35 Burst results for "Prostate Cancer"

Duran Duran guitarist Andy Taylor absent from Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony with stage 4 cancer diagnosis

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Duran Duran guitarist Andy Taylor absent from Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony with stage 4 cancer diagnosis

"That Rock and Roll Hall of Fame welcomed a new class of inductees in Los Angeles on Saturday And Margie's are a letter with the latest Olivia Rodrigo performed on behalf of inductee Carly Simon who did not attend after the deaths of two sisters Lionel Richie eurythmics pep benatar and Neil Geraldo also were inducted Andy Taylor was unable to attend because of stage four prostate cancer Eminem says his induction was about more than just him I'm a high school dropout man with a hip hop education And these are my teachers And

Roll Hall Of Fame Olivia Rodrigo Lionel Richie Eurythmics Neil Geraldo Margie Carly Simon Benatar Los Angeles Andy Taylor Eminem Cancer
WABC Talk Radio Host Bernard McGuirk, Dead at 64

The Officer Tatum Show

01:36 min | 2 months ago

WABC Talk Radio Host Bernard McGuirk, Dead at 64

"I just real quick here radio legend Bernard Bernard McKernon died on Wednesday at the age of 64 following a battle with prostate cancer, a WABC announced man. I remember him. Mcgurk a long time, executive, a longtime producer and personality for late icon Don Imus, famed imus in the morning, was most recently the co host of WABC's Bernie and Sid in the morning alongside Sid Rosenberg, red Apple media president Chad Lopez announced that mcgirt's passing announced that mcgirt's passing Friday morning with the touching statement about the man who moved the imus moved with I miss a WABC in 2007 and has been on the air in New York City since 19 86. Here's what Lopez had to say. It is with profound sadness that I'm gonna share this news with you. Bernard mcgurk, husband, father and our friend passed away yesterday. October 5th in the company of his family, Bernie courageously battled cancer for all to see and hear in a manner that was inspiring to all of us. Bernie loved radio and shared his life with the listeners in New York City since 1986 when he joined the many voices on New York City's airwaves. He entertained millions across the country, working with imus in the morning, making you laugh one moment and making you think the next low-pass continued in 2007, Bernie came with imus to broadcast here at WABC, his personality from day one dramatically improved the camaraderie and morale of the entire radio station, his comedy and press of his professionalism, immeasurable and his character without peer.

Wabc Mcgirt Imus Bernard Bernard Mckernon Mcgurk Bernie Sid Rosenberg Chad Lopez Don Imus Bernard Mcgurk New York City Prostate Cancer SID Lopez Apple Cancer
How Drug Companies Stand to Make Billions by Preying on Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 3 months ago

How Drug Companies Stand to Make Billions by Preying on Children

"Can you talk about how Pfizer and these major companies stand to make billions? Off of children that are being preyed on by weak parents and these predatory doctors and institutions. Talk about lupron. Yeah, so lupron is manufactured by a company called AbbVie. And AbbVie recommends lupron for precocious puberty endometriosis as well as prostate cancer, which is what I believe it was developed to treat. They say that it should only be used for three months. The FDA also doesn't recommend this for gender dysphoria. However, the drug between 2020 and 2021, I believe, increased in sales by some $30 million. And lupron does sell for this purpose. It is the main puberty blocker that I believe is used in the U.S., although there are others. So AbbVie does stand to make a lot of money from this. It was interesting because you were Laura Ingraham Ingram's show the other night, talking about this and I was watching your segment and as I was watching, there was an advertisement for AbbVie, pharmaceuticals, and I thought now isn't that interesting. That they're on TV right now talking about how dangerous this is. And here's this company buying ad time with Fox to talk about how amazing their products are that are actually farming children.

Abbvie Lupron Pfizer Laura Ingraham Ingram Prostate Cancer FDA U.S. FOX
"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

"It's a pleasure. Perkin Elmer genomics is a global leader in genetic testing, focusing on rare diseases, inherited disorders, newborn screening, and hereditary cancer. Testing services support the full continuum of care from preconception and prenatal, to neonatal, pediatric, and adult. Testing options include sequencing for targeted genes, multiple genes, the whole exome or genome, and copy number variations. Using a simple saliva blood sample, Perkin Elmer genomics answers complex genetic questions that can proactively inform patient care and end the diagnostic Odyssey for families. Learn more at Perkin Elmer genomics dot com. For more information about today's episode, visit DNA podcast dot com where you can also stream all episodes of the show. We encourage your questions, comments, guest pitches, and ideas. Send them all into info at DNA podcast dot com. Search DNA today on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, so you can connect with us there. And a favor, please rate and review the podcast on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen. This truly helps us climb the charts and allow more genetic nerds like yourself to find the show. DNA today is hosted and produced by

"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

"Discover all the Perkin Elmer genomics has to offer at Perkin Elmer's nomics dot com. So in terms of these different genes, obviously we've been hinting at treatment. So I want to get into it. What are the current treatment options available for people with prostate cancer? Before we get into all the nitty Gritty of the genes and variants. I think if I understand your question, where might this matter? Where might knowing about a mutation matter in the management or the treatment of prostate cancer? And I think we're we are learning more about it. And it's really exciting. I mean, it's kind of what I built my career on. But first is finding patients who have variants, and then right now, it's mostly in the really advanced disease setting the metastatic prostate cancer setting that I was mentioning earlier, people who have had cancer that started in their prostate that had spread outside the prostate. And this is a situation which is serious that warrants attention, but this sort of gratifying thing as a medical oncologist is that men are living longer than they ever have before with advanced prostate cancer. So that reflects the fact that our field has advanced and there are more life prolonging drugs ever than before. And what's really neat is that for people who have BRCA2 mutation, for example, or BRC one mutation or the genes that we're talking about, there are now drug that are especially or we have a very good suspicion or high hope that those drugs will be especially effective for people who have cancers that are associated with BRC one and BRC two, for example. And so essentially what that means is knowing about those mutations opens up an additional toolbox beyond what the average patient with prostate cancer already has, which is bigger than it ever has been, but it's even bigger or they're even more options if people have know about a mutation. And so that's why this is really important for prostate cancer patients. Even though right now it's mostly in the advanced disease setting and there's two FDA approved drugs inhibitors which those who follow breast in ovarian cancer already kind of know are also used in association with BRCA1 and two, but those are in the toolbox, but the cool thing is also that clinical trials are moving those drugs earlier into earlier disease states, meaning hopefully as we move them earlier, people will continue to live even longer, even if they have cancer, but also if we move it very early, then maybe more people can be cured. And for those who are at risk for prostate cancer, there's also clinical trials now available for screening. So basically saying, can we do as they do in breast cancer and do more attentive screening for cancer if we think there's a higher risk. So all of those things are potentially possible for people. Once they know they have, you know, they have a mutation. So hopefully, you know, people sort of ascribe to the idea of knowledge as power. So when we know about it, then we can sort of tailor the treatment and trailer to the management accordingly. And that's the beauty of personalized medicine. It's just figuring out, okay, you have a pathogenic variant mutation in this specific gene. This is

prostate cancer Perkin Elmer genomics Perkin Elmer metastatic prostate cancer cancer ovarian cancer FDA breast cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

02:56 min | 3 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

"BRCA1, if the VOS exists in those genes, then we actually invite patients for follow-up because part of the hope is that as they get reclassified, we can then give that information back. So that's and there are also opportunities for enrollment and therapeutic clinical trials. Increasingly, we can talk a little bit more about that. That's really exciting and something we want to make sure patients are aware of. Those opportunities and then in so doing, we can sometimes reclassify those variants by looking at the tumor, for example, so we look at tumor germline. There'll be opportunities. Now, that's not built into promise, but those are things that we just know from a clinical experience, I actually have had several patients in that situation where there be U.S. then are reclassified. And that then is helpful for other individuals who may carry those same variants. Yeah, because that's the goal that someday when we have these panels, we're going to get no views or experiences. Especially for these genes that are more well known. Obviously as we learn more about cancer genetics, we're adding more genes to these panels saying, oh, now we know this has a role in certain cancers. But in terms of for BRCA1, two, ATM, for these genes, I would imagine they're the ones that are going to have the U.S. is very rare before other genes because we know of these genes have been studying them, especially for BRCA when studying since what the early 90s. Early 90s, that's right, yeah. And I think that that's definitely something we know a lot more about them. We still have more to learn. And one of the truths, unfortunately, is that many of the database you probably know this in the audience knows this, but many of the databases that help us classify are largely European ancestry or kind of white patients and not the diverse populations that we have in the United States aren't necessarily represented equally in those databases. And so for example, people who are black may have a higher likelihood of having a VOS. And so getting more data in that regard is also really important to make sure that we give them sort of most useful information back by avoiding getting having fewer VOS, as you said. Yeah, I'm so glad you mentioned that because I feel like in a lot of interviews, I'm the one to bring that up. And I'm like, here I go with my soapbox again, like we need more people of non European ancestries to be part of these databases because as you said, there's a huge disparity. People that have European ancestry are less likely to have a variant where we say, we don't know what this means versus people of non European ancestry. And yeah, it's just so important. And I hope as part of your study, you're able to include people from a lot of different places in the world so that we can start getting to the bottom of some of that and just having so much more information there. So there's we're closing that disparity. Did you know Perkin Elmer genomics was

U.S. cancers Perkin Elmer genomics
"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

02:28 min | 3 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on DNA Today

"Parts of our treatment implication. One is access. Because not all insurance companies will cover this testing, but we think it's really important. We're also learning as we go. And then the second is for people who have prostate cancer and have germline mutations. We want to understand better what happens with their treatment and how often is it cured, how often when they get treatment X? Does it work really well? Does it work less well? How can we learn from that and pay that information forward for relatives and other men who may have those same mutations? Because there's definitely some really interesting biology that I think we can take advantage of. And we've borrowed already a lot or we've learned a lot from the breast and ovarian cancer setting. And so I think bringing that to prostate cancer patients is really exciting. Yeah, we need so much more data so that we can actually understand what the trends are to be able to apply that to more patients in the future as you were talking about in terms of healthcare providers and people listening that maybe know someone that's had prostate cancer are currently have prostate cancer. Who is eligible to actually enroll and promise? Yeah. Great question. So we are inviting any individual with prostate cancer or prostate cancer diagnosis. To enroll in the study and some people may actually know they already have a mutation. We also, especially invite them as well. So anyone with prostate cancer, any stage of prostate cancer is invited. And does that include people that say had prostate cancer ten years ago and are not currently diagnosed? Yeah, I think it does, although if it's really, you know, I think that the value may be a little lower, but I think certainly if there was a strong family history and someone was closer to their diagnosis that that might be something important to think about. But that would certainly be some may be less important in terms of the treatment, but certainly it could be. Not your target person. Maybe not that. But yeah. Okay. Interesting. So if people are interested or want to send their patients your way, how does it work in terms of being able to register and starting that process to understand a little bit more about the study? Yeah, it's pretty easy, I think we've tried to make it as patient friendly as possible and there's a website and the website is WWW dot prostate cancer promise dot ORG all one word, no punctuation.

prostate cancer ovarian cancer
Matt Walsh: Doctor Couldn't Deny Facts on 'What Is a Woman?' Film

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | 6 months ago

Matt Walsh: Doctor Couldn't Deny Facts on 'What Is a Woman?' Film

"It's because you know Matt Bill Clinton and his team kind of realized that they were going to have to make a shift And you had that whole Democrat leadership committee thing after they got routed after three losses Reagan Reagan Bush And I think a couple of bad losses for the Democrats I'm not optimistic like you but it is possible that they could lift and shift and say all right enough of the discrepancy One last question I'll let you roll So one of the things you interview a doctor in a movie and you bring up the fact that this drug is very powerful drug that they claim is reversible to perform this chemical castration on these young kids is used for sex offenders and you'll see in the movie folks is a very uncomfortable moment where the shifting in the seats like I think this interview is over That's an accurate statement She just didn't want to acknowledge the hard fact of the matter Yeah the drug is lupron Anyone can fact check me on this The drug they give for people to block this for kids and it is literally by definition chemical castration that they have used for that application But before that though it's actually originally a cancer drug for men with prostate cancer That is used kind of off label in this way But you'll notice that she took issue with the words that I was using She called the words harmful and offensive or whatever But she couldn't deny the basic reality because it is that's what it is This is what we're giving the kids

Matt Bill Clinton Democrat Leadership Committee Reagan Reagan Bush Prostate Cancer Cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:36 min | 8 months ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on WTOP

"WTO Pete the 1137 I like father men to understand that prostate cancer is something that can be treated Probiotic surgery is an excellent way to go and I recommend it at GW hospital It's not a day that goes by when I am not grateful man And realize how blessed I am to be able to have a successful cancer procedure We got through came out the other side Physicians are not employees or agents of this hospital Meet Allison teammate a Truist bank Hi She was born to care and she always had your back You could say that Like that time back in the mid 80s when she spotted Stacey Kaminsky with her new perm and a car was coming about to hit a puddle So Alison jumps in front of the splash just in time to protect Stacy's fresh curls Look I had to do it A wet perm just doesn't work Today Allison's a teammate of Truist the bank that starts with care When you start with care you get a different kind of bank Learn more at truest dot com slash care Truest bank member FDIC 1138 Ian Crawford in the traffic center And we go ahead and start in Virginia once again Michelle on the outer loop of the capitol bellway the ramp to westbound 66 a single left lane getting by their inner loop ramps to both east and westbound 66 are shut down because we have work over the top of that on 66 over the top of the capitol beltway east bounders coming from nutley street in fact after action 62 you're going to be shifting over to the left in the single filing get past the work Westbound there's one to the right coming from falls church across the beltway after exit 64 heading toward Vienna and oakton Elsewhere on 66 eastbound work is going to be near manassas from the Prince William Parkway towards hudley road It's a single left lane getting by there 95 northbound on the ramp to the fairfax county Parkway the ramp blocked by a crash with a tractor trailer or slightly overshooting that ramp enough to block the ramp anyhow southbound on 95 after Stafford it's a left lane getting by that work so then be prepared to shift to the right after exit one 36 for the centerport Parkway one to the right getting by that works on heading toward falmouth On three 95 with caution if you make the transition from Virginia into the district may have crash activity on the freeway may be eastbound near the ramps for Potomac park and the U.S. park police exit two with caution for what may be lurking in the darkness there The rest of the district ride is in good shape on the Maryland beltway earlier crash activity outer loop in your branch avenue now cleared to the right shoulder if anything is there at all It's going to be on the right shoulder It should have the travel lanes back Watch or emergency work in Montgomery county on the outer loop after the two 70 spur heading toward river road and on toward the capitol belt toward the legion bridge I should say after exit 39 that work should be blocking a left lane On 95 and on the Baltimore Washington Parkway essentially quiet however all the ramp from the BW Parkway northbound to the outer loop of the Baltimore beltway We've got a tractor trailer off its wheels and that is blocking that ramp from northbound BW Parkway onto the outer loop of the Baltimore beltway Is your sub pump ready for the spring Don't wait till your basement floods to find out visit value dry waterproofing dot com to get started today that's value dry waterproofing dot com Ian Crawford WTO traffic All right Ian now to Amelia Draper Dry conditions tonight with plenty of clouds now after midnight showers move back into the area with lows in the upper 40s to low 50s We'll have rain and showers around tomorrow with chili temperatures only in the 50s Shower to as possible on Friday otherwise some sun is possible with highs around 60 I'm strum team for meteorologist stimuli a Draper We have 60° outside.

GW hospital Ian Crawford Stacey Kaminsky Truest bank Allison WTO centerport Parkway prostate cancer Potomac park U.S. park police Virginia Stacy Alison FDIC oakton manassas fairfax county Michelle cancer Vienna
Who Is Vivek Ramaswamy, Author of 'Woke, Inc.'?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Who Is Vivek Ramaswamy, Author of 'Woke, Inc.'?

"Show. I've been looking forward to this one for quite some time. One of the most important books that has been authored in recent memory and it's all about kind of woke ism and corporate America and what we can do about it and it's a very interesting very articulate guest. The vague Rama Swami did I get that right? You pretty darn close, Charlie. Good to see you. All right, I'm in the zip code. Honor to have you on our show. You're doing a wonderful job introduce yourself first to our audience and then talk a little bit about your book and we'll go from there. Yeah, sure, just a brief introduction. I grew up was born and raised in Ohio, where actually I live today. My parents were both immigrants from India. I often jokingly asked my dad why he came halfway around the world to Southwest Ohio. And he said that, actually, it was the only place in the world where he could get a job in the United States to be near his older sister who was in Fort Wayne Indiana. And that, of course, beg the question of why she came to Fort Wayne Indiana and we joke around it's the only U.S. state with the word India containing. That gets a bit of my family background on how they came here on a joking note. More seriously, I ended up going to Harvard for college. I studied molecular biology. I was a nerdy guy in the lab the whole time. Ended up getting into BioTech investing after I graduated. Did that for 7 years from 2007 to 2014, spent three of those years at the same time in law school at Yale where I met my wife, probably the most productive thing that came out of it. She was in med school and lived next door to me. And when I came back to New York City, after I finished law school and having a fund job on the side, now it was just a fun job. I ended up having a gap in my schedule, took up stand up comedy for 6 months before I decided that that wasn't my calling and left my job to start a BioTech company. I led the company as CEO for 7 years and during that time we got a number of medicines developed. The one I'm probably most proud of is a new drug to treat prostate cancer. But I stepped down from my job as CEO, this January. And you know, thankfully, the company runs well today. It's multi-billion dollar business, but I stepped down as CEO to work on what I thought was a different kind of cancer. Not a biological cancer. But a cultural cancer that I thought threatened to kill the dream that allowed me to achieve everything I ever had in my life as a first generation American. And that was the new orthodoxy. Well, I guess we could call the new woke orthodoxy that had really taken control of one elite institution after another. And though I wasn't born into a lead America, I had lived it for the last 15 years. And I felt compelled to not only tell my story, but to reveal the problem that I saw, which I viewed as a defining scam of our

Rama Swami Southwest Ohio Fort Wayne America Harvard For College Indiana India Charlie Ohio Yale Cancer New York City Prostate Cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Out for you. Google. Thanks a lot. That could be a bug more than anything. But anyway, just embarrassed. The God of Android here at Google, not cool. Not cool. It's all good. This is how it works. When you do demos, 9 times out of ten, they're going to fail. Yes. You're lucky if it doesn't fail. And then my other thing is just a mention of something that I decided a couple of days ago. I've actually considered participating in movember for years. But I've never done it this year, I decided I'm going to do it for two reasons. One of just to shine a light on men's health and mental health, especially, I've done a lot of work on my own personal growth and mental health over the last three years. I feel like a better more alive person because of it. It's an important thing to shine a light on. Everybody can actually find help for themselves and reach a better place. So that's part of it. But it's also because in my entire life, I have never run out my facial hair. More than I'd say like a week. And even at a week, I hardly have anything. That's why I've never grown it out because I've been like, well, what's the point? I don't grow facial hair like everybody else does. So I'm curious to see what's going to happen. So I've already started. Even though it starts in November, I started a couple of days ago. I apologize in advance because it could look really weird and gross and strange. But it's a journey and I hope that you'll forgive me for taking this journey. Over the course of the next month. And as a prostate cancer veteran, I thank you, sir. Yeah, absolutely. I am so thrilled. And gentlemen. We just lost an important actor last week. 59 years old, prostate cancer, get tested. Get tested. Yeah. I want you to grow a big twirly like snidely whiplash kind of Mustang. I'm not sure my wife wants that. But we'll see. We'll see how it goes. How do you remember? That's true. That's the thing. She totally supports it. She's like, oh, it's for a cause. Okay, I'm like, you don't know what you're getting yourself into. This could be the grossest mustache you've ever seen. Like I could look really bad with a mustache, but I'm willing to try and see what happens. I'm really happy. I did it. I've done movember twice. The last time I did it, I'd let it grow out, but I ended up cutting it to where it looked like I had some kind of weird designs on my face. But I stopped doing it because it wasn't raising enough money in my opinion to help out the cause and I'm walking around looking pretty stupid..

Google prostate cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Which is not readily examined by a examined the rectum which is a can only feel the backside of the poster side of the prostate. There's research in that where it actually may be fear of the healthcare system and really not wanting to go to dr for fear of false information or other aspects as relates to that. But you know. I have colleagues Who who work with you know different avenues to increase awareness of prostate cancer and african american to younis. I'm so glad that you came here to talk with us today. On prostate cancer awareness month You know. I see so much about breast cancer. And there's a lot of attention brought to breast cancer appropriately so it affects a high percentage of the population. But it seems a prostate. Cancer does as well. And i don't think i hear quite as much about it. You don't i mean we. We don't have You know for whatever reason we really don't have a voice like it's being soon and breast cancer Just because men are not willing to talk about it. i think that's changed I think we've empowered men Whether it's on with research to speak up about the disease come about screening We certainly have different foundations across the country. And it's true that one in a us men. i will be diagnosed but you know it's it it cannot. It's not always an aggressive relief of disease. But still it's the second leading cause of cancer death in us men and not all can't not prostate. Cancer should be ignored and we certainly Need to try to diagnose the ones early that do need to be treated and safely survey those that don't need to be treated and that is a really active area of research of mining and many other prostate cancer experts. Well thank you for being here to educate us today. Thank you archie. Yes our pleasure thanks. Jeff kearns urologist at mayo clinic in rochester.

breast cancer prostate cancer Cancer us Jeff kearns archie mayo clinic rochester
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Diagnosed with advanced cases the survival rates can still be very good and we hope that even more advanced in the future allow allow us to be even a chronic disease. And try to stay on top of it and use the next therapy and don't necessarily Pull all the arrows are out and start shooting but but make sure we could do it more sequentially logically in for the better of patient. I think it's amazing when we can start talking about cancers as chronic diseases. Isn't that something. That's different than when i was a child in her. Someone was diagnosed with cancer. I frequently use that that analogy to especially among the younger man who have advanced. I said you know we may not be able to careless with one approach or two approaches but hopefully we can provide a good quality of life and try to make this a chronic disease. Jeff does mail have ongoing studies For individuals who have prostate cancer. And if so what are some of them so we do have active studies. We have studies in different types of imaging as russell cancer detection We have active studies mentioned in different types of focal therapy for prostate cancer. Where we don't necessarily treat the whole prostate just part of it you know either with some form of radiation some form of freezing of of that particular. Part even nanoparticles which are very small articles that can be injected We have a lot of active research in biomarkers and biomarkers or even m. or i could be a biomarker determine the aggressiveness of disease But you know blood tests urine tests and we certainly work with our research partners to help them. With their studies. In more advanced cases of prostate cancer and providing specimens biopsies or surgically removed prostate cancers. Help them study different approaches to to those cases again those that may be refractory or resistant to traditional promotional of great dutch kinds. Are there any healthcare disparities related to prostate cancer. That we should be aware of as Physicians at mayo or that individuals should be aware of. I think we should I think the biggest disparity is the racial disparity when it comes to caucasian versus in american men. Why that is. We don't quite know But we do know that that african american men are more likely to be diagnosed more likely to have an advance case win diagnosed and more likely to die a prosecutor almost twofold higher a white male And it may be a number of factors slowly call. Multifactorial may be related to social economic lack of access to Different healthcare even screening You know if you're an african american male. I think you should start. Screen at age of forty and most guidelines would also suggest were tailored screening four minute higher risk of cancer whether it's family history or african american descent. It could also be genetics. You know and i've been actually involved with some genetic Genomic research groups of genes. That may explain. Why are cancer may be more aggressive and african americans. It could be what i refer to his geography of the bussey cancer. Maybe they're more likely to actually have prostate cancer in a region of the prostate cancer. That historically as evaded detection like the front part of the prostate..

prostate cancer cancer chronic disease prostate cancers chronic diseases Jeff mayo bussey cancer
9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks but Better Survival Rates

Short Wave

01:45 min | 1 year ago

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks but Better Survival Rates

"I grew up in the new york city area. And i remember this period so clearly. Many first responders spent weeks doing rescue and recovery work at ground zero site in the aftermath of september eleventh. What were they exposed to. Well you know just. After the towers collapsed the air was filled with smoke with debris basically all that had collapsed on the concrete glass pipes. I mean everything. Kind of pulverized and burning into this ash. It was laden with all kinds of heavy metals including lead and other toxins. I mean many of us. Remember that plume of smoke and debris that could be seen from space on that day and dr michael crane. Who's an environmental medicine. Expert at mount sinai told me that there has never been anything quite like it be exposure was really dramatic the dust. I mean there was all kinds of carcinogens and combustion products in fibers glass fibers in festus fibers and it was really a witch's brew and given what was in the air. There was definitely a concern early on that it might increase the risk of certain cancers and we have research about that now so how much of an increased risk of cancer is there among first responders. Well some of the most recent data suggests that the total number of cancers is only slightly elevated compared to the general population but scientists have documented like significant increases in certain cancer is a twenty five percent increase in prostate cancer. A doubling in the risk of thyroid cancer and about a forty percent increased risk and leukemia. And there are also a number of rare cancers that are linked to the

Dr Michael Crane New York City Cancer Mount Sinai Prostate Cancer Thyroid Cancer Leukemia
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

Who Cares About Men's Health?

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

"It's something that goes into the rectum. It's got these little prongs that pop out and into the prostate. It just sounds so uncomfortable. So i liked it. They're additional steps to avoid that if that. Psa is elevated. And then make that next decision on the next step and as we've talked You know past episodes if your physician or providers not offering those. Have that conversation ask. Hey i understand that there are some other things we could do again. You could use this podcast as a source of reference. Or you could just ask. Aren't there other things that we could do. You know just had those honest conversations with your provider so all right dr towards thank you very much for coming in. That was a lot of information. But i think it's important information for us as men to have because prostate cancer can radically impact your life if not in mortality quality of life and You know being told you have cancer can be really really scary and the treatments can be really really scary. But knowing that there's some inbetween before you have to get to some of the scary parts has been very useful so thanks for being on the show and thanks for caring about men's health my pleasure. I really appreciated this opportunity. And i hope that this is valuable to the men out there and don't be shy to talk to your doctors about this problem. Hey you're still here. Cool this scott who about mental. Well i hope that Dr toward made the case why you should get screened. And then what to do. Afterwards if the result comes back positive prostate cancer dealing with it at a later stage just is not fun. A lot of terrible side effects is just not enjoyable to go through as you heard some of them on the show so get screened if it's that time and then just take it nice and slow and figure out how you're going to progress after that point using information this podcast. This episode was one of our men's health essentials health topics that impact you particularly as a man could be very unique manner just the ones that we struggle with more than perhaps women. So if you like this show and you want to hear some.

prostate cancer cancer scott
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

Who Cares About Men's Health?

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

"With your testosterone production could either put you at increased or decreased risk of developing prostate cancer. And that's where weight and body fat sort of come into play but again there hasn't been very clear Proof that you know modification or getting under a certain bmi you know will lead or not lead to the development of prostate cancer per se but no downsides really to be under a certain. There's no question that that being under a certain bmi but also if you want to relate it to the prostate cancer if you are healthy and in shape it's going to keep your options open for what treatments if you need to provide them are going to be offered and you know not only that but how you might recover from those treatments so one. The things that a man has to understand is that when when they're diagnosed with prostate cancer. You don't just get put down a standard treatment path. You are given this large cheesecake factory menu and i say that hurt the cheesecake. Pay that man. It's so huge. Nothing against the cheesecake factory. I'm just delicious food. No doubt and you is overwhelming. And that's and it is overwhelming and if you give somebody too much choice. They're overwhelmed. But but what i'd say here in this case especially as it relates to die exercises on the one hand you also want to keep as much choice open as possible so that you can nuance this complex treatment. Choice that you're gonna hopefully make with some shared decision making between your doctors your family and others to make one that is going to result in the best outcome and preserve your quality of life sustain healthy. Never a bad thing. Never a bad thing. But i'm going to ask this question. Because i know just about every guy listening has heard this and maybe this is an urban myth does more frequent ejaculation reduce the risk of prostate cancer. You're on red it. I saw a rally read it and everywhere else you've ever looked for for preventing prostate cancer. There have been corlett of studies purporting to show that and we're in the realm of sort of level to evidence. There's also been correlative. Studies have refuted that. I think that most knowledgeable expert at this point would say there's really no evidence that That that would reduce your risk of prostate cancer but it might be good for the soul depending on the individual so so You know. But but i wouldn't. I wouldn't use that as a strategy to reduce your risk of frosty as you know. Here's how that started troy. I have a good idea of how that whole thing started. Some guy got busted for.

prostate cancer troy
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

Who Cares About Men's Health?

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

"Well if that number does come back say higher than four than i have to get a biopsy from what i understand. It's it's a pretty uncomfortable to go through what's your take. Would you tell friends family. Members of patients Typically say do it. Or i think i'm at a point where i i recommend screening but it doesn't mean that you necessarily should automatically trigger biopsy just because you're before i guess how i would perceive it is I guess on the counter argument with the lifesaving we've seen a big shift over the past five years specifically as a result of decreasing screening. Where now we're seeing men with much higher stage cancers and and they are now receiving a call multi modality therapies to try to eradicate instead of maybe a simple surgery or one. Kind of radiation. We have to throw the book at them. So so i guess what. I'm advocating. answer the question is you. Should you should get screened. And that includes a psa test and honestly a digital rectal exam and if there is a concern then the discussion should go onto the next step with you. Know your urologist about the relative merits and whether or not there's some additional testing that we can do rather than willy nilly going into the biopsy. So there's there's just so much discussion. In what i would encourage is eman get screened however the first question. They should ask their urologists. Should they're referred to as do i do. I really need to proceed immediately to biopsy. Are there other tests we can do. And do you do a transparent neil biopsy or trans biopsy. There's there's every step of the prostate cancer process from. Do you screen to do you. Biopsy do you treat is is a complicated array of choices. I have a stupid comment but Alright super comment. Go ahead okay. Well i'm going to add this scott because you didn't I'm just going to clarify for all of our listeners. Many of them work in the tech industry. A digital rectal exam is not a virtual rectal exam it simply refers to the use of of the providers digit. Just just so people know what we're talking about like. Hey what about the virtual rectal now no anyway. So we've talked about psa test but we haven't talked about the finger exam which you're not using anymore are you. Well that's not fair to say. I think the digital rectal exam is is complementary to the psa test however digital rectal exams are are very heterogeneous in in detecting a cancer. What does that mean heterogeneous. That's what i mean by that. Is you know a practitioner's ability to feel something in the prostate. A it varies amongst practitioners number one the link to their fingers differ when you do a digital rectal you can only really touch a small part of the gland but it's it's basically a free be it's they don't charge you extra to get a digital rectal examination your doctor but of course mendel want things stuck in their end however i will tell you that there's no doubt in my mind if you're over fifty and you're seeing a doctor they should do a digital rectal exam because for maybe a a three seconds of discomfort you might actually be able to detect something that's concerning so in addition to a psa test psa test does not replace the digital rectal exam. I would say replaces it. I mean if you held a gun to my head and said you can only choose one screen. What would you do. I'd say okay. Give me a psa test however like anything else. This goes into risk modeling. The more the more things you do to detect a risk the more likely you are to have confidence in in the result so a digital rectal exam has a.

eman cancer prostate cancer scott mendel
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

Who Cares About Men's Health?

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Who Cares About Men's Health?

"The try because we have a doctor here. Who's in a recognized authority. And he's an opinion leader. Like people look to dr toward regarding treating prostate cancers. We could play a little game yup for a game. I'm always right so this game is called. What do you know about the prostate and prostate cancer. Who questions. I'm answering Well i thought i would start okay. I'd i'd start by throwing out something i know like. For example what is the prostate. What do i know about it. It gets cancer. That's about all i know. Good start so this episode of who cares about men's health is one of our men's health essentials episodes and we're talking about prostate cancer and this is an important episode because as a man. If you understand this condition it can help. You have an informed conversation with an expert if you do need to to task or not what it means. If a test comes back positive what choices you might have if it does come back positive and it can really impact your lifestyle so with me as as always co host. Dr troy matteson. Say troy scott and dr jonathan toward from huntsman cancer institute. Thank you for having me and i'm scott. Sing pill people ask. What do you contribute. I'm here to ask the dumb question so our listeners don't have to. That's my job. Dr toward what is the prostate anyway. Well i mean the tongue in cheek answer is a gland. That's designed to make your life miserable as you get older. But but actually what. The prostate gland is a little gland that sits between the base of the penis inside your body and blow the bladder and the aretha actually runs through it and what its function. As it has a fertility roll it produces the fluid that A man would ejaculate and helps keep the sperm alive on the way to the partner so It's important for fertility but if you're done with that that particular aspect of your life It no longer is i. Guess a functionally necessary..

prostate cancers prostate cancer Dr troy matteson troy scott dr jonathan huntsman cancer institute cancer scott
James Michael Tyler, Gunther on 'Friends,' Reveals He Has Cancer

Mojo In The Morning

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

James Michael Tyler, Gunther on 'Friends,' Reveals He Has Cancer

"If you are a fan the actor who played gutter on a show. James michael tyler. Just announced some really sad news on the today. Show says he's battling stage four prostate cancer. Which has left his lower body completely paralyzed and he said his illnesses worsening spread to his bones at this point and that's what left him unable to attend the friends reunion. Hbo max that's why he called into the special via zoom but he said the cancer started mutating at the beginning of the pandemic and the it progressed after he missed a doctor's appointment so he is undergoing chemotherapy right now and he said my goal. This past year was to see my fifty ninth birthday. I did that on. May twenty eighth. He said my goal now is to help. Save at least one life out with this news.

James Michael Tyler Prostate Cancer HBO Cancer
'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

"Doctors reported promising results from an experimental cancer drug that delivers radiation directly to tumor cells an emerging class of medicine called radio pharmaceuticals may become a new way to treat patients with hard to reach inoperable cancers in a study involving over eight hundred men with advanced prostate cancer released by the American society of clinical oncology a tumor targeting radiation therapy from drug maker Novartis kept cancer at bay for nearly nine months compared to three months for people receiving standard treatment and survival was better to fifteen months versus eleven months the drug is administered through an IV in each dose contains trillions of engineered molecules a tractor portion of the molecule hunts down cancer cells the payload portion is the radiation experts say radio pharmaceuticals maybe the next big wave of therapeutic development I'm Jennifer king

Experimental Cancer Inoperable Cancers American Society Of Clinical O Prostate Cancer Novartis Cancer Jennifer King
Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

"Sinewy right the Tony nominated actor famous is the voice of Sebastian the crab has died really right had an acting career spanning five decades after moving to New York he made his name on Broadway replacing Ben Farina and Pippen it was an original cast member of Jesus Christ Superstar in the nineteen seventies right played the purple grape in the fruit of the loom commercials right on only a dollar he played chronic wanted on from Disney's dinosaur but was best known as Sebastian the crab in Disney's little mermaid and won a Grammy for Best Original Song in may two thousand interview Wright said he enjoyed speaking for Disney characters I'm in seventh heaven and I don't and I know it sounds like all he's just giving us the press the you know the old sound bite no really really this is what I've always wanted to do one of Wright's daughters D. Kelly wrote on Facebook my beautiful strong loving Daddy is off to his next adventure right was seventy two according to his family he died Monday in New York after a three year bout with prostate cancer I'm Jennifer king

Ben Farina Jesus Christ Superstar In The Sebastian The Crab In Disney's Pippen Sebastian Disney Tony Wright New York Grammy D. Kelly Daddy Facebook Prostate Cancer Jennifer King
Doctors Urge People To Keep Up With Their Routine Screenings

WBZ Afternoon News

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Doctors Urge People To Keep Up With Their Routine Screenings

"About the consequences of Americans putting off doctor's appointments and early detection screenings because of covert 19 WBZ is Kim Tunnicliffe tells US a Boston based nonprofit is launching a public awareness campaign urging men to start going for their prostate cancer screenings again. The prostate Health Education Network believes a crisis is looming for African American men in the U. S. President Thomas Farrington is concerned. The pandemic has cause meant to put off their early detection screenings, he says. The American Cancer Society is estimating that new prostate cancer cases will increase by 30% this year in American Man of the highest isn't afraid so there's more than 70% high for all other bands and die at a rate of more than 120% higher with they expected estimated you increases we see a major crisis, the network is teaming up with politicians. Energy and doctors to speak out about the importance of scheduling those early detection screenings. Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ

WBZ Kim Tunnicliffe Prostate Health Education Netw S. President Thomas Farrington Prostate Cancer Boston U. American Cancer Society
Why Fans and Nearly 600 Jeopardy Contestants Are Slamming Dr. Oz as Guest Host

Mark Blazor

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Why Fans and Nearly 600 Jeopardy Contestants Are Slamming Dr. Oz as Guest Host

"What? Dr Oz out as guest host on jeopardy. I guess that was quick. Last night was the first time he's hosted right last night was the very first one. Well, I guess they're protesting his gig as the guest host eyes two week run. He's supposed to do this for two week. They're accusing him of dangerous and UN researched medical claims. What has he given medical advice during jeopardy? No, you just You know, some of the things he's had on his show over the years have been more of a holistic approach instead of pure modern medicine, quote unquote. So they're saying the fact that this is a Fact based game show is a slap in the face to all involved having him hosted. I guess like you were just kind of alluding to that, you know. Some of the stuff he's done in the past might not be by the medical book. If you Will that holistic, some of that kind of thing. It sounds like you know, he does a blend. I guess he does. He doesn't blend and that's I don't think it's a bit. I don't think it's a bad thing. I really don't our own the governor Dimitri's Stanley on Friday he has done a combination of Modern scientist. Whatever you wanna call it, modern medicine for you know, with his battle with prostate cancer and some holistic stuff, and he's doing friend Fantastic right now. So what? I don't understand why people freak out about that?

Dr Oz UN Dimitri Stanley Prostate Cancer
"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Men with prostate cancer of the unique approach that avoids robotic surgery and for most men maintains the quality of life and the integrity of the body and integrity. The Penis And to college. So that's how we put together. An advertisement. All in 60 seconds with takes more than 60 seconds to explain it. But the whole idea is that you get a new idea and then call us up. If you wish, and anyone with a cancer might want to call us up and come in. For a fresh second opinion, which is so important and I want to talk about a gentleman who comes to us with skin cancer. He comes to us. He's 83 years old. He's a smoker. And, of course, I encouraged him to stop smoking. He's married. He's got three sons and his high blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol, perfect vascular disease, and he's got COPD and emphysema and he's short of breath smoking. And he comes to me with skin cancer. Nice had Mose. Most surgeries kind of an excavation where they excavate part of the body. Use it so face the eyes. The Knows that ears of the mouth area cuts the main areas where skin cancers hit, so he's had most radical surgery on this face. He doesn't like it's deformed. His face is deformed, and now he's gotta active cancer and the left forehead right in the middle of the forehead is a basal cell cancer. And he wants to be treated. He wants us to treat it because he does not want more deformity. He knows for skin cancers. Basil sour, squamous cell character I can't though, was that our success rate is very, very high. And this is the work that we do every day with outpatient therapy, no cutting and no bleeding. And to maintain again to maintain the integrity of the body. And so this man is going through the treatment now and his cancer's going away. It's just a few treatments and he is done. And this is the.

60 seconds more than 60 seconds second opinion three sons 83 years old Mose COPD
"prostate cancer" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

william oastler fifty percent kenneth pinta steven sixty sixty percent steve Six hundred thousand people Thirty thousand men united states Eighty percent fifty years old james buchanan johns hopkins Brady urological institute two aspects kenneth inte today forty five hundred hospitals first sight three family members
UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

Marketplace

03:33 min | 2 years ago

UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

"China has been recent years trying to improve its global image. That effort took a hit today in London, Britain's communications regulator announced it is stripping the state run China Global Television network of its broadcast license there, MPR's Frank Langfitt explains from London. The C GT N That's it's known, opened its European production center here to great fanfare about two years ago. Today off come, the British regulator announced it was pulling the network's license. Officials said. The reason was straightforward. The people in charge of CG Tien's editorial policy are ultimately beholden to China's Communist Party in British Broadcasting law forbids political bodies from controlling license holders. Thank goodness, Finally, this license has been taken away. Peter Humphrey, performer fraud investigator in Shanghai was glad to hear the news. He filed a complaint against CGT in last year. Not over Communist Party control of the network. But over Chinese state media is airing of what Humphrey says was a forced confession. It followed his arrest in 2000 and 13 on charges of illegally acquiring the personal data of Chinese nationals. Well, of course you go way up 10 personal information by illegal means. I regret what I did and apologize to the Chinese government. Humphrey insists he never actually confessed and that the interview was doctored. He also says his captors pressured him to make a statement by withholding medical treatment for his prostate cancer, considering the kind of brutal human rights violations that CD Tien has been involved with extracting and packaging forced confessions from prisoners held under torture in China, who've never been in front of a judge. I just think that we should have no organization like that on our soil in Humphries case, Afghan found CGT And had seriously breached fairness and privacy rules. It also found the network had failed to cover the Hong Kong democracy protests with quote due impartiality CG Tien was indignant with today's ruling. It blamed quote the manipulation of far right groups and had I China forces for the off calm decision, according to a statement on way ball, China's nearest equivalent Twitter. The loss of the license undermined two key Chinese government strategy. Steve saying is director of the so as China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies. University of London. She camping has been very clear he wants the Chinese story being told well. He wants his versions off everything being spread across the world in the most positive, light possible Sititi and is one of those instruments used for this purpose. It's hang expects the Chinese government to retaliate against BBC reporters in China. Even though the BBC is editorial independent of the British government. Peter Dahlin is the director of Safeguard Defenders Human Rights Organization, which spearheaded the campaign against C G. T n Here. The U. K stands out across Europe is having a quite well developed framework for help to regulate TV for how to control this information. The stripping of the license prohibits CG Tan from broadcasting here, but dollars, says that doesn't mean the network has to leave. Still, he does think today's move could have ripple effects are other countries going to start holding them accountable as well? I say this might be the beginning of a process that city and will find very unfavorable for their type of this information for their type of broadcasting. That would mean more challenges for a Chinese government that has invested a lot in trying to change the way it's perceived. Frank Langfitt NPR NEWS

Cg Tien China Chinese Government Frank Langfitt European Production Center Peter Humphrey Communist Party Humphrey London CGT China Institute Britain Tien Shanghai Humphries Prostate Cancer Peter Dahlin School Of Oriental And African Safeguard Defenders Human Righ BBC
"prostate cancer" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on WSB-AM

"We typically I'll tell people we could do a what's called before Kate Test, which is another blood test, which is a more specific type of P ece, But generally we wouldn't or that someone had elevated P ece. And all we could do something like an M R. I check your prostate cancer problem with Mariah, though, is that it misses about 15 to 20% of prostate cancer. So the good our bottom right, though, is if it does find something we could do what's called a target biopsy. Then that leads me to the next thing, which is a bias. That's the gold standard. That's how we figure out. You know, if someone has prostate cancer is doing a prostate biopsy. So you've I'm worried about prostate cancer, and I come in to see you and I do all of these tests, and I'm getting up. Um three or four times a night and I discover fortunately that I don't have prostate cancer. So what's next? Absolutely so at that point, so he s a is fine of a deal. The test. We'll work it out. No prostate cancer. We just had a run of the mill. Normal BPH for nine Prostatic cocker pleasure. So usually always councilman. What we do is we can start out with medicine. That's often times the first and easiest step. So there's generally two types and medicines. There is a medicine like an Alfa blockers. Something like Flomax camp so low since the very common one, and there's another medicine called for national right. So finasteride to do cast a ride. Those types of medicines shrink the prospect so you could take that every day. It's Prince the prostate, generally by about 30 to 40%, but that one takes around six months really, to get going. Tells of being affected. The other medicine. Like I said, the alpha blocker that works by opening the bladder neck and they could easier your XO improves the flow. They have side effects. So an asteroid side effect potentially could lower the libido. They can have my 1% of population. Upon the side effect is it can make you grow more hair on your head. So you know if he doesn't want that, who doesn't be the Flomax or cancel ocean again? There's a lot of different alpha blockers out there. That's just more than more common ones that we could make you a little tired or fatigued. People even called something called author Static hypertension. That means when you stand up, you could get a little lightheaded. So I gently tell people take that a night. Another big side effect of that What it's called retrograde ejaculation. So some people do not like this one. That is, if you when you ejaculated. Nothing comes out. It goes backwards into your bladder, So I've called retrograde and he's urinated out later. That's about 20% of population that happens to you. So when you're talking with patients do they come in with their wives? Um or they coming in mostly by themselves? Mostly by himself, especially covert days. It's Hello, outlets, people going in the opposite, usually just just as good at this point, but it would take about 75% come in just himself. It. There's been many studies that have shown that the chief Caregiver in a family of the person who's responsible for making the medical decisions turns out to be the wife in the family and it many men delay treatment because They're afraid of what they might find. Or they are afraid of, Um, what the treatment might be, and it's typically in many cases, the wives Finally drag their spouse into the into the office and get treated. Oh, absolutely. Certainly Found that to be true. And most of the guys you know they're they're alone. They office where the first things out of the mountains. I'm only here because you're my wife told me to come here. I've heard that many times before. Okay. Well, I think that we are coming to a hard break here in the show. And we will talk more about BPH. Some other urologic issues. Um, as the show goes on, we hope that you'll join the conversation at 4487207 50, so stay with us. One way this'll is a traffic red alert from 95.5 wsb 3 19 and the cool ray. Carry your wsb 24 hour Traffic center. I 20 westbound West Freeway and MLK Drive remains shut. Now this red alert. All lanes are blocked. So what they're having you do. Police are there directing you back to that Langhorne Street exit ramp, And they've shut that down on the downtown connector traveling south bound 2020 westbound. Going out of the east Atlanta area. Continue. 75 85 South bound over the light for Parkway and you could take that westbound into 85 year traveling on those midtown areas. Get over to 78. That's Hollowell Parkway. You can use that westbound as well. Also some good news If you're traveling 85 south round earlier crashes cleared at highway 1 20. That crash is also clear. 75 85 South bound and that North Avenue area in midtown. My boozer 95.5 wsb way. Know how important the news, weather and traffic Artie,.

prostate cancer Kate Test Mariah Hollowell Parkway alpha blocker finasteride chief Caregiver Atlanta boozer Artie
"prostate cancer" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Stage D onesie. 55 year old man. He's a Spanish speaker. He's married with two Children, and he had a biopsy. Five of those 12 cores were positive. High risk answer. And he came for treatment. He came to us two years ago and his peers say with our treatment on Lee is now zero. He's in remission. He's had no other She within our achievement for Ah, hi police and police in eight cancer. This is the work we do. And speaking about Travel. I just talked about a family that traveled the husband, wife traveled from Miami. Both had cancer. The wife had bilateral breast cancer. The husband of prostate cancer. Here's a man who flew up. Usually people think about going to Turks and Caicos Islands. Is the man who came from Turks and Caicos Islands for his treatment. Why? Because he heard about our treatment in our results. He's 55 years old from the Caribbean islands. He's married Ia's 10 Children. As a family history. That's positive for prostate cancer. Yet a biopsy showing mother wears of cancer in the bone scan was negative. Yet some pelvic pain his way was to 26 aside is 5 FT eight. Is in the large prostate and we treated him. He came here two years ago for prostate cancer treatment just have the treatment here. He works for the government and Turks and Caicos Islands. Came for the treatment and he came back This week, He came back to New York for a visit and came to see me is P ece is now zero. He's sexually active is urinary life is fine. His sexual life is fun. And that's what happens to our patients, most commonly, which is the opposite. Compared to surgery. Most people have surgery lose their sexual life. Most people have surgery for the prostate open surgery. Robotic surgery lose their urinary control of lick each of the year and lots of reasons Why so Many men and women with cancer come to 13 84 Broadway. Where we accept most insurance is Medicare. Medicaid. I can tell you this man is Very, very happy. He was happy and smiling. And we talked yesterday about stream meant and how beautiful it was an easier was and how his cancer is now in remission, and he's doing well with no other treatment. This is the work we do. You can get information if you would just call us to win two choices. Madam Sector Leader middle Bright back when Dr Lieberman came to New York, from Harvard 97% of Women in New York were losing their breasts as breast cancer treatment. But 90% of Dr Lieberman's patients with breast cancer, we're keeping their breasts. Dr Lieberman and outspoken advocate of breast saving therapy educated women about choices. Toe arm, every woman about breast cancer choices, breast saving whenever possible. And desired when every hospital thought standard radiation was okay. Dr. Lieberman had a better idea. Innovative doctor Liederman First bought brain radiosurgery to New York and body radiosurgery to America. Meet Dr Lieberman.

cancer prostate cancer Dr. Lieberman Caicos Islands New York Turks Lee pelvic pain Caribbean Liederman First Ia Miami Medicare America Harvard
"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"prostate cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Host is on that video and other patients to she'll learn a lot of details. And obviously much more time is on that video. So give us a call if you want Two on two choices or come by our office to pick it up. Officers 13, 84, Broadway, Broadway and 38 Street, and you couldn't hear much more from double 07 about his prostate cancer issues. And speaking of prostate cancer. What about a 67 year old man from George is a black man. I said that because the black community there is an epidemic of prostate cancer. One and six black men get prostate cancer when attorney three will die a prostate cancer It's a man who was a very famous musician and artist who is blind and the 67. He came with his aide. He had juvenile black home, which was a disease unheard of. When he was 14, and he's lost his vision over the years and his mother died. He got diagnosed with prostate cancer by a big surgeon to surgeon told of all you gotta, like, Go have surgery, will you as a police and seven cancer, Gleason, seven, is how the cancer looks under the microscope. He was recommended of robotic surgery. He came here to learn about it and well when he learned about it, he understood that for police and seven cancer with US Success rates 90% with surgery, robotic surgery Successful It is 60%. So we're 50% better, which is a big thing. We don't do radical surgery, which is a big thing. He learned that when you have radical robotic surgery about 98% of men have damaged her sexual life. Which is not seen here like that, And he learned that when you have radical robotic surgery about 8% of men have leakage of the year and why doesn't want leek each He doesn't want to be impotent. He doesn't want the cancer to come back. And also he learned that when you have your prostate removed because they removed the prostate and the urinary passageway, which is called the prostatic urethra. They shortened the Penis. Well, no man, in my view, wants to have less good results. Who would want to 60% results when you could have 90% success with us? Good when I have radical surgery and be in a hospital, and again, you in a SEC getting hit by a truck. Would one lose the sexual life 98% of time. Who would want to be infinite? Who would want to be in Kana leaking urine and who'd want have shortly? The Penis. That's why it's so. Easy to make a decision about coming here and talking about all the options. And of course, if a man wants to get checked out for prostate cancer, you welcome to get checked out. If you have prostate cancer, you probably want to come here and learn about all the options. First, this man had seen two of the most famous surgeons in New York, and no one told him all the side effects. Of surgery or all the failures of surgery and the benefits of registered E. None of those doctors told him that is sad because we think a doctor should talk about all the risks and benefits. And alternatives whenever possible. Take every patient and so for this man who's scheduled to have robotic surgery, and now he understands he just doesn't want to have a big operation doesn't mean the hospital doesn't want to be impotent. Incontinent doesn't have shortening of his Penis. So we have lots of information to send you can call is that 212 choices you call now their night in come in and pick up information. It's always best to meet in person. If you have a cancer question, it's well worth your time and effort. So give us a call to into choices to make an appointment if you wish. And we have bet on the line. Hello, Ben. Hi. Dr. Leaving. How you doing? Okay. What's your question? Say, um, my sister was. I know my cousin back to my cousin. She's like your sister. She was diagnosed with breast cancer. And one special told us about the chemotherapy. She don't want that. And there's a side effect. 11 is what is Radiosurgery? What is that? All right, so radio surgeries more precise method of giving radiation, So we see many, many women. In fact, we have a brand new booklet in DVD. We just produced recently and She should probably get her hands on it also send you a copy, if you want. It's a package information about breast cancer treatment options. So we see many, many women who just did not want to have chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment. We see many women you don't want to have surgery don't want to have Remove of the breast or any surgery. So we see many women with breast cancer with early cancers of late cancers who want to know about all the options, not just one option. We don't think it's fair to learn about only one option. We think it's important to learn about all the options that we use. Very painless or right. Painless. Our work is painless. It's not invasive. We said invisible beams from thousands of angles to hit the cancer in the breast. It's successful. That's the high success rate. So patient there's no cutting. No bleeding, No hospitals, no ICUs, no ventilators. So it's an easy treatment. It's one of many options. We offer everyone with breast cancer. No, because I know my dad. My dad had lung cancer. He passed away from Sergeant. When he had chemotherapy, and I know he's a go for his treatments and And, uh, Yeah. Hmm. Uh, uh, used to call me. Yes, that's arrives in New York City. That's the right thing, Uh, way treats like cancers and our success rate where we attack the lung cancer. With.

prostate cancer breast cancer lung cancer cancer US prostatic urethra George attorney New York City SEC leek New York Gleason Dr. Leaving Radiosurgery
Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75

Environment: NPR

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75

"National book award winner berry lopez was famous for chronicling his travels to remote places and the landscapes he found there but his writings weren't simply account of his journeys they were reminders of how precious life on earth is an our responsibility to care for it. He died after a long battle with prostate cancer just months. After a wildfire forced him from his oregon home he was seventy five years old. Npr's dave blanchard has this remembrance berry lopez spent more than thirty years writing his last book horizon. He don't spend that much time on a project without going through periods of self doubt when i met him at his home last year he told me when he was feeling defeated by the work. He'd walk along the nearby mckenzie river. Every time i did there was a beaver. Stick in the water at my feet. And they're of course their workers. So i imagine the beaver were saying. What the hell's wrong with you. You get back in there and do your work up. In his studio he had a collection of the stakes are little tooth marks. It was a lesson for lopez. Every day i walked in that room. I saw the signs of. Don't lose in yourself. This was the world of barry. Lopez beaver could teach you the most valuable lessons. Lopez was born in new york but his father moved the family to california when he was a child. Hugh eventually settle in game. Notice for his writing about the natural world he win the nineteen eighty-six book award for nonfiction. Work arctic dreams at the time he told npr how he approached the seemingly empty arctic environment. I made myself pay attention to places where i thought nothing was going on. And then after a while the landscape materialized in a in a fuller way denied. I imagine that at first glance in lopez books. A cloudy sky contains grays of pigeon feathers of slate in pearls packs of hammerhead sharks in the galapagos. Move like swans million a city park pond composer john. Luther adams was a friend and collaborator of lopez. For nearly four decades he says lopez writing serves as a wake-up call. She surveys the beauty of the world. And at the same time the cruelty and violence that we humans inflict on the earth and on one another and he doesn't with deep compassion lopez experienced that cruelty first hand as a child. He was sexually abused by a family. Friend he i wrote about it in two thousand thirteen. He later told. Npr experience made him feel afraid and shameful around other people. The animals encountered in the california wilderness. Offered something different. They didn't say oh. We know what you went through. I felt accepted by the animal world. Lopez would spend his life writing about that world in particular the damage done to it by climate change. That hit home for lopez. This past september much of his property was burned in wildfires tore through oregon partly due to abnormally dry conditions. His wife deborah gordon says he lost decades of notes and correspondence and much of the forest around the home where lopez had lived for fifty years. He talked a lot about climate change in. And how it's so easy to think it's going to happen to other people and not to you but it happened to us. It happened to him personally. And i think that the fire was just a blow. That not just couldn't quite ever get back from when i spoke to lopez last year. He said he always sought to find. Grace in the middle of devastation is so difficult to be a human being. There are so many reasons to give up to retreat into cynicism or despair. I hate to see that. And i i want to do something that makes people feel safe and loved and capable in his last days. His family brought objects from home to him in hospice. Among the items the beaver stakes from his studio dave blanchard. Npr news

Berry Lopez Lopez Dave Blanchard Lopez Beaver NPR Mckenzie River Luther Adams Oregon Prostate Cancer California Hugh Barry Arctic Deborah Gordon New York John Grace Npr News
Longtime MD Senate President Mike Miller Resigns Seat, Citing Health

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Longtime MD Senate President Mike Miller Resigns Seat, Citing Health

"After a career in the Annapolis statehouse that spanned nearly five decades. Maryland's former Senate president, Thomas Mike Miller, has resigned. The 78 year old state senator who served 33 years, a Senate president in Annapolis, Thomas, Mike Miller, announced in the letter. He's resigning from his Senate seat effective today. Miller said He made the move with tremendous sadness, but cited his health He's been dealing with prostate cancer in recent years and said he felt he couldn't meet the demands of another legislative session. Even during heated debates. Miller, a Democrat, often had the respect of Republican lawmakers, who sometimes grudgingly would say he made sure they were heard in the legislative process. Miller's seat one that covers parts of Prince George's. Calvert and Charles counties will remain vacant until the Democratic Central Committee's in all three counties send a recommendation to Governor Larry Hogan governor then gets to make the appointment. General Assembly will convene

Thomas Mike Miller Senate Annapolis Miller Mike Miller Maryland Thomas Prostate Cancer Democratic Central Committee Prince George Calvert Governor Larry Hogan Charles General Assembly
Giuliani deemed high risk for complications from the coronavirus

First Morning News

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Giuliani deemed high risk for complications from the coronavirus

"Giuliani Giuliani says says he's he's feeling feeling okay okay is is he he battles battles coronavirus coronavirus that that in in Washington, Washington, D. D. C C hospital they 76 year old Giuliani, currently the president's personal lawyer who's admitted to Georgetown Hospital on Sunday, Learning the president's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, has been hospitalized at Georgetown University Medical Center here in Washington, D. C. After testing positive for covert 19. His conditions is unclear. But we do know that Rudy Giuliani is 76 years old. He is considered high risk and he does have a history of health complications, including a battle with prostate cancer. In recent weeks, he has been crisscrossing the country, leading the president's fight to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Just Thursday, Rudy Giuliani was in Georgia, asking state lawmakers there to overturn the November election. Giuliani son Andrew also came down with coronavirus in late November. He works at the White House. Speaking

Giuliani Giuliani D. D. C C Hospital Rudy Giuliani Georgetown Hospital Washington Giuliani Georgetown University Medical Prostate Cancer Georgia Andrew White House
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test1

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

test1

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer