18 Burst results for "Protease Inhibitor"

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

11:39 min | 6 months ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on No Agenda

"There's an issue with the PR tests and the standards that are set that could be producing very high false positives which again screws up. All the data means we have nothing. We know nothing and it seems to be not one of those less really. Try and do it right. Everybody which backfires this is. David Crowe an investigative journalist. He's going to briefly. Explain the problem with the testing process and effectiveness of the process. Is that you have aren't a insane is a swap so you. I need to extract the irony get rid of the DNA which interferes with the test get rid of various enzymes and things that can affect later processes that is not a perfect process so the amount of Arna you get it step on will vary depending on which lab do it in the second stage is that piece you are only works on DNA. Not Ernie so you have to convert the Arnie DNA using an enzyme called transcriptase and the efficiency of that according to buston varies by a factor of about ten so what that means is the amount of DNA you end up with at the end of the second process is can be quite different by probably more than a factor of ten between different. Labs the way you tell if somebody is the way you say. Somebody is positive or negative is by running cycles of each of double the amount of material and you say for example if we get to thirty seven sample thirty-seven cycles and we haven't found any material. You're negative de choice of cycle numbers in in tests that are approved by the FDA varies from thirty to forty five. The second point is if you push the test to heart you can get false positives. Stephen Bus Recommend recommended no more than thirty five cycles and the tests the thirty three tests approved by the FDA. Go from thirty to forty five and only three of them had less than thirty five cycles. So what they are doing is they're pushing the envelope because they don't want to miss somebody who's infected but the consequence of that is could be generating massive number of false positives and they could have generated an entire epidemic by a massive number of false positives and if somebody tests positive on this test there's no way to determine whether it's true or false positive. The whole thing is a mess. It's a mess. And now we've been taught trust the science. The science is in Cheryl Wall rated. It's evidence based fact-based poll crab. It's just not true. You don't have all the is okay. This is this has been proven out by the whole global warming scam well and this is GonNa listen to anybody else. They close the door on discussion. Ninety seven percent of all scientists. They say it they lie about it and it's all about the money. Do you remember when it was only a week ago. China's going to test all eleven million people in Wuhan in ten days stunned. In right we got our our producer boots on the ground in Wuhan. He checked in a week ago. The reality of testing has changed. They are not testing all of who we no longer need to be tested because we were tested in March. My Co workers are also exempted since they were tested last month. I have no idea how many were tested into no longer reported on the Chinese news television and the CNA. I work all over. Wuhan and no longer see the big testing stations. Wuhan is thirty two hundred eighty square miles so maybe they moved to another section of WHO? I don't see but this testing is over. They're lying they're all full of crap. Not Testing testing ten million people in ten or eleven million people in ten days bullcrap now taking into the hydroxy liars take into the hydroxy. This is the final one and I thought it was quite brilliant that you came up with the concept that this virus had back door and the back doors hydroxy chloroquine. Or that's the key and then you insert the zinc and then you Effectively neutralizing the that somehow could have been known at least to the president since he was so early with this. Yeah very I think he was read in on something something somehow somewhere. Here's the final clip for me. Dr Bark again The politicization of it. But IT'S A. It's a good clip from a doctor. Who prescribed it and a little interesting tidbit so hydroxy chloroquine for example has found to be very safe effective cheap readily available now but if I use hydroxy chloroquine now and I read a prescription not uncommonly. I'll get a phone call from the pharmacy for me to justify why I'm prescribing this medication. I've never had this happen in my thirty. Plus Year Years Prescriptions. He'd never had someone really questions. And whoever nope never but now every time I write it I get a response back to justify why either the patient is sick and they meet a certain protocol of a particular age or this that and the other. I've never seen that before and I know I know that this this drug is being used throughout the country successfully and safely yet. It's now a political drug because a few months ago can't remember how long ago now every day just seems like you know a year but maybe a month and a half ago. President Trump said on public TV. I remember I was driving to work listening to the news. One of the press conferences and I heard him say it and immediately when I heard him say something about Hydroxy Click when I said. Oh boy here we go. How long is it going to be since till my phone blows up till I start getting emails from patients and sure enough by the time I got to the office I had already received emails? Enquiring about hydroxy chloroquine. But now immediately the press picked it up and now hydroxy. Chloroquine is a political drug. So if there's a study that shows that it doesn't work mainstream media front page news. If there's a study that shows that it has some benefit it's ignored or when it's presented right next to it is a so-called expert to immediately shoot down that study to say that this is not a good drug to be using and I think as a public service. You have some information on this This sixty year old drug seventy year old drug seventy year old drug the been long since proven to be quite safe of course they. There's a lot of stories but let's go back to the doctors that were discussing this whole issue We had on the last show. People like these clips. This is continuation. These are a couple of one of these. Two of these are long kind of but let's start with clip to set this up. This is a Again this is the discussion of why this discussion of people get it. Why more men get it? A concept called co morbidity which seems to be an element of Y. You get it what the older men would get it. And then it continues with And then we'll continue where they get into the oxy. Chloroquine d three and vitamin C. discussion especially the vitamin Z discussion. Which has a fascinating. Punchline started started off be interested to see who expressed the disease state and what they were taking to support their their prostate. I think there's a correlation there but we would have to really research that so when the change of somebody was using finessed ride or something although there's there's with HIV and the advent of viral treatments in lieu of say maximum with the only real treatment you'd have for for viral infection right out the symptoms and treat those something called protease inhibitors. Now and there's a protease inhibitor. That both blocks TMP RSS to and I think there's other ones for ace to but again you don't want to get into the ace inhibitors. What we already mentioned. But that's already approved in Japan for a pardon escalates coma stat mesylate. That's the we tried to order some studies on it. I tried to get. Api brought in. And there's also no famous that mesylate. It's pretty much the same family of drugs. Yeah both are approved. They're both been used great success the longest shortest when we talk about different medical interventions or supporting those. That are at risk. These are prime candidates prideaux. Some of that. The virus comes along. I can't their immune system takes care of it. They Ciro convert make their own antibodies. Because you'd inhibited. The cell from delivering its virus. So we've already agreed on or we already put a hypothesis together here that the viruses made I wanna go to the next level for a minute and say if it was man made is the groups that it hits coincidental or was there a deliberate nature behind that. I don't know that it's coincidental. I think when you when you enter into gain of function type research and you start pumping up. It's it will naturally naturally go a become more virulent income morbid patients. That's that's a given. What's interesting with this? Is that normally. You would expect immuno compromised patients to be hit just as hard as co Morbid patients that that's usually a given but in this particular virus it's not because children babies are immuno-compromised I mean. They do have passive immunity from their mother. There's no doubt and if you're breastfed you'll have more passive immunity but not like an adult. Now what they mean to kind of break this down a Children don't have much immunity. It takes years and years to build it up. You're exposed all these viruses. You're out floating around you out. You get sick. You get sick. You get Willia- develop a lot of immunities and Co morbidity refers to having to chronic illnesses at the same time which is mostly older men right and they discuss how it should be mostly women who get this disease just naturally based on the nature of this virus of the coronavirus but men that have co morbidity and that would be for example having diabetes and high blood pressure that would be like having hypertension and a Enlarged prostate which every man after about the age of fifty. So so men. Have this this this these issues and it turns out that the virus needs to couple of things going on for it that to latch onto to get going walking. The latching on is the easy part. It's it's developing the open. Getting the virus load into the cell is hard part via the viral viral load. And Anyway so now. We're going to discuss the mechanisms that stop it and it turns out that oxy chloroquine is one of them. So let's go to clip to not like an adult so the fact.

chloroquine Wuhan Chloroquine FDA Arna protease inhibitor David Crowe Ernie Cheryl Wall China Stephen Bus President Trump Japan president Dr Bark producer hypertension
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

11:36 min | 6 months ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on No Agenda

"There's an issue with the PR tests and the standards that are set that could be producing very high false positives which again screws up. All the data means we have nothing. We know nothing and it seems to be not one of those less really. Try and do it right everybody which backfires this is David Crowe. He's an investigative journalist. He's going to briefly. Explain the problem with the testing process and effectiveness very simply. The process is that you have aren't a insane is a swap so you. I need to extract the irony. Get rid of the DNA which interferes with the test. Get rid of various enzymes and things that can affect later processes that is not a perfect process so the amount of Arna you get it step on will vary depending on which lab do it in the second stage is that piece you are only works on DNA. Not Ernie so you have to convert the Arnie DNA using an enzyme called reverse transcriptase and the efficiency of that according to buston varies by a factor of about ten so what that means is the amount of DNA you end up with at the end of the second process is can be quite different by probably more than a factor of ten between different. Labs the way you tell if somebody is the way you say. Somebody is positive or negative is by running cycles of each of double the amount of material and you say for example if we get to thirty seven sample thirty-seven cycles and we haven't found any material. You're negative de choice of cycle numbers in in tests that are approved by the FDA varies from thirty to forty five. The second point is if you push the test to heart you can get false positives. Stephen Bus Recommend recommended no more than thirty five cycles and the tests the thirty three tests approved by the FDA. Go from thirty to forty five and only three of them had less than thirty five cycles. So what they are doing is they're pushing the envelope because they don't want to miss somebody who's infected but the consequence of that is could be generating massive number of false positives and they could have generated an entire epidemic by a massive number of false positives and if somebody tests positive on this test there's no way to determine whether it's true or false positive. The whole thing is a mess. It's a mess and now we've been taught trust the science. The science is in wall rated. It's evidence based fact-based poll crab. It's just not true. You don't have all the it's okay. This is this has been proven out by the whole global warming scam well and this is GonNa listen to anybody else. They close the door on discussion. Ninety seven percent of all scientists. They say it they lie about it and it's all about the money. Do you remember when it was only a week ago. China's going to test all eleven million people in Wuhan in ten days stunned. In right we got our our producer boots on the ground in Han. He checked in a week ago. The reality of testing has changed. They are not testing all of who we no longer need to be tested because we were tested in March. My Co workers are also exempted since they were tested last month. I have no idea how many were tested into no longer reported on the Chinese news television the CNA. I work all over. Wuhan and no longer see the big testing stations. Wuhan is thirty two hundred eighty square miles so maybe they moved to another section of Wuhan that I don't see but this testing is over. They're lying. They're all full of crap testing testing ten million people in ten or eleven million people in ten days bullcrap now taking into the hydroxy liars take into the hydroxy. This is the final one and I thought it was quite brilliant that you came up with the concept that this virus had back door and the back doors hydroxy chloroquine. Or that's the key and then you insert the zinc and then you Effectively neutralizing the that somehow could have been known at least to the president since he was so early with this. Yeah very I think he was read in on something something somehow somewhere. Here's the final clip for me. Dr Bark again. the politicization of it. But IT'S A. It's a good clip from a doctor. Who prescribed it and a little interesting tidbit so hydroxy chloroquine for example has found to be very safe effective cheap readily available now but if I use hydroxy chloroquine now and I read a prescription not uncommonly. I'll get a phone call from the pharmacy for me to justify why I'm prescribing this medication. I've never had this happen in my thirty. Plus Year Years Prescriptions. He'd never had someone really questions. And whoever nope never but now every time I write it I get a response back to justify why either the patient is sick and they meet a certain protocol of a particular age or this that and the other. I've never seen that before and I know I know that this this drug is being used throughout the country successfully and safely yet. It's now a political drug because a few months ago can't remember how long ago now every day just seems like you know a year but maybe a month and a half ago. President Trump said on public TV. I remember I was driving to work listening to the news. One of the press conferences and I heard him say it and immediately when I heard him say something about Hydroxy Click when I said. Oh boy here we go. How long is it going to be since till my phone blows up till I start getting emails from patients and sure enough by the time I got to the office I had already received emails? Enquiring about hydroxy chloroquine. But now immediately the press picked it up and now hydroxy. Chloroquine is a political drug. So if there's a study that shows that it doesn't work mainstream media front page news. If there's a study that shows that it has some benefit it's ignored or when it's presented right next to it is a so-called expert to immediately shoot down that study to say that this is not a good drug to be using and I think as a public service. You have some information on this This sixty year old drug seventy year old drug seventy year old drug the been long since proven to be quite safe. Of course. There's a lot of stories but let's go back to the doctors that were discussing. This whole issue We had on the last show. People like these clips. This is continuation These are a couple of one of these. Two of these are long kind of but let's start with clip to set this up. This is a Again this is the discussion of why this discussion of people get it. Why more men get it? A concept called come morbidity which seems to be an element of Y. You get it what the older men would get it. And then it continues with And then we'll continue where they get into the oxy chloroquine d three and vitamin C. discussion especially the vitamin Z discussion. Which has a fascinating. Punchline started started off be interested to see who expressed the disease state and what they were taking to support their their prostate. I think there's a correlation there but we would have to really research that so when the change of somebody was using finessed ride or something although there's there's with HIV and the advent of viral treatments in lieu of say maximum with the only real treatment you'd have for for viral infection right out the symptoms and treat those something called protease inhibitors. Now and there's a protease inhibitor. That both blocks TMP RSS to and I think there's other ones for ace to but again you don't want to get into the ace inhibitors because of what we already mentioned. But that's already approved in Japan for a pardon escalates coma stat mesylate. That's the we tried to order some studies on it. I tried to get. Api brought in. And there's also no famous that mesylate. It's pretty much the same family of drugs. Yeah both are approved. They're both been used great success the longest shortest when we talk about different medical interventions or supporting those. That are at risk. These are prime candidates prideaux. Some of that. The virus comes along. I can't their immune system takes care of it. They Ciro convert make their own antibodies. Because you'd inhibited. The cell from delivering its virus. So we've already agreed on or we already put a hypothesis together here that the viruses made I wanna go to the next level for a minute and say if it was man made is the groups that it hits coincidental or was there a deliberate nature behind that. I don't know that it's coincidental. I think when you when you enter into gain of function type research and you start pumping up. It's it will naturally naturally go a become more virulent income morbid patients. That's that's a given. What's interesting with this? Is that normally. You would expect immuno compromised patients to be hit just as hard as co Morbid patients that that's usually a given but in this particular virus it's not because children babies are immuno-compromised I mean. They do have passive immunity from their mother. There's no doubt and if you're breastfed you'll have more passive immunity but not like an adult. Now what they mean to kind of break this down a Children don't have much immunity. It takes years and years to build it up. You're exposed to all these viruses. You're out floating around you out. You get sick. You get sick you get Willia- develop a lot of immunities and Co morbidity refers to having to chronic illnesses at the same time which is mostly older men right and they discuss how it should be mostly women who get this disease just naturally based on the nature of this virus of the coronavirus but men that have co morbidity and that would be for example having diabetes and high blood pressure That would be like having hypertension and a Enlarged prostate which every man after about the age of fifty. So so men. Have this this this these issues and it turns out that the virus needs to couple of things going on for it that to latch onto to get going walking. The latching on is the easy part. It's it's developing the open. Getting the virus load into the cell is hard part via the viral viral load. And Anyway so now. We're going to discuss the mechanisms that stop it and it turns out that oxy chloroquine is one of them. So let's go to clip to not like an adult.

chloroquine Wuhan Chloroquine FDA Arna protease inhibitor David Crowe Ernie China Stephen Bus President Trump Japan president producer Dr Bark hypertension diabetes
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

11:08 min | 8 months ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Another group saw that study in. W- let's look at the the antiviral effect of Horse Chestnut in killing R. S. V. Respiratory. Whatever virus that usually. It's a virus that's not Cov- but it is. Rsv So it's a mouse. This is it shows that it has the ability to do certain things. The reason why this one was so cool was that day infected mice with RSV and they demonstrated that the Horse Chestnut extract decreased. Inflammatory markers specifically one called. I'll six that's relevant Katie. Because a study just came out where they now are looking at when somebody shows up to the hospital if they check their. I'll six level. That is a prognostic sign on whether the patient will need an ICU. Bed or they're going to do good. That particular inflammatory. Marker seems to be something that sets off the side of kind store some reading an article that was done now. These articles that are done in two thousand four two thousand fourteen. These are these are lab articles showing this. I'm like Oh my gosh. It's makes total sense so if you block island if you don't allow the body to overreact then you're attenuating this cytokine storm which killing young people then fun to other studies where they're looking at other viruses like HIV. Dang gay and the activity of the extract. These people were trying to determine because of the other through studies. Are we able to make a drug on this so they wanted to pull out the Beta ason portion of it just meaning like all things we see this all the time in traditional medicine? If there's something that works naturally then somebody's going to try and figure out. How do we extract that molecule and mass produce a molecule so that we can get a patent because it's very hard to patent mother nature so they compared the whole chestnut extract versus? Just what was supposed to be a drug? And they determined that when they gave pneumonia to mice. And I'm sorry I know there's probably animal lovers out here but this is a lot of the studies that we get unfortunately but when they gave him only two mice they showed that the whole chestnut extract the chest x Ray did much better in decrease in the inflammatory markers in the mice had much better clinical outcomes so trying to just take one little thing out and go. Oh I'M GONNA I'm GonNa make this and just move on so just the straight up. Antiviral effect is pretty impressive at least in the lab and so that was the first step. Which is we're GONNA have antiviral effect for you. I mentioned or you said the ace inhibitor. I explained that the way that the virus actually gets attached to the as two receptor is through a proteinase. So right now there are tons of studies will on over thirty five when I last checked looking at protease inhibitors to try and help the SARS Cov to virus so protease inhibitors is what president trump is getting on TV and talking and goes. We're GONNA talk about hydroxy chloroquine and a secular and there's great studies going on with all these protease inhibitors because that's what we that's what was developed for age to treat AIDS so there's two different studies looking at the anti protease effect of polly females. Polyphenyls have been shown to block the SARS Cov- twos ability. So in the first part I'm referencing SARS cubs two thousand three now talking about the virus that causes Kobe. Nineteen two different studies looked at the anti protease effect. One looked at three antivirals and eleven. Different polyphenols in different classes. This show that the polyphenyls as effective as the antivirals in being a protease inhibitor. So then a group out of Turkey and Pakistan Red Dot and their lab published a comparison where they're looking at the binding strength of one commercial protease inhibitor. Compared to twenty-six polyphenyls the conclusion was twenty four polyphenyls out of mother. Nature outperformed the Commercial Nelfinavir. Which is used an AIDS treatment so I loved what happened here. One Academic Institution said we read the data from two thousand four. We're GONNA now do a study on SARS come to and then another one said we wanNA know if binds harder to or not as much in it outperformed the antiviral that was there the commercial antiviral have. I lost you completely yet. No that's really astounding. I'm not surprised that Mother Nature can outperform. But that's incredible to know we have those tools. It's pretty wild isn't it? I mean imagine being somebody who's studied these molecules for ten years and I'm just like uncovering one after another going now no and I'm like rubbing my eyes I'm like am I. Am I delusional my in an ICU? Bed Right now intimated and this is how. I'm trying to cope with this that. I'm seeing that I can help this so now. Let's talk about so the first one was it's it's it has the possibility of killing the virus. The second one that has the possibility of not allowing the virus. Attach the third one that I mentioned is. Don't allow the virus to actually replicate in your cells. What we do know is that zinc is critical to this. But you can't just take tons of zinc you have to get the zinc into the cell intracellular. Zinc is the key to this. Because we figured out that if zinc's to sell it will block let's call the Arna polymerase of SARS of two so when this virus infiltrate sell it hijacks it it goes up to the ARNA preliminaries and says I need you to replicate me a billion times and the Arne polymerase normally as well if you're in the cell. Oh that makes sense all right so they tell the ribe zome everybody we gotta start replicating this now and then the virus gets replicated so zinc comes in there and says now wait a minute let me see your let me see your security pass so to speak and zinc blocks that from happening but you have to zinc into the cell and what you need there is called a zinc ion afor so a zinc ion afford drives zinc into the cell. Guess what hydroxy chloroquine is we've all been talking about the antiviral effects of Hydroxy Chloroquine. Pla- Quinnell plus a cycle of beer. But hydroxy chloroquine is here. That's one of the methods that some of these virologist feel that it's killing the virus or helping some people driving zinc into the cell so we found an article in two thousand fourteen which showed that polyphenyls like Carson in an SEC act as zinc ion fears meaning. They drive zinc into the cell. So it pushes it in there. We're looking at doing a mass drug hydroxy chloroquine which new data coming out that it may have a toxic effect on anybody on a diabetic medication called foreman. And there's reasons for that and it can cause some prolongation in in college can run out of the drug and all these other things and some researchers showed. Hey Do you know that these polyphenyls Mother Nature gave us can actually drive zinc into the cell? Nobody is talking about this and we. I've been joking around with my team. I'll say something and people will blow it off and then a month later the news will be like we don't to. They'll say something that I've been talking about because you know to make it into the news. I don't know what what you have to do or do something but I'm over here going okay. So this is all like okay. Now wait a minute. There's no there's no way Katie. At times I feel like this time off and when I've been doing this it was either divine intervention or Kismet or whatever it is that fate but it's just like one step is leading to the next so now so we've talked about that so now. I want to talk about this whole thing about this Predator tele `bacterial. Nobody's talking about it yet. But I've been looking a lot of the data a lot of the research coming out of China. A lot of doctors like we don't understand how some crash and burn so fast. New evidence is showing that SARS Cov- to virus may have this accomplice called Prep Attala which is why it can be so infectious and people can have really were rapid. Pneumonia crash and burn an hours and two studies out of China have demonstrated that SARS Cov to the causes covered. Nineteen has the ability to integrate with this bacteria. Called prevot. Hella. The virus can actually has a way to get into the bacterial species. And then it can hide so when you test for your negative but it can get the Potala to start replicating itself one of the theories of these. These different studies coming out. Prevot AL is found in the Gut and many patients that are dying of pneumonia are being cultured with prepa Tele Bacteria as 'cause here's what's wild. Two thousand. Seventeen study in cattle looked at giving Cabrera show to cattle to see if that helps them. Gain weight have better milk production and things like that well. The conclusion was that it actually made the count much healthier and like an afterthought I never would have seen this article after thought. It was the only interesting conclusion was after checking the bacterial content of these cattle. And they just like aspirated the stomach. The unique factor was privy. Tele species were drastically decreased adding to the fact that Privata can actually cause problems in cattle so they viewed it as a positive thing so tobacco can actually get rid or at least in. This study has been shown to be bacteria sidled to prevot Tele. Two bracho was the molecule that we studied that I that I always call the workhorse of tr- until but because it's a large polly phenolic compound that can help get rid of different gases and things like that and it appears that it's bacterial Seidel to maybe co accomplice of SARS Cov to imagine you're going to be hearing more about this in the near future as it starts making mainstream media right now. It's all over the academic literature where people are like that makes sense makes.

protease inhibitor chloroquine Mother Nature pneumonia Katie AIDS ace inhibitor Academic Institution Pla- Quinnell Marker Prevot AL ARNA China Ray Nelfinavir Cabrera Turkey Privata Prep Attala
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Short Wave

"Today we're talking about the progress that has been made in HIV treatment. Over the past three decades. Dr Maggie Hoffman. Terry has spent the past five years researching HIV and providing care to patients living with the virus once we started to understand you know the basics about HIV before we had any treatments. Tell me a little bit about what that time. Period was like I think very scary because initially we didn't know even how HIV have you were spread. My first exposure to it was as a pre medical student. I went over to a local hospital and worked with the infection. Doctor there but he he took me in to see two cousins who both had. HIV and held their hands without gloves. Because he said Is that I think it would be a terrible thing saying to be alone and to not be able to touch someone and to be the sick Because they were both dying and beyond that they just didn't know what to do except to keep people going as long as you could They used lots of different palliative kind of things things that we use said end of life to this day with cancer patients but that was all that was available to us and really so the first ray of hope was really. AZT The first drug. That was it was used to treat it. That is true. I remember the posters of vividly from my third year of medical school with an alarm clock on that said. If you're willing to get up every four hours and you have AIDS. We have a drug for you. I went to medical school and Temple North Philadelphia which was very hard hit area the AIDS epidemic even early on and people were lining up to get this magical drug even if it meant you got up every four hours to take at least a gave people finally some home before we talk about how. HIV drugs work. You need to know a couple of things. Our immune system is made up of all kinds of different cells. One type called T.. Cells specializes in protecting our bodies from viruses like HIV Maggie calls HIV a smart virus because it specifically attacks those t cells basically the virus kills the very cells that are trying to hunt them one way. HIV kills t cells is by hijacking genetic machinery Henry inside those cells forcing the cells to bake more and more copies of the virus eventually bursting out of the cell killing it so easy t- The first major drug targeted. HIV Pretty early on in its viral. Life cycle disrupting this process. The problem was that easy T- worked for a few months but in and of of itself as a single agent the virus was smart enough to get around it so it improved things for a few months but it never improved things in in the long run right that continued I did my infection fellowship. Nineteen Ninety two to one thousand nine hundred ninety four and it was still similar. At that time you were are uniformly telling young people time and again That they were going to die and that they should get their fares in order that they had children we would get them to meet with a case manager to figure out who was going to raise their children It was just a terrible. I can't I can't imagine what that was like. I think what often kept us going was the dream that better treatment would come along and we were fortunate enough in our fellowship to be involved in nearly nearly studies on protease inhibitors. So let's talk about that because that was another big Development and other big moment in this treatment was the development of heart and protease inhibitors. So talk to me a little bit about those so. HIV is like snowflakes in the body every time it divides it mutates at at least one spot and by doing so no to viruses in the body your body if you're infected with HIV. No two viruses viruses are alike in that way it is able to figure out how to get around easy T- so what we did was we developed drugs that hit hit from other targets and we're more potent So hard stands for highly active antiretroviral therapy And by combining signing three drugs that were working you know usually at least two different angles two different ways and the body We were able to finally finally get the virus. All the way controlled. Get it down to what we call. Undetectable but if we stopped the medicines it will come back but but having said that many of them were anywhere from ten to eighteen pills a day and they often cause side effects such as nausea vomiting meeting And leipold dystrophy which was this redistribution fat. But as these singled tablet regimens came out. They did not what caused these side effects. Right so that kind of brings us to the next big game changing moment around two thousand seven where you know a lot of those treatments that are a a lot of pills have become kind of one or two pills yes so the single pill once a day you know very much changed. The game from having to Rearrange Injured Day around two to three times having to ingest multiple pills so they were much better and much easier to take and greatly improve people's both compliance with the medicine the likelihood that they would take it every day and they're virus wouldn't develop resistance but improve their lifestyle also because because all they had to do was make sure they took that pill as they went to bed each night or with breakfast each morning Safer single tablet pills have come along now now containing integrase inhibitors and those are very easy and much much less toxic pills to take And I think we're really finally at the point in time That easy one pill a day combinations are here. Maggie says these treatments when used correctly and effectively also act as a form of prevention. When it comes to transmitting? HIV through sex treating HIV itself and getting that viral load down to undetectable undetectable prevents many many infections because even if patients sleeps with someone else so someone who has HIV if thyroid medication and they have unprotected sex. They are extremely unlikely to spread it to someone else If they are on medication so that's one. The type of prevention another form of prevention came in twenty twelve a strategy called pre exposure prophylaxis or prep in this case a daily pill. That's taken by people who don't have HIV and it prevents them from getting HIV from somebody else but when it comes to the latest treatments despite the real progress that's been made the issue of access is to these life. Changing medications is also very real. What what still needs to be done so that everybody that needs them has them well? The drugs need to be affordable because there have been states where the drugs have been waiting listed We have AIDS drug assistance programs and all of our states but they are federal dollars that have to be batch by state dollars and not every state matches them and Pennsylvania gene you were. I practice were very fortunate because we have a very very good extremely good program but there are many southern states where that's not the case And that has has been a problem for a while according to the US Department of Health and Human Services in twenty eighteen only sixty two percent of the worldwide HIV positive population were accessing assessing antiretroviral. Therapy and in some countries progress towards preventing new infections and increasing access to treatment is actually slowing down or getting worse but for those who do have access to care. The progress is undeniable. You know now that people that do have access to these like good. HIV drugs are living longer and healthier lives. Has that kind of shifted your role as a healthcare provider I in types of patients that you're seeing now The big pushes rushes looking at getting your patient into old age and Many of my patients I think our oldest patient currently is eighty seven But the average change our patients now is over fifty So we're looking at caring for later middle aged and geriatric population And that is much of what my care is pre you know in today's world So I admit early in that epidemic. I why it never thought I would be reading geriatric articles but that is much of what. HIV CARE is now a big. Thanks to both Maggie and and stash for talking with us. Today's episode was produced by Brett Hansen in edited by B at Les. I'm Anne Safai. Thanks for listening.

HIV Dr Maggie Hoffman access US Department of Health and Hu AIDS cancer Terry nausea Temple North Philadelphia Brett Hansen Anne Safai Pennsylvania
Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

Sounds of Science

09:46 min | 1 year ago

Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

"Why is the FDA's rigorous testing so necessary. Well I I think you're aware that a lot of drugs fail From safety concerns we all know about getting sleepy with antihistamines. Or you know that's the actual aside side effect that comes from the action of the drug on the brain. That's at the senior centers that we would like to counteract allergy. So that's what we call pharmacologic based aced toxicity. It's an effect actually on the target. But it's in a way that we don't want it to act GOTCHA. So as we're working on very new drugs we often don't understand like where there's receptors are in God or the brain or the immune system. There's a lot of things we don't understand about the basic mechanisms of action of disease and there's lot of things that we don't understand sometimes about where the receptors are in the buddy. I mean it seems great. Yeah but that's why. I'm kind of glad if my original training and classic Comic Anthology Because you have to ask questions okay. where else is the receptor? Who else could hit end so? FDA trained to think about those nightmare scenarios of what it could do that. You don't want it to do right and ask those hard questions to make sure that we have the checks and balances right a lot of the early drugs That were used in AIDS. Patients Cause Peripheral neuropathy and that wasn't shown very well in the animal models models but it caused intense pain in the patients at the same doses that was needed for the virus. It wasn't until later that we got the protease inhibitors that really counteracted the road. And that's the basis of the lifesaving therapies that we have today I was really fortunate to be. FDA during that time when the protease inhibitor came through so switching gears a little bit what is personalized medicine. When it comes to patients like for example adjacent armstead and meal Amac? I understand that Jaycee is a twenty five year old with Lou GEHRIG's disease while meal is a young girl with batons disease who have both recently benefited from personalized medicine. He I think we have come to the place in drug development where we understand a lot more about genetics of disease so so yes switching away from viruses and into genetic Madison we have a lot of inborn errors when we learned that there is an inborn Gene that was missing in a patient has always been there born like that and as soon as we can diagnose them and with that replacement gene product or the enzyme of interest interest. We can save their lives so. LS has also been learned to be a whole series of different mutations responsible for LS Um and so you have to look at those different subsets according to their genetic diagnosis. But we also know that Batten's disease is a specific mutation and there's also something like fourteen different forms of Batten's disease that are mutations in same pathway that result in the same type of phenotype of neurological article degeneration some earlier some younger and some an older kids or adults in the case of Mula. She has two mutations that are different on both of the wheels that caused the dysfunction of a particular protein. Batten's disease six seven and there's only a handful or double handful of kids worldwide. They're known to have that particular subtitled batons and Jaycees case she has a very aggressive form of al it lasts called F s mutation and it has a particularly bad course people with F.. US typically sadly succumbed LS typically approximately a year. Because it's so aggressive. It's very hard to intervene soon enough. And there has never been a medication that could actually address the fundamental gene problems in these two cases so we need to design whole new the truck when we find the particular mutation and it turns out depending on the molecular biology and that control mechanisms around them. A tation some all of them are amenable to go nuclear type therapy and both of these girls have been their particular. Genetics have been amenable to A strategy she of using nuclear tight enter equally sadly we did not know that. JC had this particularly bad ale ass us until she was twenty five. Her family had lost her twin sister at the age of seventeen and Alex add add. Actually he contracted the symptoms of L. S. at age eleven so the two girls were identical. They had the same mutation but one got symptoms at eleven on the other at twenty five. JC I guess Through some grace right. Her symptoms arose during time in which a drug was already available in unaccompanied show that happened to be appropriate for her. So I understand and that in this case she got lucky. Well in a way because the drug already existed otherwise we couldn't have intervened quickly enough. Yeah it was an act of considerable effort on the part of the patient advocacy group project. LS The head of Columbia University's LS LS center. Dr Neil Snider in the company who originated the drug and all of us that were helping around the sides trying to support like an exoskeleton including Charles forever and I was helping with the regulatory strategy and also trying to make sure that the drug that was chosen was actually appropriate to the most expedient animal model so as a result of that we were able to put together a very lean and mean I N D for JC and get her approved through the FDA. I have to say. FDA was understandably cautious but when they heard her situation detail and how she'd lost her twin sister the understood of course about a few and they made a lot of exceptions to the usual toxicology regulations. Well I know that she had been she and her family. They had been advocating pretty publicly for a while up until it was approved. I if I'd been in her mom shoes I would have done the same thing called. She lower local congressman. The Stephen King and there was actually quite a response. In Congress. There is a bill that was put forward to ask. FDA to move expediently for JC. I don't know that that had specific impact but just to say that they got some considerable public discussion. And how Camilla's case different in her case Tim you At Boston Children's Hospital recognized that her condition was suitable for an exon skipping being drug very similar to Isis Been Raza and he was able to use a similar backbone and design a drug from scratch within several months it was quite remarkable global. We've done the testing for it and then we've Were able to get started with just a acute data and then I designed a type of a program in which we would update the FDA very regularly on the progress of the toxicology studies so that we could extend her dosing and again. FDA's group group that does an enzyme replacement was wonderful. In working with us to customize that I approach how do you envision cases like these being handled in the future after all not everyone. Everyone has a congressman. That's willing to go to bat for them. Like Jaycee did not. Everybody should take one. There's definitely a sea-change coming is really exciting. And it goes back to the changes brought about by the AIDS patients who identified that they were an extreme unmet medical. Need we see the finalization of the L. S. guidance. We see a lot of guidances have come out on rare disease from the agency in the past twenty four months. And I'm very excited about this because we're really getting to the place where we custom tailor the amount of upfront non clinical research. That has to proceed to human trials customize. That the patient's situation well do you think that each was going to require its own uniquely designed non clinical research at will or will there kind of. Okay you're not gonna be able to have like a standard version that works for most Aso's typically called platform toxicology in kind of a dream. Right now when you look across all a good nuclear tides you find out remember. I mentioned early in this talk about the pharmacologically driven toxicity. Let's say there's another place in the genome that has has a similar sequence. We end up having the drug acting by its intended action bit at the wrong place which is an off what we call an on target but unwanted toxicity existed that could arise by modulating genome which is a little scary right to put something into the spine or once. You invoke gene therapy. What's done is done so you need to have really careful toxicology evaluations that look at the animal as if it were a miniature clinical trial? And you know you're basically siklie handling the animals has patients and so we get as much information as we can vary from each particular experiment and try to make sure that Ed's translation Lee accurate for predicting patient risk. We need the parents to know that right. If if you were me. Resigning are up to our child. An an in-and-out shoes

FDA Congressman Jaycee Batten Protease Inhibitor Ls Ls Center Peripheral Neuropathy Lou Gehrig Dr Neil Snider Aids Alex L. S. Stephen King Congress ASO Camilla ED
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"So when I started working on multiple myeloma, we had only this traditional chemotherapy in two thousand and three the first in class drug was approved which is a protease inhibitor and protease inhibitor is just thinking about it like a, you know, you have a garbage disposal, and you just clogging then you just accumulation of toxic stuff, and you know. The cells start dying. So that's how it works. And these are amazing. I mean, these drugs have changed the course of the disease now there are three drugs in that class available and in two thousand six we got a class of drugs approved called the immunomodulators drugs. So and the first in class was the drug thalidomide drug that cause a birth defect. When it was used in the fifties for motion sickness and nauseous associated with pregnancy and this drug we didn't understand how it works for a long time. But so and that but the problem was using thalidomide for a long time it can cause nerve damage. Okay. So the company that makes drug start developing next generation of that drugs that caused less neuropathy. We actually have to drugs in that class now. So we have three immunomodulating drugs three inhibitor. And then more recently the FDA approved drugs. We call him monoclonal antibody. So these are drugs that recognize the surface of myeloma cells, and sort of, you know, help eradicate these myeloma Celso protein that bind to the myeloma and bring immune cells to try to radically them Saturday decide which of those to us. Well, that's a great things. That's why we do clinical trial and in clinical trials, we find the best combination. So first of all we now know that one drug is not enough you have to use a cocktail of drugs. And so we just you know, the good things for patient today is that you have different cocktails so based on their medical condition, you can find the right combination therapy. So when you say their condition, what specific example, if somebody has significant nerve damage, you went to avoid drugs that cause further nerve damage if somebody have advanced kidney failure you and avoid the drugs that can be too toxic. If you have kidney failure. So that's a good news for the patient is that we can tailor. The therapy to were there conditions, and they're actually desire. I mean, some people would like only oral regimen. They don't wanna go to envision the can really go twice, you know, week to the clinic to get chemotherapy, we have oral regimens for them. So when you say they're cocktails a multiple drugs in a class or you're picking drugs from each different class. Exactly we pick drugs from different class. So basically what we do is synergy was at overlapping. Toxicity. Okay. And so what does the usual course, you have your dream Indra maintenance how to most patients too. So most people as I told you, you know, they really do. Well, they stay in remission for a long time. You know, now the average, you know, time in remission, maybe five to seven years, but unfortunately, we have these about twenty percent of patients who relapse was in the first two years, we call these are high risk risk of what risk of shorter remission shorter survival. That's where really a lot of research going on to try to improve the. Outcome of these patients. Do treat them again. Yes. Which read them again, we tried to find novel combinations. We tried to find clinical trials for these patients. We trying to employ some newer strategy. For example, one of the nearest strategy will be what we call Carty cells, which is basically taking the patient own immune cells expand them, genetically modify them to make sure that they can recognize myeloma and kill it. So we put to Sheen's one to recognize my Loma and one killer jeans. So that's why we call it kind Merrick receptor Antillean T-cells Carty cells. So these cells are I mean, these kind of therapy is now used and clinical trial in relapsed patients, but we may be able now to use it in a clinical trials for the higher spacious affront before they get to you know, relapse and have a horrible disease that how to control how hard is it to do that. So first of all you have to collect the patient and. T cells lymphocytes that become the killer cells. So basically, it's like we collect the stem cells. We do a free says we take the blood out separate the white cells from the rest of the blood..

multiple myeloma protease inhibitor thalidomide FDA Carty Sheen twenty percent seven years two years
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"You have a lot of energy do probably thick so number a lot of coffee number six is boiled potatoes. Now, white boiled potatoes are one of the foods with the highest society index as a result of the protein in potatoes known as protease inhibitor to if you want to lose weight, cool, the potatoes down before boiling them and that boosts the starch content, which is a substance similar to fiber. And that all helps us lose weight. Well, if you're just joining us, I'm Judy Brooke, and I'm ROY walk and heart. You're listening to healing quest. And we're counting down the top ten foods that are guaranteed to accelerate your weight loss. So far, we've talked about coconut oil apple cider vinegar, hot peppers, coffee, and boiled potatoes. Well, number. Five is green tea, and as we learned earlier in the show. Green tea is an extremely healthy drink. It contains not only caffeine, but several other bioactive substances that really help us with the fat burning one antioxidant in green tea liberates fatty acids from ourselves. Studies have shown that green tea extract can increase fat burning by up to seventeen percent. And it's especially good at helping trim the accumulated fat in our belly area. Never four on the top ten list are nuts now, they're high in healthy fats protein, and we've talked about that on the show and fiber, but low in carbs, so they are extremely helpful for weight loss. They provide a feeling of society and boost metabolism. Studies have shown that people who consume nuts have less body fat and trials indicate that nuts. Help cod. Significant reductions in waist size as a happy theme for us. Yes. It is number three hundred list, our whole eggs there among the healthiest and most nutritious foods on earth. Eggs for breakfast Heff fantastic effects on weight loss. One study found that eating eggs instead of Pagel's for breakfast made people feel fuller and resulted in them consuming fewer calories for the next thirty six hours and one other interesting note aides or found to lead to sixty five percent greater weight loss than bagels, even though both meals have the same number calories in number two on our weight loss list is protein from wild caught fish and grass fed meat. That sounds familiar. We talk about that. A lot protein is the king of nutrients, and when it comes to weight loss, and fish and grass fed meats are two of the best sources a diet rich in protein might boost metabolism by up to a hundred calories daily and one study even suggests that this goes as high as two hundred sixty calories daily and a high protein diet will definitely reduce the cravings and desire for late night snacking, which is something. I think that gets a lot of us in trouble, and it will prevent weight gain during a maintenance phase..

protease inhibitor Judy Brooke Pagel caffeine Heff two hundred sixty calories sixty five percent seventeen percent hundred calories thirty six hours
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Now, white boiled potatoes are one of the foods with the highest society index as a result of the protein in potatoes known as protease inhibitor to you want to lose weight, cool, the potatoes down before boiling them and that boosts the starch content, which is a substance similar to fiber. And that all helps us lose weight. Well, if you're just joining us, I'm Judy Brooke. I'm ROY walk in heart. You're listening to healing quest. And we're counting down the top ten foods that are guaranteed to accelerate your weight loss. So far, we've talked about coconut oil apple cider vinegar, hot peppers, coffee, and boiled potatoes. Well, number five is green tea, and as we learned earlier in the show. Green tea is an extremely healthy drink. It contains not only caffeine, but several other bioactive substances that really help us with the fat-burning one antioxidant in green tea liberates fatty acids from ourselves. Studies have shown that green tea ex. Attract can increase fat burning by up to seventeen percent. And it's especially good at helping trim the accumulated fat in our belly area. Never four on the top. Ten list are nuts now, they're high in healthy fats protein, and we've talked about that Alana show and fiber, but low in carbs, so they are extremely helpful for weight loss. They provide a feeling of society and boost metabolism. Studies have shown that people who consume nuts have less body fat and trials indicate that nuts. Help cod. Significant reductions in waist size as a happy theme for us. Yes. It is number three on our list. Our whole eggs there among the healthiest and most nutritious foods on earth eggs for breakfast Heff fantastic effects on weight loss. One study found that eating eggs instead of Pagel's for breakfast made people feel fuller and resulted in them consuming fewer calories for the next thirty six hours. And one other interesting note eggs are found to lead to sixty five percent greater. Weight loss than bagels, even though both meals have the same number of calories in number two on our weight loss list is protein from wild caught fish and grass fed meat. That sounds familiar. We talk about that. A lot protein is the king of nutrients, and when it comes to weight loss, and fish and grass fed meats are two of the best sources a diet rich in protein might boost metabolism by up to one hundred calories daily and one study even suggests that this goes as high as two hundred sixty calories daily and a high protein diet will definitely reduce the cravings and desire for late night snacking, which is something I think that gets a lot of us in trouble, and it will prevent weight gain during a maintenance days so make sure you consume enough protein while you're taking the pounds off. And finally number one on the fat burning list is water consuming. Seventeen ounces of water can boost your metabolism by thirty percent for up to an hour and a half. And our weight loss grew say it's best to drink cold water as the body. Burns energy calories in order to heat the water to body temperature. Also, they recommend drinking water before meals..

protease inhibitor Judy Brooke Alana Pagel caffeine Heff two hundred sixty calories one hundred calories sixty five percent seventeen percent Seventeen ounces thirty six hours thirty percent
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I figured I'd got got all those books on amazed. They were all available. They came back to the I got all these like started getting notices in my mailbox these like fluorescent colors. I got a call from the library of this is a crazy thing. And I brought all the books back, and it was like a a multi hundred dollar fine. All my God. Having had the books for two days or three days at this point. And these rare books are just books. So it was like, you know, something didn't have a lot of copying or something. But I had screwed the entire class. And I had humiliated I self and I hit incurred hundreds of dollars in fines. No ideal any of this worked, and I'm glad that I didn't go in and say like clearly, I'm going to be an Asian language. I'm glad that I was stupid enough a flunked out of and fail. That was humiliated by a lot of initial things settled things that I wanted to do that was more suited for and then ended up that finding my major that way it ended up sort of working out. So you leave college of two three or you graduate and and moved to the bay area. I moved to San Francisco, and you were Stanford. Yes. Not that far up. Right. And I was a little bit connected to the aids activist movement in San Francisco from being in a commutable distance, and how long between then and going to Oxford and moved to San Francisco must've been in nineteen ninety three I've moved to Oxford in nineteen ninety five ninety six I think so couple years and were you primarily doing him? I worked for Espresso Bongo. I prefer to I prefer to actually be what I think it might be. Actually, I miss forgive me. I mispronounced it was X-press. Oh bongo. Well, yeah. Because it was fast. Also junk alley it was actually a coffee place that was oriented toward west coast financial markets people in the markets open at nine AM, east coast open at six AM on the west coast. And so we opened at five so I'd have to be there for thirty. Who was my first job Stanford. That was awesome. Did it have a I'm sorry does do you have to wear any jungle themed, no safari house or anything, and okay was kinda Polynesian which too much says like kinda Tiki grass Gertie solid culturally appropriation based coffee strategy, cultural miserable. It was a confused thing. I worked there, and then I was I was in act up. And then eventually I got a job at a place called the aids legal referral panel. Which was which was a useful place. It was basically people who are HIV positive who needed legal help of any kind particularly people would need help with wills and power of attorney and that kind of stuff, and they could come to our p and get either directly will services from the staff attorneys, their they'd if they had more complicated thing. There was a poll panel of returnees who do that work for free. And I worked on the in the policy they had one policy. Shop one person who worked there who worked on basically laws that needed to be changed in. Nations that needed to be changed silicate this kind of stuff for people living and dying with aids. And I worked I was I was the secondary person in that shop that was really useful for me being street activist in all my personal time. And then have my work time the kind of lobbyist in a way. I mean, we were trying to get relations changed in definitely for a nonprofit causing with an activist mindset. But also in a crisis mindset, a lot of the people who worked there were themselves HIV positive. This is before protease inhibitors all the people who are working with everyday. Everybody was not just HIV positive a lot of people really in extremis. And so from that environment going to the state capital and talking about stuff that needs to be changed..

San Francisco HIV Oxford Stanford attorney hundred dollar three days two days
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Advice from Mom

Advice from Mom

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Advice from Mom

"Oh, yeah. No. I am wearing though I couldn't I couldn't feel that. I had to check. Same thing will happen with your members. If you run through it again deliberately on purpose again, and again, your brain will get bored and the memory will lose its power. So those are two really different ways to commit these cringe attacks, quite honestly, I think the best thing to do is just to to feel how it connects you to the rest of humor. Hannity. It's so validating and. Soothing to realize that pretty much everybody goes through this. It's not just you and this notion anxious in Arbor of having these embarrassing memories. Or like things that you did that was sort of awkward flashback to is also something that happens to folks with social anxiety. And so I have a history of social anxiety myself and after several decades and a PHD clinical psychology. I've really gotten to the point where it's under control. It doesn't own me anymore. But I always say I I do still have my moments and just yesterday. This thing happened where I was having lunch with some colleagues, and we were in this restaurant and the music was loud. And so it was it was hard to hear the conversation at points. And at one point my colleague referenced the. V crisis. And he was talking about it from the in the time point of the late eighties early nineties before protease inhibitors came out when when HOV was still really a death sentence. And I I didn't really catch what he was in kind of smiled and nodded. And and my reaction I realized in the in the in retrospect was would be appropriate. If he was talking about something pleasant. But I, but after the fact I realized oh, wait that was that was not I didn't match his tone or his what what the the gravity of of the matter. And he let the subject drop which made me wonder if if he wanted to say more, but but didn't because I was smiling not in anyway. And so for the rest of the day that memory kind of popped in my head from time to time. And I was like, oh, I should have. I missed what he was saying I should have reacted differently. And that's that is post event processing I was equally. I was relieved actually to to be able to put a name on. It was like, oh there's had again. So knowing that it wasn't just me like, this is a thing like capital teeth thing. So I wonder said anxious in in Arbor, you mention your kind of history of Zion easy as well. This might be similar of familiar phenomenon for you. And there I would say, and this is what I tried to do for myself was to try to challenge the perfectionism in. Hey. Behrendt in beating yourself up that way. So for me, I had to ask myself is it is it? Okay. That give the music was loud. Like that you misheard him or you didn't you didn't catch everything he said like does does is that so horrible. Do really have to beat yourself up for missing this comment or reacting not perfectly appropriately. In the answer. Was no I don't have to. It's not gonna help anything to beat myself up this way, or to criticize myself harshly that I can we can we can all move on. And I know that our relationship is strong enough that it can absorb some of the foibles and missteps that just happened in human communication, and that this is this is okay. It's just it's part of having a relationship with another human being it's just part of being human. Don't you have a book about all this? I do imagine that. So so. By book. Yes is about social anxiety. And so there we talk about I talk a lot more about post processing. So the the the low light real after a social interaction. But also we talk about the Tipperary anxiety before social interactions. Like, why this happened where it comes from and lots and lots and lots of things you can do to to try to to quiet that anxiety and quiet that inner critic, and so it makes sense that the book is called how to be yourself, quiet. Your inner critic and rise above social anxiety. Dr Ellen is the way I think of her was so right when she talked about a process we call exposure therapy. It's kind of upsetting to think about and people have to gear up their courage to do it..

Arbor Dr Ellen Hannity
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And so when you die all collect the entire hundred thousand the catch, of course, is the you're waiting around for me to die. Yes. Is there? I mean life insurance is regulated industry. Right. Is there? Anything that regulates? These vital settlements not really kind of one of the more gruesome parts of the industry is that especially during the aids epidemic. This was not something that was regulated. I mean, some of the brokers who were buying viatical settlements. I'm sure had you know, best interest in mind for these people. But there were a certain amount of pariahs them, right? Because in theory. It's it's a quick buck. Right. I mean, the life expectancy of these men who had aids in the eighties and nineties was not not long. No, it wasn't until medicine got involved. Yes. In nineteen five a class of drugs called protease inhibitors came to market protease inhibitors dramatically expanded the life expectancy for people living with HIV nowadays the life expectancy for an HIV positive person is just a couple of years short of an HIV negative counterpart and basically the entire industry around viatical settlements collapsed. Wow. And so they with these men now living some of them from those days or many of them are still alive. Yes. And the policies are being paid by. There isn't really a way to find out who owns your life insurance policy. Once you sell it. And so the men that I talked to who've I advocated their policies in the nineties. They don't really know who owns their policies today, which must somehow be terrifying. In in some weird way. I don't think it's constantly on their mind. But I think it's something that they definitely do think about from time to time one of the people that I interviewed the guy named Sean Strube, and he is the mayor of his town in Pennsylvania. So he is somewhat of a public figure with with some weird kind of price on his head with somebody waiting for him to die. If they've been paying the policy premiums all these years. What did these men do with the money? They got answer to that is varied hospital bills were exorbitant for people living with aids and the only available medication for a long time was a drug called AZT cost ten thousand dollars a year. It was the most. Expensive pharmaceutical ever brought to market but to them that I spoke with actually started their own businesses. One Sean Strube started a magazine called paws, which is still around today. The magazine designed for people living with HIV one of the other guys that I talked to you Henry Scott started his own media company, and is based in Los Angeles. It's interesting. It's it's a story. That's a legacy of what feels like another time. If that makes sense. Yes. But with ramifications that are playing out today. What's your sense of? Regrets that the folks you talk to have about maybe selling those policies or do they need the money in the moment? And that's what they did. Neither of them that I spoke with had any regrets about this. They both said it was the best financial decisions. They've ever made in that moment. And to this day. My sense is that yes, they were able to access large amounts of cash they would've never otherwise been able to realize thanks a lot. Thank you for having me..

Sean Strube HIV Los Angeles Henry Scott Pennsylvania ten thousand dollars
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yes. Is there? I mean life insurance is regulated industry. Right. Is there anything that regulates these settlements not really kind of one of the more gruesome parts of the industry is that especially during the aids epidemic. This was not something that was regulated. I mean, some of the brokers who were buying viatical settlements. I'm sure had the best interest in mind for these people. But there were a certain amount of pariahs them because in theory, it's it's a quick buck. Right. I mean, the the life expectancy of these men who had aids in the eighties and nineties was not not long. No, it wasn't until medicine got involved. Yes. In one thousand nine hundred five a class of drugs called protease inhibitors came to market protease inhibitors dramatically expanded the life expectancy for people living with HIV nowadays the life expectancy for an HIV positive person is just a couple of years short of an HIV negative counterpart and basically the entire industry around viatical settlements collapsed. Wow. And so they with these men now living some of them from those days or many of them are still alive. Yes. And the policies are being paid by. There isn't really a way to find out who owns your life insurance policy. Once you sell it. And so the men that I talked to who advocated their policies in the nineties. They don't really know who owns their policies today, which must somehow be terrifying. In in some weird way. I don't think it's constantly on their mind. But I think it's something that they definitely do think about from time to time one of the people that I interviewed the guy named Shawn Strube, and he is the mayor of his town in Pennsylvania. So he is somewhat of a public figure with with some weird kind of price on his with somebody waiting for him to die. If they've been paying the policy premiums all these years. What did these men do with the money? They got the answer to that is varied hospital bills were exorbitant for people living with aids and the only available medication for a long time was a drug called AZT cost ten thousand dollars a year. It was the mess. Expensive pharmaceutical ever brought to market, but to the men that I spoke with actually started their own businesses. One Sean Strube started a magazine called paws, which is still around today. It's a magazine designed for people living with HIV one of the other guys that I talked to Henry Scott started his own media company. That's based in Los Angeles. It's interesting. It's it's a story. That's a legacy of what feels like another time. If that makes sense. Yes. You know, but with ramifications that are playing out today. What's your sense of? Regrets that the folks you talk to have about maybe selling those policies or do they need the money in the moment? And that's what they did. Neither of them that I spoke with had any regrets about this. They both said it was the best financial decisions they've ever made. In that moment and to this day. My sense is that yes, you know, they were able to access large amounts of cash they would've never otherwise been able to realize. Thank you for having me..

Shawn Strube HIV Sean Strube Los Angeles Henry Scott Pennsylvania ten thousand dollars
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"So I knew all about him from from the gals, but I didn't really know him. I didn't know how wonderful he was. And now he's producing on Broadway. Did you see boys in the band? I haven't yet, but I actually know that he lives for theater. He's completely. I mean, wait till you see this. Action. I mean, I remember the original action. This is stunning. You walk into the booth theatre that's the old theater dozen cities theater and it's right. I mean, the set, I mean every God, Matt Bomer ANZAC window in Andrew Reynolds and the whole the whole company. I mean, they're just they're sport Inari. It's really is hope you'll get definitely will topless. It's closing soon too. I think I gotta get on that. Yeah, but I know that you and Ryan it makes sense that you have so much in common there and have you seen pose? Oh my God got. It's really, it's. It's extrordinary. I mean, they're talking about vogue ING and the balls, and I remember all of that from the early days of as in the houses and the and it's all these news burning, which I think inspired. I mean that and Stephen kennels isn't, and some of our writers from Our Lady j who is on. Is on the show now, but I mean, this kind of awareness of things that are again, it goes back to the thing we said in the beginning, how will you be? What will you do that will change the culture, the conversation, you know, we on transparent, took it to this place, and now this will take to this place and then there will be others that will come along that will and if we're not leaving a powerful legacy for those who come behind us, if we are not setting an example, we'll go around the same bend that we've always gone around and nothing will change, and the culture will stay the same. But we have an opportunity now in all of the worlds of our artistry on this was the thing with driver Sachi it's not, you know, there might be an assumption that what is the greater significance of a story about senseless murder of. One person which in fact, it's people. Many did not realize I forgotten that it wasn't just the one person and it wasn't propelled by something vapid in the sense. Obviously it was senseless, but it was driven by something that I will leave it to you to describe because I know something that you had to think about when preparing to play those. You see, what is it mean to be number one, a young person who is so clearly on the edge in so many ways. Knowing that they're gay and not having a culture that they can walk into where they will be met with open arms and feel safe. Those things the level of homophobia that was still going on and is still going to this these rats right Miami. That's right. And so you're dealing with a culture and a world that is still dealing with the aids crisis in a major way. Even though the protease inhibitors have come into ninety five, you're still dealing with people and their disdain for people in the gay community and the culture and rookie on her couple of weeks ago, he was saying that rigging. Myrna should say, I'm not about a first name basis, but that he who has come out as gay years ago, said that the internalized homophobia that even he felt is exactly what if if on addressed in the wrong mind can explode in the. Way that with Kuhnen. That's exactly right. And I think and I won't speak for Ryan, but I suspect that it was that part of this story. That was what was so important to him in doing it. It's not about looking at some salacious killer. It's not. That's not what this is about. And I think the brilliance of Tom rob Smith, looking at it backwards going backwards from the.

Ryan Matt Bomer Tom rob Smith Stephen kennels Sachi Myrna murder Andrew Reynolds Miami Kuhnen
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Sort of figuring out who i am and figuring out like i said this sort of i wasn't broken which is what i thought but also recognizing that this meant that i was a person who was part of a community that i knew about but did not yet no anyone in and had never really considered it's not something you consider joining you just realize that you wrote in that community and so it was a simultaneous personal and political thing realizing well you know i think this is who i am and i think this means that this is my gay community is my community and that was a community that was in the wars at that point of fighting for its existence and so that became a that became a focus for me and our channel for me in terms of learning who i was and you saw on that issue before you as a high school student started as i was coming out around coming out to myself ignorant who i was when i was about sixteen i started working on issues and that is you defined a lot of what you did as an academic more than a decade yeah it was really my i did aids in prison issue and so on you went and you wrote legislation and you champion legislation talk about that so when i first started on aids issues again it was one thousand high school and i started working at a hospice for people who are who were dying with with aids and that was in oakland california and then i ended up getting involved sort of an aids education first and then ultimately with activist groups like like act up and i found my i it's not an act up as i'm glad that there's renewed cultural interest in sort of the history of act up and act up is still around and still doing good work but having being a young person in that in that activist environment sort of before nineteen ninetysix which was the the advent of protease inhibitors which really started to change things in terms of treatment in life expectancy and stuff you sort of had to make decisions about what kind of activists worke we're going to do and i.

oakland california
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Oh my god and then obviously occupants my friends here seem to be like prostitutes you're very then yeah so you knew from a young age yeah i mean there were lots of problematic things about my childhood being gay was one of the really positive but i always need be right with they always knew they'd be when did you come out when i came out to them we're trying to do was loudly have sex with boys in the house and the hype that movement i was gonna by them but he he was living in another country but in the hype that they would sort of figure it out that were like oh on peter they would see like boy be like yeah main thing i think taken from being gay is an incredible sense of optimism because we've lived to see the most incredible transformation i'm showing the other day i showed one of my nephews some of the headline he's seventeen now i showed him some of the headlines that were the front page of the sun when we were his age and he literally couldn't believe it was two people bring the police now if the craziest you kip counselor said those things on twitter they would have to stand down right and so i think there's this tell the story in las connections about my friend andrew who in nineteen thousand four hundred was diagnosed as hiv positive he was a leading journalist in the us participant he was living in the us by them and his first thought was i deserve this raise this very hundred culture catholic family and then he left his job and people were just dying all around in this is before protease inhibitors and everything in the participators and he went to province town which is this lovely town at the typical card way he had a house and he basically went to die and he thought could last thing i'm gonna do before i die isn't going to write a book about crazy idea so i didn't know what it ever written a book about he wrote the first book proposing gay marriage i was good but actually normal it's great book and we came out and people savaged him right wing savage tim saying he was not left wing savage the lesbian avengers study should be killed same's like a sell out he was wanting to turn gay people attention.

peter hiv us andrew
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So i think it's there's been a fundamental shift in how things are treated and i think especially amongst younger people how hiv aids is is viewed but i i wanna i wanna talk to you about about your experience it seems that since the discovery of hiv the disease is definitely been stigmatized can you describe what life was like for you during the aids epidemic of the nineteen eighty s well the question of stigmatization what's there from the very beginning and i think i wrote this book as a way of exploring the dominant narratives of hiv aids which as you pointed out shifted in nineteen ninetysix during the advent of protease inhibitors of medications that greatly increased life expectancy for people living with hiv hey it's a new change the landscape completely but i i'm fearful that if the narrative is constructed entirely around the pharmaceutical interventions that that changed the world we're overlooking the fact of life for the thirty six million people last time i counted still living with hiv aids in the world which has to which pharmaceutical interventions have no power to help in other words steak will racism mass incarceration aids in prison criminalization women and aids those are things that were there from nineteen eightyone but the story tap the dominant narrative is more the storytelling of aids than it is the.

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"And infection what they do is shift the balance of your immune system in your favour so a bacterial infection you are fighting it but you're losing an antibiotic helps you win if this drug that the japanese have works it might be because in an acute infection you need to tip the balance in your favour so in mice it might be a oneday treatment in humans it's probably a two to three day treatment just because it depends on where and your cycle of the flu you are but if you can walk away from the flu and start winning that's better than losing so i'm sure that such drugs can work i don't think that's a clinical trial result so much as a mouse trousers pay they referencing abidli just for reference folks the company in japan is s h i o n o gee i should nogi i'm probably asked you know you work looking at them because they also have a new antibiotic actually we're not gonna pick him for any of our newsletters but i literally have is you know you headline on one of the screens on my computer right now the interesting and it was a key human clinical trial took a medium time 24 hours for snow gives experimental compound to kill the fluid american and japanese patients during late stage trial sweet so it's a it's some kind of an anti replication a small molecule that uh that doesn't allow cells that except for beer a protease inhibitor basically yeah okay uh the the the next uh uh poll from the headlines question i've got for you but see um it's it's a were shifting gears and getting away from medicine uh but we're i wanna talk about invidia and automation and cars and i i you know this is such a enormous breakthrough it would really change so much about the how we think about commerce and transportation i mean i can imagine if there's fully automated vehicles you probably would never ever go to a store again you adjust summon the macy's van to your house and pick out whatever clothing articles that you need and walk out and they'd have rfid tags and they'd no you took on men than they know with a need a restock the vehicle or whatever i'm you can imagine various.

flu japan protease inhibitor three day 24 hours oneday
"protease inhibitor" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"protease inhibitor" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"We more than attended trump's inauguration by the way is like seven people there so oh so probably it could be as many as three times more omega3 unattended trump's inauguration throughout the late eighty's and early ninety's act up chapters started in cities across the us and continued to educate demonstrate and advocate meanwhile the number of people with aids around the world was steeply climbing by 1991 it was at an estimated ten million ten million ten million people with aids notches with hiv um while an estimated one hundred thousand people in the u s had died from aids since the start of the epidemic 1991 eleven years oh my god it is during these years that we see the highest death tolls in the us yeah with fifteen thousand twenty thousand twenty five thousand dead each year in the early nineties yeah i saw some numbers estimated even higher than that like in the 30's and forty thousand 30s and 40s were around ninety four ninety five ninety six asked he's new experimental antivirals came onto the scene sometimes cooked up at home sometimes brought into the country buyers clubs are all over providing people with experimental drugs which if they didn't offer a cure may be offered hope real measurable qualified hope didn't come until 1995 the year the first protease inhibitors were approved people with aids who seemed to be nearing the end of their days rebounded after taking these drugs while doctors called it the lazarus effect it was very dramatic while within two years death rates in the us in in much of europe plummeted but this miracle cure would come too late for so so many people for over three hundred thousand dead in the u s for them.

trump us aids europe 1991 eleven years two years