35 Burst results for "Prostate Cancer"

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:23 min | Last month

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Which is not readily examined by a examined the rectum which is a can only feel the backside of the poster side of the prostate. There's research in that where it actually may be fear of the healthcare system and really not wanting to go to dr for fear of false information or other aspects as relates to that. But you know. I have colleagues Who who work with you know different avenues to increase awareness of prostate cancer and african american to younis. I'm so glad that you came here to talk with us today. On prostate cancer awareness month You know. I see so much about breast cancer. And there's a lot of attention brought to breast cancer appropriately so it affects a high percentage of the population. But it seems a prostate. Cancer does as well. And i don't think i hear quite as much about it. You don't i mean we. We don't have You know for whatever reason we really don't have a voice like it's being soon and breast cancer Just because men are not willing to talk about it. i think that's changed I think we've empowered men Whether it's on with research to speak up about the disease come about screening We certainly have different foundations across the country. And it's true that one in a us men. i will be diagnosed but you know it's it it cannot. It's not always an aggressive relief of disease. But still it's the second leading cause of cancer death in us men and not all can't not prostate. Cancer should be ignored and we certainly Need to try to diagnose the ones early that do need to be treated and safely survey those that don't need to be treated and that is a really active area of research of mining and many other prostate cancer experts. Well thank you for being here to educate us today. Thank you archie. Yes our pleasure thanks. Jeff kearns urologist at mayo clinic in rochester.

breast cancer prostate cancer Cancer us Jeff kearns archie mayo clinic rochester
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:01 min | Last month

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Diagnosed with advanced cases the survival rates can still be very good and we hope that even more advanced in the future allow allow us to be even a chronic disease. And try to stay on top of it and use the next therapy and don't necessarily Pull all the arrows are out and start shooting but but make sure we could do it more sequentially logically in for the better of patient. I think it's amazing when we can start talking about cancers as chronic diseases. Isn't that something. That's different than when i was a child in her. Someone was diagnosed with cancer. I frequently use that that analogy to especially among the younger man who have advanced. I said you know we may not be able to careless with one approach or two approaches but hopefully we can provide a good quality of life and try to make this a chronic disease. Jeff does mail have ongoing studies For individuals who have prostate cancer. And if so what are some of them so we do have active studies. We have studies in different types of imaging as russell cancer detection We have active studies mentioned in different types of focal therapy for prostate cancer. Where we don't necessarily treat the whole prostate just part of it you know either with some form of radiation some form of freezing of of that particular. Part even nanoparticles which are very small articles that can be injected We have a lot of active research in biomarkers and biomarkers or even m. or i could be a biomarker determine the aggressiveness of disease But you know blood tests urine tests and we certainly work with our research partners to help them. With their studies. In more advanced cases of prostate cancer and providing specimens biopsies or surgically removed prostate cancers. Help them study different approaches to to those cases again those that may be refractory or resistant to traditional promotional of great dutch kinds. Are there any healthcare disparities related to prostate cancer. That we should be aware of as Physicians at mayo or that individuals should be aware of. I think we should I think the biggest disparity is the racial disparity when it comes to caucasian versus in american men. Why that is. We don't quite know But we do know that that african american men are more likely to be diagnosed more likely to have an advance case win diagnosed and more likely to die a prosecutor almost twofold higher a white male And it may be a number of factors slowly call. Multifactorial may be related to social economic lack of access to Different healthcare even screening You know if you're an african american male. I think you should start. Screen at age of forty and most guidelines would also suggest were tailored screening four minute higher risk of cancer whether it's family history or african american descent. It could also be genetics. You know and i've been actually involved with some genetic Genomic research groups of genes. That may explain. Why are cancer may be more aggressive and african americans. It could be what i refer to his geography of the bussey cancer. Maybe they're more likely to actually have prostate cancer in a region of the prostate cancer. That historically as evaded detection like the front part of the prostate..

prostate cancer cancer chronic disease prostate cancers chronic diseases Jeff mayo bussey cancer
9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks but Better Survival Rates

Short Wave

01:45 min | Last month

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks but Better Survival Rates

"I grew up in the new york city area. And i remember this period so clearly. Many first responders spent weeks doing rescue and recovery work at ground zero site in the aftermath of september eleventh. What were they exposed to. Well you know just. After the towers collapsed the air was filled with smoke with debris basically all that had collapsed on the concrete glass pipes. I mean everything. Kind of pulverized and burning into this ash. It was laden with all kinds of heavy metals including lead and other toxins. I mean many of us. Remember that plume of smoke and debris that could be seen from space on that day and dr michael crane. Who's an environmental medicine. Expert at mount sinai told me that there has never been anything quite like it be exposure was really dramatic the dust. I mean there was all kinds of carcinogens and combustion products in fibers glass fibers in festus fibers and it was really a witch's brew and given what was in the air. There was definitely a concern early on that it might increase the risk of certain cancers and we have research about that now so how much of an increased risk of cancer is there among first responders. Well some of the most recent data suggests that the total number of cancers is only slightly elevated compared to the general population but scientists have documented like significant increases in certain cancer is a twenty five percent increase in prostate cancer. A doubling in the risk of thyroid cancer and about a forty percent increased risk and leukemia. And there are also a number of rare cancers that are linked to the

Dr Michael Crane New York City Cancer Mount Sinai Prostate Cancer Thyroid Cancer Leukemia
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

Who Cares About Men's Health?

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

"The try because we have a doctor here. Who's in a recognized authority. And he's an opinion leader. Like people look to dr toward regarding treating prostate cancers. We could play a little game yup for a game. I'm always right so this game is called. What do you know about the prostate and prostate cancer. Who questions. I'm answering Well i thought i would start okay. I'd i'd start by throwing out something i know like. For example what is the prostate. What do i know about it. It gets cancer. That's about all i know. Good start so this episode of who cares about men's health is one of our men's health essentials episodes and we're talking about prostate cancer and this is an important episode because as a man. If you understand this condition it can help. You have an informed conversation with an expert if you do need to to task or not what it means. If a test comes back positive what choices you might have if it does come back positive and it can really impact your lifestyle so with me as as always co host. Dr troy matteson. Say troy scott and dr jonathan toward from huntsman cancer institute. Thank you for having me and i'm scott. Sing pill people ask. What do you contribute. I'm here to ask the dumb question so our listeners don't have to. That's my job. Dr toward what is the prostate anyway. Well i mean the tongue in cheek answer is a gland. That's designed to make your life miserable as you get older. But but actually what. The prostate gland is a little gland that sits between the base of the penis inside your body and blow the bladder and the aretha actually runs through it and what its function. As it has a fertility roll it produces the fluid that A man would ejaculate and helps keep the sperm alive on the way to the partner so It's important for fertility but if you're done with that that particular aspect of your life It no longer is i. Guess a functionally necessary..

prostate cancers prostate cancer Dr troy matteson troy scott dr jonathan huntsman cancer institute cancer scott
James Michael Tyler, Gunther on 'Friends,' Reveals He Has Cancer

Mojo In The Morning

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

James Michael Tyler, Gunther on 'Friends,' Reveals He Has Cancer

"If you are a fan the actor who played gutter on a show. James michael tyler. Just announced some really sad news on the today. Show says he's battling stage four prostate cancer. Which has left his lower body completely paralyzed and he said his illnesses worsening spread to his bones at this point and that's what left him unable to attend the friends reunion. Hbo max that's why he called into the special via zoom but he said the cancer started mutating at the beginning of the pandemic and the it progressed after he missed a doctor's appointment so he is undergoing chemotherapy right now and he said my goal. This past year was to see my fifty ninth birthday. I did that on. May twenty eighth. He said my goal now is to help. Save at least one life out with this news.

James Michael Tyler Prostate Cancer HBO Cancer
'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

"Doctors reported promising results from an experimental cancer drug that delivers radiation directly to tumor cells an emerging class of medicine called radio pharmaceuticals may become a new way to treat patients with hard to reach inoperable cancers in a study involving over eight hundred men with advanced prostate cancer released by the American society of clinical oncology a tumor targeting radiation therapy from drug maker Novartis kept cancer at bay for nearly nine months compared to three months for people receiving standard treatment and survival was better to fifteen months versus eleven months the drug is administered through an IV in each dose contains trillions of engineered molecules a tractor portion of the molecule hunts down cancer cells the payload portion is the radiation experts say radio pharmaceuticals maybe the next big wave of therapeutic development I'm Jennifer king

Experimental Cancer Inoperable Cancers American Society Of Clinical O Prostate Cancer Novartis Cancer Jennifer King
Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

"Sinewy right the Tony nominated actor famous is the voice of Sebastian the crab has died really right had an acting career spanning five decades after moving to New York he made his name on Broadway replacing Ben Farina and Pippen it was an original cast member of Jesus Christ Superstar in the nineteen seventies right played the purple grape in the fruit of the loom commercials right on only a dollar he played chronic wanted on from Disney's dinosaur but was best known as Sebastian the crab in Disney's little mermaid and won a Grammy for Best Original Song in may two thousand interview Wright said he enjoyed speaking for Disney characters I'm in seventh heaven and I don't and I know it sounds like all he's just giving us the press the you know the old sound bite no really really this is what I've always wanted to do one of Wright's daughters D. Kelly wrote on Facebook my beautiful strong loving Daddy is off to his next adventure right was seventy two according to his family he died Monday in New York after a three year bout with prostate cancer I'm Jennifer king

Ben Farina Jesus Christ Superstar In The Sebastian The Crab In Disney's Pippen Sebastian Disney Tony Wright New York Grammy D. Kelly Daddy Facebook Prostate Cancer Jennifer King
Doctors Urge People To Keep Up With Their Routine Screenings

WBZ Afternoon News

01:02 min | 7 months ago

Doctors Urge People To Keep Up With Their Routine Screenings

"About the consequences of Americans putting off doctor's appointments and early detection screenings because of covert 19 WBZ is Kim Tunnicliffe tells US a Boston based nonprofit is launching a public awareness campaign urging men to start going for their prostate cancer screenings again. The prostate Health Education Network believes a crisis is looming for African American men in the U. S. President Thomas Farrington is concerned. The pandemic has cause meant to put off their early detection screenings, he says. The American Cancer Society is estimating that new prostate cancer cases will increase by 30% this year in American Man of the highest isn't afraid so there's more than 70% high for all other bands and die at a rate of more than 120% higher with they expected estimated you increases we see a major crisis, the network is teaming up with politicians. Energy and doctors to speak out about the importance of scheduling those early detection screenings. Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ

WBZ Kim Tunnicliffe Prostate Health Education Netw S. President Thomas Farrington Prostate Cancer Boston U. American Cancer Society
Why Fans and Nearly 600 Jeopardy Contestants Are Slamming Dr. Oz as Guest Host

Mark Blazor

01:24 min | 7 months ago

Why Fans and Nearly 600 Jeopardy Contestants Are Slamming Dr. Oz as Guest Host

"What? Dr Oz out as guest host on jeopardy. I guess that was quick. Last night was the first time he's hosted right last night was the very first one. Well, I guess they're protesting his gig as the guest host eyes two week run. He's supposed to do this for two week. They're accusing him of dangerous and UN researched medical claims. What has he given medical advice during jeopardy? No, you just You know, some of the things he's had on his show over the years have been more of a holistic approach instead of pure modern medicine, quote unquote. So they're saying the fact that this is a Fact based game show is a slap in the face to all involved having him hosted. I guess like you were just kind of alluding to that, you know. Some of the stuff he's done in the past might not be by the medical book. If you Will that holistic, some of that kind of thing. It sounds like you know, he does a blend. I guess he does. He doesn't blend and that's I don't think it's a bit. I don't think it's a bad thing. I really don't our own the governor Dimitri's Stanley on Friday he has done a combination of Modern scientist. Whatever you wanna call it, modern medicine for you know, with his battle with prostate cancer and some holistic stuff, and he's doing friend Fantastic right now. So what? I don't understand why people freak out about that?

Dr Oz UN Dimitri Stanley Prostate Cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 9 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

william oastler fifty percent kenneth pinta steven sixty sixty percent steve Six hundred thousand people Thirty thousand men united states Eighty percent fifty years old james buchanan johns hopkins Brady urological institute two aspects kenneth inte today forty five hundred hospitals first sight three family members
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 9 months ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

Marketplace

03:33 min | 9 months ago

UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

"China has been recent years trying to improve its global image. That effort took a hit today in London, Britain's communications regulator announced it is stripping the state run China Global Television network of its broadcast license there, MPR's Frank Langfitt explains from London. The C GT N That's it's known, opened its European production center here to great fanfare about two years ago. Today off come, the British regulator announced it was pulling the network's license. Officials said. The reason was straightforward. The people in charge of CG Tien's editorial policy are ultimately beholden to China's Communist Party in British Broadcasting law forbids political bodies from controlling license holders. Thank goodness, Finally, this license has been taken away. Peter Humphrey, performer fraud investigator in Shanghai was glad to hear the news. He filed a complaint against CGT in last year. Not over Communist Party control of the network. But over Chinese state media is airing of what Humphrey says was a forced confession. It followed his arrest in 2000 and 13 on charges of illegally acquiring the personal data of Chinese nationals. Well, of course you go way up 10 personal information by illegal means. I regret what I did and apologize to the Chinese government. Humphrey insists he never actually confessed and that the interview was doctored. He also says his captors pressured him to make a statement by withholding medical treatment for his prostate cancer, considering the kind of brutal human rights violations that CD Tien has been involved with extracting and packaging forced confessions from prisoners held under torture in China, who've never been in front of a judge. I just think that we should have no organization like that on our soil in Humphries case, Afghan found CGT And had seriously breached fairness and privacy rules. It also found the network had failed to cover the Hong Kong democracy protests with quote due impartiality CG Tien was indignant with today's ruling. It blamed quote the manipulation of far right groups and had I China forces for the off calm decision, according to a statement on way ball, China's nearest equivalent Twitter. The loss of the license undermined two key Chinese government strategy. Steve saying is director of the so as China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies. University of London. She camping has been very clear he wants the Chinese story being told well. He wants his versions off everything being spread across the world in the most positive, light possible Sititi and is one of those instruments used for this purpose. It's hang expects the Chinese government to retaliate against BBC reporters in China. Even though the BBC is editorial independent of the British government. Peter Dahlin is the director of Safeguard Defenders Human Rights Organization, which spearheaded the campaign against C G. T n Here. The U. K stands out across Europe is having a quite well developed framework for help to regulate TV for how to control this information. The stripping of the license prohibits CG Tan from broadcasting here, but dollars, says that doesn't mean the network has to leave. Still, he does think today's move could have ripple effects are other countries going to start holding them accountable as well? I say this might be the beginning of a process that city and will find very unfavorable for their type of this information for their type of broadcasting. That would mean more challenges for a Chinese government that has invested a lot in trying to change the way it's perceived. Frank Langfitt NPR NEWS

Cg Tien China Chinese Government Frank Langfitt European Production Center Peter Humphrey Communist Party Humphrey London CGT China Institute Britain Tien Shanghai Humphries Prostate Cancer Peter Dahlin School Of Oriental And African Safeguard Defenders Human Righ BBC
Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75

Environment: NPR

04:27 min | 10 months ago

Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75

"National book award winner berry lopez was famous for chronicling his travels to remote places and the landscapes he found there but his writings weren't simply account of his journeys they were reminders of how precious life on earth is an our responsibility to care for it. He died after a long battle with prostate cancer just months. After a wildfire forced him from his oregon home he was seventy five years old. Npr's dave blanchard has this remembrance berry lopez spent more than thirty years writing his last book horizon. He don't spend that much time on a project without going through periods of self doubt when i met him at his home last year he told me when he was feeling defeated by the work. He'd walk along the nearby mckenzie river. Every time i did there was a beaver. Stick in the water at my feet. And they're of course their workers. So i imagine the beaver were saying. What the hell's wrong with you. You get back in there and do your work up. In his studio he had a collection of the stakes are little tooth marks. It was a lesson for lopez. Every day i walked in that room. I saw the signs of. Don't lose in yourself. This was the world of barry. Lopez beaver could teach you the most valuable lessons. Lopez was born in new york but his father moved the family to california when he was a child. Hugh eventually settle in game. Notice for his writing about the natural world he win the nineteen eighty-six book award for nonfiction. Work arctic dreams at the time he told npr how he approached the seemingly empty arctic environment. I made myself pay attention to places where i thought nothing was going on. And then after a while the landscape materialized in a in a fuller way denied. I imagine that at first glance in lopez books. A cloudy sky contains grays of pigeon feathers of slate in pearls packs of hammerhead sharks in the galapagos. Move like swans million a city park pond composer john. Luther adams was a friend and collaborator of lopez. For nearly four decades he says lopez writing serves as a wake-up call. She surveys the beauty of the world. And at the same time the cruelty and violence that we humans inflict on the earth and on one another and he doesn't with deep compassion lopez experienced that cruelty first hand as a child. He was sexually abused by a family. Friend he i wrote about it in two thousand thirteen. He later told. Npr experience made him feel afraid and shameful around other people. The animals encountered in the california wilderness. Offered something different. They didn't say oh. We know what you went through. I felt accepted by the animal world. Lopez would spend his life writing about that world in particular the damage done to it by climate change. That hit home for lopez. This past september much of his property was burned in wildfires tore through oregon partly due to abnormally dry conditions. His wife deborah gordon says he lost decades of notes and correspondence and much of the forest around the home where lopez had lived for fifty years. He talked a lot about climate change in. And how it's so easy to think it's going to happen to other people and not to you but it happened to us. It happened to him personally. And i think that the fire was just a blow. That not just couldn't quite ever get back from when i spoke to lopez last year. He said he always sought to find. Grace in the middle of devastation is so difficult to be a human being. There are so many reasons to give up to retreat into cynicism or despair. I hate to see that. And i i want to do something that makes people feel safe and loved and capable in his last days. His family brought objects from home to him in hospice. Among the items the beaver stakes from his studio dave blanchard. Npr news

Berry Lopez Lopez Dave Blanchard Lopez Beaver NPR Mckenzie River Luther Adams Oregon Prostate Cancer California Hugh Barry Arctic Deborah Gordon New York John Grace Npr News
Longtime MD Senate President Mike Miller Resigns Seat, Citing Health

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Longtime MD Senate President Mike Miller Resigns Seat, Citing Health

"After a career in the Annapolis statehouse that spanned nearly five decades. Maryland's former Senate president, Thomas Mike Miller, has resigned. The 78 year old state senator who served 33 years, a Senate president in Annapolis, Thomas, Mike Miller, announced in the letter. He's resigning from his Senate seat effective today. Miller said He made the move with tremendous sadness, but cited his health He's been dealing with prostate cancer in recent years and said he felt he couldn't meet the demands of another legislative session. Even during heated debates. Miller, a Democrat, often had the respect of Republican lawmakers, who sometimes grudgingly would say he made sure they were heard in the legislative process. Miller's seat one that covers parts of Prince George's. Calvert and Charles counties will remain vacant until the Democratic Central Committee's in all three counties send a recommendation to Governor Larry Hogan governor then gets to make the appointment. General Assembly will convene

Thomas Mike Miller Senate Annapolis Miller Mike Miller Maryland Thomas Prostate Cancer Democratic Central Committee Prince George Calvert Governor Larry Hogan Charles General Assembly
Giuliani deemed high risk for complications from the coronavirus

First Morning News

00:55 sec | 11 months ago

Giuliani deemed high risk for complications from the coronavirus

"Giuliani Giuliani says says he's he's feeling feeling okay okay is is he he battles battles coronavirus coronavirus that that in in Washington, Washington, D. D. C C hospital they 76 year old Giuliani, currently the president's personal lawyer who's admitted to Georgetown Hospital on Sunday, Learning the president's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, has been hospitalized at Georgetown University Medical Center here in Washington, D. C. After testing positive for covert 19. His conditions is unclear. But we do know that Rudy Giuliani is 76 years old. He is considered high risk and he does have a history of health complications, including a battle with prostate cancer. In recent weeks, he has been crisscrossing the country, leading the president's fight to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Just Thursday, Rudy Giuliani was in Georgia, asking state lawmakers there to overturn the November election. Giuliani son Andrew also came down with coronavirus in late November. He works at the White House. Speaking

Giuliani Giuliani D. D. C C Hospital Rudy Giuliani Georgetown Hospital Washington Giuliani Georgetown University Medical Prostate Cancer Georgia Andrew White House
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The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
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The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test1

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test2

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

test2

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"When diagnosed with this type of cancer of course when the cancer is more advanced than we certainly taylor the the focus to actually treating the cancer so any man with a pardon all the lingo but gleason score seven or higher a great group to or higher prostate cancer and You know somebody with what i would consider. Intermediate risk parameters really should be encouraged to treat intermediate responders or higher should really be encouraged to focus on treating the prostate cancer. Especially if they have a life expectancy of more than ten to fifteen years and that's an important topic to mention is that because prostate cancer can present very advanced stages or ages. Life expectancy is a consideration to in part of the discussion because if a man is in his eighty s and has competing Medical problems sometimes even with significant prostate cancer. We may not treat that cancer because our goal is to do no harm. You mentioned the gleason grade Just for the listeners. And the view is. Can you explain a little bit what that is. Gleason grading is a pathologic grading system. That really looks at the actual cell structure of the cancer under a microscope in the look at the cell structures determine the aggressiveness of the cancer. So the gleason grading system starts from six or three three equals six to five. Plus five equals ten on the extreme advanced presentation form so They've tried to shift away from this gleason pattern to what they call a great groups. Great group one through five and simply for the fact that when men here a gleason six cancer to them they hear six out of ten and they get very concerned that the cancer is beyond five notes to them. It sounds more advanced. So we've changed the nomenclature over the years to accommodate for the fact that gleason six prostate cancer is actually a very slow growing cancer and very early detected non-aggressive other times we think for example patients should seek a second opinion. I think oftentimes when you use the basic minimum to make a diagnosis in stage patient I think that's that is all that's required for most providers. I think for patients who want more information to ensure that they are accurately staged and accurately diagnosed. I think a second opinion at center of excellence is important because there are various things we can offer such as a second opinion. Review of the pathology slides. You'd be surprised. How often pathologist will disagree looking under a microscope looking at the same exact cell and tissue and they may disagree about the the grading of the cancer so gleason grading can be somewhat subjective. And it's based on that physicians experience and opinions. So i think mayo clinic. Of course we have very experienced with Most of the day they spend looking at prostate cancer so they really become specifically interested also experts on prostate cancer so they can be better qualified to make some of those calls when when there is a kind of a a know a subjective situation the other reason why people come for second opinions to a prostate cancer specialist is also to ensure that there are no other tests that could be run that may improve the staging of the cancer so one example of staging imaging. That is really helped over the years. Mri surprised to help patients who are diagnosed with prostate cancer. Oftentimes.

prostate cancer cancer gleason mayo clinic center of excellence taylor
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"And that's a metric that most organization use to determine a prostate cancer aggressiveness in prostate cancer. even some of the ages still has nearly one hundred percent five year survival and that's different than the perspective of someone having pancreatic cancer brain cancer where the five year survival Not even fifteen percent time. So you know. I do counsel patients of based on that and tell them to put things in perspective. I encourage all my patients to make long-term plans still into the positive outlook because the dynamic is also the landscape of prostate cancer. Treatment is also being. it's a dynamic process. A one of the things that you mentioned. That was about the stage of diagnosis. Can you just mentioned Described trust to pack. What do you mean by the stage. So the stage of the cancer is the extent of the cancer within the prostate itself so when the cancer is localized to the prostate. We usually say that's oregon confined or stage two when it's a stage three cancer. It simply means that the cancer has gone beyond the capsule or the surface of the prostate. And so that means the Cancers tumors actually penetrated the surface of the prostate in gone beyond its out a nearby structures Outside of the prostate wall stage four prostate cancer means that the cancer has grown into a lymph node or has grown far away from the prostate distant until liver surrounding organs Bones so that would make it a stage four cancer. I see and then obviously i'm assuming depending on the stage. The treatments vary. Can you talk to us a little bit about the treatments that patients can expect when we say localized cancer were simply focused on cancer. That has not left. The prostate has not penetrated the surface of the prostate has not gone into the bones or lymph.

brain cancer prostate cancer. oregon
"prostate cancer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on WTVN

"This is the the foreign protein of the prostate cancer. The T cells, the other immune cells. Take that message. And they tried to attack and slow down and wall off the cancer is we're talking to Dr Martin, who is Dimitri See his urologist with Central Ohio Urology group doctor is The the thing with prostate cancer is its It stays hidden. It doesn't present as soon as maybe other cancers. Correct. I mean, that's what's part of what's so tricky or so elusive about this particular type of cancer. Correct. Correct. Really. If you wait until you felt something, then it's usually too late. If you had a fine if you have some sort of specific symptoms From it. It probably means the cancer either fairly large or it has spread. Yeah. Yeah, So that's that's the thing about this. That's why is so much more research and the P s a thing. I mean, it doesn't necessarily have to be And this is for the The reason I bring this up for the guy that's listening now going, man. Ah, gosh, I'm I'm embarrassed. I don't want to go to the doctor. I You know, I'll be okay. Kind of thing. Not that they're necessarily having any kind of symptoms. But a lot of guys don't like You know the finger test and that doesn't necessarily have to be. I mean, there's been leaps and bounds with regard to the P ece through a blood test. Correct, correct, So the test is far from perfect, but It's still the best thing we have. So we got to go with it. You know, hopefully someday there will be a better test. But you know, the problem with a lot of men is they might get their high school physical when they're 18. Or maybe when they start a new job, and I do some physical Then they don't go to the doctor again until they're in their fifties or sixties or when they finally go to the e R with their heart attack or whatever. And then they find out all you got all these medical problems. You know. Unfortunately, I think what Dimitri was trying to push is you guys need to go to their doctor in their thirties in their forties. You know, they need to be checked. It's not just prostate cancer. It's all the things but It. Obviously prostate cancer is on the list. All right, Dr Martin,.

prostate cancer Dr Martin Dimitri Central Ohio Urology group
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"The most hated of all airline fees. . Is the fee your charge to change your ticket? ? And never more than right now during corona virus where if somebody books a ticket to travel somewhere, , they may later say, , ooh, , I really don't feel comfortable going. . And that's why. . The nation's airlines have followed the longstanding policy of South West. . With. . asterisks where you can buy a ticket now. . On. . Any US, airline , and under Their straightjacket conditions. . You don't lose the money. . If you choose not to take the flight, , you just gotTa meet all the rules jump through the right hoops and all that. . But the reality is. . Bit Airlines have only looked at what they make from change fees rather than how much business they ultimately don't get because they have changed fees in the first place. . Let me explain. . So I. . Fly a lot on south. . West Airlines. . Until this year when I'm not flying anywhere because I'm in. . Quarantine. . Because a pre existing anyway. . So I would fly typically in a year. I . would take somewhere twenty five to thirty trips a year. . Right, , now I'm taking zero. . So. . I had a trip that I talked about. . On the show last fall that change five times before I took it and I talked about how on the big three full fare airlines American united and Delta. . I would have paid a thousand dollars and change fees before I ever left the ground. . But because that was a ticket on south, , west at paid zero in change fees. . And so it's always been competitive market advantage for South West that they don't charge change fees that other airlines do. . Well now, , United Airlines. . Has announced that they are eliminating change fees. . Not Related to corona, , virus, , just eliminating change fees. . On. . All their airfares for domestic travel except. . Basic economy basic economy is the one where we hate you but we'll take your money and let you fly. . That has a long list of don'ts. . And all that with basic economy, , they have basic economy at the airlines so that their fares look lower. . Than they really are. . But anyway. . As on United. . Or going to have no change reason that this is something that upfront looks gutsy on United's part. . Because according to the fads united collects over six, , hundred, , million dollars a year that goes straight to profit. . From the change fee junk fee because the reality is. . The cost for an airline somebody changing a flight. . If any is just a couple of pennies. . There's really no cost to the airline is just a junk fee. . And so United's walking away from fifty million dollars a month. . and. What . they're not GONNA get in change fees but what they may well find. . Is that people are more likely to book a ticket. . Knowing that they can change it later without having to pay pay change fee. . Now, we'll , see over the course of this week. . If The. . Other two full fare airlines. . American Delta. . Follow United because often the three full fare airlines pretty much act like tweedle dee tweedle dum on what they do in terms of junk fees and nuisance fees and all that, , and so we'll see and this will. . Potentially. . Erode. . A huge market advantage four southwest airlines if airlines just blanket. . Eliminate pretty much all the fares that are subject to junk fees united did not do so for international flights, , but most people fly only domestic. . So it it's not as much an issue for most people but. . This is a very positive change. . And I think back. . That the junk fee for changing a flight for a long time was twenty five dollars. . And then over the years the full fare ions got more more greedy kept raising it to the ridiculous two hundred dollar point and as travel writers pointed out repeatedly. . Two hundred dollars change fee in most cases is higher than the fair bid a leisure travel or paid for their ticket in the first place. .

Prostate Cancer Foundation Nachos
"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hold onto your hat more than five thousand. Wow. So this man in all likelihood has prostate cancer metastatic to the bones, and what are we doing about it? Well, number one, we're going to take a little biopsy to confirm number to win a stage up and see exactly where the cancer is number three we're going to start treatment if he wishes everything, of course, is credited on the patient's wishing something we never do anything without the patience. Permission. So why are we talking about this van with number one? He's a man is a man of human being who has cancer, and he just walks in the door. I had no idea whatsoever that he should get screened or checked out. And that's one issue educational point number one. Oh one. If you're a man, you may want to get checked out. For prostate cancer. You're welcome to come into our office at thirteen four Broadway. We accept most insurances Medicare, Medicaid in Colorado, office, even this moment, if you want to get our prostate book with a DVD we will send it out to, you know, charge of a brand new DVD. It's x Ray to part DVD to DVD's in one set at no charge. We'll send it out to you. Call us at two and two choices. That's our phone number two and two two four six forty two thirty seven you can also come by our office Monday through Friday, eight to five and picking up at no charge. Many people do come by and pick up, booklets and DVD's because they like to get a few extra ones more than we can send out and many people. Many listeners save lives. We already know that we know that listeners save lives. And we know that listeners, come in and get information and pass it along to their relatives, and friends and neighbors, and sometimes people who need help. This man, Shirley needed help he would have benefited if someone padded. Him on the shoulder ten years ago and said, hey, it's time to go see Dr Liederman about prostate possibilities, but he had no idea. And now his PSA is five thousand he's got copies of the papers. Of course, we have our patients copies of the tests that we do. So he has copies of the PSA were wrenching for everything else for him to know exactly what he has to wear is, and how to treat him and how to.

prostate cancer metastatic prostate cancer cancer Dr Liederman Medicaid Shirley Colorado ten years
"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Here at radio surgery, New York, another man with prostate cancer or talk about lots of prostate cancer man this week. He's eighty seven years old. He's a widow these musician. He's been on national television with his musical genius. He had prostate cancer treatment with seed therapy only twenty years ago. Now, the cancers come back has PSA's got up to twenty we staged him up and could find cancer only in the prostate. So it's twenty years later, but PSA's continuing to rise, and he does not want to facilitate having a death from prostate cancer. That's why he's choosing treatment. He's famous physician. He's played with celebrities across America. And here's another man also prostate cancer, this is a man who's related to one of the senior people in Jehovah's Witness. That means he's Jehovah's Witness tells witness or people who in general, do not accept blood transfusions. It's another reason to avoid radical surgery because radical surgery can be a bloody mess. It's open openness cutting just like robotic opening cutting. And yeah, there's bleeding from robotic surgery. He hasn't want that he was non invasive treatment being treated by us here at British New York, and we're treating a mass of cancer in his prostate, the high PSA PSA had gone to seventy two he got a biopsy with us. His high grade cancer hit never been worked up before he had pain in the pelvic area had some laboratory ah, but his PSA was off the wall at seventy two as a high Gleason score. And luckily, the cancer hasn't traveled, and we are treating him to try to cure him all avoiding radical surgery all avoiding robotic surgery..

prostate cancer PSA New York America twenty years eighty seven years
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"He's at at the hutch and Seattle, and he published a paper, and they look. At the germ lines of men with metastatic castrate resistance with the most end stage prostate cancer, and what they showed was that. In contrast to the general population of men that mutations in these different DNA repair, pathways or significantly enriched and individuals who had metastatic prostate cancer. So about eleven to twelve percent of men with metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer mutations. Particularly Brock to Braca one ATM RAD fifty one these different pathways that are involved in DNA damage repair. If you look in the tumors of men with metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer, it depending on where you look over one third of the tumors. The cells will have mutations in these pathways, which makes them incredibly sensitive to park in addition. So that's a huge game changer. The other thing that people now look at his kind of the total genome scorer the alterations in the genome of the individual cancer cells will that make them more sensitive to immunotherapy? Fear. Not that's more coming online. But the idea that there are things in the semantic DNA of the tumor cells, and in the germline of individuals that you can use to screen for not only, you know, prostate of breast pancreas excetera that's a huge game changer. And then as we touched on earlier, those are not just prognostic biomarkers, but their predictive of drug response, which is pretty amazing. And then I think allies test the version two point. Oh, or the beta version of it which has a lot of these built in biomarkers at predict responsive drugs that now are being tested in clinical trials with with the idea that let's test the ability to predict response, it's pretty mazing. Stop actually. So obviously, you specialize in prostate cancer the field of urologists so much bigger than that. Right. We haven't even talked about renal cancer bladder cancer, and to do so would only be to do it an injustice. You know, given that we've been talking for a little while. And I know you've got a hard stop here in about twenty minutes. I wanna talk a little bit about benign stuff. So I'll tell you personal maybe.

prostate cancer renal cancer DNA damage Seattle Brock twelve percent twenty minutes
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Is converted via an enzyme called five after reduc days into a very similar molecule called dihydrotestosterone abbreviated DAT. Dat is actually any slightly more potent steroid and in men who fifty times more potent. Yeah. So the in men who are susceptible to baldness DHT, drives that process D H T also probably plays a role in the enlargement of the prostate is correct. Most of the five for duck days enzymes in the prostate. So yes, reducing Anderson's in the prostate by reducing effectively. Reducing DHT production reduces the size of the prostate. So a lot of guys take medication to reduce DHT either to reduce prostate volume size of something called benign prostatic, hypertrophy or to re minimize hair loss, and it's usually the exact same drug given it slightly different doses. And sometimes even come up with different names for the same drug. So proc-. Car is financed. Rated five milligrams. And I think pro-peace says the one milligram nets. Right. Okay. Now, I remember many years ago, and I don't I'm sure this has been revised one hundred times, but maybe ten years ago, maybe less, but a paper came out that said look in guys who have suppressed DAT levels when they get prostate cancer. They're more high-grade is at my remembering that correctly. And there's been definitely case reports of that. It's hard to really study that over I gotta yeah. So what is the current thinking on five algebra dictation habituation, and that relationship to prostate cancer? Well, there's was a very large randomized trial to see if you could take that medication with the idea that if you reduced the relative amount of Andhra Jensen the prostate by preventing the production of his potent androgen DAT. Could you reduce the risk of prostate cancer in those men and the answer was if you took that medicine that reduced potent Anderson? Hugh could. So there was a oatmeal study. This was in men starting out who did not have cancer. That's right. So it was called the prostate cancer prevention trial, and it was over seven years at the trial is conducted in Thompson was the PI on the trials of big study. It did reduce the chance at a man would develop prostate cancer overall, you know, reasonable amount of time. But one of the problems was that there was increased detection of more aggressive cancers in the men who are taking the finance. Right. And so then the question was, well, what is that? From is it inducing, a more high grade cancer, you know, and whether or not that's true or not as or is it selecting for it because any cancer that comes out of a low DHT environment. Well, yes. So I personally think that what you were just saying as is true. So yes, and there's case reports that people with low testosterone, or for example, people with low PSA's because PSA is only made when there's testosterone around, for example. That those individuals have more aggressive cancers. Now, this is what I've been focusing on in my lab for like the last four or five years now. And so one of the cool things we did in this collaboration with this company genome DX in this great, scientists alight of an she Oni was to look at the biology of prostate cancer, how grass if they were and compare the gresh Innis of the prostate cancer with the Anderson output of the tumor another nuanced way to normalize things a bit. Yep. And so we had this ipod uscis that the tumors that had the most amped up Anderson, signaling the most Anders output because prostate cancers and ginger tumor that they would be the most aggressive, and I say that way 'cause you know, the answer stieg's act posit the tumors with the lowest Anderton output or the are the most aggressive tumors. So it's somewhat relates to PSA, but not entire. Fairly like there's not a is on a true, you know, linear correlation. So the high Anders output tumors. They can be aggressive, but they are not as aggressive as Alterra low once's by modal distribution. And this is a good way to segue. Talking about these molecular tests because this is a commercially available test from genome DX might tell a funny story about ally. Before we go down there. Sure, I've told this story before but now we get to put a name to it..

prostate cancer Anderson dihydrotestosterone Andhra Jensen testosterone Anders gresh Innis Hugh Thompson stieg seven years five years ten years
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"I'm sure have different versions. But even from a screening standpoint that they could be you'd have one tool that is so good in both yet. There is fortuitous. Yeah, they're good tools. And then so after if there's an abnormality in the P H I R four K score. Then I moved to an MRI. And then there's been good day. Can you just because I mean, we talk we geek out on this stuff because I'm super nerdy about what type of MRI to do for what thing, but for a patient listening to this Ted who's going to go to their doctor, and whose doctor is hopefully cooperative enough. What do you recommend because not all Emmys doing the trick here? Yeah. I mean on paper what you want a multi parametric prostate MRI, the most important phase the most important parameter in the multi parametric MRI is actually the diffusion weighted imaging which is the most operators dependent. So it really requires a skilled technician and escape. Killed interpreter. Radiologist to look at those DWI images, that's the most important one. So we do get patients contrast. But people showing you can get a lot of value out of just non contrast DWI based the one we use. No contrast, but it's their DWI's exceptional. I've sent you the images I think if they're Schaefer approved I'm happy. They're very good. Yeah. T one t two DWI an multiplayer MR is if you're listening to that. And if you and if your doctor refuses that I think those are the kinds of things that make me think you need another doctor because at this point and look your insurance might not cover. You may have to foot the Bill for that. And that's that's horrible. Well, wouldn't cover that? That was true. But there's recently reported a large multinational prospective clinical trial, looking at the utility of Mariah used for screening for prostate cancer. And the study was half the men got an MRI of their suspicious lesion. They got that lesion biopsy. And they increase detection of high grade cancer reduce it over. Detection of low grade prostate cancer. So it was a quote, unquote, positive study. We haven't had problems in the mid west Illinois getting 'em is approved. But that randomized trial based out of reported out of the UK that really has changed a lot about what companies are approving for Moore is for screening so rate to here. So so if somebody has an MRI if there's an Adra malady on the MRI, I'll recommend a biopsy. Now, there's a lot of data that says you shouldn't just sample the suspicious lesion that you should do the suspicious lesion plus doing a Sexton. Bob Sierra, kind of what I tell patients is right left top middle bottom that adds value. Not just in the detection of cancer. But if someone is gonna move to surgery, for example, and I don't do a biopsy in ninety year old guy. Even if they have an abnormal Marai, do it. If I think that person's gonna live a long long enough to benefit from treatment in those scenarios. I do those systematic by because I want to know exactly where the extent of the cancer and one of the problems of them arise it it doesn't. Actually, see the true boundaries are true. Borders of the tumors within the prostate, very well. So they're often especially the DWI because it's not really an anatomic. Yes. The way a t one way to images traffic. So if you take if you take the lesion on T to for example, it often under sizes the tumor by between five and ten millimeters. So pretty significant for prostate, which is generally pretty small. So so I do those to get a better roadmap..

prostate cancer Bob Sierra technician Ted Schaefer Adra west Illinois UK Mariah Moore ninety year four K
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"On every cancer. And there's one other one other oh, the CDC is the fifth body to weigh in. And we show them. Here are the recommendations from all five of these for every cancer. And I remember when that shift changed to for prostate cancer. There's no more recommendation while the recommendation is talk about it with your doctor pass the buck besides the I think the American kademi of family practitioners, and they don't recommend PSA screening still. I'm not sure why. But you know, that's a different discussion. But the bottom line is that almost all the guidelines now say it's a shared decision making process, which I think makes perfect sense. That's how I view mod modern medicine. Yeah. It does it. In theory, makes great sense. What I worry about Ted is theirs. A bunch of patients they get caught. They don't have doctors like you or me who are willing to be able to have had the luxury of the time and the ability to educate themselves to do that. Because I still see a lot of patients that show up and they're not getting screened because their doctors basically saying, well, obviously, this is quote, unquote. Controversial, you know, I sort of remember hearing that we shouldn't have been screening. So we're not gonna do it. And that's that's sort of my fear with these things. Well, I think I think shared decision making it require also. So then to me conceptually, it makes a lot of sense in reality. What does that actually mean? Well, that's the next question. That's the next unknown. Right as well house. Our shared decision making process, how does it occur? And when a patient sees you that's different than when a patient sees an average internist, let's say, and it's different. When a patient doesn't see any doctor. So, you know, the idea that there's the bus that rolls up that just does your bloodwork and send it back in the mail. That's terrible. I mean, I did that when I was a resin they pay me fifty bucks. Go man the bus and do that. That's not really doing that patient, those individual men any, you know, any they're not helping those people because you don't know their whole health history. You know, and all that. So I experienced that. And you know, I got into it with Otis Brawley about screening, and you know, he raised that point in. It's valid. I did that when I was rather than because I was told to do it..

Otis Brawley prostate cancer CDC Ted
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Forty percent of men coming in with prostate cancer metastatic at the time by two thousand it was four percent. Now, the skeptic is going to say this is such a controversial topic. So it's so good that we're. Doing this the skeptical say, well, that's just lead time bias. I mean, all you did was catch a bunch of men earlier. So you have a much bigger funnel. Right. Right. So by the way, the same controversy exists on mammography. So I can't wait to actually sit down with Ted Schafer quivalent of breast cancer at some point. Because I realized that an episode like this is probably a little bit more geared towards male listeners or probably the female listeners who have males houses or people that care about going through this. But it's interesting to watch the rise of mammography and the rise of PSA go through this parallel thing and Kohanovsky though to a slightly lesser extent that really being the big three mass employed screening while it's and it's been written about Al Peter you've written about this. So Peter Albertson is a nother Hopkins alum, he's Charon Connecticut, and he's an anti screener effectively for prostate cancer. And he wrote about this, and he showed that if you just look at incidents of metastatic prostate cancer incidence of metastatic, breast cancer. There's no change with implementation of. Mammography? There's a huge drop in the incidence of medicine prostate cancer with implementation. So why is he anti screener? Well, he just he was historically. He wrote this paper and showed that there is a huge difference. So now with screening you have increased detection, and what we've learned is unlike let's say pancreatic cancer where most of the time if if you picked it up early if you did nothing it, you would die not everybody who has prostate cancer has a lethal variation of it. And so initially we developed a biomarker to pick up all prostate cancers that was the PSA blood test. We pick them up we treated them, we reduced deaths. We also over treated people people who had a cancer that would never have been lethal in their lifetime. That's the dying with the dying from. And this is something you and I used to talk about nearly twenty years. I remember sitting in the cafeteria because you know, even though you know, you. We were still interns, and basically two knuckleheads you knew you were going to do this. And you were always head and shoulders above everybody else in terms, which when I said, I remember asking like, I don't get it. Like, why do some guys get prostate cancer? And it seems to be relatively uninteresting like, yeah, they and another guy though at it and they're dead in two years in it's his devastating pancreatic cancer. What is it about the biology of that because it strikes me as more a function of the biology than the environment? You're the host. But but I could be wrong, of course. But I remember talking about the Salahdin and really coming away scratching my head thing. I don't but clue what's going on this disease. I mean, I'm still scratching my head about it. Because that's my whole research program is all about his will what's the molecular biology, lethal prostate cancer? So we'll talk about that in a second. But to circle back to our story. So we diagnosed many men with prostate cancer, we.

prostate cancer prostate cancer metastatic pancreatic cancer cancer Charon Connecticut Ted Schafer Al Peter Kohanovsky Forty percent four percent twenty years two years
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"For protection when they're out and about functionally totally fine now for a fifty year old, man. I think there's a over ninety percent chance that you can recover sexual function. Yep. But with each deck member, you know, erectile dysfunction is a disease of the aging male. So for each decade that somebody gets older there's decline in sexual function. So he's been people say that they're totally potent and their seventy they'll tell you if you ask them, no miam-, not as good as I was when I was twenty. So there's that component of things in the other factor is prostate cancer. And it's not like, there's the prostate. There's five millimeters of tissue, and then there's this nerve bundle. There's the prostate. There's no capsule or lining encasing, the prostate. And then there's the neuro vascular bundle of Walsh named after Dr wolf. So you have prostate. The prostate itself has different zones or different regions prostate cancers develop in the peripheral region or perforate zone. So right at the edge of the prostate. So you have to Mer at the edge of the prostate, and then you have the nerve bundle. And so you're talking about one or two cruel trick of fate of of the cancer's not developed centrally. They don't develop centrally they develop Rivoli. So I understand why patients by listeners to say, why don't you don't you just you know, what I don't get it? Because it in many cases today, we I published on this a lot. Now. You know, there's prostate cancers that we pick up today are just bulkier. They're more aggressive and so. When you have a tumor that you know is going to be outside the prostate. You know, it's extra prosthetic it's involving the nerve bundle. A lot of the times. And so you have to remove part of it. You have to remove you know, the tissue around to try to clear your margins. And so when you do that in sixty five year old guy, and you take out half of his nerve on one side. It's unlikely that he'll be able to regain sat sexual function on his own. Now, these days I'd try to be very upfront about that. And I try to set appropriate expectations. We can we have special tools that we have in urology that will enable Amanda get don't total satisfaction sexually. So we can maneuver around out. So to speak. And these days many of the people I see have very aggressive cancers that are quote, unquote, the real deal. So we really have to be careful you our number one goal for doing cancer surgeries to get the tumor out. It's talk a little bit about prostate cancer because it's not a cancer that comes without its controversy to let's start with the biggest Connor is really one of the biggest controversies or things that would confuse the layperson because about every year, the advice changes on this thing called P S A. So what is the prostate specific antigen PSA is a protein it's made by the prostate. And it's normal function is to liquefy semen. So it's highly expressed in the process of the way, I explained the process of people the best analogy, I can come up with his if you think about it like a sewer system, you have the main sewer leaving the city, that's the urea three that's the tube that we normally urinate through. But this channel also deliver semen out. A tip of the penis off this main sewer are slightly smaller sewers had go to different neighborhoods within the neighborhood. There's a sewer that comes out of the individual house and the individual houses in this analogy are prostate epithelial cells, they make components of the semen, and the semen is used to give nutrients to the sperm while it's trying to fertilize an egg to enable the sperm to penetrate, the cervical mucus these different functions PSA is a protein that breaks down the semen and liquefies it and people think it's an important for for this whole process of fertilizing egg. So that's what it does. And if you look in the semen, the PSA numbers are hundred million per m l mean, the numbers they mount of this protein in the semen is astronomically high. So that's what it is..

prostate cancer Walsh Amanda Dr wolf Connor sixty five year ninety percent fifty year
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And I don't think I was I don't think could process it what it would have meant. Anyway, if I had asked, but when I was a medical school, and I was doing my PHD I asked. My parents what he died of and he died of prostate cancer. So I was at the NIH I was doing science. I had done some clinical work. I realized what people in DC not in science. But in politics were interested in their interested in cancer biology, and they are interested in prostate cancer. I saw at other people are interested in and I had this very vivid memories of my, you know, my father migrant, my grandfather, having prostate cancer and dying from it. And I decided that that's what I wanted to do. So when I came back to medical school. I knew that I wanted to be to be a prostate cancer biologist and understand the disease. I also knew that I wanted to be a surgeon. And so I didn't to be a medical oncologist. Although that appealed to me a lot, and I'm always flattered when people think of a medical colleges because those guys are smart, they're smart. But I knew I wanted to do something I love working with my hands. So for me, the I. The of being a surgeon. Scientist was just it just made sense. I loved the biology I love, but I still love the idea of not just conceptually deconstructing something and putting it back together. But actually, physically deconstructing something putting it back together. So as a perfect fit for what I wanted to do for the listener to put some things in context at the time that you and I began our residencies. I don't really think there was any debate about what the best urology program was in the United States. I think there is a good race for number two or lots of programs that would have competed to be the second best urology program in the country. But but Johns Hopkins was hands down in a league of its own. And they only take two residents per year. So if there are four hundred or five hundred medical students graduating who want to go into urology only two of them get to go to Hopkins, and you were one of them, which perhaps isn't surprising. Did you wanna go to Hopkins for reasons other than it was the best program? Was there something about the environment? There. There that drew you to it. Yeah. It was a people. It's an amazing place that I think about think about it all the time. So I interviewed there and the chair of the department. The time was is the godfather of my field. He made all the contemporary modern discoveries in prostate cancer. And it was real simple. He looked me in the eyes. And he said, I looked at your CV. I know what you have the ability to do. And I wanna help you get there so pet well selected you as much as you selected Hopkins. I guess you can say that. Yeah. You know, it was a perfect fit because as we've talked about mentorship is just so much of everything. It's everything in life. Really? If you're motivated, and you have drive, it's, you know, even if you're not motivated, you don't have drive you need a good mentor. So for me, I showed up for the interviews. I'd interviewed all over the country..

prostate cancer Johns Hopkins NIH United States Scientist DC