you know we offer that that I guess easy transition to discover discovering things to do in your surrounding area and active promotions in your surrounding. Surrounding area from from local businesses located around you and the one thing that POPs up in my mind is kind of like a potential user is at what point is overwhelmed like walking into a mall and there's a hundred and twenty four stores and get one hundred twenty four promotions like a one point. Is that just become like spam mail that we all get our inbox? That is a great point, we actually. Actually plan on fixing this issue as we start to grow, and we're GONNA limit the amount of promotions or announcements in specific location, so it's going to be super exclusive. Obviously we would. We would have to charge these businesses more, but as of now we're just trying to get businesses inside and and willing to promote

Prussia Mall Prussia Asia Philadelphia Philadelphia Pa Maryland Instagram
How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

Travel with Rick Steves

03:59 min | 1 year ago

How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

"Berlin has become the high tech and cultural powerhouse of today's dynamic German economy but there are still plenty of Berliners who can tell you about the difficulties. They faced back in the twentieth century as a divided city and stories of life under the Nazis during World War Two. We're joined now by German tour guides older Timur and Fabien Muga. Look at some of the most impressive monuments and memorials. You can visit to remember the lessons from Berlin past gentlemen. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having to live in Berlin as a tourist. You just come and go to live there. You're surrounded by all of this history and all of these memorials when you walk down the streets. Does it become just background and you just see through it or are you constantly aware of this happened there? This happened there and so on holger is part of everyday life. Yes but it's not like you kind of oversee it because it is there it is right in your face. I've seen most of the memorials like many countless times. As a berliner as tour guide here but they still are some of them are really haunting especially when it comes to divided city to the wall or to the time of the National Socialist period and in the case of Germany. With your complicated history. The memorials are almost there to not go away to be in your face. I mean there's even something called stumble stones right Fabio yes. There are a memorial stones to victims of the Holocaust who had deported from particular houses. And if you have a friend or relative was deported from that house you can donate some money to this foundation and they will put stumbling stone into the pavement Princeton pavement. Like you need to trip on this to never forget the horrible thing that happened right there when you think about Germany. A lot of our fixated on World War Two in the whole fastest thing but of course there's many layers of the city that was the leading city of of the PRUSSIAN empire and so on Fabio. And when you think about memorials of the horns period and Prussia what is there in Germany to look at our Berlin. I think the most visible that everybody know will know. Is The victory column. That's in the center of the main park often. The victory column was built as a symbol of victory over the French. This is where history and Berlin connect. It was originally standing on the spot where it is today. The Nazis moved at there to make it stand in a more triumphant spot in the very center of the city. It was originally built near the rice stuck building and was not looking quite some one mental there today. Six major streets of lead straight towards the listen to that part of a big access isn't it? I mean Hoeger. The whole city is built on this axis which lined by memorials. The East and west access really is this fascinating thing. You look up. And you see Golden Angel Hair and you think. Wow that's wonderful. Then you close in you. See while this is all candidates made cannons French cannons French cannons. Like as a AS A TO Z. Boy To as spoils of war multiple. Yeah so it is weird thing. If you you would think that's nice to call between can look at it that it has a little jab at the French. It's a big Jab at Big Jab at the French or the Germans the French and of course I in the next century. We've got the whole Hitler situation and a lot of memorials relating to the nightmare of Berlin being the capital of Nazism. What are some of the memorials that you'll see when you go to Berlin that way what I found very haunting as the memorial to the burning of the books right near onto the Lyndon right near the State Opera House? And it's basically a memorial that you wouldn't really see because it's underground and you would just maybe pastas Query Newton. We have no idea what it is but quite often you see consumerist groups looking at nothing really and then you look there and it basically is a hole in the ground. It's a glass plate in the ground and he looked down and there is an empty library like five by five five meters containing empty shelves for twenty thousand books. Symbolizing was happening in the tenth of May Nineteen thirty three. When the Nazis took all the books and literature that they hated that it didn't understand they didn't like and were putting them in a big pile and burning him openly for people to see and that's now empty. Shelves are very haunting memorial to that.

Berlin Germany Timur Fabien Muga Fabio Holger Prussia Hoeger Princeton State Opera House Hitler Lyndon
Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

BrainStuff

08:55 min | 1 year ago

Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

"With glance at Karl. Marx's curriculum vitae says a lot economist philosopher journalist sociologist political theorist historian. Add to that socialist communist in the original meaning of the word and revolutionary and. That's just a start. Karl Heinrich Marx was one of the most respected minds of the nineteenth century. His meditations on how societies work and how they should work have informed and challenged humans for more than one hundred and fifty years. Yet to the uninitiated marks may be only a bushy mugged symbol of revolution the father of communism the hater of capitalism. He's considered by many especially in the West as the man whose ideas spurred authoritarian communist regimes in Russia China and beyond that again is selling the man short. Because it's not entirely right in his book Karl Marx. A nineteenth century life author. Jonathan Sperber wrote viewed positively. Marks is a far seeing profit social and economic developments an advocate of the emancipatory transformation of state and society from a negative point. Marks is one of those most responsible for the pernicious and features of the modern world. If nothing else marks was a keen observer of the human condition he was deep finger with bold ideas about how to make life better we spoke with Lawrence Talmon who teaches a course on marks and philosophy at the University of Chicago and is the CO author of a chapter on Marx and Marxism in the rootlets. Handbook of philosophy and Relativism domine said Marx himself was first and foremost kind of scientist. He was a student of reality but he himself struggled throughout the course of his career. How exactly to put his ideas to politics. It's important to note that despite his one time lofty standing in what was then the Soviet Union marks was born in tier in the Kingdom of Prussia in eighteen eighteen. That's what's now known. As the Rheinland area of western Germany. After the failed German Revolution of Eighteen. Forty eight marks fled to London where he eventually died in eighteen eighty three. He's buried beneath a large tomb in London's highgate cemetery. Inscribed with the words workers of all lands unite but marks grew up privileged the son of well off and liberal parents in an ancient town that had been racked for decades before his birth by Warren Revolution that upheaval cultural religious and political shaped his parents and was a big part of young. Marx's upbringing later marks attended universities studying law and philosophy where he became engaged to and later married a Prussian baroness it was well studied philosophy and law that marks introduced the works of German Philosopher Yard Ville Helm Friedrich. Hegel whose ideas he used to later. Form his take on Communism Marx began a career. As journalists early twenties writing for radical newspapers in Cologne and Paris the route he consorted with other liberal minded philosophers and by his mid twenties met and collaborated with one of the major influences in his life. Friedrich Engels it was angles who convinced marks that societies working class would be the instrument to fuel revolutions and bring about a more fair and just society in eighteen forty eight the to published a pamphlet. That would be the basis for a new political movement. The communist manifesto in eighteen eighty three after Marx's death engels summed up the main idea in the communist manifesto like this quote that economic production and the structure of society of every stoorikhel epoch necessarily arising therefrom constitute the foundation for the political and intellectual history of that epoch the consequently ever since the dissolution of the primeval communal ownership of land. All history has been a history of class struggles of struggles between exploited and exploiting between dominated and dominating classes at various stages of social evolution. That this struggle however has now reached a stage where the exploited and oppressed class. The proletariat can no longer emancipate itself from the class which exploits and oppresses it. The bourgeoisie without at the same time forever. Freeing the whole of society exploitation oppression and class struggles domine explained marks was always concerned to understand the real underlying causes of social phenomenon the events and institutions that kind of shape the social world marks wanted to kind of dig down beneath the appearances and see what was really going on early on in his career. He thought that the best arena to do that in was philosophy and then as time went on he transitioned more into the social sciences. What's most important about marks is that he very much had a kind of engineering mentality about society he wanted to know. What makes it work? And how if we want to change it do we change it. What are the levers that we have to pull? Marx's eighteen forty seven economics work capital a critique of political economy a takedown of capitalism that decried the exploitation of the working class crystallized debate one that continues today between the West's ruling social and economic theory capitalism and Marx's idea of communism too many. It's a fight that hits rich versus poor bourgeoisie versus proletariate ruling class versus workers. And it's even more than that to those who debate it. It's right versus wrong. An argument about the best path to a perfect society. But that of course is very simplistic and doesn't get Marx's thinking right the Allman said above all else the association the people have with marks is that he some Utopian Pie in the sky dreaming a perfect world that is free of all the nastiness we live in now really that couldn't be further from the truth. Marks had a kind of engineering mindset. He was probably of all the major figures in the history of political thought the most practical the most realistic he was the most concerned with what is really possible. In the real world what marks to find as communism boiled down society that produces goods only for human need not for profit and in which there is no master slave royalty peasants owner worker relationship and therefore no need to overthrow. Anybody certainly clashes with the materialism of capitalism. But it's a long way from what many today see is communism to after the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen and later under Joseph Stalin's reign some of Marx's ideas along with those of Ladimir Lennon were used to build a new empire. Millions were killed along the way similarly millions died in China under the rule of Mao. Zedong's Communist Party domine acknowledged. It's hard to even talk about what marks out of communism without dragging in all the weight from Soviet Russia and Communist China and obviously a lot of people hold marks responsible for that or -tarian rules like Stalin's and malls were not what Marx had in. Mind it's important to note too. That Marx did not hate capitalism. He actually saw some virtue in the system. He saw it as a necessary precursor to communism and he envisioned some of the technological challenges automation unseating workers for example. That are true today. Domine explained marks was very impressed with the kind of progressive character of capitalism by forcing people from all different walks of life into the same workplaces capitalism. Kind of breaks down. The old divides between communities and so things like race and gender religion. Divide people less. The more people are forced to see each other as equals in the workplace. Marks recognized marveled at the economical and technical growth the capitalism begets and saw it as an improvement from previous societies. Later in life. Domin says mark suggested that a growth capitalism might be a way to move toward communism instead of all out revolution but he still saw communism with no master slave dynamic as the end goal in that way and in others. Marx's idea of communism was far from the atrocities that have been committed in the name of communism elsewhere and his ideas are still perhaps strangely many a beacon and a search for a better way of life in that this practical and deep thinker of the nineteenth century still has relevance in today's world. Dahlman said marks was so committed to giving a kind of rational criticism of everything not just the enemy but to himself in everything he was willing to criticize the old modes of life and show how capitalism kind of improved on them but he was also willing to criticize capitalism and show how we could foresee improvement coming in the future. That is still hopeful vision.

Karl Heinrich Marx Marks West London Soviet Union Friedrich Engels Jonathan Sperber Warren Revolution Germany University Of Chicago Cologne Russia Rheinland Lawrence Talmon Scientist Hegel Joseph Stalin Domine China Highgate Cemetery
Bridging Ethereum Wallets with Pedro Gomes

The Bitcoin Podcast

09:32 min | 1 year ago

Bridging Ethereum Wallets with Pedro Gomes

"Pedro could you do us a favor and give us an introduction on who you are where your minds at and how you ended up in the CRYPTO space today cope. Thanks for having me on the show guys. Of course so I. I started an e commerce as a developer building online shops in one of the things. That always really intrigued me. Was the payment systems like paypal striper like Mike Prussia's in terms of tech and then eventually moved into Fintech and I started working smart banking so I was always kind of leaning towards like personal. Finance user experience spoke after a few months working smart banking. You get a good grasp of the traditional finance regulations and everything and that's where I got really bored and tired of like developing features and not having to comply with regulators and features getting toned or cancelled. And that's where I got into tier when I saw smart contracts. I heard about this before but it was just a internet money but cerium really brought me into the building. A smart contract imprecations on chain. That's where I fought. This is where finance is really going to go. And it's going to move away from all the traditional finance and regulations and everything people will be really in charge of their personal finance. And that's the part that I was mostly involved was developing bang. Interfaces so wallets felt like the really next step and one of the companies that I worked I balanced and balanced was developing Interfaces for not only managing portfolios but also developing a wallets. But at the time there weren't many good solutions for building wallets We actually played around. With a semi custodial solution but then we really didn't want to dive into the the the idea of having to manage keys for the user. There was a lot of risk involved in that so we kind of just. We started brainstorming. About like how could we improve the user experience? The first APP was bounced manager where we developed Lake. Immanent away to just manage your tokens and indices very nicely so you could just like law again and have met a mosque never thing but a lot of the experience was kinda conditioned by the waltz like it was always around we can do as much as many. Moskowitz allow us and we really were man. We really wish we could just like control the wallet side. We should build a mobile. And then that's that's where the the direction kinda headed. The problem was a mobile wallets and our interface weren't really playing together because the beauty of the interface was having the full desktop screened manage. Your portfolio Tokens San Receive Exchange. But how could we then integrate with our mobile wallet which would store the private keys and we can actually provide a better experience for signing transactions messages. And that's where Walt can came in and well it connect. Kinda was inspired by. What's up? I remember once more of a desktop user so I had once web and you can just Kinda cure code and it just does this handshake between the device. And from that point. You literally just use your desktop. Yep that's volley go a little bit into you. Know more on the tactful while it connected. Let's let's sort of backpedal a bit more than just sort of diving more about who? You are So like that being said like you came into space. You had like you know your own like idealistic view on openness and Permission List like being able to build an innovate on top of these financial tools. That you really wanted to do so. You saw an opportunity in niche break into the space like that being said. So where did you find your earliest connections into the community before you started working on balance? And all that stuff. How did you sort of make that segue into traditional finance? Here's this thing. Daring of cool smart contracts liberty. Let me do my part to help here as I should be funny story actually so I I was. I was just doing my day job. The Smart Bang and I would spend most of my time just talking to my peers about look at this thing that the gym can do. Look at this thing that Jim could do and they would always joke about every day. I would have some fun. Facts about the tearoom some cool project that I've found and I would just like spend more and more time even during my job like looking to term style and one of the things that I did most was joining twitter and start tweeting about determine stuff and I. I remember applying like on a few jobs. I remember I played for Aragon and other jobs with at the time it had like no experience watching. It was definitely no go but On twitter through the M Richard Burton from balanced reach. That's how he space. I just got at the end and he was like you seem like a pretty solid developer and year actually know about to tear him so we should talk and then we just met up and he was in London at the time. That's where I was working for and then we went to an ATM. Meet up at the time which was so small like at the time. It looked great but that I think about it. There was like twenty people and it was awesome. It was like the first cross about how people were talking about tokens and creating different interfaces and everything and at that moment I was hooked. Not There I was just okay. I gotTA leave this traditional financing and that's when I joined balance around August two thousand seventeen so Early eat area Morella. I'm sorry go ahead after me major but just curious early term that Oliver I mean were you in early. Two thousand two thousand seventeen doesn't seem early compared to a lot of folks in the space. Well it all depends on where. You're looking at the charts. Basically I think asking is like were you early insurance financially which led to your further because expansion on your motives or was it just like pure curiosity well. I. I didn't even unencrypted time. I was really I was really just. I remember every time I told even on my regular job I would talk to my peers and there were like. Oh but bitcoin is going this and this and this and I'm like you're missing the point. I was completely baffled by how they were looking at. The prices and I was just like look at this tech and everything and I remember looking documentation and it was only around that year in December. Though is like wow. I'm kind of missing this whole run like I should buy some meat though is like really caught up by technology. I think I missed out a lot of the financial gain space. Its Own. It's important now. I'm like full on the and I own more cryptic than feed. Yeah it's that's a fun game to play. It is hard to manage. Sometimes it's fun so my question is You said you were traditional finance and a lot of features in at County Rail. A lot of plans that got thrown in the trash can things that you just couldn't do because of compliance or otherwise. So how old one of the things that you couldn't do that you can't and you're Bernie crypto well. There's a lot of clever ways that he can play around with like for example the same way we have compound than everything we had like these cold goals which were like these kind of buckets of money that he could put aside in everything. But there's only so much we could do so what we ended up just doing was just splitting into different accounts so the person could just like put money aside for a trip or put money aside for a lot of the wanted to buy so it was. Kinda like just containerized. Their money into different buckets. But we couldn't do much like there was so much we can do like. That could go into savings that there were so many financial instruments that we could build for their own financial empowerment that warm compliance because there were so many regulation issues with us putting some interesting to like those buckets for example and Yeah so it's Kinda like you. You wanted to be able to automate people's financial lives in a way that benefited but because the regulations probably let's just get down to the brass tacks. Everybody's gotTa make some money on the processes you couldn't do it. Yeah there there's a there's a very big barrier to new

Twitter Developer Mike Prussia Pedro Fintech Lake Moskowitz Walt Bernie Aragon JIM County Rail Oliver Richard Burton London
Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

"Johann. Sebastian Bach was the greatest member of a musical dynasty beginning in sixteenth century Germany. Three Hundred Years. Worth of box held jobs as town. Musicians organist and choir directors Johann Sebastian's. Father was a musician. His grandfather was a musician and his great grandfather was a musician. All the male members of the family were trained by their fathers uncles and older brothers to carry on the tradition. That's by no handsome. Asean box Uncle Johann Michio or John. Michael Bah his daughter. Maria Barbara Married Johann Sebastian. Who was her second cousin? I guess that made her Maria. Barbara Bach. Pa IN GERMAN WORD MEANS STREAM BUT JOHANN. Sebastian produced a whole ocean of box. He and Maria Barbara had seven kids when Maria Barbara Died Balk married. A singer named Anna Magdalena and had thirteen more children twenty in all J S. That's short for Johann. Sebastian Bach expected his sons to follow in his footsteps and several of them became well known composers. Box oldest son bill him. Freedom on or W. F. Baugh worked mostly as an organist. He never quite lived up to everybody's great expectations even though he wrote some Nice music the fifth child the third son of J S Baugh was Carl Philipp Emanuel Norse EP. Aw He was very successful. Cpi box spent years working for the flute. Playing King of Prussia. Frederick Great Frederick. The great never went anywhere without his flute. Not even into battle so. Cpa Bach wrote a lot of music both CPI and W. F. were sons of J s Bach's first wife Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena Baw. Second wife was the mother of his youngest son. Johann Christian J C Bach was the most radical member of the clan for starters. He left Germany and went to study and work in Italy in order to get a job at the cathedral in Milan Italy. This Bach did something. Nobody had done before he changed. Religion converting from Lutheran Catholic and J C Bach. Did something else. His father had never done. He wrote operas after Italy. He moved to one of the hottest cities in Europe for Italian opera and became known as the London Bach. That's right people in London. England were crazy about Italian opera even or especially if it was written by Germans. There's a man named Peter Shakily who claims to know about yet another box son P Q. According to Peter Shakily until he discovered P Q. No one wanted to admit that he existed. Peterson says that's because PD Q. Box Stole Music from other composers and came up with things so outrageous that they make people laugh because it makes people laugh. Peter Shakily keeps right on composing. I mean discovering music Cuba that's from PD Q. Bach piece called Kanaya in Brooklyn. That's written for Double Reeds. When a COMPOSER SAYS MUSIC IS FOR DOUBLE REEDS? He means oboe. Zampa Soons instruments that have double reeds sticking out of the top of them. Blowing into the reads is what makes the instruments sound but PD. Cuba wrote for double reeds without Hobos and bassoon. Attached the words pretty funny to watch it to us to be home you know moves run grounding knows

Whats Next for Bombardier?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:56 min | 1 year ago

Whats Next for Bombardier?

"So could that happen? Could there be a could Canada which is subsidized this company in the past come through with an infusion of cash to pay off debts or subsidies. Those never had any ambition. Come it's interesting. The Canadian governments made it clear. They keep a close eye on this. I don't know if they would step in adding any sort of rescued. He wouldn't be risky deal. Because it's not a case of giving body now. It's kind of. It's kind of dumb but it had to do. Quebec SAYS NO WAY. And they're not gonNA do more but that the Mahdi will go back to them next because developing new airplanes that go to keep developing nuclear plant. Wildaid pay down their debt. So they'll be back to the government looking for looking for some sort of support and that's just fact of life so so what's the next bit actually gets wrapped up into the eight hundred ten day? Two Twenty story because it affects Embraer Number Casino. Random Body a arrivals that go back to the very beginnings of all of this so some really by by by giving selling the twenty in its entirety of and the twenty five percent is owned by Quebec itself. In Abbasi's now I was totally under the age of twenty before. This airbus was always constrained in what it could do to the airplane because Bombardier had to match investment and body didn't have the money right so so it was sort of official throttle book done with the eighty twenty. Well that's been moved right. That governor has been removed they can ramp up action which they have to do in order to break even and and get the cost of their into wary should be they can stretch airplane. They can now basically. They can pump money into the bottom end of the of the narrow body airliner market to twenty they could bunny at the top end of the narrowbody market with three twenty one. Xl Exit and they can literally take the legs off. And the head of Boeing in that market they now got in essence blank sheet to go do what they want to that market. Which we're Boeing at the moment doesn't know which way to go where to going out to take it even kill it and it would only have cost them less than six hundred million right because that's how much they paid. You have the whole program dinner. They have complete freedom moment. It seems to be an airplane that the market wants so if they can find customers push production rate up than than they've been so so that that. Then that then puts the pressure on Boeing and rare who earned in the middle of trying to put this commercial aviation joint venture together. 'cause that no held up by the Europeans who are still reviewing and delaying a decision. And so and it's becoming critical that makes it critical for Embraer. What happens next in the rumor that we think the reason the Europeans haven't proved it yet is because there's a W. T. O. Large airliner tariff dispute between America and Europe. Airbus and Boeing and that there's another decision coming in May or June and everybody's waiting to see what kind of penalties Europe applies against the US. And how President? Trump reacts to that and the belief is that the Europeans may be holding this approval of Ambler as leverage one piece of leverage against trump tariffs. And so. It's a big ugly mess that Doesn't seem to have an easy resolution really. It's become almost critical to embarrass. You know they. They had a successful commercial aviation business before they went into this plan. Joint Venture Boeing sort from Boeing. Side Ed at the generally accepted reasoning is they did this as a response to. Airbus become involved in the twenty. Didn't have a response to an airplane to compete against twenty. They tied up with ember who had an airplane. That's not quite the same. But it's but they could probably get into that market plus. They had a big engineering birth force that Boeing could access etc etc but the intervening months. That's how long it's been going now. This this whole thing of the joint venture things more more difficult going forward for because their next generation of Egypt's is not selling the way the previous generation dates. So they they're not commercial side. Their future is not as strong as it might have seemed a couple of years ago. They are trapped in same business jet conundrum that everybody else's which is they have some great products but they're selling to the same customers over and over again they're not really bringing new people into the market and they they have to launch a new airplane. They haven't engineering workforce doing a lot of the moment. They have to put money into a new airplane the daily way that they can do it. It's the existing market increased competitive pressure push the pricing down even further. So you're looking at at at body number. Even though they're sort of coming super doing it differently a facing exactly the same Prussia's so could they come on with me here is what call it what you want them? Bardy? Am Rear something like that. Heard it I rare but you won't pay for it. Looks absolutely fantastic. Because if you put the budget let you would have the entire business jet industry one company from the from the Lightest Jed to the biggest cabinet. But you know Cabestan the market you. Would you would not reduce competition whatsoever and you would fundamentally doubled down on your product development demands because this market needs new products on regular basis. This is not like L. Industry. We did develop an airliner and you can milk it for fifteen years the same basic airplane fifty years. Sometimes the long business aviation because you're constantly selling back to the same customer base the only way to get the mantle of airplane you just to them is by offering them a battery plant. So it's like a comedy. It's a five year cycle. It's like oh but it's more like a college cycle and go to continually Roy existing customer base out of what they fly into your next offering. So it's a constant investment draw and and putting together would look Winston traders fantastic. But it wouldn't it. Would not solve industry's issues with overcapacity too. Many models too many manufactures. But I just want to add one final point there. Which is if you're a government official. In in one of these countries there may be a certain appeal to them combining because of course for probably a near mid term. It would guarantee that the John's work remained in May not do anything to help Biz have but when you are responsible for national champion like rare. Rda You definitely don't want to see it go away. And that's different than I don't think anybody would call Gulfstream or textron Cessna products necessarily national champions. I'm not trying to. I'm not trying to bruise. Their Egos and say that. They're not great companies. But I don't think America looks at them the way that Brazil looks at Embraer. In Canada. Looks at bombarding.

Boeing Airbus Embraer Quebec Canada Joint Venture Boeing Official America Cabestan The Market Abbasi Europe Prussia Donald Trump W. T. O. Large President Trump ED United States John Bombardier Egypt
Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

Between The Lines

13:38 min | 1 year ago

Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

"For a generation Iran's May General Sulejmani he was a consequential Fica League in the Persian Gulf for the Americans in the region Sunnis? He was a terrorist mastermind for the Iranians the Assad regime in Syria Hezbollah in Lebanon. Sulejmani was a hero who protected the Shia cresent in the region. So it's no wonder the Iranian generals death via a drone attack attack in Baghdad. That was a huge news story. Earlier this month cast into the money rainy and military commander assassinated in the US drone strike on mm struggling marks a huge escalation coming just days at was revered by Iran supporters in proxies being blamed for the deaths of hundreds of Americans in the Middle East over the we took took action last night to stop a war. What comes next? What's the broader strategy? Here we did not take action to start a war. Your since the American killing of Sulejmani Tehran launched a missile strike on your spices in Iraq and in the process mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian Ilana carrying one hundred seventy six passengers something. The Mullah's had initially denied responsibility but crucially the Iranians signings avoided killing Americans. which was the red line? The president trump has drawn. US military response. So we'll this episode. Leave Iran Ryan stronger or is tyron now more isolated than ever and what is the showdown between Tehran and Washington Maine for Iraq the US military Tori prisons there and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Danny Applica- is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington and Co host of the AAAGH. Ah podcast what the Hell is going on. Making sense of the world get identity. Hey Tom and I'm in. Sokoll is author of Iran Rausing the survival and and future of the Islamic Republic and CO author of Islam beyond borders the Oma in world politics. Welcome back to Iran. How good morning now? Also Amani abetted genocide in Syria to keep the Assad regime in power. He's responsible for the deaths of many American troops. He armed Hezbollah in. Lebanon with rockets is to attack. Innocent Israelis killed many innocent Sunnis in Iraq. So I mean isn't the world better off without Sulejmani. Were president trump. I think so. And also quite a number of American allies in the region Probably I think the same way but at the same time demand was a national hero and in fact that he was the one of the top strategic brains behind Iran's overseas operations and expansion of eight onion influence in the region. I will just support related to the fair that it only leadership has about the possibility of an American attack or an Israeli attack on a combined and attack. But let me see this Tom that nobody is commendable. dimitris full of commanders. Top commanders into the Nobel Prize winners and so on General money is being replaced And I think e to the debt is a widespread view in the West. That if you bump one or two individuals isn't the situation is going to get better We duty cold in history that take for example a Prime Minister Anthony Eden go around the nineteen fifties and calling for the elimination of Jamaa Nasser as the national president of Egypt and has was that this man is removed from a then. Everything will be fine. Nothing died in nine hundred. Seventy and a situation has not improved a cold and and at the same thing was said to be so I mean the point though. Is that knocking off Salomon. He's not going to make a great deal of difference. But also can I just add to this Dani salamone and these Iranian backed Shia proxies. They did help inadvertently into why help. America Islamic state. So does it worry you that people cheering the loudest about this. Guy's death other suny jihadists in there are slighted areas in the desert and the mountains of Iraq and Syria. I don't think they're the ones who are cheering the loudest I. I think you heard pretty loud cheering from here. I think you heard some plenty of loud cheering in In Iraq and Lebanon and and elsewhere throughout throughout the region. Look you know. I think it's important to acknowledge that. That as the head of the cuts force Qassem Soleimani was a very powerful folks very influential very strategic and very effective leader and he brought that effectiveness to things. That would terrible And the arming of Hezbollah. The murderer of half million Syrians. The arming of mass. The arming of in Yemen. We could go on for a while here but but But he did all of those things but when when the challenge was from Sundays you had is. He helped set up and guide ride. The hoste. Shabby the popular mobilization units in Iraq that That that ended up being part of the battle to to defeat Isis. The problem here is that every situation in the region is is more complicated than the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Just because Stalin Fort with us to defeat Nazi Germany did not make stolen a good guy. And if you look at these anti-regime protests some and. I've been breaking out in Iran since Tehran admitted that its military military shot down. A Ukrainian passenger Ilana have the Iranians overreached because despite the Iranian successes in Iraq Syria and Lebanon on on their rule out officials sites there on stable they print across he so have the Iranians overreached. There's no doubt that many Iranians feel about the Ashim and today have protested over the last few months in order to bring about A structural reforms today as a system of governance and economy which is setting enormously under represent- trump's sanctions but has the Iran overreached. What are I pointed out earlier I mean Iran does fear a a very strongly as possible American that much Israeli combined attack and therefore what update on your the humans done his belt reasonable security and press such for itself which would really want? Shepherdess Arafat at all costs but that does not necessarily Saudi mean that Iran is only Aggressive power in the region aggressive actor in the region. I mean. Let's not forget that that that the destabilization Iraq really started the two thousand three. US invasion of that country. Okay so the. The American invasion of Iraq helped Iran on because it overturned the suny state and it created a Shia majority Stein. I saw a natural law with the Shia brethren in Tehran following following on from that Danny shortly a problem about striking at pro Iranian sheeham paramilitary groups as trump has done is the now part of the Iraqi state. So is it any wonder. Washington's increasingly modulation is part of the world. First of all. I think it's offensive talk about Shiites. As if they're all some sort of monolith. The share of Iraq are Arabs. The Shia of Iran are Persians. These these are different people this. These two countries Shia versus Shia fought a bloody war for eight years in which there were one million casualties casualties in the nineteen eighties. The notion that somehow Iraq is a natural satellite or or or or slave to Iran is wrong Iran has chosen to try to dominate that country and demonstrations throughout the central and southern part of Iraq. Over the last month have been against Iranian domination the Iranian consulate in Jeff was burned to the ground at the end of last year not by Sonny's he's not by Sunni jihadis not by Isis not by Kurds but by Shiites carrying placards yelling out to out for Iran. Get Out of our country and I think that that is absolutely right to suggest that Iran has gained more influence in Iraq since the demise of Saddam Hussein. I I guess I I'm just not that big a fan of Saddam Hussein and the and the stability that he brought to Iraq. I wish that the United States had done more in the aftermath of the wall. I think thinks that we I think that we failed miserably. In many instances I think it was absolutely fatal in two thousand eleven when at a time of genuine stability in Iraq Iraq. President Obama withdrew troops and really provided the opportunity for Isis. To rise up again. My guest Daniel Placate from the American Enterprise Institute. And I'm in Sokoll. He's the author of Iran rausing and Islam beyond borders. I mean how would you respond to all of this. Because we've got these tensions here between Tehran Iran and Washington and the Iranian backed Shia politicians released most of them in Baghdad. I support if not closer ties with Tehran. They want the the Americans out of Iraq. But don't the sooners and the Kurds fee for the Iranian intrusion in Iraqi sovereignty. I absolutely and of course sir. The APP is not only the president of the American so who'd be which are being the opposed to in Iraq but also the presence of eight onions there. No question Ah about that but at the same time if we know that the majority of the Iraqi population is made up of the Shiites and some powerful elements among the Shiites have got the value equals relationship and relationship. What they don't know in the meantime ago? The Iraqi parliament release the iranian-backed Majority Shia legislators I support the withdrawal of US troops Danny now given trump's ambivalence about the region and the fact that he was elected impact to get the US out of the so-called forever awards isn't a US military withdrawal from Iraq. Just what trump and many war-weary Americans want. Well it's kind of funny. Isn't it because we start off talking about the you know the Iranians and what they want and and of course. The number one goal is to get the Americans out of the region and that is in fact the instruction is that has gone out to all of their proxy groups. All around the region. Is You need to step up activities to get the Americans out. Then we've got the president of the United States. It's who dearest and fondest goal is to get American troops out of the region so so a couple weeks after killing Kassim Sulaimaniyah. We have this unbelievably in coherent bizarre response. Where we where we're doing exactly what the around him one let? This is what Donald Trump has to sort out. He has to sort out whether he's the president. He's the kind minded president who who leads in a forthright fashion against men like costume ceremony. Who Seek to destabilize the region and extend Iran's hegemony Germany or he is going to be the kind of president that like Bernie Sanders like Barack Obama wants to turn around and high tail fin is to the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump's uh-huh Washington energy independent America Stein fought these endless wars danny well A? They aren't endless wars. We have lost fewer people in these. This was than than than we lost a single day in World War Two so while they are conflicts that have continued on and off to a certain extent. You know the notion Shen that we've been sold that somehow we've still got one hundred and fifty thousand troops on the ground and losing them at a rapid pace is just wrong. We lost six in Syria. I I mourn every single one of them but the Kurds lost eleven thousand in their fight against Isis. So what what. What is the reason? We'll tell you very straightforwardly woodley because every time we turn tail every time someone says let's get out of that bloody Middle East. Let's pay attention to something fun. Like Asia and you'd like that. Tom Would now but hang on your way but every time we say that we end up being dragged back because the dynamics in the region of the ones that bring us back we need. We need a long-term solution that lets us. Stay away for good rather than one where we run away. Anita did it come back every single decade I mean the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal Provided tyron with as much as apparently one hundred fifty billion dollar windfall. Aw and certainly many people who are skeptical of the deal side that the Iranian spent lavishly arming the Shia militias across the region. So what it was trump right to pull the US out of the deal and instead impose maximum Prussia built around these economic sanctions on Iran. I think he was totally wrong and and I can care. There has been a backlash president. Trump's would would you withdrawal has a basically a provoked said that on Not to really go for the for police. Speed to in order to rebuild that they have nuclear program and. I think you're going to really do that. And of course that also carries the risk of a possible confrontation from tation between the United States and Iran possibly Israeli attacks on Iran and that could easily dissolved in a regional warfare. That at the end nobody may may be able to control it Danny. Any I mean a lively debate. Thanks so much for being back on. ABC

Iran Iraq President Trump United States Donald Trump Syria Lebanon Danny Applica Hezbollah Washington TOM Tehran Baghdad Sulejmani Tehran Shia Cresent Middle East Saddam Hussein American Enterprise Institute
How Did a Mad King Design Disney's Castle?

BrainStuff

07:02 min | 1 year ago

How Did a Mad King Design Disney's Castle?

"You can thank a mad bavarian king for the opening credits to every Disney movie before Walt Disney built Disneyland. He and his wife Lillian toward Europe including stop at the magnificent noise von Stein Castle in the Bavarian Alps of Germany. Disney was so impressed with the skyscraper turrets and towers of this fo romanesque structure. That he used it as the model for sleeping beauty's castle centerpiece of Disneyland and now the ubiquitous logo of Walt Disney pictures but if Disney known the real story of Nausea von Stein and it's fairy tale king an eccentric opera fan who was declared a madman before dying under mysterious circumstances says he might have chosen a different castle. Nausea von Stein. Castle is one of the most visited tourist destinations in Europe welcoming more than six six thousand visitors on busy days in the summer but the man who dreamed up the fantastic castle never intended for it to be open to the public it began as an architectural sexual love letter to the German composer. Richard Wagner and evolved into a refuge for reclusive king who slowly lost his grip on reality King Ludvig Ludvik. The second never fit the mold of stoic monarch born in eighteen forty five. He was raised in princely elegance in his father. Maximilian the seconds castle who Schwangau Schwangau. Where the young royal quote enjoyed dressing up and took pleasure in play acting? According to his mother Marie of Prussia from an early age Ludvig had a vivid imagination and flair for the dramatic how in Schwangau built in eighteen. Thirty two in the GOTHIC style was decorated with paintings drawn from Medieval Evil German legends and poetry and young Ludvig particularly identified with Luhan Green. A legendary night of the holy grail. who travelled on a boat pulled by spawns when? Maximilian the second died suddenly in eighteen. Sixty four Ludvig then. Eighteen years old was thrust into power unprepared for any serious political leadership. One of the first things Ludwik did as king was to invite his musical idol vagner to come to Munich for an opera festival wagner was also obsessed with German medieval legends and an even written opera version of Balloon Greene story in eighteen fifty wagner who was in dire financial straits eagerly accepted ludvig said vegetation and the young king became one of the composers chief patrons when they met Wagner. Didn't know what to make of the other worldly ludvig Wagner Wagner wrote. Today I was brought to him. He's unfortunately so beautiful. In Wise soulful and lordly that fear his life must fade away like a divine dream in this this base world. You cannot imagine the magic of his regard. If he remains alive it would be a great miracle. Wagner couldn't have predicted it but just two years later in eighteen sixty six Bavaria and Austria suffered a humiliating defeat to Prussia in the seven weeks war and Ludvig was stripped of all real power it was then historians believe that. Ludvig decided to retreat into a fantasy kingdom in the Alps dedicated to Wagner and alternate reality in which he could play out his operatic. Attic daydreams full of Christian Knights Magical. Swans ludvig already. Had the perfect location picked out a rocky promontory near his childhood castle with three hundred sixty degree views of Pristine Alpine Lakes lush valleys and towering peaks. He wrote a letter wagner describing his plans to build a far more ambitious ambitious version of his. Father's Sean Gal. Quote the location is one of the most beautiful to be found holy and unapproachable a worthy temple for for the divine friend who has brought salvation and true blessing to the world to bring his vision to life. ludvig enlisted a theatrical set designer and scene painter from Munich Nick named Christian young to make some appropriately dramatic drawings of the new home Schwangau as Ludwik called it. It was meant to be an idealized version of medieval castle. Missile inspired by visit to the legitimately Medieval Art Board Palace but cranked up to an eleven ludvig. Wanted two hundred well appointed rooms cavernous cavernous singers hall for Opera Performances Ornate Walled Gardens and even a nights bath akin to the ritual baths used by the knights of the Holy Grail. But rather even being a complete throwback the castle was to include the latest technological comforts including electric lighting flush toilets central heating and an electric buzzer system for summoning servants. Since the first stone of Ludvik Dream Castle was laid in eighteen sixty nine he'd written to Wagner that he hoped to move in in three years but construction was still still ongoing when Ludvig finally moved into the first completed section fifteen years later by that point the scale of the castle had been pared down significantly and the the project had taken on a distinctly coach feel looted a deeply pious Christian had begun to identify himself. More and more with the Arthurian Hero. Parsifal another night in the quest of the holy grail. In the castle a space originally planned as an audience room for receiving guests was turned into a high donned throne room without a throne instead. It's guilt walls and murals would serve as a hall of the Holy Grail. ludvig grew increasingly reclusive. He he slept during the day and wandered the castle at night it higher musicians and actors for private concerts and operas and during various snowy winters. Journey out for nighttime sleigh sleigh rides in an elaborate custom-made sleigh sometimes in medieval costume by eighteen. Eighty five the still unfinished castle had gone wildly over over budget and Ludvig had tried the patience of his foreign creditors when he couldn't repay his debts. The foreign banks seized the property and threatened to bankrupt the state of Bavaria. LUDVIG ministers largely to protect state assets accused the King of insanity and removed him from the Throne Ludvig had clearly shown some borderline align delusional behavior and his obsession with building his new Schwangau plus four other lavish personal palaces and homes was all consuming whether or not he. He had any mental disorder. That would be diagnosed by. Today's standards is still debated Ludwig's ultimate fate is also shrouded in mystery days after. Ludvig was deemed insane by the state appointed psychiatrist and locked up in a drab hassle. He was found. Dead apparently drowned in waist. Deep Water Ludwig's death at only only forty years. Old What have been ruled suicide. If not for one gruesome detail. His psychiatrist was floating dead next to him. No one knows exactly what happened. The castle was renamed noise Von Stein German for New Swan Stone. After Ludwig's death as a homage to the tragic and eccentric figure known as as the fairy tale king. Ironically the debt ridden castle opened to the public seven weeks after Ludvig step in eighteen. Eighty six has paid for itself many times over. Thanks to the one point point. Four million tourists who visit every year

Ludvig Richard Wagner King Ludvig Ludvik Throne Ludvig Stein Castle Medieval Castle Ludvik Dream Castle Walt Disney Von Stein Schwangau Disney Maximilian Prussia Europe Ludwig Walt Disney Pictures Munich
"prussia" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"She may have been the nineteen hundreds I global celebrity K on January fourth nineteen Ninety-two Alice made her debut to the world. So it's debutante ball. Sure. She was a labeled the White House debutante teddy kept out of the limelight that evening Edith handle the receiving line and presented Alice to society. Here is this embarrassing fucking shit little asshole whose name we won't say. I don't wear. Good dirty. Fuck head v the best out of five. Her name is thing thing. One everyone give it up. My mom died. She is. Newspapers covered it that. It did talked about her dress the music, you know, the whole thing all described the media always focused on the right things. Always saying a month later frame went international wind she christened yacht that belong to Kaiser Wilno will helm up Germany, the yacht. Was Kristen the media would be an honor. If you would come down and B's vonda breaks champagne upon the media. You new it girl. Do you know that I just don't? Don't expression different because they're sent his cousin. Okay. Prince Henry of Prussia to accompany Alice and sure relations between America and Germany is sounding very similar situation. Now. Would you know, you know, about Kaiser Wilhelm's probably the closest thing that has ever been to Trump. I wish I was kidding. Oh, I didn't put the picture in here of them. Is that the right one what a different one than you before too? But I had a picture of Kaiser. Yeah. That's a bummer. All right. You can look them up. Yeah. Yeah. Good photo there. Look ridiculous. Okay. So anyway, sorry prince Henry, so he accompanies Alice short relationship new American Journey house broke abolish and pain over the bow newspapers record it all including how many times the prince touched Alice's. Oh, sure. Right and keep the arm count. Yeah. Alice love the publicity the times noted that she seemed above it, all quote, she seemed to look upon the whole affair as a lark. So she's kinda cool. She's at sounds like. Yeah. Right. It is like I mean when you play the media like that he you are cool. Right. When you're above it. Whereas most people would be like oh super into. And she's like this is fucking stupid. Right. She thinks stupid. We love our more. Right. We're the media. So she's grown up not giving shit. Yeah. Because of what happened to and now she's like this is all fucking, right? And so she's like cool. The press began speculating that the president was going to marry off his daughter to a European the monarchy, okay? The Tribune, quote, she has become one of the most regarded women in the world replacing the young Queen of Holland in popular favor. That's cool that their ranking women. Well, we don't do that anymore though. No more or no list, or whatever. Yeah. So the quote unspoiled the woman was nicknamed prince Alice by the papers. Because she did this thing with prince Henry, and they hit it off. And she little he touched her eight times eight times, it's pretty hot armed count and welcome to gossip dish. And then because he's a prince because she she made a big splash this thing they start calling Princess Princess. Okay. Princeton's Alice, and it stuck okay, immediately after the christening, the owner of the New York Tribune invited Alice to Edward the eighth coronation in England that's the hot ticket. That's the fucking shit right there who Edward the eight eight eight eight eight eight eight eight eight I'm trying to buy weed his coronation. Yeah. He's the corner of right, right? That's the ceremony present you the new man who will be diagnosing how someone past he's gonna come king. Just like Simba the Simba. Now. I get okay now. We're okay now, we're getting it. So he sees pop in the clouds and his dad sort of emerges from the clouds, and he's like you must keep fighting. It you exactly that's how it become king fucking scar. Okay. Sorry. Sorry. Sorry. Thing insisted on treating her like she was a Princess so word gets over that she's going to come..

prince Alice Prince Henry Kaiser Wilno Kaiser Wilhelm Germany Edward Edith Kristen Prussia The Tribune New York Tribune president Trump America Holland Princeton England
UNSW Sydney engineers want to mine water on the moon

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

10:21 min | 2 years ago

UNSW Sydney engineers want to mine water on the moon

"New ustralian project underway to mine. Water on the moon for conversion into rocket fuel. It'll stems because one of the biggest problems with spaceflight at least chemically powered space lot. Like, we use here on earth is the cost of transporting the few needed for the journey. So wouldn't it be great? If you any knitted enough, you'll to get you there and then fill up again for the return journey and that fuel would be plain old water or the most common molecules in the universe. And there's plenty of it on the moon frozen. His eyes on the permanently shadowed flows of polar impact craters which never exposed to Rick. Sunlight what a molecules of also that ticket in the thin lays of gas flooding just above the lunar surface. Of course, water in the chemically related hydroxyl group can also exist in forms out of the normal water molecules by being chemically bound as hydrates hydroxides Telent minerals, and this strong evidence suggesting that low concentrations of these hydrates hydroxides cover much of the Luna. Surface finding water in the moon's important firstly astronauts can drink it that can break down to oxygen and hydrogen use the oxygen for breathing. And of course, the oxygen and hydrogen constituents are also the ingredients of rocket fuel making rocket fuel out of water on the moon would significantly cut down the cost of carrying out space missions now professor Andrew Dempster and colleagues from the university of New South Wales. I looking at the commercial viability of mining water on the moon to produce that rocket fuel Dempster believes a strategy is uniquely placed the covets out a niche in the global space industry by exploiting its position of strength in mining expertise to office mining. He says Austrailia hasn't natural advantage. It already has the world's best mining research technology in automation, tools, and the planet's largest mining companies the major deterred for industry involvement is being the lack of understanding of the commercial viability associated with this type of project, and of course, the besieged investment risk profile of mining Dempster and colleagues. Want to create the engineering machinery mining methods energy resources and communications required to make such operations viable. Hey says while commercial mining operations of the moon still decades way given sufficient funding his team could be just five to ten years away from politics a water mining proof of concept operation on the lunar surface any settlement that happens on the moon would need waterfall source of purposes, if people that would consume it fuel growing plants, you grow them, but most of the applications we looking at for water, the moon would be before settlement happens. And so most of this would just be purely robotic exercise so things like if you can produce the water you can separate it out into hydrogen oxygen. You can then use it as fuel. So you could input that rocket fuel in orbit around the moon or or run the summed. And so if you only way MAs you could refuel away, you know, the reason why that's interesting is or sensible is that it costs limit about ten thousand dollars peculiar to get something into Lewis ov-, it if you. Can create your water. Listen ten thousand dollars a kilogram. You've got a business sorta to do this. I guess they're very side as I gonna melt the water in situ, are you going to extract it as rock rock as regular minds would or are you looking at extracted out of the brick here on the moon liquid? It doesn't exist. There's not enough pressure. Only sort of two types of what do exist as a solid on spending. It will if you hate it out. It would immediately become guests. It will sublime drinking against solely because of lack of Prussia. So what you need to be able to do is not only to heat the ons, but you need to be able to capture and stored in personalized why tunes into a liquid all sorts of technologies that are around try and do this one of them's of build say bubble of the top of the the regular, which is the the soil, and you could apply to it. And you can expect a water in that way. And then gathered together into a container pressurize it separated into the Hudson oxygen the technologies being looked at to achieve. This they being experimented with. Now. You more interested in this. Or are you more interested in the actual robotic the autonomous vehicles that will be doing the extraction? And then processing we'll we have reward Ryan interests. We have students looking at the of this issue. How you might to environmental impact statement. How you as you come up with business cases, and you can close them which mining message. What used to extract to to get the rock into a state where you can convert the the water admission does on how you look at the whole mission where you the resources where you'd want to land. How you power the robots so run across the range of research, topics. We'd looking at or base things basics already looking at missions to examine the feasability of mining at the Luna south pole is this something you want to get on board with or you guys looking at it totally independent approach we hoping to with whatever Papa so whoever would love to wick with their various companies seventy nine them, but some of the lodge inch. National spice companies have very strong interesting strategy at the moment, probably because we sit up out spice agency last year. But also just because the spice industry Hughes growing very rapidly. Regardless of anything to do with the agency we've gone from having to spice startup companies five years ago, having one hundred now it's a really exciting place to be looking at spice, and that's tracking bit of interest. For somebody's international palms. Visit logic to examining mining as in each four spell you. We have the largest mining companies advice team who pays in Rio Tinto's of this world. We have the best mining researches in the world Hugh money engine eating, and we have the strongest mine or am I shouldn't. So those months up in north western strategy with around people in the minds. Leaping up ready for number of years now and successful with automated trains to and they like fifty thousand Tom transit the little things. No, none. But to some extent the the degree of automation of those months at the moon. And is not enough to spice. So by that. I mean, there's still a favorite of communication between a mind and the the headquarters and one of the things that I'm personally quite interested in is the trade off between much communication bend. We'd see need and how tournaments the robots have to be much decision making that can do by themselves without having an intervention from the headquarters. So I think there's a lot of little research to be done there as well. And you really can pay Monte on a to extraterrestrial mining considering the distances the different sorts of environments and especially on the moon with dust play such an important role, the capacities probably more straightforward than you might think the stages that you go through what mining engineers coal exploration. And what Lyman would call like people would go prospecting like would prospecting. But when you talk about exploration and spice that means something else. So we need to come up with some language consisted. But that stays the prospecting style. Edge, the feasibility stage than his mining this transport, and this delivery to a customer a lot of that. Brian Wook exists ready for mines and a lot of the big money companies would understand how you about putting together an argument for for or how you structure it that we are not though talking about driving with trucks with ties twice the height of the person, and I sort of things it would be quite different mechanics, but at the high level, it looks very similar at the low level looks quite different. When you talk about the dust on the moon, bigger problem. That's absolutely the case very haunting reliable Queant l'agence is one of the things that is very important the Trishul money even moso in spice because you can't seem to post a long to go and and fix your robot for you. But when I talk about mining in a very remote place, like the moon, the challenges quite similar to for instance, moaning in the deep sea in the deep oceans, so because again, it has to be very remote, disagree of autonomy era environmental challenges. Is that different challenges? But it's it's still the same general problem. So I think we've got a lot of people working on some of those problems already. And I think if we were to start looking at money and spice, we could then be learning lessons that we could apply on the United States already looking at a success to the national space station in the form of and you space station, which would be one of the Legrand's positions between the earth and the moon. So it'll always sort of remain the opening the middle sort of always remain that position. And that would be a jump off point for regular excursions explorations, prospecting, whatever you wanna call it to the lunar surface. I believe that's why some of the first mining techniques of an extraterrestrial nature gonna be let it in practice yet. Yeah. Wasn't gonna mention on the grounds point to that point on that. That's actually according more like to deliver the fuels to those those points. And yes, we getting quite a lot of interest in the US ninety nine potholes than they would like to deliver payloads onto the Luda surface. Europe has been very active in their moon village China as landed in arrive Rome fossil. So there's there's a lot of intimacy interest in authentic. We have being too out there to be joining in on what time line is is they won. Or is that in terms of developing the technology, which obviously you got to be doing here on us is there at Tom line for that. Or is that too early in the process to to look at things, I think in terms of polio relation commercial operation between talking dick by the need putting in of proving the technologies to make that possible. I think missions can be put together now to start doing that part of what we're interested in stubby was really only examining technologies that apart of a close business. So if you say, this is entirely commercially useful, this technology, then we'll study that one example was we had a student who has growth Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we've had students have placements over the as part of this program. And it was listening at a MAs settlement. And one of these early findings was if. We used this particular technology, and they were forty people in settlement thirty six of them would have to be writing this. And so clearly that's feasible, and those are the sorts of things you wanna knock on the head before you start testing them on on the surface. If they never going to be useful. So a lot of work has to be done the head of time to make sure that what you're doing is going to be useful in the long run. That's professor Andrew Dempster from the university of New South

Andrew Dempster Professor United States Austrailia Rick Prussia Jet Propulsion Laboratory University Of New South Wales Lewis Rio Tinto Europe Ryan Papa TOM Hugh Queant L'agence Brian Wook Lyman Monte University Of New South
"prussia" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"Or it is learning the eighth house or lording the twelfth house. He there's a whole chapter in Prussia horsh Ostra that he gives for each of these dossiers sequences so for Jupiter Saturn Jupiter mercury Jupiter if any of them are in a negative situation. And and I'll just let's see I have right here. Prussia open because we're a new be talking about this topic. And he gives results of the untarred dash of mercury in the Mahabharata of Jupiter, and it lists. In the let's see I. Easier to find rate here the Mahidol of Jupiter on tush of Saturn. He says that if if there is this negative relationship or negative house lordship he says in order to mitigate the evil affects of the afflictions chant the Vishnu saucer nam, which is a particular prayer and donation of a black cowl or female buffalo begin charity with the blessings of the supreme Saturn. So he gives us whole list of things to donate and prayers to to to give and in the tradition that I- studying we get we use that as a stepping stone. Not as a not as a dog Matic situation, you know because it saying the Vishnu sauce for Phnom that's letting us know that this Jupiter, Saturn conjunction has this energy of Vishnu and Vishnu and what does vision do. Vishnu appear firing energy..

Vishnu Prussia horsh Ostra Prussia
"prussia" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on EconTalk

"I want to go back to his arrest though for a minute or just to make it clear because it it's sometimes hard to believe for for non Russian folks. He was arrested by his own government. He said he was going into Prussia. They were advancing into the attack on a defeat of ultimate defeated Germany, and he's arrest. Sted for treasonous remarks. If if I remember correctly, he said this letter that stone was doing a good job, prosecuting the war, just like a couple of sentences. But of course, all the mail is censored which is not common in wartime, but it's such is not the right word. It's red. And censored and then, but the other part I wanted to mention because he's a little bit different, but he writes about this extensively in the gulag is that. Thousands of Russian soldiers were arrested after the war in thrown into prison camps. If they had been in German prisoner of war camps. So it's just important to think about, you know, the camps were to be talking about who's in them. Some of them are people who wrote it innocuous somewhat innocuous. After Rita, unoccupied criticism of of of Stalin. Others are there under suspicion of treason because if they rented German labor, prisoner of war camp, they may have collaborated with the Germans. They may have who knows what so extraordinary thing. Just literally to me literally, it's unbelievable that that after suffering through a German prisoner work, you were greeted by your nation's police as a potential traitor, and we're thrown into a prison and an eight year sentence was often could be a death sentence. Gonna American modern prisons eight years. Okay, it's not fun, but this these were a lot of people died during the eight year or ten year five year sentences. Well, as we read in the early chapters of the novel in the first circle, these eight and ten year prison sentences in terms upon completion, very, very often in quite in fact, quite typically were converted into fifteen and twenty and twenty five year term. So in other words, theoretically one could should say both theoretically and practically in practice one could serve his tenure sentence and then have another sentence added onto this. The prisoners who went in, let's say during the nineteen thirties, particularly the early nineteen thirties, we meet several of them in the novel itself who are now, let's say in their twenty third, twenty four twenty fifth. Year of sentence. This did not apply to social needs some himself nor to a number of his characters that he bases novels on, but you, you hit the nail on the head at the end of World War tune. This would be following social, these sins own arrest, and interrogation and prison sentence. But in history and historical fact, Soviet soldiers who had indeed been taken prisoner upon returning home to their to the Soviet Union. They would either be arrested and immediately tried and sent to a gulag camp or many of them in fact, were executed. And this is why so many prisoners Soviet prisoners of war who were being released after the war from the German camps. And so. On many of them end up coming to Canada. Some come to the extreme northwestern part of the United States rather than going home because they by that time, it was quite clear that they would either be arrested and sentenced to camp or they would be executed now. And I just mentioned two things that I think are again to give the flavor. There's a joke. It's a very dark show, but I'm pretty sure read it in the Gulag Archipelago gulag is by the way the should define what that is listeners don't know is gulag is will the term gulag means gravity means the main. Administration of camps camps Lennon as early as the nineteen twenties in the early nineteen twenties followed by Stalin essentially established what we would call perhaps concentration camps of quite different than than the concentration camps that we soci- for Jews in in Germany and Poland weren't explicitly extermination camps. They were, they were labor camps, although many died, oh many people. Typically many people died in route to the camps. The cats often were based in the Arctic circle or in Siberia or in Soviet central Asia. But at any rate, it's hard to say the Soviets didn't keep records, and if they did keep them, they certainly didn't release them..

Gulag Archipelago Stalin stone Soviet Union Prussia Germany Soviet central Asia Rita Canada Siberia United States Lennon Poland eight year ten year twenty four twenty fifth twenty five year
"prussia" Discussed on Overnight Drive

Overnight Drive

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on Overnight Drive

"Basically king of Prussia, Pennsylvania Moyle, and I did not listen to a single thing in the way I just was sitting there with my own thoughts for two and a half hours. And then just like kind of came back to reality when I pulled into these right way and king of Prussia like, I'm here, that's that's a form of meditation. They say, if you go like on a whole day without speaking. That's that's the best meditation you can have. I would love to do that. Do that tomorrow. Definitely. That's. But I wanna I want to try that as well. I don't think I could do it. I've never thought about it. I feel like maybe even done it. I don't know. I thought to myself a lot. Yeah, gonna. Knock that all. All right. I'm gonna try that shit toy. Sound crazy when I talk to myself, like in public, if you saw me like looking through shorts, TJ Maxx, like how people look crazy knocking. So yeah, probably I do all the fucking time, and I notice people look at me and I'm like, I know there's nothing that wrong with me that I'm schizophrenic talking to myself. It's just the bad habit. Like what? If Justin kisses, not real. Without this terrible. Yeah, that'd be text them supposed to go to show just kissing. It's okay. It's fine. He doesn't. He probably doesn't remember what if you says, I can't talk push TJ outed me as having a secret child's. Good for Justin kiss. Good. What if it's, what? If it's like an alternative punk slash hardcore porn star from way that win, like Riley Mason, like a suicide girl Riley Mason. I remember she was the one that everybody loved. Draining choose one of that. Everybody loved because he had short dark hair and she had a tattoo of the Thursday birds on her shoulder. Oh, yeah. People want to deny the Thursday birds. But there we go. All right there. And there was a coal folk and Riley, Mesa, so hot. But she wasn't that she was looked the part she's type ago, choose prom, dress era. Harker show remember drop prom dress we, we played a tour. We played a summer swing once where suddenly. Against the I love saying against the odds lately against women were showing up to shows wearing prom dresses and like. Fanny packs on because they didn't have any pockets on the prom dresses. This is pre like pre pre iphone preforms. I'm just remembering this now and I was like, wow, that's really weird. Oh, really? This is in the Carolinas North Carolina, replay. This show North Carolina. There's a knife. Oh, I remember that. Yeah. A gun gun show? Yeah, those a gun, no is a gun show. Someone pulled the knife outside, and I talked to some people from North Carolina recently and that entire block has been leveled, and there's an apartment building. Okay. I say good. Yeah, it was not that great rinse too bad. Trash used to be. It was a role, a roller rink that was converted into a hardcore Venny. All kinds of bad ideas like that. Yeah, jeez, wow. It's all kind of a flash in basketball backs and likes lean style. So I promise I would have mall reviews for this episode. We're not actually. I lied about where I'd be doing this. I'd be doing it from in front of a computer, but now said we're in the backyard, I'm staring out into like people's windows. Did you hear about the guy from anal count? Guess I did hear about the cons. What did you hear fell? He fell off a fucking. Escalator fucking around being? Yeah, being a grown adult falling off an escalator, forty, five and dies. Which immediately, of course made me think of the time. Stares and. Made me feel away. I remember that everybody's got their own ACC story. But yeah, I mean, I it was kind of it was like he was in the band for. I read the trajectory of it and you know, I always say I was Prevost things by saying far far of me to speak all the dead, but I make fun of death tributes all the time. But I, I took it upon myself to read his Facebook and it was truly awful. Like talking about like like,.

Riley Mason Justin kisses Prussia North Carolina TJ Maxx Pennsylvania Facebook Justin kiss Carolinas North Carolina basketball ACC Harker Mesa
Concertos were Written by Nobleman Anonymously

Classics for Kids

00:10 sec | 3 years ago

Concertos were Written by Nobleman Anonymously

"I'm naomi lewin i

Prussia Prince Louis Ferdinand
"prussia" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"John batchelor this is the john batchelor show trump stuff with them in his book plunges into and we're going to tell some of the stories it's a vast canvas there's no law and all the conquered and now emptied lands years zero is the book a history of nineteen forty five i want to go first to the story of revenge in germany the russians is set up a sign you say as the as the russian soldiers reached germany or east prussia it says soldier you are in germany take revenge on hitler's rides what was behind that sign and what happened well i think it's a complicated story revenge is a very human emotion if people have wronged you wanted do something back an eye for an eye and so on it's already in the old testament but revenge on a on a massive scale is usually the result of political there's a reason for it the case of the soviets taking revenge in eastern europe and in germany it was partly because the soviet union had suffered horribly whatever they did to the germans which is pretty bad the germans did worse things to them so it wasn't difficult to get the soviet soldiers to do that west there was also in a way revolutionary purpose in that the germans who lived in what is now poland czechoslovakia parts of russia and where the old bourgeoisie they were the professors the doctors lawyers and when the soviet soldiers were often from rural very poor places moved into germany even though germany was was very badly bombed wrecked people are in an appalling situation even in those circumstances to the a lot of soviet soldiers they were shocked by the opulence they've never seen electric lighting they've never seen anything like what they saw in ordinary german homes and so the feeling was how dare these people treat us the way they did when there's so much richer than we are now going to give them a dose of their own medicine and it was officially encouraged as i say partly for revolutionary reasons and the thing that comes up again and again and you're telling the soviets army is that it was encouraged by senior officers to plunder and rape and murder in germany and it was encouraged all the way through forty five and then continuing it continued for several years afterwards in the soviet zone.

John batchelor prussia hitler europe soviet union russia murder germany czechoslovakia soviets army rape
"prussia" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Ninety plus programs and specializations in fields like business and management to help give you the skills and knowledge employers want plus with classes online and no sat g r e regime at required for most programs you'll you see can work for you at uum you see serving the military is in our dna which is why we been ranked number one among the online and nontraditional best colleges of two thousand eighteen by military times earn a career relevant degree from a respected public state university with online and hybrid courses were more you and you see dot eu slash radio certified to operate in virginia by chef ask any dentist and they will tell you must have us prussia teeth too hot unevenly and not nearly long enough and that leads to serious health problems so i decided to do something about it i'm simon editor and i invented quit the modern electric toothbrush to help you have fresh breath pristine teeth and excellent oral hygiene as a product design ah i care about how you toothbrush looks feels and the quality of every bristle quip has a lightweight and sleek design with simple time vibrations and guiding pulses for a perfect twominute clean and unlike other high end electric toothbrushes quipped starts at just twenty five dollars buzzfeed calls us the iphone of toothbrushes and time magazine named as one of the best inventions of the year start brushing better with quip go to get quipped dot com slash save and get your first refill packed free with a quip electric toothbrush that's your first refill pack free and get quipped dot com slash save spelled g t q u i p dot com slash save.

virginia editor prussia simon twenty five dollars twominute
"prussia" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on Historical Figures

"As a diplomat got pernicous was in charge of negotiating with albert of prussia the grand master of the teutonic knights but it was unsuccessful in december fifteen nineteen 5000 teutonic soldiers invaded vare mia they burn the city of fromberg to the ground and their next target was the castle at allenstein copernicus was put in charge of defending the castle he wrote to the king for military assistance and prepared fortifications and supplies for the oncoming attack the teutonic knights arrived at the castle on january fifteen twenty one with twice as many soldiers as the polish defence had rounded up they demanded that the polish surrender but copernicus refused after ten days of intimidation the siege began the nights marched across the frozen moat and broke through the towns gate copernicus led the defence directing the soldiers from on top of the city walls the polish were outmanned an underprepared but copernicus his leadership was so effective that after just one attempt the teutonic knights withdrew and left the city alone when copernicus could find spare time away from his public duties he continued working on his theory of the universe it would require decades of observation to take all the astronomical measurements he needed but he never strayed from his focus he had been mocked and ignored before but he knew he had the right idea if only he could prove it could pernicous never married or head children but after his sister katharina died he took in her five daughters and raise them as his own not much information survives about katharina children but when copernicus died he left his money to the five women who were all married with children of their own by that time.

prussia allenstein copernicus copernicus katharina pernicous fromberg ten days
"prussia" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on Channel 33

"Sales we go as she kinda like does the hands in the air kind of like she's like oh but the same julia child their prussia thoroughly funny yeah it will i loved it i had a great time movies watching the post iif soon will getting a lot of came in and street together then you have to assume so and you also have to assume that reese witherspoon will her character we'll stick her nose in the business and everyone's business and they will fight alive and kind of what i'm imagining is peak highstrung greece yelling lot is ice cold meryl right i can't wait yeah because you don't want them both yelling at each other becomes too much you kinda want merrill to bring her scary reserved sure have ever told you my personal anecdote about meryl's now you haven't please do just really reminded me of this i went to see gypsy on broadway with an exboyfriends family and i want at sitting literally ducts meryl streep meet say i need and the sea next to me was meryl streep tips a real classic you have it so here's meryl's o at the broadway show too every time there is a laugh wine the whole theatre would laugh pause and then merrill unleashes like her amazing low merrill laugh echoes through the theater and everybody recognizes instantly that it's meryl streep and there's just a moment of leading merrill laugh laugh and then the show goes on at everywhere she goes akinci ever be just like a woman in a in a shop probably because then she goes into nancy myers mode rate i guess so you can imagine her being lego this governor is cream i can't sleep i don't know then i suppose you realize earth with meryl streep back typical allies anyway so let's address the controversy briefly sure.

julia prussia merrill meryl meryl streep nancy myers
"prussia" Discussed on I Am Rapaport

I Am Rapaport

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on I Am Rapaport

"The fire both suffer recording artist laugh through 320 he pulled the prussia repeats from eastern i gladly cloud rex look you'll my name is eighty five xi's because i'm the fat gain sort of by specialists so you you hear him he's bracken he's role in a boatmaster flex who seen everybody was like oh shit like the dudes grown up there and freestyle he could have just a ninety seconds and no disrespect two two two nyse too all of them jay z all the living rappers i don't think anybody could do that that was clearly the best period clearly period it discontent young who wasn't no of romanticising drug deals nothing none of that that that soccer should it was there was no cursing right maybe two words two to four footwork but there were there were in it was in context mas play a little bit more that she went out with reckless levels what what we weapon gladly live on top of represent me rip of filler that would show frac i'm glad we may card fact monica also know this superpower bat ray matter contained too much data i'll tell a story like pickup of blood let you seem quantity black folks what what you take we are talking core positive coming up here with fifty pity floor will support of the three walk studio you bet dr scott so good so dope so impressive and and usually a lot of thousand they do these won't resolve built changed the beats like sway hill they do to five fingers a will change the beat for him to be in the park is like a john coltrane year seoul or like a jimi hendrix seoul of roma sola will you just rock like a john buying them so ago.

prussia nyse soccer dr scott seoul john coltrane jimi hendrix ninety seconds
"prussia" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The greed that represents hospitals in england have criticized the department of health fritz failure to tackle sit there what pool shortages nhs providers say urgent steps needed to east prussia on frontlines staff the foreign secretary boris johnson is facing mounting pressure to correct comments he made about a british woman in jail while in iran he said nothing the ghauri radcliffe had been teaching journalism when she was arrested in tehran but a family says she was on a family holiday the number of prosecutions for crimes of honour based violence says that its lowest level since 2012 and figures repeal just five percent of cases reported to police and then referred to the crown prosecution service poly hara founded the charen projects which the pool swimming on things like forced marriage and violence she explains why can be hard to get these cases to course two have been gremlins in assistant today donald trump is in south korea where he will hold talks to tackle the nuclear threat posed by the northeast making a speech right now in seoul and how healthy weinstein has been expelled for life fly the organizes off the emmy awards the television academy phytate imposed the ban following announcement of allegations of sexual harassment snip east against the film producer the weather heavy rain and blustery winds spreading a sleeping brighter conditions behind the gun highs thirteen degrees on the way we are choking food banks on the show and the fact that since universal credits been wrote a number of people saying there the takeup of food banks has really increase that stories on the way also before non an awful genital christopher eccleston joint just avenue reminded me he was a bad got one of the form these rachel he's been in some fantastic film and tv shows obviously i love him for dr hey how friends in the little magnificently all the battery facing his brilliant and not the thing i really love demand really re recently was safe house yours thought they really it was the second scary just now he wasn't in that but it was in the first season that was brilliant and.

england prussia boris johnson iran radcliffe tehran donald trump south korea seoul weinstein producer food banks secretary emmy harassment christopher eccleston thirteen degrees five percent
"prussia" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Now dr and drove is always the regular no one of drive and that word has been increasing in frequency uh perhaps because the invention of cars but we think that maybe an increasing youth in drove makes the rhyming of dive and dove fuel normal two speakers and given the option of thing dovan dived when dove is acceptable speakers might prefer to fado so in this instance the tendency to rhyme has resulted in the selection of dove selects of prussia is a big driver for evil lucien what about his cousin genetic drift online natural selection survivalofthefittest genetic drift describes random changes the don't result in organism becoming fritz drift is a pound for woods two he's an example take two sets of parents one who use spilt while the other use spilled if the spilt parents have one child with the spilled parents have two and these offspring loan the woods from their parents spilled has become more common in the population even though nor the would his fifth the team behind this work showed the drift is stronger fall river abs and that the strength of that drift depends on the frequency of the would is used so the more the verb is altered the morris pasta and stays the same in future generations repetition his key and this repetition keeps regular robes regular and irregular verbs irregular but what does this will mean for the words we use today mitch explains the understanding how woods revolving might give us a clue to the pace of change i think where we find selection we expect uh one form to eventually replace the utter it depends on the magnitude of fortune and draft under strong selection of for my change quite rapidly over the course of uh one hundred years under drift it might take much longer for one form to replace another just because people eventually forget one or the other form.

prussia lucien woods mitch one hundred years
"prussia" Discussed on 40oz Hemlock

40oz Hemlock

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on 40oz Hemlock

"This I keep extending this point marks all the way to logic and I've given some justification for it previously by might sort of excursion on Hegel But we see I mean let me just add this to that series of expansions on that point the sort of like easier your hesitancy because I'm telling you this is what this is the consequence of Mark's what mark means is what hey gelman think about it this way here's another attempt to sort of make good on that Marxist materialist I mean I could stop there but but think about this whatever logic is we take to listen notice harm saying this whatever logic is like the nature of it whatever you know what it's react reality at has whatever that answer to that question is notice that we take it to be something which plays a crucial role in our belief formation processes now listen don't don't drift away listen to this whatever logic is we take it to be an integral component of our thought processes now look this is I'm not going off listen on Marx's materialism that can't be the case so what are you talking about nick computers you know think listen if all processes are essentially material processes which is what marks Holt and thus all causes are essentially material causes which is a consequence of what Marx Holtz and if the laws of logic are not themselves material objects which is granted on all sides nobody thinks they're physical objects then logical laws are ultimately irrelevant to what actually happens anywhere in the fall physical world including ready your physical brain do you see don't think I'm making here making stuff up darling was terrified of this line of reasoning he said so in the in the origin he said so and it sort of I mean behind the scenes has turned into you might have gotten a flavor of this for my first series from Darwin to Donald Trump is a little bit about this in their right but a little bit it's turned into like this largely unspoken scandal philosophy in the last century I'll tell you more about this at some point but the point here is that obviously on this picture of the world that marks posits on this picture of causation that would be the case if the world was like this the laws of logic are relevant so even in this sense given the other senses supply previous episodes by the very nature of his position he is inimical to the to the you might say the ultimate juridical authority of logic all right so I've given all sorts of different angled justifications for that but there's another one anyway Jack doesn't realize it but the reason Jack sees oppression everywhere you know everywhere looks is because it's the lens that he's looking through it's the framework the model through which he's looking you know we'll call her everything that he sees oppression if you're wearing blue tinted glasses than everything you will look at will look blue everything he looked at it will look blue right but if you don't know you're wearing blue tinted glasses then you will attribute balloonists to the things around you all of that resides in the Lens through which you're looking see marks marks postures in his writing he postures because there's nothing informative about it something informative about the assertion that all as are bs if I can't define my as independently of my definition of my beats if I can't then my claim that all as are bs just turns out to be an analytic statement it's a Tautology they call it you know it doesn't tell us anything about the world but only about how I use my words that this assertion is the very first sentence of Marx's manifesto he's giving you right at the beginning the lens through which all observations of some social interaction will be seen and then you know coincidentally he'll go on to find class struggle and oppression in every instance of social.

"prussia" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on WTMA

"The regime violently suppresses its own citizens each shot unarmed student protestors in the street during the green revolution this regime has fuelled sick and violence in iraq and vicious civil wars in yemen and syria in syria the iranian regime has supported the atrocities of prussia i'll i'll assads regime and condoned assads use of chemical weapons against helpless civilians including many many children given the regime's murderous past and present we should not take likely hit sinister vision for the future the regime's to favour chance are death to america and death to israel realising the gravity of the situation the united states and the united nations security council sought over many years to stop iran's pursuit of nuclear weapons with a wide array of strong economic sanctions but the pre venus administration lifted the sanctions just before what would have been the total collapse of the iranian regime through the deeply controversial two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with iran this deal is known as the judge joint comprehensive plan of action or jcpoa all right the president does a tremendous job of laying out the case against iran and when you listen to this you really have to wonder how the prior administration at the prior administration went to this regime with hat in hand and rewarded it with one hundred fifty billion dollars and a certain road a certain road two icbms with nuclear warheads it's just astonishing the extent to which baraka obama sold out this country sold out the.

iraq yemen syria prussia chemical weapons united states united nations security counci nuclear weapons iran president baraka obama america israel one hundred fifty billion doll
"prussia" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on WTMA

"Do with played the flood he did so good they shut their mouths wolf blitzer added take an extra couple of a transfer probably to go on the and not say trump they probably had a train him in the morning i can just imagine wolf blitzer in the morning and jake tapper warming up in the green room with the napkin under the neck putting on the makeup and that is say okay today boys when you read your scripts you'll notice that there's no trump in it and they started say cia trump rubber are brought raw route known you can't say russia you can't say trump so guys i want you to practice now i want you to say president peru perot russia paraggio no no you can't say pressure but i can't say the word president without saying rush i've done it for nine straight months okay jake you'll try it now okay i'll try i'll try to say president paraggio proud sheshona jake you have to say president trump not prussia they probably had a train them not to say trump they get tonguetied now all the haters now because they don't know what to do now russia's over he did well at the flood and they don't know what to do it themselves all right whatever now what else was in the news lots of stuff that you don't want you here about it van with six drowned family members apparently found thank god he is one i really get mad at heat wave to hit burning man it can be among the hottest ever dino burning man is a bunch of sexual be generate junkies from from haiti's how in the world can they permit an open sex orgy like that in this country and that how whose they tell me all day are bigger a sick owes in the ones going a burning man whose day tell me who is in charge of them who's going to clamp down on sexual degenerates ago and who wrought in the in the desert for days on end like animals mink mink fornah kate less than these people at burning man a making hate has less sexual energy than these psychos heat wave to hit burning man that's my problem maybe the government should supply mini air conditioners for the sexual degenerates had burning man and they come back with stds and.

wolf blitzer russia president haiti jake tapper president peru perot russia prussia
"prussia" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on KELO

"The company i'm i'm the although they didn't have direct control over the script they w they did have a very good relationship with the with the people involved i i'm i'm not continued through uh in the 1960s and beyond zero dark thirty courses is tricky stuff and you write about it at a couple of different places in the book like a story about olympic for osama bin laden it's a terrific movie what was the level of cia involvement in that what about one of the cases the the has come out very well in public because a lot of organization uh who who uh both on the left on the right basically on the right one kid to uh to discover what the department depend on here because there was a concern the that had been leaked information classified information to kathryn bigelow i'm so that we looked at i give it pay i'm to try and uh the documentation on it so i got a covet the most that the others because you had because of the political prussia became big meet dory whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa ever breach breached national security during the making of the quickly made the film but jewelry the making of the film the navy seal kill bin laden so you know if the potential for that be leak i'm um uh national security problems with evident uh but basically yeah the the you know they spoke to senior government officials they spoke to cia they spoke about particularly in in debt uh the department of defense that was a lot of involvement on the one on you know by two hundred pages the ceo of of the payment even in the public domain probably know how i require so i mean there are very much a um a government film and treat them we haven't really touched on television programs uh but it and you do mentioned that in addition to the.

osama bin prussia cia ceo kathryn bigelow
"prussia" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on PRI's The World

"How many people are we talking about it's very difficult there isn't any academico or soulard research done into the numbers now having said that anecdotally one of the contributors said that he believes that third of all gay british asians are either looking or in marriages of convenience a third of gay british agents as he huge number of people and i certainly was really shocked by the the number of people who posting advice online for example you know when i started doing the research for this document tree i joined set and forums and i'd i was very open about who i was at savvas journalist and i was looking for contributors and i was inundated by people who would say you know i might be able to help you with your research a real range of ages men and women so that uh this there are certainly lots of people from lots of different backgrounds who are engaging in marriages of convenience are there any gay south asian men are women that you know who have come out of their parents yes indeed there are there are many people that do end up coming out to the parents and being open about that such relative i'd say that still something that is hugely taboo particularly within the south asian community nothing what we need to understand for context is marriages a huge deal in any community but within the south asian community it's it's the pinnacle of family life quite often in south asian coaches when to individuals get married the wedding is not just about them it's about the entire extended family you know we have this phrase in the community that sexually a marriage of two families is not just about two individuals so that means is a huge amount of prussia on gay and lesbian people not to be honest about the sexual morality and to conform to the system where they almost invariably half the atlanta heterosexual marriages and that that has.

prussia
"prussia" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"prussia" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"This is going to be banned says it industrially snow weather in advance and they can start planning it for it right now and of course abuse thing is that once that message is in place surprise surprise industry just it up because wants to signal is that incentives to the changing market prices clear every time they just move to work with it so sometimes it comes down as it were from the government but sometimes it comes to my from people to the citizens precious saying this we're just disgusted and we had enough and they they refused plastic bags and shopping he comes from citizens prussia we need those two things to work together because the power of lobbying to resist items those the lobby power of companies putting money in government pockets to prevent them from making changes is so strong that we need to get that corporate money out of politics return it to the democratic space but also enable people and governments to shift economy in the right direction and of course there are many companies also desperately trying to move in that right direction because there are many good people working with a progressive vision who want to make companies be part of the progressive future so we need to what we search progressive companies and help them to convince governments to pay should move forward with the progressives rather than being held back by the money of those who would bet benefiting from the situation as it is slow circuit in i i guess this could be the in a lot of places around the around the world uh that as as millennials get a little bit older and jansy against as the next to the next group after that those people get older and they take more leadership positions not only inc's but uh in government as well we'll be able to see a lot of this jeans really started to be affected.

prussia
 Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Rick Steves Germany Audio Tour?s?

00:57 sec | 6 years ago

Rothenburg ob der Tauber

"Government from the first dukes of brandenburg medieval times to the kings and emperors of prussia the weimar republic hitler and the nazis communist east germany and onto the democracy of today. Think of the history. This race dog has seen when the building was inaugurated in eighteen ninety-five germany was still kingdom ruled by the horns. All or and family. That had rained here for nearly five hundred years back then. The raisch dog was far from the real center of power. That was a mile east of here at the royal palace. Kaiser wilhelm the second disdainfully called this place. The rakes often house that chatting house for monkeys. But after the emperor was deposed in world war one the german republic was proclaimed right on this spot. Look above the door to see the promise. They carved into the facade. Tim deutschen folk to the german people that first democracy known as the weimar republic proved week. Meanwhile the storm of

Prussia East Germany Kaiser Wilhelm German Republic Royal Palace Germany Tim Deutschen Weimar Republic