35 Burst results for "Prostate Cancer"

Working toward a new staging system for prostate cancer, and why it matters

Katz's Corner

02:01 min | 2 d ago

Working toward a new staging system for prostate cancer, and why it matters

"Doing some fascinating research. We have some new trials that we have ongoing and we're about to open some new ones. One that I'm very excited about for prostate cancer patients and those patients that have early stage prostate cancer that are considering our cyber knife program. Which we have ongoing that may need some hormonal therapy and instead of using the traditional hormones is a new hormonal agent. Now that we hope will spare men their potency in their erections in their testosterone level, and I'll be the lead investigator here for the GNU land going Enterprise. It will be open in the city as well as here on Long Island, and I hope to have that open in a few weeks. I'm very excited about that clinical trial. It's sponsored by the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. And I think will be the only center In the area That's going to be doing that, and we have some other trials as well. That will be talking about for those men with diagnosed with prostate cancer that have had a relapse of cancer using Very widely used medication called Met Foreman for diabetes, and our research has shown that There are certain receptors on the prostate cancer cells, thie insulin receptors. That, you know, has always been thought that maybe Sugar is involved in cancer growth. And if you can block the the sugar from entering into the cells, and it seems that made Foreman seems to do that. And prevent thes cancer cells from growing. This trial has been ongoing. It's up, it's up and running. And if you know of anyone that's already been treated for prostate cancer and Has had a relapse, meaning that there say is rising. Whether it be after surgery or after radiation than you can give us. Ah Ah call and be sure to Ah. You know, we have to evaluate the You know the individual, You know, it's a clinical trial. But

Dana Farber Cancer Institute Relapse Foreman Sugar Long Island Testosterone Investigator
"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:49 min | Last month

"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Two kinds of surgeries for prostate cancer open where the doctor opens with his hands in a knife or robotic, which is not really robotic. Was that gives more put in your body either way, with open or robotic surgery for prostate cancer, most likely 97% chance The man's sexual life will be damaged, often destroyed and we'll show that data when you come in. And you'll see from surgery on the prostate 80% chance the man will be leaking urine or having damage with her urinary control. We see that so often. And number five. The thing all of these are actually seldom spoken about by the surgeon. So here a man with prostate cancer, prostate issues, and they're planning to radical surgery. We may never be the same if you have radical surgery. First of all, you may not make it through. Radical surgery, which is pretty sad to die on the table or during the postoperative period to be left. Impotent, incontinent and with his shortened Penis, yes. Radical surgery on prostate cancer is the number one cause of Penis shortening in The world. And who wants that? Because he just listen to that. And With 152 100,000 prostate cancer's a year. You probably know someone who has prostate cancer. It might be. You are loved one and by passing on the information that you get better results. Most likely keeping your sexual life and your urinary life And, of course, not altering your body, not shortening your Penis, which is done by radical surgery. You may understand why so many men with prostate cancer come here and.

prostate cancer Penis shortening
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Gays Are Revolting

The Gays Are Revolting

07:28 min | Last month

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Gays Are Revolting

"Mentally. For a lot of men which is horrible. But Yeah, obviously let you get cancer of the prostate and then they have to remove it or you get radiation therapy that you have to which both have really bad side effects on your reproductive organ your. Heinous and you'll shelter. Any litmus at need a sort of anatomy a very big penis level anatomy lesson. Is it right to say that the prostate is kind of like the male what we joke about as the male g spot? We be hidden on when when we do. Yeah, it's like it's the size of a walnut I guess but it produces your same and you'll sperms the liquid that comes out when you agenda. But we're sort of living in an age now where we're finding more and more man have the chance to live an older life especially going through the AIDS and HIV epidemic in the eighties nineties a lot of older men just didn't make it whatsoever and those. Didn't make it to the age that you are at risk of getting prostate cancer is well now we're getting like a big insurgence of people being able to live with HIV and not dying from it dying from AIDS. So the getting to these ages now where it is becoming such a big. Also. None of us Dr Share. We're just think base if you want definitely A. Search and look it up, and it's very helpful to know because we didn't know of before everyone should be getting that prostate checked. You know not to drag down the class level of this. my daddy got his. Watch just come daddy daddy is like this little boy in person or is this your actual day his? Never say. Daddy. Sorry I don't know why I said that my father when I was a teenager had a he was testify prostate cancer a few times because he's he's in this demographic. He's an older white men, Ryan everything, and it was very ashamed of it one a lot of men and not comfortable having a that part of their buddy examined and it's not like a social norm for men to have that part of their buddy examined and so when they actually like posted back, they did some x rays because I checking something around that area as well and they posted back and I knew exactly what it was because came in the big lake or like the giant on Yeah and I was like this is the inside of my daddy's. nudes. Yeah and so I took an because I grab the mail ru quick and I knew my dad ashamed of and I put them up Olivia my bedroom wall. Muff like artwork I room and and then he was mad but it forced us to have a dialogue about Oh ati health and. You need to get this checked because Oh. There was this strange myth I think out of the prostate cancer because it's Of the prostate and That it somehow agay Kenza the the potentially were more risk of getting it only evidence. Watts. But it affects game differently who's gay sex obviously, very different straits. But if you get the radiation therapy, a lot of men can get erectile dysfunction. Sorry like they cannot get as high as before a lot of the time it. You can be softer and like still have sex with a vagina is like yeah. You need Kinda more punch power without yeah hunch. Powell When I came from. Full now. Like, in in saying that, it's like I guess, a lot of people would just be like all. Why don't you just bottom then instead will the problem with that is like your anus itself becomes a lot more sensitive and actually becomes pain. They can become painful to have anal sex as well. So it's Up, in Botham's. Like it's no guarantee that you'll ever get function of direction back. To have a L-. Obata. That's who have a desire to have sex as to have like. Wouldn't that be the worst owning feelings and suffered? There's nothing they're not only that like a lot of gay men that live in metropolitan areas even just meant in general that live in metropolitan areas more exposed to I guess equal healthcare where you can go see lgbt Qa plus doctor and it's fine and it's not a weird thing whereas like a lot of people that don't live in metropolitan areas, they just not getting checked because they don't want to be ridiculed by the doctor whatsoever because they are gay or the your God I cannot think of anything worse than going to like a super straight being like can you tell me about my but as a gay man like and then? Just like grimacing at your, not ever wanting to treat you probably because, yeah, you have to disclose to them that you'll gay and it's really sad a lot of people that live in sort of moral areas areas that aren't gay friendly. They don't disclose that whatsoever and they pretty much like brokerage back into the cause at which I absolutely high and that should never have to be anything that anyone has to deal with with the health professional whatsoever. Be An absolute sites means I think. Also it's it's worth the conversation that happens around the prostate as as just a body pot and not some. Thing and You know like it's a gay thing or whatever. It excludes a certain part of a community of people who do not identifies men that do actually physically have prostate and. I've seen a lot of the men's health sites and and they yuck. Yuck like they saw heavily targeted towards the luckiest laureate literally just like running up each with a surfboard and dog. entered. Could you imagine being a person that didn identifies Mayo wanting? To. Stay on top of their the health in all areas. But having to navigate at the minefield of toxic masculinity it would be awful and if we could grow up and realize a hoses about prostate is. And a body parts suggest buddy pots and we need to look after them and. Take narrowly unless you give each. Yeah unless you have Roy Doug and Maitland go. Oh My. For like two and a half minutes and then. You did. ruined. Yeah I'm sure there aren't many straight men in country. Victoria listening to our show politics of. Could you imagine going to check out this office show about the press they're appearing fruit awakening also officer I don't think countrymen are GonNa be listening literally paying for content from us. Do you imagine the what a attribute? Maybe. They paid because I thought it was like a hate show the gazer revolt like aren't they? Let me pay. Seven dollars. And He's like I'm I'm gonNA give thirty dollars. mikey's teeth in the mail..

AIDS HIV cancer A. Search Dr Share officer Botham Ryan mikey Powell Mayo Roy Doug Maitland
"prostate cancer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:36 min | Last month

"prostate cancer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This hour we're talking about prostate cancer why we don't talk about it because of issues like incontinence, impotence, men's private parts, and so forth I'm joined by Boston Globe Mark Shanahan who is out with a new podcast Mr Eighty percent, which tells the very personal story about his own prostate cancer and a warning again to listeners, we are talking a very frankly about this disease about sexual function and so on and so forth, and so this might not be suitable for younger listeners. We just want to put that warning out there. mark I want to talk a little bit about how this diagnosis it didn't just affect you affected your loved ones too. So your audio, your daughter Julia was in junior high when you were first diagnosed. So I want to hear a little bit of the two of you talking in episode one of Mr Eighty percent. I think I just took it to like. Like he actually died I would basically lose my best friend. This is my daughter Julia she's in college. Now they say like we're not your best friend like where your parents by. Having. Cancer means you get a preview of what your kid might say at your funeral. You're the funniest person I've ever met I. Think one of the most supportive and hardworking people I've ever met and. I also think you one of the most intense people I've ever met and you have a very impressive career, and so I always like looked up to that and by impressive you mean I have talked to Bj. Novak. You took me to Taylor concert. She gave me her bracelet, right? So. So that's a cut from Mr Eighty percent I'm here with Mr, with Shanahan and mark that's really touching moment. But say a little more about that because you make this, you spend a lot of time in this podcast talking about. The effect that this has on your entire family, and by the way the way your wife stepped up in heroic ways and supported you and this is a huge theme about in this story. It's true Anthony that You know you just can't anticipate something like this and and again it's the nature of this disease that you know. This was something that as my surgeon says, at some point in the podcast, you know when you're when you're treating. Prostate cancer patient, you're really treating the couple. And So Michelle had a heavy lift Michelle, your wife correct. I should say right Michelle. My Wife. And she was Extraordinary and But so it's a learning process. For she and then in terms of our children. You well, I Beckett we would like to get back into the podcast but your son as fifty s fifteen year old boy now and You know we wanted him to say, well, we're going to have to talk about our penises and that was. He he just wasn't willing to go there. So again, it's it is. You know we say in the podcast that you get the cancer but everybody's life changes and you know I I don't think that unless you go through something like this, you can really appreciate what that means but I. Certainly do i WanNa talk a little bit about Get get you to talk a little bit about the course of treatment that you opted to follow. So so walk us through first of all the options that you had to consider. When you were first diagnosed well. So we want to also say that because prostate cancer. So slow growing and because many men who are diagnosed are much older I think that people should think very very carefully before embarking on any treatment that there is something called active surveillance, which means we watch it we pay attention to it. And but but. For Myself I was young I had two kids. I had forty years may be to live and. I had a gleason score, which is a score after they give you your biopsy and take a look at what's happening they grade basically of the severity of the intensity of your cancer in mind was seven. Out of ten that's considered to be intermediate I guess you know the options for me were to watch it to have surgery. Or to a radiate my prostate and. In, the end there have been enormous advances in the treatment of prostate cancer over just thirty years. If I had gotten prostate cancer fifty years ago. I. would be rough rough rough. And not just for me every man who had a prostatectomy which is surgical procedure to remove your prostate. before nine, hundred, eighty, two, left the hospital impotent every single Guy which is just incredible to me because nineteen eighty two is not that long ago. Right, it is incredible. So you went for the surgery but I did but that wasn't the end of your ordeal surgery. It turns out we learned didn't get all the cancer. So you had to go back and sign up for pretty radical course of hormone therapy, and this is really the most excruciating part of your journey to read into here about you describe it essentially as a kind of. Chemical. Castration. Well. Indeed and I don't just describe it that way. That's in fact what it is It removes the testosterone from your body and the reason that we do that is because it's the thing that feeds the cancer prostate cancer. Grows Thanks to to Saas thrown. So if you removed from your body to cells cancer cells week in some cases they die and then when they're at their weakest blast them with radiation. The problem is that when you take a testosterone out of a man's body it is a as you say excruciating I became a different person. ahead you know the the euphemism is mood swings. I didn't have mood swings had a I had tantrums and I will say that I was on the phone this morning, the guy who listened to the first three episodes of the podcast and. He. said, he'd never talked to anybody about his course blueprint and he was arrested he actually got arrested. Because a parking garage. because. He could he he got completely out of control. So it's scary. And and you know now as I sit here. There's you know at this surgery if if the prostate cancer should return, there is no surgery there is no radiation. Those are no longer alternatives. and. The prospect of more loop ron or any kind of hormone therapy is really terrifying mark. You're honest in this podcast in and you tell a story in there and we heard from your daughter Julia just about how difficult this became when you were on this loop Ron Therapy and you tell the story of her eighth Grade Graduation and where you pretty much. Fall apart and and She loses this moment to be photographed in her right of passage. It's a it's a very, very sad story, but I'm just wondering what it was like for you to make that decision to go public with that to hear your family and friends describe. What an unbearable person you became. Well. You know. Here's the thing I really don't have a lot of. You know. Again it's a good story and I'm interested I'm interested in A. After a drinker to these are the stories that I tell and So when somebody at the globe said, you know you got an idea for a podcast I said you bet I do. But I in terms of like. How others will view me and? That sort of thing. I I really don't care. It doesn't that doesn't concern me what's really weird also is that. I didn't do the podcast right the story really yet of any. Sense of. Its crusade that I'm on at all however now that it's out there and emails that I'm getting in on the phone calls and the and the feedback, it's it really is very gratifying. To think that there are guys who were like me. But have no outlet to and no desire to they won't talk about it but they WanNa talk about me. Mark, I want to bring in Dr Mark pomerantz. He's an oncologist. He's one of your doctors through this ordeal and he joins us from the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston Dr Pomeranz Welcome to on point. Thanks for joining us. Oh..

prostate cancer Cancer Mark Shanahan Julia Mr Eighty Dana Farber Cancer Institute mark Michelle testosterone Mark Boston Ron Therapy Dr Mark pomerantz Bj Novak Taylor Anthony
'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:29 min | Last month

'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

"We're talking about prostate cancer why we don't talk about it because of issues like incontinence, impotence, men's private parts, and so forth I'm joined by Boston Globe Mark Shanahan who is out with a new podcast Mr Eighty percent, which tells the very personal story about his own prostate cancer and a warning again to listeners, we are talking a very frankly about this disease about sexual function and so on and so forth, and so this might not be suitable for younger listeners. We just want to put that warning out there. mark I want to talk a little bit about how this diagnosis it didn't just affect you affected your loved ones too. So your audio, your daughter Julia was in junior high when you were first diagnosed. So I want to hear a little bit of the two of you talking in episode one of Mr Eighty percent. I think I just took it to like. Like he actually died I would basically lose my best friend. This is my daughter Julia she's in college. Now they say like we're not your best friend like where your parents by. Having. Cancer means you get a preview of what your kid might say at your funeral. You're the funniest person I've ever met I. Think one of the most supportive and hardworking people I've ever met and. I also think you one of the most intense people I've ever met and you have a very impressive career, and so I always like looked up to that and by impressive you mean I have talked to Bj. Novak. You took me to Taylor concert. She gave me her bracelet, right? So. So that's a cut from Mr Eighty percent I'm here with Mr, with Shanahan and mark that's really touching moment. But say a little more about that because you make this, you spend a lot of time in this podcast talking about. The effect that this has on your entire family, and by the way the way your wife stepped up in heroic ways and supported you and this is a huge theme about in this story. It's true Anthony that You know you just can't anticipate something like this and and again it's the nature of this disease that you know. This was something that as my surgeon says, at some point in the podcast, you know when you're when you're treating. Prostate cancer patient, you're really treating the couple. And So Michelle had a heavy lift Michelle, your wife correct. I should say right Michelle. My Wife. And she was Extraordinary and But so it's a learning process. For she and then in terms of our children. You well, I Beckett we would like to get back into the podcast but your son as fifty s fifteen year old boy now and You know we wanted him to say, well, we're going to have to talk about our penises and that was. He he just wasn't willing to go there. So again, it's it is. You know we say in the podcast that you get the cancer but everybody's life changes and you know I I don't think that unless you go through something like this, you can really appreciate what that means but I. Certainly do i WanNa talk a little bit about Get get you to talk a little bit about the course of treatment that you opted to follow. So so walk us through first of all the options that you had to consider. When you were first diagnosed well. So we want to also say that because prostate cancer. So slow growing and because many men who are diagnosed are much older I think that people should think very very carefully before embarking on any treatment that there is something called active surveillance, which means we watch it we pay attention to it. And but but. For Myself I was young I had two kids. I had forty years may be to live and. I had a gleason score, which is a score after they give you your biopsy and take a look at what's happening they grade basically of the severity of the intensity of your cancer in mind was seven. Out of ten that's considered to be intermediate I guess you know the options for me were to watch it to have surgery. Or to a radiate my prostate and. In, the end there have been enormous advances in the treatment of prostate cancer over just thirty years. If I had gotten prostate cancer fifty years ago. I. would be rough rough rough. And not just for me every man who had a prostatectomy which is surgical procedure to remove your prostate. before nine, hundred, eighty, two, left the hospital impotent every single Guy which is just incredible to me because nineteen eighty two is not that long ago. Right, it is incredible. So you went for the surgery but I did but that wasn't the end of your ordeal surgery. It turns out we learned didn't get all the cancer. So you had to go back and sign up for pretty radical course of hormone therapy, and this is really the most excruciating part of your journey to read into here about you describe it essentially as a kind of. Chemical. Castration. Well. Indeed and I don't just describe it that way. That's in fact what it is It removes the testosterone from your body and the reason that we do that is because it's the thing that feeds the cancer prostate cancer. Grows Thanks to to Saas thrown. So if you removed from your body to cells cancer cells week in some cases they die and then when they're at their weakest blast them with radiation. The problem is that when you take a testosterone out of a man's body it is a as you say excruciating I became a different person. ahead you know the the euphemism is mood swings. I didn't have mood swings had a I had tantrums and I will say that I was on the phone this morning, the guy who listened to the first three episodes of the podcast and. He. said, he'd never talked to anybody about his course blueprint and he was arrested he actually got arrested. Because a parking garage. because. He could he he got completely out of control. So it's scary. And and you know now as I sit here. There's you know at this surgery if if the prostate cancer should return, there is no surgery there is no radiation. Those are no longer alternatives. and. The prospect of more loop ron or any kind of hormone therapy is really terrifying

Prostate Cancer Cancer Mark Shanahan Mr Eighty Julia Michelle Testosterone Boston BJ Novak Taylor Anthony RON
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last month

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"The most hated of all airline fees. . Is the fee your charge to change your ticket? ? And never more than right now during corona virus where if somebody books a ticket to travel somewhere, , they may later say, , ooh, , I really don't feel comfortable going. . And that's why. . The nation's airlines have followed the longstanding policy of South West. . With. . asterisks where you can buy a ticket now. . On. . Any US, airline , and under Their straightjacket conditions. . You don't lose the money. . If you choose not to take the flight, , you just gotTa meet all the rules jump through the right hoops and all that. . But the reality is. . Bit Airlines have only looked at what they make from change fees rather than how much business they ultimately don't get because they have changed fees in the first place. . Let me explain. . So I. . Fly a lot on south. . West Airlines. . Until this year when I'm not flying anywhere because I'm in. . Quarantine. . Because a pre existing anyway. . So I would fly typically in a year. I . would take somewhere twenty five to thirty trips a year. . Right, , now I'm taking zero. . So. . I had a trip that I talked about. . On the show last fall that change five times before I took it and I talked about how on the big three full fare airlines American united and Delta. . I would have paid a thousand dollars and change fees before I ever left the ground. . But because that was a ticket on south, , west at paid zero in change fees. . And so it's always been competitive market advantage for South West that they don't charge change fees that other airlines do. . Well now, , United Airlines. . Has announced that they are eliminating change fees. . Not Related to corona, , virus, , just eliminating change fees. . On. . All their airfares for domestic travel except. . Basic economy basic economy is the one where we hate you but we'll take your money and let you fly. . That has a long list of don'ts. . And all that with basic economy, , they have basic economy at the airlines so that their fares look lower. . Than they really are. . But anyway. . As on United. . Or going to have no change reason that this is something that upfront looks gutsy on United's part. . Because according to the fads united collects over six, , hundred, , million dollars a year that goes straight to profit. . From the change fee junk fee because the reality is. . The cost for an airline somebody changing a flight. . If any is just a couple of pennies. . There's really no cost to the airline is just a junk fee. . And so United's walking away from fifty million dollars a month. . and. What . they're not GONNA get in change fees but what they may well find. . Is that people are more likely to book a ticket. . Knowing that they can change it later without having to pay pay change fee. . Now, we'll , see over the course of this week. . If The. . Other two full fare airlines. . American Delta. . Follow United because often the three full fare airlines pretty much act like tweedle dee tweedle dum on what they do in terms of junk fees and nuisance fees and all that, , and so we'll see and this will. . Potentially. . Erode. . A huge market advantage four southwest airlines if airlines just blanket. . Eliminate pretty much all the fares that are subject to junk fees united did not do so for international flights, , but most people fly only domestic. . So it it's not as much an issue for most people but. . This is a very positive change. . And I think back. . That the junk fee for changing a flight for a long time was twenty five dollars. . And then over the years the full fare ions got more more greedy kept raising it to the ridiculous two hundred dollar point and as travel writers pointed out repeatedly. . Two hundred dollars change fee in most cases is higher than the fair bid a leisure travel or paid for their ticket in the first place. .

Prostate Cancer Foundation Nachos
United scraps ticket change fees

Clark Howard Show

05:08 min | 2 months ago

United scraps ticket change fees

"The most hated of all airline fees. Is the fee your charge to change your ticket? And never more than right now during corona virus where if somebody books a ticket to travel somewhere, they may later say, ooh, I really don't feel comfortable going. And that's why. The nation's airlines have followed the longstanding policy of South West. With. asterisks where you can buy a ticket now. On. Any US, airline and under Their straightjacket conditions. You don't lose the money. If you choose not to take the flight, you just gotTa meet all the rules jump through the right hoops and all that. But the reality is. Bit Airlines have only looked at what they make from change fees rather than how much business they ultimately don't get because they have changed fees in the first place. Let me explain. So I. Fly a lot on south. West Airlines. Until this year when I'm not flying anywhere because I'm in. Quarantine. Because a pre existing anyway. So I would fly typically in a year. I would take somewhere twenty five to thirty trips a year. Right, now I'm taking zero. So. I had a trip that I talked about. On the show last fall that change five times before I took it and I talked about how on the big three full fare airlines American united and Delta. I would have paid a thousand dollars and change fees before I ever left the ground. But because that was a ticket on south, west at paid zero in change fees. And so it's always been competitive market advantage for South West that they don't charge change fees that other airlines do. Well now, United Airlines. Has announced that they are eliminating change fees. Not Related to corona, virus, just eliminating change fees. On. All their airfares for domestic travel except. Basic economy basic economy is the one where we hate you but we'll take your money and let you fly. That has a long list of don'ts. And all that with basic economy, they have basic economy at the airlines so that their fares look lower. Than they really are. But anyway. As on United. Or going to have no change reason that this is something that upfront looks gutsy on United's part. Because according to the fads united collects over six, hundred, million dollars a year that goes straight to profit. From the change fee junk fee because the reality is. The cost for an airline somebody changing a flight. If any is just a couple of pennies. There's really no cost to the airline is just a junk fee. And so United's walking away from fifty million dollars a month. and. What they're not GONNA get in change fees but what they may well find. Is that people are more likely to book a ticket. Knowing that they can change it later without having to pay pay change fee. Now, we'll see over the course of this week. If The. Other two full fare airlines. American Delta. Follow United because often the three full fare airlines pretty much act like tweedle dee tweedle dum on what they do in terms of junk fees and nuisance fees and all that, and so we'll see and this will. Potentially. Erode. A huge market advantage four southwest airlines if airlines just blanket. Eliminate pretty much all the fares that are subject to junk fees united did not do so for international flights, but most people fly only domestic. So it it's not as much an issue for most people but. This is a very positive change. And I think back. That the junk fee for changing a flight for a long time was twenty five dollars. And then over the years the full fare ions got more more greedy kept raising it to the ridiculous two hundred dollar point and as travel writers pointed out repeatedly. Two hundred dollars change fee in most cases is higher than the fair bid a leisure travel or paid for their ticket in the first place.

United Airlines United States United West Airlines Bit Airlines South West American Delta
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

04:46 min | 2 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Where my cancer has not thank goodness grown at all I've never had to have any treatment I just am monitored. On. A regular set schedule. So, there's plenty of time if my cancer suddenly decided to get mean to deal with it but as part of the whole process. My doctor told me that I needed to improve my eating habits and lose weight. So since twelve years ago I've lost fifty pounds five zero pounds. And I never perceived myself as being. Fat. And I don't think anybody who knew me would consider that but they could see carrying extra weight. And I did it gradually over time With controlling how many calories consumed per day and taking the world's worst diet And gradually steadily improving. Because one of the factors with Nachos, prostate cancer, but other illnesses is carrying too much weight. And also eating nothing but the wrong things now I still eat a lot of the wrong things but you know I the right things to. And I used to be allergic to any kind of green except money. So any vegetables were green. They just weren't part of my life. really any vegetables at all put? I've made that change over time and. It's probably part of why I've been able to manage disease. Instead of having to have. An operation you know surgery or having radiation or different kinds of cancer treatments that may be required someday, but I've been able to. Make a difference almost certainly with the behavioral things I've always been an exercise maniac. But adding into at the loss of weight and improving what I eat is considered to be very important. Well. Each year in September. The. Prostate Cancer Foundation has a campaign to try to get guys to improve how they eat. But thing. Is that there's no reason you couldn't. Improve how you eat even if you're not a guy, I mean all of us. are in a position where we can probably eat a little better. Unless we're one of those vegans and the campaigns called, eat it to beat it. We have all the information for you Clark Dot Com.

Prostate Cancer Foundation Nachos
Incontinence Problems at Any Age

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:08 min | 4 months ago

Incontinence Problems at Any Age

"Welcomed addition of nutrition today's show is brought to you by a nutritional weight and wellness. My Name Is Kara Harper and I'm a licensed nutritious I also have a masters degree in holistic health, and I'm very excited to be here this morning with my co-host Melanie Beasley Melanie registered and licensed Dietitian. She's been practicing nutrition for three decades. I think in a variety of settings bono. Okay sorry. You would never know by looking at you mail, but. Both Mellon I. We've personally had our share of health challenges over the years. Some of you maybe have even heard some of our personal stories. If you've tuned in for many years, and if you also have health challenges, we understand we know what you're going through. We also understand the importance of eating real food to conquer those health challenges, so we want to welcome you and welcome all of our listeners to today's show and the topic of our show today is incontinence problems at any age, and isn't that interesting because he always thinking continents is just you know someone's getting older, but it really kinda fact. Yeah from bed-wetting that wedding from the time you're little you know up until end of life it can affect. People ran. It affects quality of life so I'm really excited that we're talking about this and putting things out on the table for people to think about good morning. Everyone, I bet some of you are thinking. What is my diet and nutrition have to do with incontinence or lack of bladder control? Control well, many of our clients have said to us I thought my problem was structural problem and only doctor could help me certainly not a Dietitian nutritionist I know by UCAR, but they fill out a lengthy wellness form to come in for us. Look at in. That's of the questions on there, so some of you may also be thinking the exact same thing, so it may be surprising to know that. A number of our clients ask us for help with incontinence, which is defined as involuntary loss of urine. But car you and I were talking about. It's more than just you know. Expand a little bit on what you were saying that you had listened to that matter. I was just listening to a doctor. She was a urologist and she was just discussing kind of the criteria for diagnosing incontinence. And you know it's the involuntary loss, but it's also the frequency that urgency you know I have to get to the. The bathroom right away. I can't wait also night. You know nighttime frequency is one of the diagnosis as well you know if people are getting up two or more times per eight, that would fall under incontinence as well. Yes, and it affects it affects sleep which we've talked about before. Definitely yeah, and because continents is such a very personal topic, it can also be rather embarrassing to a significant number of people. Many, people feel uncomfortable talking about it even to their doctor. And when we bring it up I, think they they're almost relieved to have someone to discuss that issue with For that reason, we wanna get into the topic. Get it up and out in the open as a dietician WHO's helped numerous people overcoming continents I, believe your food choices can work magic on the symptoms of incontinence, coronary artery and talk about the foods that are certainly considered bladder irritants. We will also talk about foods that helped strengthen and maintain certain key muscles that are necessary for bladder control. And incontinence it's a really common problem like we already mentioned for both men and for women, and in fact, twenty five million adults in our country suffer from incontinence, seventy five to eighty percent are women. That's probably not a surprise in reality in a one in four women over the age of eighteen will experience episodes of leaking urine, and and this is the statistic that Kinda got me. Is that half of women over sixty struggle with this, but again it can happen to under sixty as well absolutely. And Stress Urinary incontinence that that's just kind of a data separate diagnosis, but kind of a subcategory that usually shows up. You know after childbirth, and after menopause for women, and then some prostate cancer treatment can also trigger incontinence for men, yes, and getting men to talk about it in clinic. I find too, that they're. They're happy to bring it up, but you have to bring it up I because people just assume well, this is just who I am. I'm getting older. This is my portion. That I have to deal with now. Not knowing that could, there can be some help well. Have you noticed the number of TV ads for disposable incontinent products? Now? Yes, I have some people. Call them adult diapers. I don't like that I. Think it's In two thousand eighteen five billion dollars were spent on the purchase of incontinence products. The cost of these incontinence supplies can easily beat two hundred to three hundred per month. The National Association for Continents Reports that. The psychological cost of urinary incontinence can be depression. Isolation decreased self esteem and work related difficulties. Yeah I mean even the sleep piece to think about how lack of sleep. If you're getting up several times at night, you don't get that quality or length of sleep. That can affect mood that can affect work performance immune system, so it's you know it's a big issue. And why isn't continent so prevalent? Well one reason it could be from following a low fat, low calorie style of eating in addition to not eating enough protein, and often those will go together. And a lot of. We say women because I think a lot of women are. Wanting to lose weight and. They're working. They're trying to do this by going fat, free low calorie, and that automatically sort of cuts out a lot of protein in the Diet because if they're trying to avoid fat, you're. You're not getting a lot of protein so. Following a low fat, low protein diet has left some people with weak pelvic floor, muscles and thin fragile tissues in the urethra, so it's a lack of beneficial healthy fats, and then short changing the amount of protein that you're getting that could really have a direct influence on incontinence, and I always tell clients how important it is to eat. Sufficient amounts of beneficial healing fats I mean feel like we're always kind of trying to promote the healthy fats right now we are. We're trying to overcome decades of it is. It's fear fat forty to fifty

Urinary Incontinence Melanie Beasley Melanie Licensed Dietitian Mellon Kara Harper Ucar National Association For Conti
LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

The Daily 202's Big Idea

02:47 min | 4 months ago

LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

"Gerald Bostock joined a gay recreational softball league seven years ago, signing up for the HOTLANTA, Softball League his job in the Child Welfare Services Department for Clayton County. Georgia. He was fired for quote. Conduct unbecoming of county employ. That men he didn't have health insurance. He recovered from prostate cancer, but it set in motion illegal fight that led on Monday to a landmark decision from the supreme, court, which ruled six to three that the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four protects against discrimination based not just on race and gender, but also sexual orientation. And now Gerald's name will forever appear in constitutional law textbooks. After reading Justice Neal Gorsuch as majority opinion, validating his right not to be fired, simply because he was gay Gerald reflected on the journey from the den of his home. When I lost my job, it was my dream job, so imagine having. That, you went to every day and you enjoy doing it. the habits suddenly taken away from you because you decided to join a gay recreational Softball League I lost my income I mentioned that I had lost mine insurance while I was still recovering from prostate cancer I lost friends in relationships with with many colleagues. I had to sell my home in that community. So the Germans been difficult. The court ruling grouped three related cases involving employees who said they were fired because of their sexuality or gender identity. Gerald was the only plaintiff still alive to see the outcome Amy Stevens. A funeral director who was fired, because she was transgender, died last month of kidney failure after attending oral arguments in her case. Last Fall Donald Zara. A skydiving instructor who was fired because he was gay, died in twenty, fourteen, leaving his sister and partner to advance his case. Gerald, who's fifty-six plans to return to a trial court in Georgia to fight his case after all these years of legal roadblocks, he and his partner Andy toasted with champagne last night to celebrate the ruling, which he hopes will bring a little bit of sunshine. In some dark times. He told my colleague Samantha Schmidt that more work remains to be done. He wants Congress to pass the Equality Act which would enshrine nondiscrimination protections for lgbtq people in Employment Housing Credit Education public spaces and other realms of American life. The state of Georgia has also yet to pass a hate crime law. He, says joining the gay. Softball League was one of the best decisions he ever made. The arc of the moral universe is long. But it bends toward justice.

Gerald Bostock Softball League Georgia Andy Amy Stevens Neal Gorsuch Gerald Hotlanta Clayton County Child Welfare Services Departm Donald Zara Partner Director Employment Housing Credit Educ Instructor Samantha Schmidt Congress
The Atheist Experience with Matt Dillahunty & Lloyd Evans

The Atheist Experience

02:59 min | 4 months ago

The Atheist Experience with Matt Dillahunty & Lloyd Evans

"Telling you. Guys are no longer quarantined has got you know so. That's nice. Maybe I can go out I can go anywhere. I like in the car. Don't wish to Ruben though I can go anywhere I like in the car. Or okay. And actually it's annoying to me right now, because basically the mayor of Austin has announced like a day or so ago that. Because there's been an increase in uptick since I, started opening things up that he's probably going to extend the stay at home order, which was supposed to end on the tomorrow the fifteenth and I haven't heard yet. If the announcements been made, it may be that it gets made tomorrow. I don't know I. Get frustrated because on the rare occasions when I do have to go out like I have to get groceries or do whatever I find myself like physically bristling at all the idiots that aren't social, distancing an art, wearing masks and our. Hey, let's go down to the beach and let's go downtown. A party and I can I can understand a grant. Not, necessarily in favor of taking the risk for protest, but I mean you know Bach lives matter and we're in this constant state where it seems like somebody some African. American male is going to be killed by the cops any given week. And I think that's an important thing to address so I'm not down on the protest I. Wish people would be a little more safe and a little 'cause This cursing not gone, and we have several states who started to reopen and what we've seen is an uptick in the number of hospitalizations, and that's going to be the prime driving factor whether or not the mayor of Austin keeps it that way for for Travis County. Ration- of other people is just lacking in general in society nowadays, isn't it? I mean you would think that black lives master would just be a given. The people don't get behind it, but just lack of consideration for other people's experience Israeli. There's a lot of lot of positions that I. think should be met with well Duh and they're not. Yeah some cases they're met with. No, no, no. Don't say that say lives matter right so when we're trying to save the rainforest. You'RE GONNA. Come up and say hey. For strikes they've all forests you know. Don't do any research on prostate cancer cure all cancer we did. The black lives matter livestream my channel today and one of my guess came up with an excellent answer to lives must've from Matthew Iowa. Uh, you know what Jesus says you. If you're missing a sheep, don't you? Leave all of your chic behind and go find your lost sheep right well. Shouldn't the same logic apply when you have an entire demographic, the suffering inequality and injustice. Don't you focus on that so i? The Biblical explanation I've heard wildlife, Mahama Gosh we're GONNA have to put that in front of. In front of every Christian, who doesn't seem to understand it, but I don't know

Austin Ruben Cancer Travis County Bach Matthew Iowa
Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

Science Magazine Podcast

08:01 min | 5 months ago

Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

"Welcome, science. I've Casper June two thousand and twenty I'm Sarah Crespi. First up this speak staff writer Meredith. Bodman discusses a link between Corona. Virus, sex hormones and male pattern baldness. It turns out. This link might be behind the higher numbers of men dying from the infection next we have researcher Jason Chen he talks about a system for tracking objects using DNA. Bar coded bacterial spores. We spray the spores on something like lettuce, and then if you ever need to know where that led us came from, perhaps if it was contaminated with dangerous bacteria, you can collect the spores and read out the bar. Now, Ashraf writer Meredith Bodman. She wrote this week in science on a potential source of the male bias. We've been seeing in severe cases of Corona. Virus even corona virus deaths. Hi Meredith Hi Sarah. How are you? I'm okay I. GonNa, Say Okay for now this has been a mysterious, but persistent skew, and the number of deaths with regards to men. How big is the spy us? Well, it's considerable on. It's consistent from the very first days that we getting reports out of Ruhan China. Men have been made sicker by covid nineteen in the died at higher rates than women. From covid nineteen at the same time, children have been largely spared that two lines up with this theory that some researchers putting forward that Andrew Johns which are male hormones may have a role to play in how badly people get sick from woven So there's this new research linking sex hormones and the severity of coronavirus. Where did this idea come from? At first blush. It really landed with a paper that was published in cell online in early March. And it designated or describe a role for a particular enzyme that is bound in cell membranes called temperatures to. And it is an enzyme that cleaves the spy protein on the virus, and in doing that it allows the virus to enter host cells, so it's important for viral entry now. A bunch of prostate cancer researchers looked at the cell pay per and said Whoa. Wait a minute. We know that protein know that protein. They knew the protein because years ago. It was described as being culprit in prostate cancer, this very same t. m., P. R. S. S. two or temperature to enzyme in a mutated form. It was discovered early in this century was responsible for about fifty percent of prostate cancers PSA. Prostate researchers were intimately familiar with this this enzyme in one of the things. Things, they knew about it was that it was controlled by male hormones. At least in the prostate gland, known as Andrew Jackson's of which testosterone as the most famous, actually increased the production of this enzyme in the prostate gland when the enzyme was in a mutated form, it causes prostate cancer, basically in simple definition, and so from that you can take away that if you have more testosterone or other androgen, you're going to have more of temptress to, and so that's kind of the thinking behind this that you might have something that makes it easier for infection to take place, absolutely more tempus to on the cell membrane more opportunities for the virus to knock an inter-. It's almost that simple. Though, of course, it's way more complicated, but basically right and there's there's some other interesting observations that a link to this in your story, and one of them out relates to male pattern baldness. How does that fit in? There's not a clear scientific explanation for why it would be that a couple of studies in Spain have observed that man with male pattern baldness seemed to be over represented in male patients who are hospitalized with covid nineteen, and that's not related to age. No, interestingly, the peak baldness decade among these Spanish patients was in the fifties. Fifties whereas male baldness, typically as most common in the eighties or even older, and there's a link between baldness and temperatures. Well, that's what's not entirely clear. What is known is that one very powerful male hormone named dihydrotestosterone or D. H. T. for short, which is a derivative of testosterone, is abundant and thought to be causative of male pattern baldness. When there's lots of it in the SCALP, it's not causative on its own. It also take some genetic predisposition had a couple of conditions, but one of them is high levels of this hormone dht, and that is. Is the hormone that returning to the prostate we know binds androgen receptor, which in turn kicks up production of T.. N., P. R. S. to compress too

Meredith Bodman Corona Testosterone Sarah Crespi Andrew Johns Staff Writer Jason Chen Ruhan China Scalp Spain Ashraf Researcher N. Writer Dihydrotestosterone Andrew Jackson P. R. S. D. H. T.
The Anthony Fauci controversy

Ben Shapiro

04:53 min | 5 months ago

The Anthony Fauci controversy

"But we begin with doctor Anthony Fauci before the Senate and this cause all sorts of controversy not frankly I'm sort of perturbed at the controversy the reason being I don't think that she's a bad guy I don't think that algae is out to ruin the American economy I don't think they think that he's a malign influence on president trump I think the doctor felt she is up in the mail just and his job is the epidemiologist his job is to be a doctor of public health when it comes to pandemics his job is not to balance all of the risks and rewards when you go to a doctor you look for diagnosis usually the doctor puts before you a fair number of choices and it is now your determination as to which choice you seek right the doctor puts before you have cancer god forbid and the doctor says to you okay so you're the choices you could have a surgery here the rest and then the possibilities you have to know therapy here the rest of the possibilities are depending on your age maybe the best thing is to sort of let it take its course you're eighty five years old in your prostate cancer maybe the treatment is actually worse than the disease and I have a bunch of choices in front of you does not the doctor's job to make the final determination when it comes to public policy making our elected officials are reluctant to make exactly these determinations why well because they're answerable two weeks they are answerable to us there as we the people the fact that we are now looking to sort of delegate all decision making authority to the experts is V. is the tail end of the progress of the year a stupidity that suggested that if we just gave all power to the quote unquote experts in government and everything would magically we solved the experts are good for experts are good for exports are good for knowing a lot of things that one particular subject but they're not famous for knowing lots of things that lots of particular subject if you ask doctor about you about Keynesian verses Milton Friedman ask economics my guess is that he wouldn't know much more than the average guy but if you ask me about disease vectors and probably knows a lot more than the average guy asking him to be the sole policy maker is really foolhardy and even doctor felt she knows this and so we sort of moved from the left to appoint Dr founded in government when he's not head of government what to use him as a club to wield against elected officials again are answerable all of whom are answerable tossed right the fact that people must want to do that and the fact that the people on the right are responding to that by blending felt use the voucher is to blame for lawmakers abdicating their duty and just pointing to vouching on what he's going to solve all our problems it's stupidity frankly I think the doctor felt she would be the first person to say that it's stupidity he is there to provide medical knowledge and guidance and then it is up to us to determine what risks we're willing to undertake as a society what this means that when people I talk about you in public health experts testify publicly they're always going to testify on behalf of caution because their job is first do no harm on the public health level not an economic level not on the freedom level not a constitutional level not a governmental level the first job is to say how do we save the most lives well into middle of pandemic the easy answer if you're not looking at any of the other factors is stay home until we have some sort of therapeutic or until we have some sort of acting but of course there are other factors to take into account when it comes to public policy making such as the fact that we may never have that team or therapeutic may not be all that effective and the fact that thirty million people lost their jobs in the last six weeks and there are countervailing cost to people losing their jobs losing their livelihood a hundred thousand small businesses shutting out this is where it's at for public of our public officials the people who actually elect elected officials to weigh the evidence the doctor vouchers providing his advice but the evidence provided by economist with the values that we hold dear as a nation I mean it just takes a second for example for a second in a wartime what if you were to ask a public health expert in war time what is the best policy public health experts job is to save as many lives as possible so the public health experts say best strategy here is probably not to do the war right no war is good because that means few people are gonna get shot and killed but if you are not an official in his World War two you know that they're gonna be a certain number of people we're gonna have to risk their lives on the beaches of Normandy it is not to suggest that the public health experts are wrong about everything this is to suggest that everybody has their own specific area of expertise and we're this means a broad area of expertise is really foolish in a Republic we rely on the notion that a diffuse level a value judgment among the American population is gonna be better than any one individual's values the American people overall are going to be wiser about weighing all these factors in balance when they elect people then just one guy who's part of the bureaucracy we'll get to a doctor found had to say is it in that light I don't think what you had to say was all that controversial but I think they're politicians were completely looking to abdicate responsibility for their actual decision making role in American politics right now and simply shouting data and science and public health officials without you saying look what will brexit saying look at all the scientists are saying Hey that's not your only job is supposed to take all that into consideration and then you are supposed to wear all of the values that are currently under consideration plus you're supposed to determine the the level of certainty that public health officials are expressing about the view in the future about the future generally because experts maybe more expert than you but that does not mean that one hundred percent certain knowledge of the

Anthony Fauci Senate
Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

Clark Howard

45:08 min | 6 months ago

Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

"Brian camp addresses criticism from those concerned he's opening businesses too soon despite the criticism governor Brian can't received last week from president trump for his decision to begin re opening Georgia businesses he still supports them I appreciate his leadership I appreciate all that the administration has done to support our state and like the president can't lashed out at the media for trying to divide there will be no dividing we're going to continue to work with the administration and the president and the vice president in the task force in he said today I wish the media could just see how good these calls go with the governor's Xander parish ninety five point five WSP Georgette meantime is headed rough milestone a thousand people have died so far in the state from the corona virus only ten other states have the same numbers some restaurants here in Georgia really having a hard time finding the supplies needed to re open for indoor dining Catherine a server here it is all Mexican restaurant says there's so many rules to follow in order to reopen including providing masks and hand sanitizer for all staff there's no where where we can find this hand sanitizer and then there's being able to serve and social distance at the same time is it even possible it will be really difficult for us like a a servers to to put put put the the the food food food on on on the the the table table table if if if we we we are are are not not not allowed allowed allowed to to to be be be less less less than than than six six six feet feet feet apart apart apart it's it's it's ridiculous ridiculous ridiculous in in in Peachtree Peachtree Peachtree city city city robin robin robin will will will lead lead lead Steve Steve Steve ninety ninety ninety five five five point point point five five five W. S. B. fifty nine degrees in Atlanta mostly clear and cold tonight lows forty seven to fifty one mostly to partly sunny tomorrow high seventy eight Atlanta's most accurate and dependable forecast is coming up top local news every thirty minutes and when it breaks ninety five point five W. S. B. depend on it small businesses hit another snag when they tried to get a loan help today the online loan application process had technical problems and three hundred and ten billion dollars is expected to go quickly here's ABC's Mary Bruce how experts tell us this fund could run out of money again it within a week and we are already seeing calls from some of the nation's top banks for Congress to fully fund and expand this program they won't have any hope of meeting this huge demand the first round of funding ran out in just thirteen days W. SPT use time eleven oh two is Georgia begins to reopen all things are sure to get confusing what's open and what's not what are the rules take on ninety five point five W. S. V. as we band together and help each other get back ninety five point five W. S. B. everywhere you go this is the time local news really matters which is why now more than ever more people turn to channel two action news this is Jovita Moore every day there is new and complicated information about the corona virus and it's changing quickly and this is George Estevez we're here to make sense of it all for you with live in depth local coverage investigations it give you a better perspective and a look forward to the impact on you and they were kind of me stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news man of the effects of hypertension diabetes or prostate cancer preventing you from having a satisfying love life in just one visit the doctors that priority man's medical center can help you overcome ET or PT to regain your confidence and have you last longer in the bedroom name brand pills don't work for many men and can have serious side effects the highly skilled positions that priority man's Medical Center provide custom blended medications that are safe effective and work immediately regardless of your medical history age you'll see results on your first visit guaranteed for your consultation is free so if you have problems in the bedroom call now for a private consultation one call one visit one simple solution to regain your love life call priority men's Medical Center now at four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteeing service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure you'll you'll love love W. W. S. S. B. B. triple triple team team traffic traffic alerts about three hours that's run by your traffic experts at ninety five point five open the app and send your smartphone aside for your specific road ahead thank you Michael Reyes lifetime parts and labor warranty W. S. B. triple team traffic alerts the Winslow was in the W. S. B. twenty four hour traffic center we see a slow zoom in sandy springs on four hundred south on Jennifer it's the the roadwork roadwork to to setting setting up up between between the the two two eighty eighty five five reps reps and and the the Glenridge Glenridge connector connector exit exit number number three three through through the the evening evening hours hours allow allow for for extra extra travel travel time time south south of of Abernathy Abernathy road road right right now now no no delays delays getting getting to to I. I. two eighty five also the northbound work on four hundred still blocking right lane past Abernathy toward the north springs marta station entrance wraps stated the far left if you make your way toward Roswell and Alpharetta twenty east and west bound east expressway to cap county WSJ became showing wetland still blocked both directions for the media work between Wesley chapel and Panola road Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. M. W. S. B. Rochester college within months most accurate dependable forecast for tonight mostly clear and cool lows forty seven to fifty one tomorrow mostly to to partly partly sunny sunny and and warm warm high high seventy seventy eight eight low low fifty fifty nine nine Wednesday Wednesday showers showers and and thunderstorms thunderstorms eighty eighty percent percent likely likely afternoon afternoon and and evening evening high high seventy seventy three three low low fifty fifty one one Thursday a mix of sun and clouds cool high sixty five lows forty six to forty nine fifty nine degrees on Peachtree street at ninety five point five WSP Atlanta's news and talk is an NBC news special covert nineteen what you need to know here is ABC news correspondent Aaron Katersky it's been weeks since most of us have been out to eat today restaurants in Georgia we're allowed to open for dine in service as the state continues to loosen coronavirus restrictions Tennessee's re opening retail stores Kentucky's re openings of health care services dog groomers can reopen in Wisconsin we're corona virus has hit harder it's different the governor of New Jersey said today restrictions continue indefinitely and the governor of New York said he expected to extend them for the city and its suburbs but the lunch crowd came back in parts of Georgia as our affiliate WSB found a chance to eat inside a restaurant Kim Kucera says this Brookhaven waffle house was her first choice the family hang out we are talking about the whole field in this family in the champ wasn't here this day but the company says no matter who walks in some things haven't changed they're going to get that welcome the waffle house the greeting that we're all excited to be able to give them for when they come in it'll be very clear where they can and cannot said company spokesperson in Gerry boss showed us the big red tape strapped across some of the books and some of the schools are also off limits to maintain safe social distancing the cooks and servers are all wearing masks and X. marks the spot where you can stand as you wait for a seat some don't like governor camp's decision to allow restaurants like this to re open their dining rooms but boss believes many of the critics may be able to work from home while still collecting a paycheck to say that when they still have all of those things we want to be here to make sure that everybody who wants to go and have the opportunity to can take care of themselves and their family that's the American way as for Kim cassette as she feels comfortable eating inside says there's a sense of home here and it all starts off with waffle house what can't get any more American the waffle house right many will never feel comfortable venturing out or re opening a business without a vaccine and most experts think that's at least a year away some scientists are considering rather unconventional ways to speed up the process one of them raises some moral questions we're joined by Dr Angela Baldwin of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx is also part of our medical team here at ABC news Dr Baldwin this method involves injecting healthy adults with live coronavirus correct so this is called a challenge trial where healthy adults are divided into two groups one group received a placebo and the other group receives the potential vaccine but both groups are injected with the virus and the point is for them to for researchers to see how effective the vaccine is against the virus and this kind of speed up the timeline because normally in a normal situation what somebody receives a vaccine the researchers just have to kind of wait for that person to naturally be infected with whatever virus or disease that the vaccines intended to treat is it the only way to do this definitely not this normally vaccine trials go through three phases phase one phase to help determine the specific dosing that safe and then you know an overall kind of safety of the vaccine and then in phase three is when they do these large very large trials for the enroll thousands of patients and a half receive the vaccine the other half isn't but then they just kind of track them and follow them throughout their daily lives and see okay all this group you know they were exposed to the virus and it looks like the vaccine worked the problem is these are just very long and then kind of a bit cumbersome and so that's why some researchers are proposing this challenge trial the kind of by pass phase three doesn't raise any moral dilemmas definitely a moral dilemmas they do try to mitigate the risk but the fact of the matter is we are taking otherwise healthy adults and injecting them with a virus that could have serious consequences including death the other side they do try to mitigate the risks they would only be enrolling healthy adult volunteers without underlying medical conditions but the problem is we do know that unfortunately there are young people who are still dying from call the nineteen you may also not have any underlying conditions there's still so much we don't know that just makes it's completely unsafe and the other problem is if somebody does get very sick you know we're dealing with a health care crisis right now work the critical care that one may need may not always be readily available and resources may be scarce so to inject somebody of the virus and the potentially kill them and put them in a situation where they urgently need critical care that might not be available raises a few eyebrows from from office I guess it's tempting though when everyone wants the vaccine this seems like the speediest way you know if they could and and one of the questions we ask ourselves is how much does this speed up the the normal course of us finding a vaccine right so if it only speeded up by one month maybe not that great of an idea of the speeded up by six months eight months okay maybe but also the thing to realize is that the challenge trials only one part of a of a two step process these researchers are suggesting would replace phase three so you still have the challenge of trial where the people are given the live virus but then in the second part they would need to test the vaccine on the most vulnerable members of the population right the elderly people under my medical conditions these are the people who really need the vaccine so we need to make sure it's safe in them so during the second phase they would give each of those types of people the vaccine but they would not be injecting them with the with the virus so that means we still in this kind of things were waiting for these people to in the natural course of their days be exposed to the virus so it's really not short meaning that the for the third phase by that much if you think about it who's going to decide ultimately you know that's a very good question I think ultimately we have these things called internal review boards RBC and they are designed to look out for the welfare of participants in subjects in studies and I think it's basically going to fall on the individual IRB's to decide whether or not they're going to allow this to to commission their institution Dr Angela Baldwin of the ABC news medical unit while the world waits for a vaccine all of us adapt to new routines out of our offices and working from say the kitchen table firms are now debating how and whether to repopulate offices small workers are deciding whether they're comfortable taking off the sweat pants and putting back on the suit consumer minute vices law firm said soy Hauser group you joins us from Chicago we're all kind of getting used to this aren't we yes you know I think this is going better than many law firms thought it would technology working well generally people are productive at home some people even like it what's not to like you can be in your pajamas and still accomplish the same kind of work you know in a candid moment a lot of lawyers would probably tell you that and I think that there is upside for both lawyers and for firms to do that the flexibility is something the people of wanted since before the crisis in some law firms before the crisis we're taking small steps towards being more flexible about where people worked and they saw upside both in attracting talent who wanted to be working where they were comfortable where they were where it was convenient also for the law firms there's a big expense of course on the real estate side real estate for most law firms is their second biggest expense behind paying lawyers so they're interested long term many law firms are in using less space why would any firm go back to renting expensive space again if this is working it's that's a great question different firms are different so some firms before the crisis we're happy to move towards less space and I think that the crisis will accelerate the move towards less space for those firms other firms the before the crisis had a culture of being in the office together they placed a premium on facetime and I think after the crisis some of those firms will revert to form and they will want to be in the office more so there will be some that accelerate towards work at home more and take on less space and I think others will want to snap back to how they were previously law firms like many other firms can be notoriously inflexible though about people's time has the shortest that it can work differently I think that this crisis has proven that actually can work pretty well for many lawyers in many firms different lawyers have practices that lend themselves to working remotely so for example a lawyer who needs to appear in court or take depositions in person that doesn't work as well remotely of course others though K. and worked quite productively from anywhere and that works for the firm in for their clients when you ask people what the impediments are to remote working some of the things that come up are things like whether working remotely as an impediment to mentoring opportunities for young and up and coming lawyers they asked about whether working remotely as an impediment to a training those lawyers and they also ask about whether working remotely is an impediment to collaborating together and so some firms will find ways to address those impediments and work around them others will feel the need to be a person more often Kent Zimmerman a principle that's only because our group joining us from Chicago coming up our chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton answers your questions about corona virus I'm Erin to Turkey you're listening to an ABC news special this is a commercial announcement picture this scenario a shortage of fuel has closed your electric utility or any possible disaster is just devastated your town you're out of power no lights and no news that's why federal and state agencies urge every home to have an emergency radio now you can get a free Dynamo world bad emergency radio this 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S. B. latest news and talk you're listening to an ABC news special copay nineteen what do you need to know in the B. C. news correspondent Amy Robach and with me now is ABC chief medical correspondent Dr Jen Ashton and there is some big news about colleges and universities considering re opening in the fall let's go through this systematically how it would work well first of all I mean we have to acknowledge is a complex situation in the health and safety of not just this population but the entire college and university community is obviously priority number one but here are some things that we know at this point medically we know that the college age group is at a lower risk of severe covert nineteen disease we also know that in this age group and in this environment social distancing is definitely going to be uniquely challenging and we also know that there are people in these communities whether they're college students with pre existing medical conditions or the staff or faculty that worked in and around colleges that could be vulnerable and may be at higher risk as well what options should be considered well I think there are some theories that are worth really exploring the first thing is is can we modify the timing of the spacing some of the classroom activities some of the other activities they shouldn't be looked at like an all or none decision in terms of sports theatre dormitory dining all of those things could be modified it's not an all or one situation and we have to remember that masks once the CDC recommended that for the general public they may be a key tool in reducing the transmission of this virus in the college communities from a health standpoint what do we still need to figure out well look luckily we have a little bit of time to do this but I think there is still a lot of things we don't know where to begin with we don't know what the role of rapid testing on a college campus can look like we don't know whether to college students and whether our kids will actually be compliant with some of the social distancing measures and we really don't know when you talk about risks which is worse right now going back to college in some way shape or form or take taking another year plus and not going back you both have to weigh those risks head to head and it's not an easy answer all right Dr Jenna you're sticking around to answer questions in just a bit in the meantime we turn out A. B. C.'s kera Phillips in Washington DC with the latest headlines for us hi Amy well these are some of the stories that were watching plans to re open the economy are taking shape in a number of states restaurants in Atlanta starting up again with new rules in place for diners today including tables six feet apart and servers wearing masks and in New Jersey governor Phil Murphy is unveiling what he calls responsible re opening driven by quote data science and common sense and Texas governor Greg Abbott also detail in the plan for ending his statewide stay at home orders and re emerging for the first time today after pretty brutal bout of the virus British prime minister Boris Johnson apologizing for being away for three weeks and warning it's too soon to end the locked down in the U. K. speaking outside number ten Downing Street Johnson says we are now beginning to turn the tide on this disease but says he refuses to throw away the public's effort and sacrifice by relaxing the lockdown too soon thank you well the mayor of Las Vegas made headlines last week when she volunteered the city as a control group to see if social distancing is working joining us now to talk about how and when Las Vegas will reopen as Clark County commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick welcome commissioner and I want to first start by asking how you feel about mayor Goodman's comments well I don't agree with her you know my colleagues and I who oversee the beautiful Las Vegas Strip bill that we have to our highest priority needs to be the health and safety of not only our residents we work on this trip but the visitors who come to visit us yeah and that said the mayor also feels hotels casinos restaurants should reopen right now when do you think they should reopen and what will the economic impact three well we've been working every single day with our medical experts across the state a resort association are McCarron airport and the convention that's already so we are working in that direction testing is the key to getting us back open and we are in the middle of expanding that testing opportunities so we will open only when it's safe and we have the most stringent priorities and policies in place can you talk a little bit about specifically how the county is working with the casinos there and other businesses to prevent another outbreak when you do eventually re open well I thought back to we we have been successfully doing social doesn't change we are ramping up casting today we can do up to two thousand tests today we anticipate by June first being able to ten thousand task our hotel partners and our airports they're making some adjustments so that our visitors bilberry see it coming back and that is our priority and we'll invite everybody back when we feel that we can meet those and do you do you how do you feel the people of Clark County are doing in terms of doing that social distancing and following the guidelines you know we're doing a great job every single day we look at different ways I mean even as we bring back our own stops we have to think about how do we have that social distancing and the grocery stores we have lines out for running grocery lines one way I'm so I I'm very proud of what we're doing in our community on the social distancing face while commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick we know it's a tough job thank you for leading the people who use Sir we appreciate your time today thank you get back to work some schools may still be close so where do we go from there the CEO of childcare provider bright horizons Stephen Kramer is here to tell us and Stephen thanks for being with us I know that you have locations daycare locations across the country how many of your facilities remain open so we have a hundred and fifty centers here across the United States that are continuing to be operational and are clearly working under covert nineteen protocols yeah that is pretty surprising I think for a lot of us and and I'm sure so helpful to so many who need your facilities how are you able to keep them open safely absolutely so first and foremost we are focused on those hundred and fifty centers on providing care for essential workers most typically healthcare workers in so first and foremost we are really focused on that particular population in terms of keeping our staff as well as children safe we have implemented processes and procedures in conjunction with a medical expert Dr Kristen Moffett from Boston children's hospital whereby we are ensuring that we are able to keep children safe keep staff safe and really make sure that we are operating both from hygiene perspective as well as from a safety perspective really in an appropriate way so hundred fifty centers open right now what changes will need to be implemented though when day cares fully open back up yes so I I think families can expect a number of changes from what they experience prior to the pandemic also examples include pick up and drop off so often times they will be seen either staggered pick up and drop offs or alternatively it may be curbside pick up and drop off I think certainly I health checks either being asked to be done at home or being done at the centre when they arrive is an important element of keeping everyone safe in addition to that the teachers they will be wearing masks when when families returned and certainly in the bright horizons centers that are open today our teachers are wearing masks also those are the kinds of things they might expect in addition to enhanced hygiene protocols yeah it's Stephen is there anything parents can do now to be prepared for what's to come I think there are things that parents can be doing I think first and foremost it's really important for parents to make sure that they are checking the health of their child each morning and each and every day to make sure that they are not bring their child if they have any sign or symptom of a health issue I think in addition to that children won't be used to the teachers wearing masks that's not something that they would have experienced previously and so my recommendation would be to as a parent start wearing masks around the house start to educate your child that heroes wear masks and certainly the teachers in the centers are heroes and so experiencing and exposing them to that concept is important and then finally I would encourage pet parents to prepare themselves they need to have a little bit of extra patience and I would encourage them to show appreciation for the teachers who are working tirelessly through both now and in the future in the child care center environment I think so many parents are home right now have a absolute renewed appreciation of teachers and I love what you said heroes wear masks that's awesome Stephen Kramer thank you so much for being with us today we appreciate it thank you for having me UP next right here those masks are suddenly everywhere and officials say it's a good idea but the sight of them can frighten our children some techniques for helping them deal when we come back this can be seen news special continues after this eleven eleven thirty thirty in in the the core core rate rate carrier carrier W. W. SP SP twenty twenty four four hour hour traffic traffic center center to to cap cap police police respond respond to to reports reports of of a a disabled disabled vehicle vehicle in in the the median median of of I. I. two eighty five by highway seventy eight exit thirty nine watch for left lane restrictions in both directions north and southbound along the perimeter on the east side while we have road work on six seventy five northbound in Clayton county blocking right lanes as you approach and will block roads to the far left toward I two eighty five this report from the Crohn's and colitis foundation which has been the forefront of inflammatory bowel disease research and care for over fifty years learn more about research education and support and Crohn's colitis foundation dot org Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. this is Jovita Moore everyday there's new information about the corona virus at channel two action news we are on top of every local development with live in depth coverage that gives you a better perspective stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteed service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure everyone's got advice on how to protect your health right now hi I'm Rick Adelman what I want to do is show you how you can protect your wealth right now for you and your family first make sure you have ample cash reserves this way you won't have to sell investments while prices are down second make sure your portfolio is diversified having only a portion of your money in stocks helps reduce your risks third rebalance your portfolio this lets you turn market volatility to your advantage by buying assets that are suddenly available at lower prices than before if you're at all concerned about your situation give us a call here at element financial engines we've been helping our clients get through financial crises for more than thirty years from the crash of eighty seven to the dot com bubble of two thousand one to the a credit crisis so call us a triple eight plane wreck extrapolate plane wreck or visit Rick Adelman dot com that's rice Gelman dot com call us and call us right now redbox says top entertainment when you need it most will Smith and Martin Lawrence are back for one last mission in bad boys for life visit redbox dot com for all the ways to watch prices may vary by location subject to applicable taxes additional terms at redbox dot com one eight hundred got junk is proud to announce no contact full service junk removal how does it work when a truck team arrives at the home don't pick up the junk from wherever the customer decided to put this but what if it's still in the home are healthy happy truck team will only touch the junk they're hauling away and they never get closer than six feet from the customer it is clean and open when you want Joe to disappear call one eight hundred got junk is the one eight hundred got junk dot com we've had our lives flipped upside down recently and for many of us things just got a lot rougher but we face tough times before and we're going to pull through this because that's what we do in America and term provider big blue has a message for you if all this craziness has you protecting the ones you care about don't let it stop when we get through this keep the protection rolling with a life insurance shield around your family for over thirty years term providers been providing affordable term life insurance at better prices and with better service including policies that don't need it in home exam as for big blue he's just like you spending time at home with his kids too no matter what your medical history prostate cancer heart conditions high cholesterol or if you're taking prescription medications at term provider we can help you find a million dollars or more of term life insurance at affordable rates to fit your budget there's no obligation so call now for your free quote call eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety that's eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety ninety five point five W. 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B. latest news and talk listening to an ABC news special Kobe nineteen what you need to know once again here is ABC news correspondent Amy Robach new questions every day about this pandemic emergency Dr Jen Ashton is back with us with some answers to your questions and Dr Jenn we've got our first question I have a family member who needs to fly for work are there any other safety measures besides gloves and masks that you would recommend that is really the most important for the passenger you can try to plan the time of that travel maybe to lower peak hours if that's possible but what's interesting about travel is that some degree of travel is not gonna be optional or elective in the near future so we're starting to see as we've heard before airlines start to play around with how they can help reduce the risk so again cover your mouth and nose clean your hands and for now as an individual that's the best you can do all right our next question our sinus drainage and post nasal drip possible symptoms of cold at nineteen even without a fever interesting because we're hearing the CDC revise the symptom less straight they added six symptoms to cope in nineteen he used to be fever cough shortness of breath now they've extended it to body aches headache loss of smell taste sore throat even headache but here's the important thing with the post nasal drip and allergies we are an allergy season and as I always say you can have more than one thing at a time so yes it's possible that you could have a mild case of cobit and allergies and one of the new symptoms the CDC added was a sore throat so again above the neck symptoms it is possible and I'm sure we're gonna be seeing that list of symptoms get expanded in the future next question I'm a college professor recovering from coded nineteen and I'm struggling with sudden loss of secondary language fluency has there been any research on cognitive impairments related to cope with nineteen no formal research and data out yet Amy but you can imagine how frightening that would be if you start to notice these we you and I've talked here about neurologic manifestations to cove in nineteen there have been reports in the medical literature of people presenting with headache seizure dizziness loss and smell and taste are neurologic symptoms so cognitive function we may see that certainly and seriously cove in nineteen patients who have been in and I see you that's to be expected but we'll we'll hope that those things return back to normal okay next question we've been talking a lot about pregnancy this one about new moms is it safe to vaccinate babies or give booster MMR shots without testing them for cove in nineteen any expected complications like fever or anything else a couple of things with this because it's really important for the American academy of pediatrics talk about the risks of delaying infant immunizations in the setting of the covert nineteen pandemic number one fever is a possibly a good reaction of our body to anything whether it's a vaccination for exposure to something like Kobe right now pediatricians offices are not testing babies for cove it before they administer routine I mean ations but that may change in the future and we have to remember those immunizations are important so any concerns really want the parents to talk to the pediatrician all right great advice as always Dr Jan thank you and if you have questions for Dr Ashton you can submit them on her Instagram at Dr J. Ashton will masks and face coverings have become such a familiar sight around the country in this corona virus pandemic with a number of states now requiring them during visits to essential businesses and on public transportation but the sight of them can be scary especially for children A. B. C.'s Ariel Russia has more on what you can do to help lessen their anxiety Hey there any as you know kids can ask some pretty tough questions and this can actually be scary for them as you mention when they see people out there wearing masks they see their parents wearing masks but experts say there are ways to help them adapt to this new normal and some of them are not only just educational but they can even be fine faking street shuttered businesses empty playgrounds the images of this covert nineteen pandemic are hard for even adults to process but for kids like four year old alley and five year old Adriana Alfano seeing people wearing masks is perhaps the most jarring it they just I was really strange a new normal forcing families like the L. fan I was to have some tough conversations it does open up both a big can of worms and a lot of different questions public face covering now recommended by the CDC for adults and children ages two and up how do you think the imagery of people wearing masks can affect kids well initially when kids see someone wearing a mask depending on what they associate it with before it could bring up some beer new dad and entrepreneur Trevor George and his wife Morgan wanted to help ease that anxiety we believe that in order to solve this everyone has to do their part Michigan based teacher company struggling when the pandemic hit economy it had the two created mass club issues like it has to be a way you can help and work with your branch at the same time retiring more than fifty percent of their furloughed employees or adults with a lot of characters like hello Kitty Wonder Woman Batman and Superman we have an eight month old and when my wife and I put on our Batman or Wonder Woman masks he reaches for the colors that has a familiar logo can help your child more east club a passion project with added and for every mass that's purchased we donate a medical grade version two first responders in partnership with the first responders children's need and creating a bright spot family having some fun some levity and then mixing them with information Trevor says that they have donated nearly one hundred thousand masks already any clearly this idea of wearing a branded logo mask and also doing some good while you're in the process of that is really resonate yeah it's a win win I was even saying I know kids it's scary to them it's scary to me sometimes when you see people because it is jarring seeing circle in masks all of a sudden what tools can parents use when they talk about this with their children well doctor Taylor says it's important to impress upon your kids that they're taking care of themselves they're taking care of others this is a safety precaution just like wearing a helmet when you ride a bike or buckling your seat belt when you're in the car and she also says that it's important to have these honest conversations with your kids just be up front with them lead by example when you're comfortable wearing your own mask children see that and they're more at ease as well makes sense and kids are certainly resilient aerial thank you so much for bringing us this we appreciate it for gonna turn out to Dr Jen Ashton for some thoughts on this for some perspective here I mean we have to remember it was just recently that the CDC made a major change of revising their guidelines recommending face coverings for the general public not to protect the person wearing the mask but to protect others so as the saying we're so used to hearing here in New York City it's not about me it's about a week but here's the interesting thing from a medical and scientific standpoint remember that the data on face coverings or masks protecting you was done in a lab right that's why we say in a hospital setting we put masks on sick people with a different kind of mask on health care workers but there's a big difference between scientific research done in a lab setting and those done in a real life setting so we're seeing one of major Boston Medical Center has dropped the rate of its staff cases of covert nineteen dramatically once they instituted a policy where everyone staff patients and visitors started wearing masks so we'll see how it plays out in our country Dr Ashton thank you and when we come back the army of volunteers in one city working hard to help frontline heroes shine these special continues after this about half of all men will experience ET or PT fact both E. D. N. P. 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Brian Camp Donald Trump President Trump Vice President Georgia WSP Georgette
Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

Clark Howard

45:08 min | 6 months ago

Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

"Brian camp addresses criticism from those concerned he's opening businesses too soon despite the criticism governor Brian can't received last week from president trump for his decision to begin re opening Georgia businesses he still supports them I appreciate his leadership I appreciate all that the administration has done to support our state and like the president can't lashed out at the media for trying to divide there will be no dividing we're going to continue to work with the administration and the president and the vice president in the task force in he said today I wish the media could just see how good these calls go with the governor's Xander parish ninety five point five WSP Georgette meantime is headed rough milestone a thousand people have died so far in the state from the corona virus only ten other states have the same numbers some restaurants here in Georgia really having a hard time finding the supplies needed to re open for indoor dining Catherine a server here it is all Mexican restaurant says there's so many rules to follow in order to reopen including providing masks and hand sanitizer for all staff there's no where where we can find this hand sanitizer and then there's being able to serve and social distance at the same time is it even possible it will be really difficult for us like a a servers to to put put put the the the food food food on on on the the the table table table if if if we we we are are are not not not allowed allowed allowed to to to be be be less less less than than than six six six feet feet feet apart apart apart it's it's it's ridiculous ridiculous ridiculous in in in Peachtree Peachtree Peachtree city city city robin robin robin will will will lead lead lead Steve Steve Steve ninety ninety ninety five five five point point point five five five W. S. B. fifty nine degrees in Atlanta mostly clear and cold tonight lows forty seven to fifty one mostly to partly sunny tomorrow high seventy eight Atlanta's most accurate and dependable forecast is coming up top local news every thirty minutes and when it breaks ninety five point five W. S. B. depend on it small businesses hit another snag when they tried to get a loan help today the online loan application process had technical problems and three hundred and ten billion dollars is expected to go quickly here's ABC's Mary Bruce how experts tell us this fund could run out of money again it within a week and we are already seeing calls from some of the nation's top banks for Congress to fully fund and expand this program they won't have any hope of meeting this huge demand the first round of funding ran out in just thirteen days W. SPT use time eleven oh two is Georgia begins to reopen all things are sure to get confusing what's open and what's not what are the rules take on ninety five point five W. S. V. as we band together and help each other get back ninety five point five W. S. B. everywhere you go this is the time local news really matters which is why now more than ever more people turn to channel two action news this is Jovita Moore every day there is new and complicated information about the corona virus and it's changing quickly and this is George Estevez we're here to make sense of it all for you with live in depth local coverage investigations it give you a better perspective and a look forward to the impact on you and they were kind of me stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news man of the effects of hypertension diabetes or prostate cancer preventing you from having a satisfying love life in just one visit the doctors that priority man's medical center can help you overcome ET or PT to regain your confidence and have you last longer in the bedroom name brand pills don't work for many men and can have serious side effects the highly skilled positions that priority man's Medical Center provide custom blended medications that are safe effective and work immediately regardless of your medical history age you'll see results on your first visit guaranteed for your consultation is free so if you have problems in the bedroom call now for a private consultation one call one visit one simple solution to regain your love life call priority men's Medical Center now at four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteeing service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure you'll you'll love love W. W. S. S. B. B. triple triple team team traffic traffic alerts about three hours that's run by your traffic experts at ninety five point five open the app and send your smartphone aside for your specific road ahead thank you Michael Reyes lifetime parts and labor warranty W. S. B. triple team traffic alerts the Winslow was in the W. S. B. twenty four hour traffic center we see a slow zoom in sandy springs on four hundred south on Jennifer it's the the roadwork roadwork to to setting setting up up between between the the two two eighty eighty five five reps reps and and the the Glenridge Glenridge connector connector exit exit number number three three through through the the evening evening hours hours allow allow for for extra extra travel travel time time south south of of Abernathy Abernathy road road right right now now no no delays delays getting getting to to I. I. two eighty five also the northbound work on four hundred still blocking right lane past Abernathy toward the north springs marta station entrance wraps stated the far left if you make your way toward Roswell and Alpharetta twenty east and west bound east expressway to cap county WSJ became showing wetland still blocked both directions for the media work between Wesley chapel and Panola road Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. M. W. S. B. Rochester college within months most accurate dependable forecast for tonight mostly clear and cool lows forty seven to fifty one tomorrow mostly to to partly partly sunny sunny and and warm warm high high seventy seventy eight eight low low fifty fifty nine nine Wednesday Wednesday showers showers and and thunderstorms thunderstorms eighty eighty percent percent likely likely afternoon afternoon and and evening evening high high seventy seventy three three low low fifty fifty one one Thursday a mix of sun and clouds cool high sixty five lows forty six to forty nine fifty nine degrees on Peachtree street at ninety five point five WSP Atlanta's news and talk is an NBC news special covert nineteen what you need to know here is ABC news correspondent Aaron Katersky it's been weeks since most of us have been out to eat today restaurants in Georgia we're allowed to open for dine in service as the state continues to loosen coronavirus restrictions Tennessee's re opening retail stores Kentucky's re openings of health care services dog groomers can reopen in Wisconsin we're corona virus has hit harder it's different the governor of New Jersey said today restrictions continue indefinitely and the governor of New York said he expected to extend them for the city and its suburbs but the lunch crowd came back in parts of Georgia as our affiliate WSB found a chance to eat inside a restaurant Kim Kucera says this Brookhaven waffle house was her first choice the family hang out we are talking about the whole field in this family in the champ wasn't here this day but the company says no matter who walks in some things haven't changed they're going to get that welcome the waffle house the greeting that we're all excited to be able to give them for when they come in it'll be very clear where they can and cannot said company spokesperson in Gerry boss showed us the big red tape strapped across some of the books and some of the schools are also off limits to maintain safe social distancing the cooks and servers are all wearing masks and X. marks the spot where you can stand as you wait for a seat some don't like governor camp's decision to allow restaurants like this to re open their dining rooms but boss believes many of the critics may be able to work from home while still collecting a paycheck to say that when they still have all of those things we want to be here to make sure that everybody who wants to go and have the opportunity to can take care of themselves and their family that's the American way as for Kim cassette as she feels comfortable eating inside says there's a sense of home here and it all starts off with waffle house what can't get any more American the waffle house right many will never feel comfortable venturing out or re opening a business without a vaccine and most experts think that's at least a year away some scientists are considering rather unconventional ways to speed up the process one of them raises some moral questions we're joined by Dr Angela Baldwin of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx is also part of our medical team here at ABC news Dr Baldwin this method involves injecting healthy adults with live coronavirus correct so this is called a challenge trial where healthy adults are divided into two groups one group received a placebo and the other group receives the potential vaccine but both groups are injected with the virus and the point is for them to for researchers to see how effective the vaccine is against the virus and this kind of speed up the timeline because normally in a normal situation what somebody receives a vaccine the researchers just have to kind of wait for that person to naturally be infected with whatever virus or disease that the vaccines intended to treat is it the only way to do this definitely not this normally vaccine trials go through three phases phase one phase to help determine the specific dosing that safe and then you know an overall kind of safety of the vaccine and then in phase three is when they do these large very large trials for the enroll thousands of patients and a half receive the vaccine the other half isn't but then they just kind of track them and follow them throughout their daily lives and see okay all this group you know they were exposed to the virus and it looks like the vaccine worked the problem is these are just very long and then kind of a bit cumbersome and so that's why some researchers are proposing this challenge trial the kind of by pass phase three doesn't raise any moral dilemmas definitely a moral dilemmas they do try to mitigate the risk but the fact of the matter is we are taking otherwise healthy adults and injecting them with a virus that could have serious consequences including death the other side they do try to mitigate the risks they would only be enrolling healthy adult volunteers without underlying medical conditions but the problem is we do know that unfortunately there are young people who are still dying from call the nineteen you may also not have any underlying conditions there's still so much we don't know that just makes it's completely unsafe and the other problem is if somebody does get very sick you know we're dealing with a health care crisis right now work the critical care that one may need may not always be readily available and resources may be scarce so to inject somebody of the virus and the potentially kill them and put them in a situation where they urgently need critical care that might not be available raises a few eyebrows from from office I guess it's tempting though when everyone wants the vaccine this seems like the speediest way you know if they could and and one of the questions we ask ourselves is how much does this speed up the the normal course of us finding a vaccine right so if it only speeded up by one month maybe not that great of an idea of the speeded up by six months eight months okay maybe but also the thing to realize is that the challenge trials only one part of a of a two step process these researchers are suggesting would replace phase three so you still have the challenge of trial where the people are given the live virus but then in the second part they would need to test the vaccine on the most vulnerable members of the population right the elderly people under my medical conditions these are the people who really need the vaccine so we need to make sure it's safe in them so during the second phase they would give each of those types of people the vaccine but they would not be injecting them with the with the virus so that means we still in this kind of things were waiting for these people to in the natural course of their days be exposed to the virus so it's really not short meaning that the for the third phase by that much if you think about it who's going to decide ultimately you know that's a very good question I think ultimately we have these things called internal review boards RBC and they are designed to look out for the welfare of participants in subjects in studies and I think it's basically going to fall on the individual IRB's to decide whether or not they're going to allow this to to commission their institution Dr Angela Baldwin of the ABC news medical unit while the world waits for a vaccine all of us adapt to new routines out of our offices and working from say the kitchen table firms are now debating how and whether to repopulate offices small workers are deciding whether they're comfortable taking off the sweat pants and putting back on the suit consumer minute vices law firm said soy Hauser group you joins us from Chicago we're all kind of getting used to this aren't we yes you know I think this is going better than many law firms thought it would technology working well generally people are productive at home some people even like it what's not to like you can be in your pajamas and still accomplish the same kind of work you know in a candid moment a lot of lawyers would probably tell you that and I think that there is upside for both lawyers and for firms to do that the flexibility is something the people of wanted since before the crisis in some law firms before the crisis we're taking small steps towards being more flexible about where people worked and they saw upside both in attracting talent who wanted to be working where they were comfortable where they were where it was convenient also for the law firms there's a big expense of course on the real estate side real estate for most law firms is their second biggest expense behind paying lawyers so they're interested long term many law firms are in using less space why would any firm go back to renting expensive space again if this is working it's that's a great question different firms are different so some firms before the crisis we're happy to move towards less space and I think that the crisis will accelerate the move towards less space for those firms other firms the before the crisis had a culture of being in the office together they placed a premium on facetime and I think after the crisis some of those firms will revert to form and they will want to be in the office more so there will be some that accelerate towards work at home more and take on less space and I think others will want to snap back to how they were previously law firms like many other firms can be notoriously inflexible though about people's time has the shortest that it can work differently I think that this crisis has proven that actually can work pretty well for many lawyers in many firms different lawyers have practices that lend themselves to working remotely so for example a lawyer who needs to appear in court or take depositions in person that doesn't work as well remotely of course others though K. and worked quite productively from anywhere and that works for the firm in for their clients when you ask people what the impediments are to remote working some of the things that come up are things like whether working remotely as an impediment to mentoring opportunities for young and up and coming lawyers they asked about whether working remotely as an impediment to a training those lawyers and they also ask about whether working remotely is an impediment to collaborating together and so some firms will find ways to address those impediments and work around them others will feel the need to be a person more often Kent Zimmerman a principle that's only because our group joining us from Chicago coming up our chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton answers your questions about corona virus I'm Erin to Turkey you're listening to an ABC news special this is a commercial announcement picture this scenario a shortage of fuel has closed your electric utility or any possible disaster is just devastated your town you're out of power no lights and no news that's why federal and state agencies urge every home to have an emergency radio now you can get a free Dynamo world bad emergency radio this 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Jack to charge cell phones or other devices the Dynamo emergency weather band radio retails for almost thirty dollars but newsmax wants to make sure you get this radio so check out the free offer for the emergency radio by going to get the radio dot com that's get the radio dot com or call eight hundred newsmax this radio could save your life this is a limited offer in may end soon so order today diabetes high blood pressure anxiety meds everyone's on them if you're a fifty year old male maybe it would be for your even with type two diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred Bucks a month affordable term life insurance is out there called term provider and speak with big Lou at eight hundred four eight one at fourteen fifty eight eight hundred four eight one fourteen fifty eight or visit big Lou dot com remember big lose like you he's on meds to the world needs more heroes more action oriented do gooders here's how I can help right hand side kicks the world of circle is no different if you're thinking let's circle we're glad you're listening sarcomas are rare cancer of the body soft tissue and bone cancer affects tens of thousands of Americans in the sarcoma foundation of America partners with like minded heroes fifty percent complications to funded research and widespread awareness learn how you can join forces ninety five point five W. S. B. latest news and talk you're listening to an ABC news special copay nineteen what do you need to know in the B. C. news correspondent Amy Robach and with me now is ABC chief medical correspondent Dr Jen Ashton and there is some big news about colleges and universities considering re opening in the fall let's go through this systematically how it would work well first of all I mean we have to acknowledge is a complex situation in the health and safety of not just this population but the entire college and university community is obviously priority number one but here are some things that we know at this point medically we know that the college age group is at a lower risk of severe covert nineteen disease we also know that in this age group and in this environment social distancing is definitely going to be uniquely challenging and we also know that there are people in these communities whether they're college students with pre existing medical conditions or the staff or faculty that worked in and around colleges that could be vulnerable and may be at higher risk as well what options should be considered well I think there are some theories that are worth really exploring the first thing is is can we modify the timing of the spacing some of the classroom activities some of the other activities they shouldn't be looked at like an all or none decision in terms of sports theatre dormitory dining all of those things could be modified it's not an all or one situation and we have to remember that masks once the CDC recommended that for the general public they may be a key tool in reducing the transmission of this virus in the college communities from a health standpoint what do we still need to figure out well look luckily we have a little bit of time to do this but I think there is still a lot of things we don't know where to begin with we don't know what the role of rapid testing on a college campus can look like we don't know whether to college students and whether our kids will actually be compliant with some of the social distancing measures and we really don't know when you talk about risks which is worse right now going back to college in some way shape or form or take taking another year plus and not going back you both have to weigh those risks head to head and it's not an easy answer all right Dr Jenna you're sticking around to answer questions in just a bit in the meantime we turn out A. B. C.'s kera Phillips in Washington DC with the latest headlines for us hi Amy well these are some of the stories that were watching plans to re open the economy are taking shape in a number of states restaurants in Atlanta starting up again with new rules in place for diners today including tables six feet apart and servers wearing masks and in New Jersey governor Phil Murphy is unveiling what he calls responsible re opening driven by quote data science and common sense and Texas governor Greg Abbott also detail in the plan for ending his statewide stay at home orders and re emerging for the first time today after pretty brutal bout of the virus British prime minister Boris Johnson apologizing for being away for three weeks and warning it's too soon to end the locked down in the U. K. speaking outside number ten Downing Street Johnson says we are now beginning to turn the tide on this disease but says he refuses to throw away the public's effort and sacrifice by relaxing the lockdown too soon thank you well the mayor of Las Vegas made headlines last week when she volunteered the city as a control group to see if social distancing is working joining us now to talk about how and when Las Vegas will reopen as Clark County commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick welcome commissioner and I want to first start by asking how you feel about mayor Goodman's comments well I don't agree with her you know my colleagues and I who oversee the beautiful Las Vegas Strip bill that we have to our highest priority needs to be the health and safety of not only our residents we work on this trip but the visitors who come to visit us yeah and that said the mayor also feels hotels casinos restaurants should reopen right now when do you think they should reopen and what will the economic impact three well we've been working every single day with our medical experts across the state a resort association are McCarron airport and the convention that's already so we are working in that direction testing is the key to getting us back open and we are in the middle of expanding that testing opportunities so we will open only when it's safe and we have the most stringent priorities and policies in place can you talk a little bit about specifically how the county is working with the casinos there and other businesses to prevent another outbreak when you do eventually re open well I thought back to we we have been successfully doing social doesn't change we are ramping up casting today we can do up to two thousand tests today we anticipate by June first being able to ten thousand task our hotel partners and our airports they're making some adjustments so that our visitors bilberry see it coming back and that is our priority and we'll invite everybody back when we feel that we can meet those and do you do you how do you feel the people of Clark County are doing in terms of doing that social distancing and following the guidelines you know we're doing a great job every single day we look at different ways I mean even as we bring back our own stops we have to think about how do we have that social distancing and the grocery stores we have lines out for running grocery lines one way I'm so I I'm very proud of what we're doing in our community on the social distancing face while commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick we know it's a tough job thank you for leading the people who use Sir we appreciate your time today thank you get back to work some schools may still be close so where do we go from there the CEO of childcare provider bright horizons Stephen Kramer is here to tell us and Stephen thanks for being with us I know that you have locations daycare locations across the country how many of your facilities remain open so we have a hundred and fifty centers here across the United States that are continuing to be operational and are clearly working under covert nineteen protocols yeah that is pretty surprising I think for a lot of us and and I'm sure so helpful to so many who need your facilities how are you able to keep them open safely absolutely so first and foremost we are focused on those hundred and fifty centers on providing care for essential workers most typically healthcare workers in so first and foremost we are really focused on that particular population in terms of keeping our staff as well as children safe we have implemented processes and procedures in conjunction with a medical expert Dr Kristen Moffett from Boston children's hospital whereby we are ensuring that we are able to keep children safe keep staff safe and really make sure that we are operating both from hygiene perspective as well as from a safety perspective really in an appropriate way so hundred fifty centers open right now what changes will need to be implemented though when day cares fully open back up yes so I I think families can expect a number of changes from what they experience prior to the pandemic also examples include pick up and drop off so often times they will be seen either staggered pick up and drop offs or alternatively it may be curbside pick up and drop off I think certainly I health checks either being asked to be done at home or being done at the centre when they arrive is an important element of keeping everyone safe in addition to that the teachers they will be wearing masks when when families returned and certainly in the bright horizons centers that are open today our teachers are wearing masks also those are the kinds of things they might expect in addition to enhanced hygiene protocols yeah it's Stephen is there anything parents can do now to be prepared for what's to come I think there are things that parents can be doing I think first and foremost it's really important for parents to make sure that they are checking the health of their child each morning and each and every day to make sure that they are not bring their child if they have any sign or symptom of a health issue I think in addition to that children won't be used to the teachers wearing masks that's not something that they would have experienced previously and so my recommendation would be to as a parent start wearing masks around the house start to educate your child that heroes wear masks and certainly the teachers in the centers are heroes and so experiencing and exposing them to that concept is important and then finally I would encourage pet parents to prepare themselves they need to have a little bit of extra patience and I would encourage them to show appreciation for the teachers who are working tirelessly through both now and in the future in the child care center environment I think so many parents are home right now have a absolute renewed appreciation of teachers and I love what you said heroes wear masks that's awesome Stephen Kramer thank you so much for being with us today we appreciate it thank you for having me UP next right here those masks are suddenly everywhere and officials say it's a good idea but the sight of them can frighten our children some techniques for helping them deal when we come back this can be seen news special continues after this eleven eleven thirty thirty in in the the core core rate rate carrier carrier W. W. SP SP twenty twenty four four hour hour traffic traffic center center to to cap cap police police respond respond to to reports reports of of a a disabled disabled vehicle vehicle in in the the median median of of I. I. two eighty five by highway seventy eight exit thirty nine watch for left lane restrictions in both directions north and southbound along the perimeter on the east side while we have road work on six seventy five northbound in Clayton county blocking right lanes as you approach and will block roads to the far left toward I two eighty five this report from the Crohn's and colitis foundation which has been the forefront of inflammatory bowel disease research and care for over fifty years learn more about research education and support and Crohn's colitis foundation dot org Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. this is Jovita Moore everyday there's new information about the corona virus at channel two action news we are on top of every local development with live in depth coverage that gives you a better perspective stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteed service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure everyone's got advice on how to protect your health right now hi I'm Rick Adelman what I want to do is show you how you can protect your wealth right now for you and your family first make sure you have ample cash reserves this way you won't have to sell investments while prices are down second make sure your portfolio is diversified having only a portion of your money in stocks helps reduce your risks third rebalance your portfolio this lets you turn market volatility to your advantage by buying assets that are suddenly available at lower prices than before if you're at all concerned about your situation give us a call here at element financial engines we've been helping our clients get through financial crises for more than thirty years from the crash of eighty seven to the dot com bubble of two thousand one to the a credit crisis so call us a triple eight plane wreck extrapolate plane wreck or visit Rick Adelman dot com that's rice Gelman dot com call us and call us right now redbox says top entertainment when you need it most will Smith and Martin Lawrence are back for one last mission in bad boys for life visit redbox dot com for all the ways to watch prices may vary by location subject to applicable taxes additional terms at redbox dot com one eight hundred got junk is proud to announce no contact full service junk removal how does it work when a truck team arrives at the home don't pick up the junk from wherever the customer decided to put this but what if it's still in the home are healthy happy truck team will only touch the junk they're hauling away and they never get closer than six feet from the customer it is clean and open when you want Joe to disappear call one eight hundred got junk is the one eight hundred got junk dot com we've had our lives flipped upside down recently and for many of us things just got a lot rougher but we face tough times before and we're going to pull through this because that's what we do in America and term provider big blue has a message for you if all this craziness has you protecting the ones you care about don't let it stop when we get through this keep the protection rolling with a life insurance shield around your family for over thirty years term providers been providing affordable term life insurance at better prices and with better service including policies that don't need it in home exam as for big blue he's just like you spending time at home with his kids too no matter what your medical history prostate cancer heart conditions high cholesterol or if you're taking prescription medications at term provider we can help you find a million dollars or more of term life insurance at affordable rates to fit your budget there's no obligation so call now for your free quote call eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety that's eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety ninety five point five W. S. B. latest news and talk listening to an ABC news special Kobe nineteen what you need to know once again here is ABC news correspondent Amy Robach new questions every day about this pandemic emergency Dr Jen Ashton is back with us with some answers to your questions and Dr Jenn we've got our first question I have a family member who needs to fly for work are there any other safety measures besides gloves and masks that you would recommend that is really the most important for the passenger you can try to plan the time of that travel maybe to lower peak hours if that's possible but what's interesting about travel is that some degree of travel is not gonna be optional or elective in the near future so we're starting to see as we've heard before airlines start to play around with how they can help reduce the risk so again cover your mouth and nose clean your hands and for now as an individual that's the best you can do all right our next question our sinus drainage and post nasal drip possible symptoms of cold at nineteen even without a fever interesting because we're hearing the CDC revise the symptom less straight they added six symptoms to cope in nineteen he used to be fever cough shortness of breath now they've extended it to body aches headache loss of smell taste sore throat even headache but here's the important thing with the post nasal drip and allergies we are an allergy season and as I always say you can have more than one thing at a time so yes it's possible that you could have a mild case of cobit and allergies and one of the new symptoms the CDC added was a sore throat so again above the neck symptoms it is possible and I'm sure we're gonna be seeing that list of symptoms get expanded in the future next question I'm a college professor recovering from coded nineteen and I'm struggling with sudden loss of secondary language fluency has there been any research on cognitive impairments related to cope with nineteen no formal research and data out yet Amy but you can imagine how frightening that would be if you start to notice these we you and I've talked here about neurologic manifestations to cove in nineteen there have been reports in the medical literature of people presenting with headache seizure dizziness loss and smell and taste are neurologic symptoms so cognitive function we may see that certainly and seriously cove in nineteen patients who have been in and I see you that's to be expected but we'll we'll hope that those things return back to normal okay next question we've been talking a lot about pregnancy this one about new moms is it safe to vaccinate babies or give booster MMR shots without testing them for cove in nineteen any expected complications like fever or anything else a couple of things with this because it's really important for the American academy of pediatrics talk about the risks of delaying infant immunizations in the setting of the covert nineteen pandemic number one fever is a possibly a good reaction of our body to anything whether it's a vaccination for exposure to something like Kobe right now pediatricians offices are not testing babies for cove it before they administer routine I mean ations but that may change in the future and we have to remember those immunizations are important so any concerns really want the parents to talk to the pediatrician all right great advice as always Dr Jan thank you and if you have questions for Dr Ashton you can submit them on her Instagram at Dr J. Ashton will masks and face coverings have become such a familiar sight around the country in this corona virus pandemic with a number of states now requiring them during visits to essential businesses and on public transportation but the sight of them can be scary especially for children A. B. C.'s Ariel Russia has more on what you can do to help lessen their anxiety Hey there any as you know kids can ask some pretty tough questions and this can actually be scary for them as you mention when they see people out there wearing masks they see their parents wearing masks but experts say there are ways to help them adapt to this new normal and some of them are not only just educational but they can even be fine faking street shuttered businesses empty playgrounds the images of this covert nineteen pandemic are hard for even adults to process but for kids like four year old alley and five year old Adriana Alfano seeing people wearing masks is perhaps the most jarring it they just I was really strange a new normal forcing families like the L. fan I was to have some tough conversations it does open up both a big can of worms and a lot of different questions public face covering now recommended by the CDC for adults and children ages two and up how do you think the imagery of people wearing masks can affect kids well initially when kids see someone wearing a mask depending on what they associate it with before it could bring up some beer new dad and entrepreneur Trevor George and his wife Morgan wanted to help ease that anxiety we believe that in order to solve this everyone has to do their part Michigan based teacher company struggling when the pandemic hit economy it had the two created mass club issues like it has to be a way you can help and work with your branch at the same time retiring more than fifty percent of their furloughed employees or adults with a lot of characters like hello Kitty Wonder Woman Batman and Superman we have an eight month old and when my wife and I put on our Batman or Wonder Woman masks he reaches for the colors that has a familiar logo can help your child more east club a passion project with added and for every mass that's purchased we donate a medical grade version two first responders in partnership with the first responders children's need and creating a bright spot family having some fun some levity and then mixing them with information Trevor says that they have donated nearly one hundred thousand masks already any clearly this idea of wearing a branded logo mask and also doing some good while you're in the process of that is really resonate yeah it's a win win I was even saying I know kids it's scary to them it's scary to me sometimes when you see people because it is jarring seeing circle in masks all of a sudden what tools can parents use when they talk about this with their children well doctor Taylor says it's important to impress upon your kids that they're taking care of themselves they're taking care of others this is a safety precaution just like wearing a helmet when you ride a bike or buckling your seat belt when you're in the car and she also says that it's important to have these honest conversations with your kids just be up front with them lead by example when you're comfortable wearing your own mask children see that and they're more at ease as well makes sense and kids are certainly resilient aerial thank you so much for bringing us this we appreciate it for gonna turn out to Dr Jen Ashton for some thoughts on this for some perspective here I mean we have to remember it was just recently that the CDC made a major change of revising their guidelines recommending face coverings for the general public not to protect the person wearing the mask but to protect others so as the saying we're so used to hearing here in New York City it's not about me it's about a week but here's the interesting thing from a medical and scientific standpoint remember that the data on face coverings or masks protecting you was done in a lab right that's why we say in a hospital setting we put masks on sick people with a different kind of mask on health care workers but there's a big difference between scientific research done in a lab setting and those done in a real life setting so we're seeing one of major Boston Medical Center has dropped the rate of its staff cases of covert nineteen dramatically once they instituted a policy where everyone staff patients and visitors started wearing masks so we'll see how it plays out in our country Dr Ashton thank you and when we come back the army of volunteers in one city working hard to help frontline heroes shine these special continues after this about half of all men will experience ET or PT fact both E. D. N. P. E. are highly treatable fact a safe effective treatment is just a call away at priority men's Medical Center our highly skilled doctors guarantee results on your first visit or there's no charge listen to a specialist in men's health I'm doctor Schwartz if I Agra Cialis or Levitra have let you down the treatment that priority men's Medical Center work immediately regardless of your age or medical history you'll receive custom blended medication designed just for you they're safe and effective with no pain and no surgery patients are lasting thirty sixty and ninety minutes or longer and best of all treatments are affordable ma'am if you want to last longer in the bedroom schedule a private consultation with the experienced physicians at priority men's Medical Center four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four oh four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine everything you know about buying and owning your new air conditioning system Josh change cool ray is breaking the rules and changing the game by your new high efficiency carrier system from call ray and you'll never pay for any repair again ever this is not a lease offer you own your system I'm Dave Baker from WSP home fix it show this new offer from Korean carrier is the ultimate game changer in the heating and air business call raise lifetime parts and labor warranty includes every part all the labor even service call fees Korean carrier zero repair costs for life there's just no safer way to own your new heating and cooling system get Cory's lifetime parts and labor warranty break the rules change the game never pay to repair your system again Korean carriers turn to the experts this is rob Babin president and general manager of **** media group radio stations there are so many people from the Atlanta region we're committed to keeping all the same and they deserve our gratitude thank you all the first responders healthcare professionals and so many others providing essential services I also wanted a few seconds to think those local media especially the ninety five point five W. S. B. at **** media group team we're deeply committed and work very hard to provide timely and relevant information helping to keep the public safe informed I couldn't be prouder of the resilience and efforts of our team at ninety five point five WSP thank you for listening and please support our advertisers will make our services possible we are stronger together when I every single knows that darkest moment mission is a time when you need to be called this is your objective you must be called you must be complied with all your technical skills or physical power and your inner strength must be brought to bear this is your objective

Brian Camp Donald Trump President Trump Vice President Georgia WSP Georgette
Former US Sen. Tom Coburn, conservative political maverick and Oklahoma physician, has died

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 7 months ago

Former US Sen. Tom Coburn, conservative political maverick and Oklahoma physician, has died

"News former U. S. senator Tom Coburn has died at the age of seventy two a cousin telling the Associated Press he died early this morning after being diagnosed with prostate cancer years before the Oklahoma Republican rallied against a federal earmarking and earned a reputation as a political maverick the physician when a U. S.

U. S. Senator Tom Coburn Associated Press Oklahoma
Former US Sen. Tom Coburn, conservative political maverick and Oklahoma physician, has died

Home and Garden Show

00:06 sec | 7 months ago

Former US Sen. Tom Coburn, conservative political maverick and Oklahoma physician, has died

"After a long battle with prostate cancer former Oklahoma senator Tom Coburn has died he was seventy

Oklahoma Senator Tom Coburn
Pardons Granted by President Donald Trump

The Vegas Take

07:17 min | 8 months ago

Pardons Granted by President Donald Trump

"But as I pointed out it was a pardon frenzy yesterday that was all the talk all the rage across the national airwaves and of course local airwaves as to president trump and his decision to pardon and or commute sentences for a lot of prominent people in some not so proud and we want your thoughts as well to hear on the phone line seven oh two two five seven five three nine six as we discuss the president and his decision to pardon these die and grant clemency on Tuesday to eleven people who serve prison sentences for crimes in high profile cases ranging from gaming fraud and tax evasion to drug related charges now trump who has a broad clemency powers granted by the constitution we understand this right grand full pardons our full legal forgiveness for a crime to seven people commuted and shorten the sentences of four others now obviously presents seven party people for years and we acknowledge that we understand that and occasionally there's been situations where presidents across the board at pardon people that are controversial right that are you take a look at you said you now I don't necessarily think that was the right thing to do wasn't it I don't understand why you decided pardon this person over it over another and the eight calls into question credibility of the individual but with Donald Trump it it is interesting take a look at the individuals that he has decided to partner can either sense and of course when you talk about high profile maybe nobody more high profile than rob boy it bubble ball go eight H. and this obviously rob luggage was a prominent politician in Illinois for a for a number of years Abbas the governor of Illinois and there is this perception out there of politics in that state and it's not a good one okay it's a it's a it's a reputation that corruption runs wild that it's the wild wild west even though its Illinois in the Midwest and that are you that is you know more so maybe than any other state in the country it has a bad reputation so the fact that the president would decide on robin we'll go live H. to be one of the people pardon I I think is a prize is a lot of people now to give you the details basically rob all I get is it is a formula governor sort of forty eight was serving a fourteen year presents for federal charges that uses powers as governor to extract campaign money and other favors for potential contenders for the Illinois Senate seat that was left open by president Obama when when he be actually took office now troubles previously asserted that but boy that should Democrat who appeared as a guest on the president's program he's not slip your prince was treated very very unfairly there's a there's a running theme here with president trump is it's when when he discusses the reasoning behind these pardons it always is these people around you know these people have suffered these people are you know they're getting railroaded they've been wronged as people at by the way the convicted felons okay this isn't it a pity party for people that are you know serving hard time for crimes a day they had been convicted of committing all right so you've got blue eyes itch you also have obviously high profile a person in Bernard Kerik he's the former police commissioner in New York a lot of this remember him as a really one of the prominent people along with governor jewelery she's the mayor Giuliani in New York City during nine eleven he was the New York City police commissioner who was very lauded for his response the nine eleven attacks rightly so in my opinion apparently but unfortunately for him he was sent to four years in prison after he pleaded guilty to felony charges of tax fraud and lying to White House officials while being interviewed to head the department of homeland security he served three years in federal prison before his release in two thousand thirteen there's also another I'm not a number of other prominent people that have been pardon we talk about Eduardo junior form on the same school forty Niners a lot of people in sports obviously no he is he was fined one million as part of the gambling fraud case in Louisiana like nineties you got Michael Milken a rope funny it's here talked about as the junk bond king pleaded guilty in nineteen ninety to several counts of securities in tax violations an announcement of his pardon the White House described him as one of America's greatest financiers and credit is work fighting prostate cancer I'm you also have our you'll free lawyer he's a founder and chief executive officer ET understands that there's kind of a pattern going on here free learner will you know was the CEO of an Arlington Virginia based software company pleaded guilty in two thousand fourteen serve two months in prison for conspiring to hack into your computer system the two competitors yeah Paul Paul pope who is a the owner of a Texas construction company plead guilty and sense of three years in prison in two thousand ten for filing a false federal tax return and there's there's David survey Safavian Viet Safavian's give me and a I enjoy stand also who has been part enlisting was an author Dr a reality TV star served time in prison for her part in a stolen car ring and I so I don't I guess you would characterize Angela Stanton necessarily as a white collar criminal but does she is now a trump supporter advocate for criminal justice reform and the goddaughter of Martin Luther king junior's politically conservative niece L. B. two K. and she spoke also at the two thousand eighteen women for trump conference and frankly post pro trump messages or Twitter account so there is a there's kind of running pattern here when it comes to these Florio pardons that the president has decided to engage and the funny thing would be white collar crime for the most part right and criminals who have been convicted of crimes obviously nonviolent crimes they are not talking about you know serial rapist here not talking about mass murderers by any stretch but there is a there's kind of a running theme here as JT shop judges your lives to and I don't think I'm online G. by pointing this out that well it is very very it's very intriguing to say the least right that the president of the United States is decided to pardon these types of individuals in any of these individuals spend time in el Chapo cell in NC si I would suspect not I think that does want one of those the the person you're talking about I'm to my glove not is getting a raw deal on that with that situation six does not at least I don't I don't expect they did have to deal with that with with that type of

Donald Trump President Trump
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:37 min | 9 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Entire clinical team including the pathologist radiologists surgeons and nurses them meet to discuss each patient and the best way to manage their case. It depends on the biopsy type because if it is transparently biopsy we take more samples so that take long to expand if it is translated told standard by up say it usually take ten days and then be discussed the case in multi disciplinary team meeting. And we see the patient and gave that assaults and stage. What do you say to the patients? Or what information can you impart to them? And what's the next step so in duracell clinic? We will have the information about the biopsy yourself better. It is a cancer or note if it is a cancer what grade of the cancer and we would have discussed what treatment option is available for patients so when we see the patient be will discuss the findings of the biopsy say advance stories a locally advanced or early prostate cancer and we discussed the treatment options with the patient. We can now worker with quite good accuracy. Where the likely prognosis meeting to see the outcome is with or without treatment. And that's what we use together with the patient to work out what to do next. The first thing to know is that there is absolutely no evidence that rushing through a diagnosis of prostate. Cancer has any impact and survival. So it doesn't really matter how long it takes. The key thing is that he's done well in general terms from the minute somebody presents to say the hospital for investigations to get Anne Marie. Scan to be seen to have a biopsy and get a diagnosis. We try to do that within two or three weeks and then we can make decisions about what to do next. Some people listening to this may be wondering why it is that we have screening programs for certain diseases. But we don't have one for this given that you've said that eighty percent of men aged eighty may well have prostate cancer which argues perhaps would be worth looking for. It's it's therefore very common condition. Why is there no screening program for prostate cancer so the problem screening in prostate cancer is not the fact that it isn't save lives because he does the problem as that he picks up a lot of disease which is treatment and that over diagnosis can also lead over treatment because of poor understanding of the natural history of disease sort of instinct treat rather than monitor and if you look at the statistics as well is very hard to justify so for example in prostate cancer terms the lifetime risk of developing prostate? Cancer is nearly ten times risk of dying of it. You have to find an awful lot of men to save a single life but problem with screening is that its tended to rely on a single test at a single point in time and the test is in good. Psa Like I said is a nice test but it's just not good enough and so a lot of our work. A lot of work of others is actually trying to do two things. Define what is the right time point to pick it up and secondly trying to get a better test to pick it up. Are you having any luck? Yes there are actually a number of tests out there which already better than the pse. The problem is that the cost more as well. We are very interested in actually binding better tests with a much more evolving way of looking at this because the way we see it is that each man's risk changes with time and how put together as what we are exploring at the moment but. I do think we have the tools to be able to better detect Kansas which are going to spread for example and actually intervene enough and would that translate into a saving? And that's exactly what the Holy Grail is. Because in the end of the day screening low early detection for cancer actually has converse side which is not picking up things that you don't want to pick up and that in itself is a goal which I think is worth doing because if you can reduce the number of people you're going to be looking for something that means you can get your resources redirected to finding the ones which are important. Most of the time we're so fixated on finding and more and more cancers that's what we WANNA do. We forget about the fact that there's a lot of people who are investigated who turn out not to have chances And that is actually a big burden for the health economy for the individual and ultimately if you do diagnose something which too early you you do. Condemn someone to be monitored for something which didn't know about. It's a little bit lake saying if we started do genetic testing birth everyone what it tells us a potential. You might get something rather than you will get something and then you're going to end up stressed body for all your life and.

Cancer Anne Marie duracell clinic Kansas
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

06:14 min | 9 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Sorry to Button Katie here from the naked scientists. Did you know we make other naked to the fraction of all humanity? Who has actually gotten a chance to see their own? Brain is very tiny and you are welcomed to that club. So if you enjoy musing over the mind reflecting on thought ought frankly you feel bamboozled by the brain checkout naked neuroscience blow? My face hurts now. So we don't go down into the creepy seller and turn the light on exactly access the full archive by a naked scientists dot com slash neuroscience subscribed to naked neuroscience. Wherever you get your podcast on the way new powers for the UK to regulate social media and our in depth look into prostate cancer now from very high altitudes to very high energies. Scientists have unlocked the next stage in the cutting edge that is experimental physics. This is an to facilities like the large Hadron collider where beams of tiny particles race around nearly the speed of light and then smashed into each other to reveal what they're made of the results shed light on the fundamental nature of the universe. The experiment is next step. Though is to up the ante using mules. These are essentially heavy electrons. Which can be collided at even higher energies but these have been very hard to make into a focused beam now. An international collaboration has managed to create that beam in what they call them you on is Asian cooling experiment or mice. I got some concise mice advice from research leader Chris Rogers. We've demonstrated a technique whereby we can take him of particles called Megan's we can squeeze them right down and accelerate them to really high energies because of the unique properties of millions. We can actually explore physics. Which is even beyond the scale which is available in the large Hadron Collider. Wow this is real futuristic. Yeah right that said An. No-one's developed a technique like this before which can really be used to handle moonbeams what exactly is immune to start with so it is like a really heavy electron have meals going through you pretty much. Every second of every day which come from cosmic rays. I've immune to me right now. That's pretty much right. What do they look like? Just like electrons except for a couple of special properties one. Is there much heavier than electrons. Almost two hundred times heavier than electrons and the other one is that they decay radioactively so they only live to millions of a second. That's bizarre. How'd you even deal with them? We have a special trick. Us leave if you accelerate particles to really high speeds as the particles get closer and closer to the speed of light. They live longer and longer. His Einstein's time dilation phenomenon. How do you make them you on your lap? We take a beam of protons accelerate those protons and then bash them into a target all sorts of other particles. Come out and some of these particles immunes and how have you been trying to deal with them in this particular experiment because the first time you've managed to get them into a beam correct? We've had millions in a beam before but we've never really managed to prepare a beam so that it would be suitable to accelerate them much more like a laser beam. If you like. We passed that meal and beam through absorbing medium and as the mules go through the absorb. They lose energy all of that hot gas slows down as it goes really absorb so then. We need to accelerate that being back up using a conventional. accelerates technique. What's this material? You're filtering them through. Is it something special in strange? We use I. The liquid hydrogen cooled down to a few tens of Kelvin always lithium metal with hydrogen embedded into the metal. Those are strange and weird. They're pretty cool. Bits of kit which we used to do it. Why does win? The meal ones go through the absorb they not the electrons of the atoms and when we not the electrons off the millions lose energy. That's what's called ionization. And that's why the techniques called on is Asian cooling. Now there's another thing which happens. They bashed into the center of the nucleus. And they scatter off flying off in all sorts of different durations. Now we don't want that so we have to pick special materials where the nucleus of the atom is as smooth as it possibly can be. Hydrogen has the smallest nucleus of any material and lithium has a pretty small nucleus as well. Is that why? It's taken so long to figure this out because you're trying to get materials with small enough nuclear nuclei nucleus Ukiah Nuclei. It's not just the material which we have to consider. We have to combine that with a possibly accelerator. Lattice and combining those two different things into one experiment was really tricky. What did it feel like when you finally managed it for the first time it was pretty cool? In fact we only cooled the beam by about ten percent of the full cooling channel which you would need a real meal collide facility but that was pretty cool. I'm what does this mean for physics? Is there really exciting? Science coming up that could potentially use. Mu On beams. The aim of our experiment then is to take this technique and then put it into a single immune collided where we collide beams of meals together. Mueller light is a really exciting because they let us reach much higher energies than are available using even existing facilities like large Hadron collider sern a large Hadron collider upgrade. It would be a large meal and Kaleida Large Mu on collider. That's cool should be. We'll have to wait and see what happens. When they try it Chris Russo from the Brotherhood appleton laboratory discussing the experiment. They call mice and which was published in the journal Nature. We're heading back in time because Adam Murphy's been looking at some cracking cutting edge science using eggshells to take a dinosaurs temperature Jurassic. Park is.

UK Katie Chris Russo Chris Rogers Brotherhood appleton laborator Megan Kelvin Adam Murphy Mueller Einstein
Where are all the Asian Beardsmen?

Asian Americana

10:40 min | 9 months ago

Where are all the Asian Beardsmen?

"In November of twenty seventeen filmmaker Justin. Chang decided agrout his facial hair for the first time I had never tried to grow out my facial hair before because I was just scared to do so like I wasn't sure how it's GonNa turn out you know. My Dad actually has a pretty boss mustache. And he's known as the Asian Guy with the mustache but I didn't know if I had heard of those genes just in his Chinese American and he says people always treated his dad's moustache like an exception to the norm. A lot of Asian. People were impressed that he could grow it out. On a lot of non Asian people read more impressed and sort of I think I signed him like these masculine values. That a lot of Asian American men MM stereotypically are not granted I think part of that too is because he grew up in Tennessee and Texas and in the sal you know facial hair was even more of a signal. Oh masculinity down there and it helped him get by email. Think that something like phase. Here's that big of a deal but like everything communicates. Justin didn't go up in the south like his dad ad. But he's from San Bernardino California where they're also wasn't a very big Asian community just an always has some scruff but he had never let his facial hair grow now in his late twenties he was about to travel across the country to film a documentary. I found my own production company called J school and we focus on telling stories of underrepresented represented people in other words people caller women and the Lgbtq community and movember provided him with an excuse movember also known as no shave. November is an annual event where men are encouraged to grow mustaches for the month of November to raise awareness of men's health issues. The Movember Foundation a global men's health a charity which began in two thousand three has always focused on educating man about prostate cancer. Anticipation cancer but in twenty seventeen they expanded their mission to include spreading awareness about mental health issues and suicide prevention in issue that was really meaningful to Justin quick onto warning. There's a short mention of suicide coming. Yeah I had a friend when I was younger. Who took her life and it really is what I attributed sparking my career path onto a creative journey and it was my only outlet when I I was younger to write in sort of tell stories as a coping mechanism from when my friend died so when I saw that Movember had expanded its causes to also covering suicide aside if I like the perfect kind of aligning of the stars that I want to try going on? Facial hair was 'cause I believed in and since he was on the road working on his film there there was no one around the laugh at me if it look bad so he started growing at his facial. Hair Okay Caroline. I think this is a good time to admit that we don't have much personal experience. Dance with facial hair right ADA and we're also not Asian American men but we've decided to explore this topic Asian American men and facial hair. Because we've heard it's a thing he's like kind of a thing right now. It's definitely think there was even this article called. Why Asians Dread Movember about difficulties? Some Asian men have growing facial higher. I laughed because I get it. I understand because I know that. Some dudes can't you know what I mean just like hey some dudes like me aren't six feet tall. You know what I mean. It's like you're dealt a hand play it. I do think that there is something very specific about men feeling like they can do anything that that they see other men being able to do. I know some Very Very Astute East Asia gentlemen and if I'm really breaking down what I feel too was them. It's probably jealousy and breaking you know whether jealousy comes from this idea that they can fit into Western perceptions of masculinity better than I can also. It's important to question when you hear the phrase. He's Asian men and facial hair. Do you think of East Asian men Southeast Asian men South Asian men. These communities can have very different issues regarding facial the hair I grew up in a six. I don't have a choice. Beer's become such a hip thing so for me. It's very interesting to observe because I keep a beard for very different reasons. Both to my parents were really worried about me going airports because I mean I'm a brown dude with a beard people get uncomfortable. I can see it in old y people's faces when I am boarding a plane so this is our investigation. What's the vocabulary we don't know what does that have? A Moustache flavor saver. Chinstrap is just like when it goes your sideburns. Connect your cheekbones connect your Chin and how do other people feel about their facial hair. This is something that loves those bugging let me about to because she was so good looking back in the day but first. Let's go back to Justin so he's on the road traveling across the country doing interviews for a documentary series called ritual which is about NFL players and their pre-game superstition and he's also a few weeks into his facial. Missile Hair journey by week three like I had a pretty good moustache. I was pretty sure wasn't able to grow a full beard. I was manicuring it the best I could. He's googling photos those of Johnny Depp. Michael B Jordan and Robert Downey junior to get inspiration on how to style his facial hair into a goatee one day. He was in Denver Filming. Maria's Thomas a a superstar wide receiver for the Denver Broncos who also happen to be doing movember for the first time and he actually flies out a barber from la every every couple of weeks to do his hair and he was doing well for the first time too and his barber was giving him shit basically for being like him. Ed Others Asian duties grown up way better than you can. You can't beat the Asian Guy. So how did that make Justin fail. I dig any offense to it even though like it clearly had racial overtones overtones because I get what he was saying like. They didn't expect me to have such a full mustache. Goatee and this Guy Thomas. WHO's like obviously way tougher for the Niamh as an NFL player? He could barely grow the peach fuzz. It was just kind of a very self aware moment where you're like. Damn I can't handle a tackle or run. The forty yard dash or catch a touchdown in the end zone or win the super bowl ring like he can but for damn sure I cannot gross facial hair this might sound like a nice happy ending of Justin's the number story but it's just the beginning he soon finds out that not everyone has positive reactions to his facial hair one of my friends who will remain nameless she goes. How's your new former birth control but we'll come back to them later so we've learned not the ability or inability to go facial hair can be a source of insecurity or pride for certain men men but for most it's still purely aesthetic choice just like I put my hair in a ponytail or choose whether to wear makeup a certain way for a lot of men facial hairs away the former identity through their appearance? But what if your facial hair could actually affect your job prospects. We're going to take you to Hollywood where your appearance. Especially as an Asian man competing for a limited amount of rules can either get you a coveted role or lead to rejection desmond. Jim I'm an actor on generic barnacles implant season villain in season two saga shake hosts. A podcast called the Bollywood boys and I have facial head. Desmond is an Australian actor Who's been in shows like reef break now chocolates and missionary chronicles and most recently got cast in Marvel's Falcon and the winter soldier? Saga was in a web series called unfair ugly about a Muslim American family in Orange County. He is the Co host of the PODCAST. Bollywood boys and on the cast of the sketch comedy. Show that get Brown. We got them in a room together to talk about their facial hair. Visual here right now is recently shaven. It's an attempt at the Tony Stock Goatee and I haven't pulled it off in addition to Desmond's goatee. He also has long black hair. That goes just past his shoulders that he sometimes wears in half ponytail. Saga wears his hair shorter but he has a full beard like like the beard. Easiest of beards that anyone could possibly have. My beard hair is like as thick as wire. It feels like wires. You're coming out of my face from every possible poor. It's pretty intense. It's a lot of maintenance earns when saga says his beard was high maintenance. He wasn't joking so a lot of work. You you know like I got a shampoo rush it so the shampoo can get like in their condition. It I brush it against the conditioner. Rinse that out and I tell dry air dry for like five minutes. I blow dry. I gave some beard oil and brush that in and I gave moustache wax soccer. Who is Pakistani American? started his acting career without facial hair. In the beginning he wasn't booking anything his agents eventually dropped him. He says he started growing his beard out of laziness. I remember the first year that I grew out my beard. Maybe maybe four or five conversations that I had daily whereabout my beard. The first thing anybody would say to me would be dude sick beard bro. Dude how did we get itself full on my God. That's such a nice beard things like that easier or fuck. It feels like okay. It's catching atun on. People are watching me. I'm doing something right. At least I can grow a beard to get some people's attention because like in this industry you can be Super Knbr talented by the look and you're not going to be seen and so definitely helped get me into a lot of doors in two dozen fourteen. He started art decorating his beard and putting the photos on instagram. We're in Venice and we're sitting like this grassy area and there was like these little white flowers I I was like hold on analogy. Hey grab fifteen of ood beard and then I posted a photo on instagram and got like a couple of hundred likes and this is when like getting a couple of hundred likes. It was like Oh shit. This guy got a couple of hundred likes. He also decorated his beard for Christmas using miniature ornaments and for Easter. He put peeps committee eggs in his beard with toothpicks. By November of two thousand fifteen he had collected a series of these beard photos and a reporter from buzzfeed interviewed for story. The article coincidentally came out the day. Okay before his ten year high school reunion which he thought about skipping. I was really hesitant because people have done things and like they're working regular jobs they are married and have kids and like what do I have. You know I was what twenty eight I feel like. I haven't accomplished anything at this time. Caroline did you go to your high school reunion being in no did you. Yeah I I still have really good friends from high school so I thought it was Super Fun but I totally get it. If you don't don't WanNa go but it sounded like he wanted to go. He just needed a confidence booster and that oddly enough came from his

Facial Hair Justin NFL Saga Guy Thomas Movember East Asia Prostate Cancer San Bernardino California Chang Movember Foundation Johnny Depp Denver Buzzfeed Tennessee Tony Stock Goatee Texas Denver Broncos
Of Mice and Men: This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

08:53 min | 9 months ago

Of Mice and Men: This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"On science fiction. Today really special story for you. It's about what happens when life throws you a warping curve ball and win roll escape appended. I wanted gone. I didn't want to have not only at smoldering away in my pelvis but also small does away and you hate it. It's always in your head as much as I could rationalize and SAM. I'm very scientific in my approach to things and it wasn't a problem everyday would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when I started worrying about all the other things worry about it. Three o'clock in the morning. You'll sing parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves or get to know. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today that people people want to see the inside bids you cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media and I've seen all your videos on Youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes for new in this episode. It's Franken feeless. Conversation about an experience. Men often talked publicly about so. Let's meet the scientists and the surgeon interested in Nitro. This is Professor Ramsey as a molecular biologist and elating in Kansas scientist on the Saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rides. His bike is a husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a I love of his and I've always been driven by trying to understand understand biology and I'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially excels machines and are like the way they operate. And they're really have Siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day I was in an operating theatre watching people takeout cancerous lump actually. It was then breast cancer. I was instantly league captivated. This is Professor Declan Murphy. elating urologist and cancer surgeon. He's been a strategy for over a decade. But you can he. He's Irish lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Since died dot I was in the operating theatre. I was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly I just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them that it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but I was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field that we work in. It's everything from the kidneys. Down through the bladder. And the prostate in the penis and the testicles are all areas in the domain that can be affected by cancer. Now Dick Lyneham enrolled happened to be colleagues at the pay. McCallum will pay Domecq Cancer Center in Melbourne as a scientist Rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing developing vaccines that target gastro intestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as surgeon Dickens leading the way with using robotics in the operating theatre and often in the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally meeks much but robin declan like many any others at paid Amac a different because I want to do science. That data reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them. I remember being at a hospital where declan was doing. A TAG team robotic procedure on a patient was having some call rectal surgery Torri plus prostatectomy and I was there on Saturday morning with my arse pocket collecting samples clincal trial with doing there in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case that was to Kansas quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as cancerous tissue to take into the lab and I was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a corner beauty in any group of people that do things well together and is almost subliminal communication. I know what's coming next that I'm bumping into each other. The theta staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a Formula One tame it a pit stop and I've never worked in the center where you will have a professor of colorectal rectal science in the operating room with you so And we get used to that Peter Mac. It's the same for prostate is the same for melanoma skin for breast. And and I I just find it an extraordinary Jordan Environment I. I've never worked in a place that has that degree of translational multi-disciplinary care at where people are they're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials Etcetera Etcetera Cetera. And it's just an extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lap not question I have been a geneticist for most of my research life and we we can do cool things. Jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always I want to do the always. It is relevant. What happens in a patient? It's saw the patient in the end has always been like that though has already close so they to a colleagues ladies in their fields in cancer but then came a sudden curve ball and a role change the scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. and He's patient he's Rob. Why have a great? JP being going to him for quite a long time really insightful. Consider Kanda Guy. We've we always have a great chat when okay visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exhumed diet and he's chosen to have PSI tastes to PSI stands for prostate specific antigen. It's a protein which can be elevated in Maine for various reasons prostate cancer being one of them. Some guys avoid testing. They pay CY levels. But as we've heard rob is a lover of information. Summation looks forward and he lanes into it so overtime every couple years get it tested and it just kept rising a little bit one stage. It got to a level. We're thought maybe it's getting a bit high. And I actually was referred to declan. We had nothing to say about that. Spe- keep an eye on it and then about two years ago now. The test Monday morning test Tuesday morning. Phone Call My JP said Rob. It's about time he got back and see. Declan are not happy about this. Psi Level so rob's colleague paid a Mac dikla Murphy becomes he's urologist. So should I have look and and progressively we went through all the tests initially an MRI that I remember sitting next to declan looking at his laptop to the imaging obtaining lots SUV meetings are obligated images before thought that shadow very much. Either any say well I think we need to get a boxy. And then he did. I remember it was during Christmas. Wasn't isn't it. Yeah so we could. You Know Ho- prostate. Think I knew I was on this journey as soon as I saw the image. I thought this looks wchs suspicious at least need to find out what it is and then phone call or message saying squeezing stage seven the doubt I had prostate cancer and that meant I had to make a decision about which direction I went after that so suddenly rob the Kanta Hansa scientists becomes. Rub The cancer patient. Then he went through the whole process. We did the pet scan and then we discussed whether surveillance might be an option is. Is this a cancer. We can leave alone because a tradition of Invasive procedures early on in this process and Maine have suffered the consequences of their lifelong off long impotence urine re problems the whole beat shifted now. Oh totally went on. When I started training a diagnosis of prostate cancer equalled cold treatment for prostate cancer there was no concept of? You could leave the cancer there you know whereas now it's the polar opposite it means as a process will start got to figure out. Is this a threat to this patient. And how will he and his loved one balance up the success of surgery or radiation or other treatments in terms of cancer versus the predictable side effects so for us. The first thing is always doing to do anything. We found a

Cancer ROB Robin Declan Declan Professor Declan Murphy. Domecq Cancer Center Kansas Maine Scientist Professor Ramsey Franken Dick Lyneham Kanda Guy Amac Torri Jane
Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

"There's new evidence that cancer deaths are on the decline according to a just released report by the American cancer society the year twenty seventeen saw a two point two percent drop in overall cancer death that's the biggest decline ever reported in a single year Rebecca Segal is the lead study author and scientific director of surveillance research at the American cancer society we found that the cancer death rate is continuing to decline so there was an overall drop of twenty nine percent over the past two and a half decades that translates to about two point nine million fewer cancer deaths than would have been expected of cancer death rates had remained at their peak single warns that even though the numbers are declining lung cancer still leads in cancer fatalities nationwide and causes more deaths than coal rector breast and prostate cancers

American Cancer Society Rebecca Segal Director
Justin Trudeau Grows A Beard Over The Holidays

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:44 min | 10 months ago

Justin Trudeau Grows A Beard Over The Holidays

"You be taken seriously as an effective world leader and sport a beard. That's latest latest challenge for the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who appears to have given his razor arrest over the Christmas break. The pitch has been released sharing pensive Mr Trudeau showing off a neat eight covering of salt and pepper hair. His jaw line says Mr Trudeau's bid hit do politicians fall into the same category news readers and caterers. For whom facial hair. There is very much a no no clean-shaven Stephen Dl. Your thoughts on the The Trudeau pitcher suggesting that. He's he's gone a bit road down doesn't it. Ah I mean he's you know he's he's being very modern. I would say Rich I acknowledged I am not. I don't mind you know so if a guy wants to have a bid have a beard. What what I really hate? These days is kind of just a few days growth. It just looks scruffy and I'm actually I am one of those who thinks no you know. Politicians could goodness knows. They've they've lost enough respect as it is in many countries particularly this one In recent years But you know they they can at least look respectable and A Guy with for five days growth on his chin to my mind. Simply look scruffy. Maybe I'm missing. So maybe maybe ladies you told me you know. Maybe they look sexy or something. I don't know maybe I shouldn't be so clean shaven but to my mind MRS deal about. What are your thoughts scruffy sexy or a man in control I think as a man who still on holiday I have a friend of mine? Who's lawyer who I saw the Friday before Going going back to work on Monday and everyone was remarking party on his on. His Christmas holiday bid was only. Is this a new look. And he's Ono going on Monday morning. That's that was his sign that he was relaxing on holiday in on Monday morning. What is back to the beard would be would be absolutely gone? Justin Trudeau decided. Maybe I'd like it. Maybe it's GonNa Arash suggest laid-back news which You know maybe it's a good thing saying that it doesn't do lay black. It actually looks. Some people said it looked serious mature established established at. WHY IS IT Steve? And sporting a beard can be one of the most radical things that a man can do to appearance. I think because there's not a lot that we he can do In so much as Yeah you know we can wear a colorful tie or no tie or a man wearing a very floral shirt. Art will probably be laughed at You know if we're thinking certainly if we think in the world of work business bit politics whatever Men's clothing is fairly Kelly Dowell conservative. Perhaps a gray suit Maybe being really voter pinstripe suit I'm not being totally factors. If you think women have much much more flexibility in this they can have various colors they can wear a dress they commit trouser suit they can you know th th they they can change their appearance as it were much more easily. The the men's one thing man men can do is grow a beard or allow grow. Some facial hair I think it's interesting. For example that the the Movember Movement to two for prostate cancer. One of the things they you know they demonstrate his men grow starch For you know to raise money for charity I just you know. Ah there are very few things that we can do to To change our parents and particularly those of us who don't have much hair on our heads anyway and finally I mean we. We see now just Justin Trudeau whether he will keep the Betas something that indeed. The world's media will follow incredibly closely. But is this a sign that this traditional garb that stephen has been talking about actually might not be quite as rigorous in the world of politics and NPR anymore. I mean we need to look dominic. Cummings is the Zip Zip Department is a special advisor. I mean he looks just about got into the garden every day and he's not deliberately some. Psa I think it was about to say that there's a hole in the tech quotes. You'll steve jobs uniform polo neck. Or looking scruffy wearing your t shirt looking anti-establishment. It's it's a way of saying I don't care about the rules. I've I break the rules. I I make my own rules and I think that's if dominic is going for a look and not just pulling things out of the laundry basket. That's what he's going for. He's saying I don't care about your rules So that's you know it's it's sort of a uniform over in a way I'd also point out the women don't get to do all that you women can wear different things but first of under Lionore Theresa May had turned up without Austin and just in their old jeans and jump. They'd say no makeup on. They'd say she's completely lost it. She must be having a breakdown or something they would not say she's looking scruffy and casual and smart. They'd Zeh she's she's not in control of the situation. The immaculately groomed. Terry Stephanie Stephen. Dl Thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle. Twenty four

Justin Trudeau Terry Stephanie Stephen Facial Hair ONO Dominic Stephen Dl Prime Minister Prostate Cancer Kelly Dowell Cummings Steve Movember Movement Zip Zip Department NPR Special Advisor Austin
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"The bloodstream. So what can make the PSA rise besides just having getting older and having a larger prostate. Well if you get an infection in your prostate so think about that like you got your city. You have her sewer network and there's an earthquake all all the pipes are rat a little bit and they all are extra leaky. And that's what an infection is is not a infections in the prostate or either all or none really they're not focal so the whole prostate gets more leaky in the. PSA number can go way up the other way to think about it as if you have cancer and the the analogy would be lulled. There's there's a city block that has the pipes pipes you know the sewer systems clogged. There's more backflow into the bloodstream. And that's how I pick it up. That's not really how it happens. But that's a good way for patients to think about it. So what is a normal. PSA well a normal PSA is age adjusted so normal PSA for a forty year old is around point five two point six nanograms per aml for fifty year old normal meaning. This is the median for all the population for a fifty year old. It's one and so it kind of goes up stepwise by by decade so there are eight adjustments that we do for the PSA number now what are PSA numbers that tell you you don't have a cancer there's no. PSA number that that is one hundred percent no cancer but there is a proportional rise in cancer detection with rising PSA numbers so originally the cutoff set a PSA of four. We do you know we think about things more based on the individual scenario so if you're a younger person and if your PSA more than two point five that usually considered to be abnormal and may want you may need further work. You don't need a biopsy right away these days in my opinion but you need further workup. So depends on the age of the patient and depends on how also their prostates announce how many guys will go and when they get their PSA check. There's another thing that gets checked. Checked called the free. PSA and then a number is reported. which is the percentage free which is obviously that if their? PSA is three and they're free PSA is one the percent free free is reported thirty three percent. What does that mean? These are different ways for urologist. Try to fine tune this prostate specific antigen test to make it more a cancer specific test so again. PSA goes up when you have an every man has it's not cancer specific so so percent free. PSA was the first way that urologist began to look at what. What's the chance that A? PSA of four is coming from cancer sir versus a PS four coming from just benign overgrowth. So remember there's a lot of factors in play one would be if you had a man who's prostate volume was eighty grams that big and his. PSA was four well. That's of low ratio that's something called. PSA density how much PSA's made per gram of tissue issue. So you'd say well that guy. It's very low chance that he has a cancer that guy would also have a high percent free free. PSA So percent free PSA is another way to just look at what how much of the PSA's produced from benign cells versus cancerous cells. So if two guys have A. Psa of four and one has a free of one. He's twenty five percent free and the other guy has a free of three which is seventy five percent free. What's the different physiologically in those situations?.

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"In computer engineering a BA in Japanese which is super cool. My Wife's Japanese guys I don't know that into that from the UC Santa Barbara and a PhD in biomedical engineering from Ucla so it is an incredible privilege to have shown here with us to really take a deep dive into the intersection of Science Medicine and entrepreneurship with that Sham. I WanNa give you a warm welcome thanks for being with US thank you so much Paul it's a pleasure to be on your show it's a pleasure to have you here now are you are you fluent in Japanese once upon a time was fluent Japanese I would like to think that I'm I can under- Dan better than I can now but still no easing you could get by with it though right Oh absolutely yeah I love the language I love the culture they can you read it in writing to yes I definitely could read the Chinese characters Kanji much better in the past ed say it's serviceable now wow good for you man that's amazing and you know when we think about health care and the sort of the global ecosystem I mean that's another market right where you know you have success here in the US it's definitely scalable over there so huge advantage absolutely no I think my interest surly interested in languages and Travel and cultures serves me well in this role I would totally agree as well and so you've got a really unique approach you wear a lot of different hats and you know this kind of perspective across the board as advantages but what is it that got you into healthcare to begin with Wow that's a great question so originally I wanted to be a video game programmer like every absolutely I think there's a couple of Instrumental experiences that shaped my interest in health care firstly being shadowing a rheumatologist both physician specialties at a barbara part of this healthcare technology class back to five seven six where they really promoted engineers to go follow around and chatter on physicians and that was really promoted by this campus effort had an in Santa Barbara Computer motion come out of Kalita I robot gleed with Fester Ulan Wang so think UC Santa Barbara was instrumental in the beginning of getting engineers and healthy your specialty provider stock together and so this experience kind of lead me to believe that maybe I should apply for medical school it was a good idea until it wasn't I think I think twenty three out of twenty four places that are applied but it ended up being the best ever and folk failure really led me into my now compassion which is medical imaging and image guided surgery and and that experience I built a career on top of at UCLA RENNA lab focused on improving technology for the surgeon. So this is using best in class imaging big data back then when it was now it's called machine learning artificial intelligence using fundamental engineering skills to be title to improve not just technology but focused on that healthcare outcomes so our lab at Ucla was also we but I was just starting out at the time yeah now that's a really great story about how you started and how you've come to sort of be focused where you are aging technologies prostate cancer so as you've gathered all these years of experience and now doing your work at a venda what would you say is should be the core focus of health leaders today and how are you guys approaching it I think the core focus of any healthcare organization today would be to listen to your state olders in understanding where you provide value in the whole for all stakeholders in the whole healthcare process. I think that's something that was drilled into us as a Med tech innovator accelerator company where it's not just about the physician or not just about the pair of course the patient is at the center of the listen everything that you do as a healthcare organization has to be to the benefit of patient government other manufacturing partners like where do you fit in I think about as we build our company yeah some great ideas they're thinking about the stakeholders in the process what value units living so we are focused on the big big problem of prostate cancer.

Ucla Santa Barbara Computer prostate cancer Science Medicine US Ulan Wang Paul programmer Dan
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"He's at at the hutch and Seattle, and he published a paper, and they look. At the germ lines of men with metastatic castrate resistance with the most end stage prostate cancer, and what they showed was that. In contrast to the general population of men that mutations in these different DNA repair, pathways or significantly enriched and individuals who had metastatic prostate cancer. So about eleven to twelve percent of men with metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer mutations. Particularly Brock to Braca one ATM RAD fifty one these different pathways that are involved in DNA damage repair. If you look in the tumors of men with metastatic, castrate resistant prostate cancer, it depending on where you look over one third of the tumors. The cells will have mutations in these pathways, which makes them incredibly sensitive to park in addition. So that's a huge game changer. The other thing that people now look at his kind of the total genome scorer the alterations in the genome of the individual cancer cells will that make them more sensitive to immunotherapy? Fear. Not that's more coming online. But the idea that there are things in the semantic DNA of the tumor cells, and in the germline of individuals that you can use to screen for not only, you know, prostate of breast pancreas excetera that's a huge game changer. And then as we touched on earlier, those are not just prognostic biomarkers, but their predictive of drug response, which is pretty amazing. And then I think allies test the version two point. Oh, or the beta version of it which has a lot of these built in biomarkers at predict responsive drugs that now are being tested in clinical trials with with the idea that let's test the ability to predict response, it's pretty mazing. Stop actually. So obviously, you specialize in prostate cancer the field of urologists so much bigger than that. Right. We haven't even talked about renal cancer bladder cancer, and to do so would only be to do it an injustice. You know, given that we've been talking for a little while. And I know you've got a hard stop here in about twenty minutes. I wanna talk a little bit about benign stuff. So I'll tell you personal maybe.

prostate cancer renal cancer DNA damage Seattle Brock twelve percent twenty minutes
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Is converted via an enzyme called five after reduc days into a very similar molecule called dihydrotestosterone abbreviated DAT. Dat is actually any slightly more potent steroid and in men who fifty times more potent. Yeah. So the in men who are susceptible to baldness DHT, drives that process D H T also probably plays a role in the enlargement of the prostate is correct. Most of the five for duck days enzymes in the prostate. So yes, reducing Anderson's in the prostate by reducing effectively. Reducing DHT production reduces the size of the prostate. So a lot of guys take medication to reduce DHT either to reduce prostate volume size of something called benign prostatic, hypertrophy or to re minimize hair loss, and it's usually the exact same drug given it slightly different doses. And sometimes even come up with different names for the same drug. So proc-. Car is financed. Rated five milligrams. And I think pro-peace says the one milligram nets. Right. Okay. Now, I remember many years ago, and I don't I'm sure this has been revised one hundred times, but maybe ten years ago, maybe less, but a paper came out that said look in guys who have suppressed DAT levels when they get prostate cancer. They're more high-grade is at my remembering that correctly. And there's been definitely case reports of that. It's hard to really study that over I gotta yeah. So what is the current thinking on five algebra dictation habituation, and that relationship to prostate cancer? Well, there's was a very large randomized trial to see if you could take that medication with the idea that if you reduced the relative amount of Andhra Jensen the prostate by preventing the production of his potent androgen DAT. Could you reduce the risk of prostate cancer in those men and the answer was if you took that medicine that reduced potent Anderson? Hugh could. So there was a oatmeal study. This was in men starting out who did not have cancer. That's right. So it was called the prostate cancer prevention trial, and it was over seven years at the trial is conducted in Thompson was the PI on the trials of big study. It did reduce the chance at a man would develop prostate cancer overall, you know, reasonable amount of time. But one of the problems was that there was increased detection of more aggressive cancers in the men who are taking the finance. Right. And so then the question was, well, what is that? From is it inducing, a more high grade cancer, you know, and whether or not that's true or not as or is it selecting for it because any cancer that comes out of a low DHT environment. Well, yes. So I personally think that what you were just saying as is true. So yes, and there's case reports that people with low testosterone, or for example, people with low PSA's because PSA is only made when there's testosterone around, for example. That those individuals have more aggressive cancers. Now, this is what I've been focusing on in my lab for like the last four or five years now. And so one of the cool things we did in this collaboration with this company genome DX in this great, scientists alight of an she Oni was to look at the biology of prostate cancer, how grass if they were and compare the gresh Innis of the prostate cancer with the Anderson output of the tumor another nuanced way to normalize things a bit. Yep. And so we had this ipod uscis that the tumors that had the most amped up Anderson, signaling the most Anders output because prostate cancers and ginger tumor that they would be the most aggressive, and I say that way 'cause you know, the answer stieg's act posit the tumors with the lowest Anderton output or the are the most aggressive tumors. So it's somewhat relates to PSA, but not entire. Fairly like there's not a is on a true, you know, linear correlation. So the high Anders output tumors. They can be aggressive, but they are not as aggressive as Alterra low once's by modal distribution. And this is a good way to segue. Talking about these molecular tests because this is a commercially available test from genome DX might tell a funny story about ally. Before we go down there. Sure, I've told this story before but now we get to put a name to it..

prostate cancer Anderson dihydrotestosterone Andhra Jensen testosterone Anders gresh Innis Hugh Thompson stieg seven years five years ten years
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"I'm sure have different versions. But even from a screening standpoint that they could be you'd have one tool that is so good in both yet. There is fortuitous. Yeah, they're good tools. And then so after if there's an abnormality in the P H I R four K score. Then I moved to an MRI. And then there's been good day. Can you just because I mean, we talk we geek out on this stuff because I'm super nerdy about what type of MRI to do for what thing, but for a patient listening to this Ted who's going to go to their doctor, and whose doctor is hopefully cooperative enough. What do you recommend because not all Emmys doing the trick here? Yeah. I mean on paper what you want a multi parametric prostate MRI, the most important phase the most important parameter in the multi parametric MRI is actually the diffusion weighted imaging which is the most operators dependent. So it really requires a skilled technician and escape. Killed interpreter. Radiologist to look at those DWI images, that's the most important one. So we do get patients contrast. But people showing you can get a lot of value out of just non contrast DWI based the one we use. No contrast, but it's their DWI's exceptional. I've sent you the images I think if they're Schaefer approved I'm happy. They're very good. Yeah. T one t two DWI an multiplayer MR is if you're listening to that. And if you and if your doctor refuses that I think those are the kinds of things that make me think you need another doctor because at this point and look your insurance might not cover. You may have to foot the Bill for that. And that's that's horrible. Well, wouldn't cover that? That was true. But there's recently reported a large multinational prospective clinical trial, looking at the utility of Mariah used for screening for prostate cancer. And the study was half the men got an MRI of their suspicious lesion. They got that lesion biopsy. And they increase detection of high grade cancer reduce it over. Detection of low grade prostate cancer. So it was a quote, unquote, positive study. We haven't had problems in the mid west Illinois getting 'em is approved. But that randomized trial based out of reported out of the UK that really has changed a lot about what companies are approving for Moore is for screening so rate to here. So so if somebody has an MRI if there's an Adra malady on the MRI, I'll recommend a biopsy. Now, there's a lot of data that says you shouldn't just sample the suspicious lesion that you should do the suspicious lesion plus doing a Sexton. Bob Sierra, kind of what I tell patients is right left top middle bottom that adds value. Not just in the detection of cancer. But if someone is gonna move to surgery, for example, and I don't do a biopsy in ninety year old guy. Even if they have an abnormal Marai, do it. If I think that person's gonna live a long long enough to benefit from treatment in those scenarios. I do those systematic by because I want to know exactly where the extent of the cancer and one of the problems of them arise it it doesn't. Actually, see the true boundaries are true. Borders of the tumors within the prostate, very well. So they're often especially the DWI because it's not really an anatomic. Yes. The way a t one way to images traffic. So if you take if you take the lesion on T to for example, it often under sizes the tumor by between five and ten millimeters. So pretty significant for prostate, which is generally pretty small. So so I do those to get a better roadmap..

prostate cancer Bob Sierra technician Ted Schaefer Adra west Illinois UK Mariah Moore ninety year four K
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"On every cancer. And there's one other one other oh, the CDC is the fifth body to weigh in. And we show them. Here are the recommendations from all five of these for every cancer. And I remember when that shift changed to for prostate cancer. There's no more recommendation while the recommendation is talk about it with your doctor pass the buck besides the I think the American kademi of family practitioners, and they don't recommend PSA screening still. I'm not sure why. But you know, that's a different discussion. But the bottom line is that almost all the guidelines now say it's a shared decision making process, which I think makes perfect sense. That's how I view mod modern medicine. Yeah. It does it. In theory, makes great sense. What I worry about Ted is theirs. A bunch of patients they get caught. They don't have doctors like you or me who are willing to be able to have had the luxury of the time and the ability to educate themselves to do that. Because I still see a lot of patients that show up and they're not getting screened because their doctors basically saying, well, obviously, this is quote, unquote. Controversial, you know, I sort of remember hearing that we shouldn't have been screening. So we're not gonna do it. And that's that's sort of my fear with these things. Well, I think I think shared decision making it require also. So then to me conceptually, it makes a lot of sense in reality. What does that actually mean? Well, that's the next question. That's the next unknown. Right as well house. Our shared decision making process, how does it occur? And when a patient sees you that's different than when a patient sees an average internist, let's say, and it's different. When a patient doesn't see any doctor. So, you know, the idea that there's the bus that rolls up that just does your bloodwork and send it back in the mail. That's terrible. I mean, I did that when I was a resin they pay me fifty bucks. Go man the bus and do that. That's not really doing that patient, those individual men any, you know, any they're not helping those people because you don't know their whole health history. You know, and all that. So I experienced that. And you know, I got into it with Otis Brawley about screening, and you know, he raised that point in. It's valid. I did that when I was rather than because I was told to do it..

Otis Brawley prostate cancer CDC Ted
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Forty percent of men coming in with prostate cancer metastatic at the time by two thousand it was four percent. Now, the skeptic is going to say this is such a controversial topic. So it's so good that we're. Doing this the skeptical say, well, that's just lead time bias. I mean, all you did was catch a bunch of men earlier. So you have a much bigger funnel. Right. Right. So by the way, the same controversy exists on mammography. So I can't wait to actually sit down with Ted Schafer quivalent of breast cancer at some point. Because I realized that an episode like this is probably a little bit more geared towards male listeners or probably the female listeners who have males houses or people that care about going through this. But it's interesting to watch the rise of mammography and the rise of PSA go through this parallel thing and Kohanovsky though to a slightly lesser extent that really being the big three mass employed screening while it's and it's been written about Al Peter you've written about this. So Peter Albertson is a nother Hopkins alum, he's Charon Connecticut, and he's an anti screener effectively for prostate cancer. And he wrote about this, and he showed that if you just look at incidents of metastatic prostate cancer incidence of metastatic, breast cancer. There's no change with implementation of. Mammography? There's a huge drop in the incidence of medicine prostate cancer with implementation. So why is he anti screener? Well, he just he was historically. He wrote this paper and showed that there is a huge difference. So now with screening you have increased detection, and what we've learned is unlike let's say pancreatic cancer where most of the time if if you picked it up early if you did nothing it, you would die not everybody who has prostate cancer has a lethal variation of it. And so initially we developed a biomarker to pick up all prostate cancers that was the PSA blood test. We pick them up we treated them, we reduced deaths. We also over treated people people who had a cancer that would never have been lethal in their lifetime. That's the dying with the dying from. And this is something you and I used to talk about nearly twenty years. I remember sitting in the cafeteria because you know, even though you know, you. We were still interns, and basically two knuckleheads you knew you were going to do this. And you were always head and shoulders above everybody else in terms, which when I said, I remember asking like, I don't get it. Like, why do some guys get prostate cancer? And it seems to be relatively uninteresting like, yeah, they and another guy though at it and they're dead in two years in it's his devastating pancreatic cancer. What is it about the biology of that because it strikes me as more a function of the biology than the environment? You're the host. But but I could be wrong, of course. But I remember talking about the Salahdin and really coming away scratching my head thing. I don't but clue what's going on this disease. I mean, I'm still scratching my head about it. Because that's my whole research program is all about his will what's the molecular biology, lethal prostate cancer? So we'll talk about that in a second. But to circle back to our story. So we diagnosed many men with prostate cancer, we.

prostate cancer prostate cancer metastatic pancreatic cancer cancer Charon Connecticut Ted Schafer Al Peter Kohanovsky Forty percent four percent twenty years two years
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"For protection when they're out and about functionally totally fine now for a fifty year old, man. I think there's a over ninety percent chance that you can recover sexual function. Yep. But with each deck member, you know, erectile dysfunction is a disease of the aging male. So for each decade that somebody gets older there's decline in sexual function. So he's been people say that they're totally potent and their seventy they'll tell you if you ask them, no miam-, not as good as I was when I was twenty. So there's that component of things in the other factor is prostate cancer. And it's not like, there's the prostate. There's five millimeters of tissue, and then there's this nerve bundle. There's the prostate. There's no capsule or lining encasing, the prostate. And then there's the neuro vascular bundle of Walsh named after Dr wolf. So you have prostate. The prostate itself has different zones or different regions prostate cancers develop in the peripheral region or perforate zone. So right at the edge of the prostate. So you have to Mer at the edge of the prostate, and then you have the nerve bundle. And so you're talking about one or two cruel trick of fate of of the cancer's not developed centrally. They don't develop centrally they develop Rivoli. So I understand why patients by listeners to say, why don't you don't you just you know, what I don't get it? Because it in many cases today, we I published on this a lot. Now. You know, there's prostate cancers that we pick up today are just bulkier. They're more aggressive and so. When you have a tumor that you know is going to be outside the prostate. You know, it's extra prosthetic it's involving the nerve bundle. A lot of the times. And so you have to remove part of it. You have to remove you know, the tissue around to try to clear your margins. And so when you do that in sixty five year old guy, and you take out half of his nerve on one side. It's unlikely that he'll be able to regain sat sexual function on his own. Now, these days I'd try to be very upfront about that. And I try to set appropriate expectations. We can we have special tools that we have in urology that will enable Amanda get don't total satisfaction sexually. So we can maneuver around out. So to speak. And these days many of the people I see have very aggressive cancers that are quote, unquote, the real deal. So we really have to be careful you our number one goal for doing cancer surgeries to get the tumor out. It's talk a little bit about prostate cancer because it's not a cancer that comes without its controversy to let's start with the biggest Connor is really one of the biggest controversies or things that would confuse the layperson because about every year, the advice changes on this thing called P S A. So what is the prostate specific antigen PSA is a protein it's made by the prostate. And it's normal function is to liquefy semen. So it's highly expressed in the process of the way, I explained the process of people the best analogy, I can come up with his if you think about it like a sewer system, you have the main sewer leaving the city, that's the urea three that's the tube that we normally urinate through. But this channel also deliver semen out. A tip of the penis off this main sewer are slightly smaller sewers had go to different neighborhoods within the neighborhood. There's a sewer that comes out of the individual house and the individual houses in this analogy are prostate epithelial cells, they make components of the semen, and the semen is used to give nutrients to the sperm while it's trying to fertilize an egg to enable the sperm to penetrate, the cervical mucus these different functions PSA is a protein that breaks down the semen and liquefies it and people think it's an important for for this whole process of fertilizing egg. So that's what it does. And if you look in the semen, the PSA numbers are hundred million per m l mean, the numbers they mount of this protein in the semen is astronomically high. So that's what it is..

prostate cancer Walsh Amanda Dr wolf Connor sixty five year ninety percent fifty year
"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And I don't think I was I don't think could process it what it would have meant. Anyway, if I had asked, but when I was a medical school, and I was doing my PHD I asked. My parents what he died of and he died of prostate cancer. So I was at the NIH I was doing science. I had done some clinical work. I realized what people in DC not in science. But in politics were interested in their interested in cancer biology, and they are interested in prostate cancer. I saw at other people are interested in and I had this very vivid memories of my, you know, my father migrant, my grandfather, having prostate cancer and dying from it. And I decided that that's what I wanted to do. So when I came back to medical school. I knew that I wanted to be to be a prostate cancer biologist and understand the disease. I also knew that I wanted to be a surgeon. And so I didn't to be a medical oncologist. Although that appealed to me a lot, and I'm always flattered when people think of a medical colleges because those guys are smart, they're smart. But I knew I wanted to do something I love working with my hands. So for me, the I. The of being a surgeon. Scientist was just it just made sense. I loved the biology I love, but I still love the idea of not just conceptually deconstructing something and putting it back together. But actually, physically deconstructing something putting it back together. So as a perfect fit for what I wanted to do for the listener to put some things in context at the time that you and I began our residencies. I don't really think there was any debate about what the best urology program was in the United States. I think there is a good race for number two or lots of programs that would have competed to be the second best urology program in the country. But but Johns Hopkins was hands down in a league of its own. And they only take two residents per year. So if there are four hundred or five hundred medical students graduating who want to go into urology only two of them get to go to Hopkins, and you were one of them, which perhaps isn't surprising. Did you wanna go to Hopkins for reasons other than it was the best program? Was there something about the environment? There. There that drew you to it. Yeah. It was a people. It's an amazing place that I think about think about it all the time. So I interviewed there and the chair of the department. The time was is the godfather of my field. He made all the contemporary modern discoveries in prostate cancer. And it was real simple. He looked me in the eyes. And he said, I looked at your CV. I know what you have the ability to do. And I wanna help you get there so pet well selected you as much as you selected Hopkins. I guess you can say that. Yeah. You know, it was a perfect fit because as we've talked about mentorship is just so much of everything. It's everything in life. Really? If you're motivated, and you have drive, it's, you know, even if you're not motivated, you don't have drive you need a good mentor. So for me, I showed up for the interviews. I'd interviewed all over the country..

prostate cancer Johns Hopkins NIH United States Scientist DC
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Discovery

"I'm annoyed on and this is the truth about cancer on the bbc world service the series that investigates the most common global cancers and what's being done to tackle them i'm in port of spain the capital of trinidad and tobago in the carribean people are enjoying the food stalls and the music in this park their families all around us and you can really clearly see that some of the people are of african ancestry and others have very clearly of southasian indian ancestry and that's because their ancestors were brought here during colonial times as slaves and indentured labourers and you can really see that mixed heritage in the food busy young men of year serving doubles this is up fried indian bread with chick be curry and fiery sauce another lady over here grilling meats and serving fried plantains now trinidad and tobago has one of the world's highest rates of prostate cancer this is a cancer specific two men so i'm here to find out why that's the case and how doctors are dealing with it prostate cancer right no is the leading cancer in trinidad and tobago it's ahead of breast cancer it accounts for twenty percent of the council's prostate cancer is also the leading cause of death from cancer in trinidad cancer being the second most common cause of death in trinidad led by cardiovascular disease so what is the prostate and how does prostate cancer develop will head into a prostate examined just a moment but to run over the basics the prostate is a small gland in a man's pelvic region it sits immediately beneath the bladder behind the penis in most men the prostate gets bigger as they age but in some individuals cells in the gland develop abnormalities which make them grow out of control and become malignant this is prostate cancer.

trinidad african ancestry prostate cancer bbc port of spain tobago trinidad tobago twenty percent