35 Burst results for "Prostate"

'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

"Doctors reported promising results from an experimental cancer drug that delivers radiation directly to tumor cells an emerging class of medicine called radio pharmaceuticals may become a new way to treat patients with hard to reach inoperable cancers in a study involving over eight hundred men with advanced prostate cancer released by the American society of clinical oncology a tumor targeting radiation therapy from drug maker Novartis kept cancer at bay for nearly nine months compared to three months for people receiving standard treatment and survival was better to fifteen months versus eleven months the drug is administered through an IV in each dose contains trillions of engineered molecules a tractor portion of the molecule hunts down cancer cells the payload portion is the radiation experts say radio pharmaceuticals maybe the next big wave of therapeutic development I'm Jennifer king

Experimental Cancer Inoperable Cancers American Society Of Clinical O Prostate Cancer Novartis Cancer Jennifer King
Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Voice of Disney's 'Sebastian the Crab' Dies at Age 72

"Sinewy right the Tony nominated actor famous is the voice of Sebastian the crab has died really right had an acting career spanning five decades after moving to New York he made his name on Broadway replacing Ben Farina and Pippen it was an original cast member of Jesus Christ Superstar in the nineteen seventies right played the purple grape in the fruit of the loom commercials right on only a dollar he played chronic wanted on from Disney's dinosaur but was best known as Sebastian the crab in Disney's little mermaid and won a Grammy for Best Original Song in may two thousand interview Wright said he enjoyed speaking for Disney characters I'm in seventh heaven and I don't and I know it sounds like all he's just giving us the press the you know the old sound bite no really really this is what I've always wanted to do one of Wright's daughters D. Kelly wrote on Facebook my beautiful strong loving Daddy is off to his next adventure right was seventy two according to his family he died Monday in New York after a three year bout with prostate cancer I'm Jennifer king

Ben Farina Jesus Christ Superstar In The Sebastian The Crab In Disney's Pippen Sebastian Disney Tony Wright New York Grammy D. Kelly Daddy Facebook Prostate Cancer Jennifer King
The Shocking Reality of Postpartum Muscle Separation

Keeping it Re.al

02:25 min | Last month

The Shocking Reality of Postpartum Muscle Separation

"Wet delving into arguably plastic surgeries most misunderstood and misrepresented procedures the humble tummy tuck for those outside of the plastic surgery world tummy. Tucks are often used interchangeably with either suction or seen as a means to quick weight loss. This most likely a remnant from the early offsite geist where shows like nip talk and plastic surgery reality. Tv reign supreme but women. Who've had donna. Prostate will prove it's not a lighthearted cosmetic procedure in this week's episode. We'll give him rigo. Tina who gives an honest. A harrowing description of what life was like with severe muscle separation for four years and y trailer. Removed poos pot muscle separation from the n. b. s. But i joined by. Dr richard bloom to explain what exactly muscles separation and dominik plasticity Chore so attempt the medical term for tommy talkies in abdominal plastic. Their number of reasons why you might have an abdominal plassey. One would be white loss. The other nine mom would be after having children when you have children and also when you put on white. The skin is stretched up and you increase the amount of tissue intra abdominal so around all of your organs and when that happens it stretches out the muscle will so the abdominal wall is made up of two muscles in the in the middle which are the rectus abdominal muscles. So that's what keeps you. You'll see expected people talk about but then attaching into the sauna. Them us an awesome muscles together. Make up the abdominal wall. So when there is an increase in pressure in the intro donald space with that judah fat or pregnancy or other things that will get stretched up and people than the the tissue between the two central muscles gets stretched. And that's what people refer to as the muscle separation or the dive. Eric ation to use the more medical term and people focus on that but the laxity or or weakness in the abdominal wall. That's part of it. But it's also because those muscles that are inserting into the rectus ab- domino muscle. Are they not in the right place.

Rigo Dr Richard Bloom Tommy Talkies Donna Prostate Tina Eric Ation Donald Trump
Doctors Urge People To Keep Up With Their Routine Screenings

WBZ Afternoon News

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Doctors Urge People To Keep Up With Their Routine Screenings

"About the consequences of Americans putting off doctor's appointments and early detection screenings because of covert 19 WBZ is Kim Tunnicliffe tells US a Boston based nonprofit is launching a public awareness campaign urging men to start going for their prostate cancer screenings again. The prostate Health Education Network believes a crisis is looming for African American men in the U. S. President Thomas Farrington is concerned. The pandemic has cause meant to put off their early detection screenings, he says. The American Cancer Society is estimating that new prostate cancer cases will increase by 30% this year in American Man of the highest isn't afraid so there's more than 70% high for all other bands and die at a rate of more than 120% higher with they expected estimated you increases we see a major crisis, the network is teaming up with politicians. Energy and doctors to speak out about the importance of scheduling those early detection screenings. Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ

WBZ Kim Tunnicliffe Prostate Health Education Netw S. President Thomas Farrington Prostate Cancer Boston U. American Cancer Society
Why Fans and Nearly 600 Jeopardy Contestants Are Slamming Dr. Oz as Guest Host

Mark Blazor

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Why Fans and Nearly 600 Jeopardy Contestants Are Slamming Dr. Oz as Guest Host

"What? Dr Oz out as guest host on jeopardy. I guess that was quick. Last night was the first time he's hosted right last night was the very first one. Well, I guess they're protesting his gig as the guest host eyes two week run. He's supposed to do this for two week. They're accusing him of dangerous and UN researched medical claims. What has he given medical advice during jeopardy? No, you just You know, some of the things he's had on his show over the years have been more of a holistic approach instead of pure modern medicine, quote unquote. So they're saying the fact that this is a Fact based game show is a slap in the face to all involved having him hosted. I guess like you were just kind of alluding to that, you know. Some of the stuff he's done in the past might not be by the medical book. If you Will that holistic, some of that kind of thing. It sounds like you know, he does a blend. I guess he does. He doesn't blend and that's I don't think it's a bit. I don't think it's a bad thing. I really don't our own the governor Dimitri's Stanley on Friday he has done a combination of Modern scientist. Whatever you wanna call it, modern medicine for you know, with his battle with prostate cancer and some holistic stuff, and he's doing friend Fantastic right now. So what? I don't understand why people freak out about that?

Dr Oz UN Dimitri Stanley Prostate Cancer
Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

Good Life Project

06:48 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

"Tell me if this is true. Your parents met in a way that kind of foreshadowed your future in a little bit like they didn't mean a bar that didn't mean party is actually true that they met at a library. Of course it's a. I've had my own moments with that story. But it's the absolute truth. My mother was going to interview at. What was the large libraries in sta cultural center and my father was working at a desk. Saugus he Slip some gaming but yet that's that's where they met and then my mother was working actually on the the floor where the music was where all the film were. The vinyls that was this is not harold washington library This is before perr washes number and They met their first date was purple. Rain of the movie yet differs date was to go see preparation. The movie that is not suspicious. I eight yeah yeah. My dad loved france and it was really interesting. Because when i was putting out kinsey a memoir that is very reminiscent to me in a lot of ways of the story of purple rain Imprint the first place that i was asked to come pretty much to drop. The album actually was to first avenue for sold out show. And that's where my father lives now. My father has lived in minnesota for longer than twenty years. Twenty five thirty years probably which is why. This album is a purple winds wire at the vinyl herbal. But it was the first show that i was asked to come in do at prince's club where my father would walk at c be reforming in his hometown. Right before the shutdown so was the first and last show that i got to perform before we before the pandemic times matt. What what was it like for you. It was magical. It was so so amazing. I felt like it's called me. They're a felt like prince called me. You know called me to be there not knowing that things would shut down in a couple of weeks after that. But i think that it's sustained me in a way. I really miss performing and to be sold out show. I was called by desa so Of doom tree who lives in minnesota's a artist and author our own. Right of course asked me to come an open for her. So i do the sold out show and it was just one of the most magical experiences that i've had as far The reception was so so incredible and You know the people of minnesota really made me feel like a star that day in so it was just a lot of moments that were more magical more synchronised than even you know just the forty minutes i was on stage. It was just a whole magical experience that it's sort of like everything was leading up to that moment. Have you talked to your dad about that. His show yeah. It was so funny. My dad is very mysterious guy so when he came i didn't see him. He called me till we. It was a great show. And all that but i think just the way my mind works in the art. That was moving through in the art. That i was making and where i was in that space. I can't lie that i was like. I don't even know if he came. I don't even know if he was even actually here and van but me and my dad had this really interesting connection. I mean you have that connection with your parents. You have the connection with people that brought you into the world doesn't have to be so literal or on the phone or shortly proof or whatever life. I have that tie with my parents. My parents no when. I'm going through something whether i talked to them or not. Like they'll feel it from across town or prostate or cross country in so Randomly two or three weeks later. He sends me a video of me like on my last song. You know rocking the stage of okay. Right he was legit there. that's awesome. yeah. I mean as bad i think You know amazon. There's that connection. There's that sort of thing which. I'm fairly practical person. But there's also certain things like that that i just believe in you just feel something doesn't matter where you are I know you're also really close with grandma coming up as well right. Oh yeah my best details. Tell me more better ellen thompson. She was born in nineteen forty three in mississippi. And i love to speak her name. She was one of the first people that clap from me in made a really big deal out of me knowing how to read on my seventh birthday. She made me de. Protagonist of this book was a story of dr martin luther king junior. It should be around here somewhere. But it's right there so in this in this book that my grandmother gave me my tribute to martin luther king. Junior i am the protagonists of this book. And i'm writing a paper on martin luther king junior at tell the story of his life. But i'm you know in the beginning saying oh telling my cousins rookie creek turtle i have to write this paper on martin luther king junior Go into the story by the end of the story. I've told this whole thing. I turned it in. I get a on the paper. That is the book right. So not only. Did my grandmother clap for me. When she sees me reading. And saying that. I you know had a love. For words you should go to market a garden classes with me and sit in a walk me home and then when i began talking she would call me radio or lawnmower. She said because. I've talked so much if you call me that. And that was a foreshadowing in itself. Right i mean of me getting a on the paper. Maybe the paper was the black album. Right me. Being able to use my words for the upliftment of myself in marginalized communities in it was really just kind of like thinking about this is a power device and words in education literature a are powered by

Sta Cultural Center Prince's Club Minnesota Harold Washington Saugus Kinsey Desa Ellen Thompson France Prince Matt Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Amazon Mississippi
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 4 months ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
Boxing champ Leon Spinks dies at 67

WBAP Morning News

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Boxing champ Leon Spinks dies at 67

"Former heavyweight boxing champion Leon Spinks has died at age 67. He authored one of the most stunning upsets in boxing history. But Leon Spinks lost his fight with prostate and other cancers, speaks one gold of the 1976 Montreal Olympics but had only seven professional fights under his belt. When he got into the ring with Muhammed Ali on February 15th 1978, he was outweighed by Ali by more than £25, but wanna split decision against the legend becoming undisputed heavyweight champ?

Leon Spinks Boxing Cancers Montreal Muhammed Ali Olympics ALI
Leon Spinks, Boxer Who Took Ali’s Crown and Lost It, Dies at 67

News, Traffic and Weather

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

Leon Spinks, Boxer Who Took Ali’s Crown and Lost It, Dies at 67

"The only boxer to take the heavyweight title from Mohammed Ali has died. ST Louis and Leon Spinks Junior who wants meat Mohammed Ali to take the heavyweight title in boxing, has died from cancer at the age of 67, Spinks said battle prostate and other cancers in recent years Spinks be Dolly back in 1978. He was the only boxer who took the title from Ali and the ring. Ali would take back the title in a rematch. Months later, Spinks and his brother Michael, made history by winning gold medals at the 1976

Mohammed Ali Leon Spinks Spinks St Louis Cancers Boxing ALI Dolly Michael
Former heavyweight champion Leon Spinks dies at 67

Masters in Business

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Former heavyweight champion Leon Spinks dies at 67

"Are known for his gap toothed grin who went toe to toe with Muhammed Ali and 1978 and shocked the world has died. Leon Spinks was 67, the former heavyweight champion had been suffering from prostate and other cancers. The ST Louis native won a gold medal as a lightweight and the Montreal Olympics back in 1976. 13 months later spring would step into the ring with an aging 36 year old Ali and took him to the 15th round toe win The fight by a decision and

Leon Spinks Muhammed Ali St Louis Cancers Montreal Olympics ALI
Boxing legend Leon Spinks dies at 67

WGN Programming

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Boxing legend Leon Spinks dies at 67

"Boxing legend Leon Spinks, who died last night after a battle with prostate and other cancers. The Olympic gold medalist probably remember most for a stunning upset over Mohammed Ali in 1978. That match was for the heavyweight title and was only the eighth profile of Spinks career. It came just two years after his gold medal win during the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. Speaks and Ali would fight again. Just seven months after that, With Ali taking bagman title belt in the rematch, speaks reclaim the heavyweight title in 1985. He defended it three times before being knocked out by Mike Tyson. Leon speaks only 67 years old. Still ahead

Leon Spinks Mohammed Ali Olympic Gold Boxing Cancers Spinks Bagman ALI Olympics Montreal Mike Tyson Leon
Boxing champ Leon Spinks dies at 67

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Boxing champ Leon Spinks dies at 67

"Boxer known for his gap toothed grin, who went toe to toe with Muhammed Ali in 1978 and shocked the world has died. Leon Spinks was 67, the former heavyweight champion had been suffering from prostate and other cancers to ST Louis native won a gold medal as a light heavyweight in the Montreal Olympics in 1976 13. Months later, Spinks would step into the ring with an aging 36 year old Ali and took him to the 15 round limit to win the fight by

Leon Spinks Muhammed Ali Boxer St Louis Cancers Spinks Montreal Olympics ALI
UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

Marketplace

03:33 min | 4 months ago

UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

"China has been recent years trying to improve its global image. That effort took a hit today in London, Britain's communications regulator announced it is stripping the state run China Global Television network of its broadcast license there, MPR's Frank Langfitt explains from London. The C GT N That's it's known, opened its European production center here to great fanfare about two years ago. Today off come, the British regulator announced it was pulling the network's license. Officials said. The reason was straightforward. The people in charge of CG Tien's editorial policy are ultimately beholden to China's Communist Party in British Broadcasting law forbids political bodies from controlling license holders. Thank goodness, Finally, this license has been taken away. Peter Humphrey, performer fraud investigator in Shanghai was glad to hear the news. He filed a complaint against CGT in last year. Not over Communist Party control of the network. But over Chinese state media is airing of what Humphrey says was a forced confession. It followed his arrest in 2000 and 13 on charges of illegally acquiring the personal data of Chinese nationals. Well, of course you go way up 10 personal information by illegal means. I regret what I did and apologize to the Chinese government. Humphrey insists he never actually confessed and that the interview was doctored. He also says his captors pressured him to make a statement by withholding medical treatment for his prostate cancer, considering the kind of brutal human rights violations that CD Tien has been involved with extracting and packaging forced confessions from prisoners held under torture in China, who've never been in front of a judge. I just think that we should have no organization like that on our soil in Humphries case, Afghan found CGT And had seriously breached fairness and privacy rules. It also found the network had failed to cover the Hong Kong democracy protests with quote due impartiality CG Tien was indignant with today's ruling. It blamed quote the manipulation of far right groups and had I China forces for the off calm decision, according to a statement on way ball, China's nearest equivalent Twitter. The loss of the license undermined two key Chinese government strategy. Steve saying is director of the so as China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies. University of London. She camping has been very clear he wants the Chinese story being told well. He wants his versions off everything being spread across the world in the most positive, light possible Sititi and is one of those instruments used for this purpose. It's hang expects the Chinese government to retaliate against BBC reporters in China. Even though the BBC is editorial independent of the British government. Peter Dahlin is the director of Safeguard Defenders Human Rights Organization, which spearheaded the campaign against C G. T n Here. The U. K stands out across Europe is having a quite well developed framework for help to regulate TV for how to control this information. The stripping of the license prohibits CG Tan from broadcasting here, but dollars, says that doesn't mean the network has to leave. Still, he does think today's move could have ripple effects are other countries going to start holding them accountable as well? I say this might be the beginning of a process that city and will find very unfavorable for their type of this information for their type of broadcasting. That would mean more challenges for a Chinese government that has invested a lot in trying to change the way it's perceived. Frank Langfitt NPR NEWS

Cg Tien China Chinese Government Frank Langfitt European Production Center Peter Humphrey Communist Party Humphrey London CGT China Institute Britain Tien Shanghai Humphries Prostate Cancer Peter Dahlin School Of Oriental And African Safeguard Defenders Human Righ BBC
This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

05:58 min | 4 months ago

This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"I wanted. I didn't want to have not only smoldering away in my pelvis. bit also small does away and you hit. It's always in your head as much as i could rationalize it and say i'm very scientific in my approach things and it wasn't a problem every day would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when i sat a worrying about all the other things worry about three o'clock in the morning you will saying parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves. Also get tonight. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today. That people want to see the inside. Bids cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media. you know. i've seen all your videos on youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes up in this episode. It's a franken. Feel this conversation about an experience. Men don often talked publicly about. So let's meet the scientist and the surgeon interested in nature. This is professor robe ramsey as a molecular biologist and kansas scientist and on the saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rossi's by his husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a i love of his and i've always been driven by trying to understand biology and i'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially sells Machines and i like the way they operate and they're really have siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day i was in an operating theatre watching people take cancerous. Lump sexually as it was then breast cancer. I was instantly captivated. This is professor. Declan murphy lading urologist and kansas surgeon. He's been in a for over a decade but you can he he's rh lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Died dot. I was in the operating theatre was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly i just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them. That it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but i was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field work. In it's everything from the kidneys dancer. The bladder and the prostate and the pain is in. The testicles are all areas in the urology domain that can be affected by cancer. Now dick lennon rob happened to be call. Eggs at the pay to mccallum will pay to mac cancel santa in melbourne as a scientist rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing vaccines that target gastrointestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as a surgeon declines leading the way with us robotics in the operating theatre and often the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally makes much but robin declan like many others at paid amac a different because i want to do science. That reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them are remember being at a hospital where declan was doing a tag team robotic procedure on a patient was having some colorectal surgery plus a prostatectomy and i was there on saturday morning with my eyes pocket collecting some samples clincal trial without doing their in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case. That was a patient to kansas. Quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as some cancerous tissue to take into the lab. And i was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a of beauty in any group of people that do things well together and there's almost subliminal communication. What's coming next that i'm bumping to each other The theater staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a formula one team. It a stop and i'd never. I've never worked in the center where you will have a a professor of colorectal science in the operating room with you so and we get used to that at peter. Mac it's the same prostate the same for melanoma central breast and and i just find as an extraordinary environment. I've never worked in a place that has that. Degree of translational multidisciplinary care where people are. They're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials etcetera etcetera. And it's just a extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lab question. I of been geneticists for most of my research life and we can do cool things with jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always and i want to the always it is relevant. What happens in a patient. It's all about the patient in the has always westbound lot that though so these two colleagues late in their fields in cancer but then kind of a sudden curve ball and a role change. The scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. And he's patient he's rob i have a great jp. I've been going to for quite a long time. Really thoughtful considerate kanda guy. We've we always have a great show. When i go to visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exercise and diet.

Robe Ramsey Declan Murphy Kansas Cancer ROB Dick Lennon Rob Gastrointestinal Cancers Robin Declan Franken Rossi DON Mccallum Youtube Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Declan Melbourne MAC Melanoma Jane
How Long Will You Wait?

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:04 min | 5 months ago

How Long Will You Wait?

"Cat. Let's talk about the market. Because i'm you know this is a little time with. I guess we don't really that used to at the moment we've had some much splendid movement higher over the lost way while the worst we are. I guess crab walking you know it just sort of meandering along like a crab yet. Krebs will sideways. Bitcoin is down to a full percent. Today it's not really worrying me at all. You know we still hanging in there not far. From all-time highs is the first push higher. Certainly would be surprised at all. Said david pullback you look at the weekly shot and there's still room for the thing is the longer that we continue to just sort of crab consolidate about so. I'd wise when it comes to the weekly jot. What's going to happen is when the next week closes. Those moving. Averages are going to have another candle to average themselves. Ants on and they're gonna get closer and closer and closer if we continue to go saw buys Which brings you know. It doesn't necessarily mean prostates a full for us to start to move a game in the up direction. So you know this. This saw his period of time. It's a good time you try and against your also chiding against bitcoin. There are still some really nice trends out that We'll start to see all. I believe a few more of these. The transit just starting a phone when you tried any guidance. Bitcoin big courses dominant. Spain caught south for quite some time and just sort of strip the market. Rotten our in that period You know where we get. We basically get the opportunity for rum. These alz to start the trend against bitcoin again which gives us upwards again which he does up at trinity and that sort of what i'm saying at the moment with a focus is that's what my focus is wrought. I'm bitcoins dominance. Now's a sixty five point two percent and now let's just talk about how significant that is because if we discuss the month of december Old awakes are the twenty eight december. The end of the end of the basically that talked out of the shot topped out at seventy three point. Six three per cent now with bitcoin coming full quite significantly advice full and in the lost one two three weeks eleven percent now that is because bitcoin clinicals has pulled back pain so to sitting around and watch for the wall as well and some of these markets have been moving quite. Well now. don't forget that. The market and dominance the majority of what you're going to see is going to be reflected through things like a theory and katana link now all three of these have had good moves of signed period because they are the major market cap all the old market so to speak that was bringing. Bitcoins dominance down guy since it continues to grind i mean yesterday we were down Point eight four percent that they have a full one point six four. We've consistent living gronning lowering and now on a downtrend so that doesn't mean that we've opened up. The doors on all safes not at all as just a reflection of bitcoin going sideways for the time. Being some of these other. Major market cap tokens or coins. Going to call him. Having a had a bit of a tom. Tom the sun for all across the market dom is relatively ho Bitcoin thirty full six nine five down two point. Two seven percent not looking for tried a theory was shot. Still pretty good in the dialing although there is a little bit of divergence updates only the daily that shows that divergence pretty kane on a rising to last night on a theory on the four abbott. It brought to stop before before it was entered. So cancel the order before bed. So a pretty Solan recovery the small leading into the clause and since then down three point three three percent and finally enough at thirteen hundred thirty three dollars. Now not really my right At this moment in time just because again. It's starting to get a little bit starting to get a little bit a what's going on. I want to stay break above four hundred forty six. you know. Get us above those those all time highs and then we'll have successively back

Bitcoin Krebs David Spain TOM Abbott
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
test

The Sheepdog Project

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

test

"There's no predilection to cost prostate cancer from To cause a more severe form prostate cancer while on testosterone supplementation. It can increase your predilection for more treatable. Form of prostate cancer Obviously anybody on testosterone supplementation. You need to be having your test dot your prostate monitored as well and i'm gonna talk more about them. We genital urinary

Prostate Cancer
"prostate" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:35 min | 7 months ago

"prostate" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"When diagnosed with this type of cancer of course when the cancer is more advanced than we certainly taylor the the focus to actually treating the cancer so any man with a pardon all the lingo but gleason score seven or higher a great group to or higher prostate cancer and You know somebody with what i would consider. Intermediate risk parameters really should be encouraged to treat intermediate responders or higher should really be encouraged to focus on treating the prostate cancer. Especially if they have a life expectancy of more than ten to fifteen years and that's an important topic to mention is that because prostate cancer can present very advanced stages or ages. Life expectancy is a consideration to in part of the discussion because if a man is in his eighty s and has competing Medical problems sometimes even with significant prostate cancer. We may not treat that cancer because our goal is to do no harm. You mentioned the gleason grade Just for the listeners. And the view is. Can you explain a little bit what that is. Gleason grading is a pathologic grading system. That really looks at the actual cell structure of the cancer under a microscope in the look at the cell structures determine the aggressiveness of the cancer. So the gleason grading system starts from six or three three equals six to five. Plus five equals ten on the extreme advanced presentation form so They've tried to shift away from this gleason pattern to what they call a great groups. Great group one through five and simply for the fact that when men here a gleason six cancer to them they hear six out of ten and they get very concerned that the cancer is beyond five notes to them. It sounds more advanced. So we've changed the nomenclature over the years to accommodate for the fact that gleason six prostate cancer is actually a very slow growing cancer and very early detected non-aggressive other times we think for example patients should seek a second opinion. I think oftentimes when you use the basic minimum to make a diagnosis in stage patient I think that's that is all that's required for most providers. I think for patients who want more information to ensure that they are accurately staged and accurately diagnosed. I think a second opinion at center of excellence is important because there are various things we can offer such as a second opinion. Review of the pathology slides. You'd be surprised. How often pathologist will disagree looking under a microscope looking at the same exact cell and tissue and they may disagree about the the grading of the cancer so gleason grading can be somewhat subjective. And it's based on that physicians experience and opinions. So i think mayo clinic. Of course we have very experienced with Most of the day they spend looking at prostate cancer so they really become specifically interested also experts on prostate cancer so they can be better qualified to make some of those calls when when there is a kind of a a know a subjective situation the other reason why people come for second opinions to a prostate cancer specialist is also to ensure that there are no other tests that could be run that may improve the staging of the cancer so one example of staging imaging. That is really helped over the years. Mri surprised to help patients who are diagnosed with prostate cancer. Oftentimes.

prostate cancer cancer gleason mayo clinic center of excellence taylor
"prostate" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

01:50 min | 7 months ago

"prostate" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"And that's a metric that most organization use to determine a prostate cancer aggressiveness in prostate cancer. even some of the ages still has nearly one hundred percent five year survival and that's different than the perspective of someone having pancreatic cancer brain cancer where the five year survival Not even fifteen percent time. So you know. I do counsel patients of based on that and tell them to put things in perspective. I encourage all my patients to make long-term plans still into the positive outlook because the dynamic is also the landscape of prostate cancer. Treatment is also being. it's a dynamic process. A one of the things that you mentioned. That was about the stage of diagnosis. Can you just mentioned Described trust to pack. What do you mean by the stage. So the stage of the cancer is the extent of the cancer within the prostate itself so when the cancer is localized to the prostate. We usually say that's oregon confined or stage two when it's a stage three cancer. It simply means that the cancer has gone beyond the capsule or the surface of the prostate. And so that means the Cancers tumors actually penetrated the surface of the prostate in gone beyond its out a nearby structures Outside of the prostate wall stage four prostate cancer means that the cancer has grown into a lymph node or has grown far away from the prostate distant until liver surrounding organs Bones so that would make it a stage four cancer. I see and then obviously i'm assuming depending on the stage. The treatments vary. Can you talk to us a little bit about the treatments that patients can expect when we say localized cancer were simply focused on cancer. That has not left. The prostate has not penetrated the surface of the prostate has not gone into the bones or lymph.

brain cancer prostate cancer. oregon
"prostate" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

04:46 min | 10 months ago

"prostate" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Where my cancer has not thank goodness grown at all I've never had to have any treatment I just am monitored. On. A regular set schedule. So, there's plenty of time if my cancer suddenly decided to get mean to deal with it but as part of the whole process. My doctor told me that I needed to improve my eating habits and lose weight. So since twelve years ago I've lost fifty pounds five zero pounds. And I never perceived myself as being. Fat. And I don't think anybody who knew me would consider that but they could see carrying extra weight. And I did it gradually over time With controlling how many calories consumed per day and taking the world's worst diet And gradually steadily improving. Because one of the factors with Nachos, prostate cancer, but other illnesses is carrying too much weight. And also eating nothing but the wrong things now I still eat a lot of the wrong things but you know I the right things to. And I used to be allergic to any kind of green except money. So any vegetables were green. They just weren't part of my life. really any vegetables at all put? I've made that change over time and. It's probably part of why I've been able to manage disease. Instead of having to have. An operation you know surgery or having radiation or different kinds of cancer treatments that may be required someday, but I've been able to. Make a difference almost certainly with the behavioral things I've always been an exercise maniac. But adding into at the loss of weight and improving what I eat is considered to be very important. Well. Each year in September. The. Prostate Cancer Foundation has a campaign to try to get guys to improve how they eat. But thing. Is that there's no reason you couldn't. Improve how you eat even if you're not a guy, I mean all of us. are in a position where we can probably eat a little better. Unless we're one of those vegans and the campaigns called, eat it to beat it. We have all the information for you Clark Dot Com.

Prostate Cancer Foundation Nachos
"prostate" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Entire clinical team including the pathologist radiologists surgeons and nurses them meet to discuss each patient and the best way to manage their case. It depends on the biopsy type because if it is transparently biopsy we take more samples so that take long to expand if it is translated told standard by up say it usually take ten days and then be discussed the case in multi disciplinary team meeting. And we see the patient and gave that assaults and stage. What do you say to the patients? Or what information can you impart to them? And what's the next step so in duracell clinic? We will have the information about the biopsy yourself better. It is a cancer or note if it is a cancer what grade of the cancer and we would have discussed what treatment option is available for patients so when we see the patient be will discuss the findings of the biopsy say advance stories a locally advanced or early prostate cancer and we discussed the treatment options with the patient. We can now worker with quite good accuracy. Where the likely prognosis meeting to see the outcome is with or without treatment. And that's what we use together with the patient to work out what to do next. The first thing to know is that there is absolutely no evidence that rushing through a diagnosis of prostate. Cancer has any impact and survival. So it doesn't really matter how long it takes. The key thing is that he's done well in general terms from the minute somebody presents to say the hospital for investigations to get Anne Marie. Scan to be seen to have a biopsy and get a diagnosis. We try to do that within two or three weeks and then we can make decisions about what to do next. Some people listening to this may be wondering why it is that we have screening programs for certain diseases. But we don't have one for this given that you've said that eighty percent of men aged eighty may well have prostate cancer which argues perhaps would be worth looking for. It's it's therefore very common condition. Why is there no screening program for prostate cancer so the problem screening in prostate cancer is not the fact that it isn't save lives because he does the problem as that he picks up a lot of disease which is treatment and that over diagnosis can also lead over treatment because of poor understanding of the natural history of disease sort of instinct treat rather than monitor and if you look at the statistics as well is very hard to justify so for example in prostate cancer terms the lifetime risk of developing prostate? Cancer is nearly ten times risk of dying of it. You have to find an awful lot of men to save a single life but problem with screening is that its tended to rely on a single test at a single point in time and the test is in good. Psa Like I said is a nice test but it's just not good enough and so a lot of our work. A lot of work of others is actually trying to do two things. Define what is the right time point to pick it up and secondly trying to get a better test to pick it up. Are you having any luck? Yes there are actually a number of tests out there which already better than the pse. The problem is that the cost more as well. We are very interested in actually binding better tests with a much more evolving way of looking at this because the way we see it is that each man's risk changes with time and how put together as what we are exploring at the moment but. I do think we have the tools to be able to better detect Kansas which are going to spread for example and actually intervene enough and would that translate into a saving? And that's exactly what the Holy Grail is. Because in the end of the day screening low early detection for cancer actually has converse side which is not picking up things that you don't want to pick up and that in itself is a goal which I think is worth doing because if you can reduce the number of people you're going to be looking for something that means you can get your resources redirected to finding the ones which are important. Most of the time we're so fixated on finding and more and more cancers that's what we WANNA do. We forget about the fact that there's a lot of people who are investigated who turn out not to have chances And that is actually a big burden for the health economy for the individual and ultimately if you do diagnose something which too early you you do. Condemn someone to be monitored for something which didn't know about. It's a little bit lake saying if we started do genetic testing birth everyone what it tells us a potential. You might get something rather than you will get something and then you're going to end up stressed body for all your life and.

Cancer Anne Marie duracell clinic Kansas
"prostate" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Cancer now they're teaching them the med students and residents a little bit differently. It's up to you. If you want to deal with it and do the testosterone replacement. Let's say in man or woman, because listener doesn't bear out D-I-N-O-V-I-T-E doesn't create prostate cancer. Now, if you get prostate cancer, that's your genetics. Yes, it can make it more aggressive and grow faster. So we normally I normally monitor the PSA for men, not once a year twice a year. I also start when they're forty not fifty because prostate is very slow growing, if you pick it up, when they're fifty sixties, it's been there years. So I want to know if your PSA velocity you know, in six months, six months, six months, not one or two, three years at a time, because of his Alsan rapidly increasing. Well, was that prostate enlargement process or prostate cancer? So I'm looking for prostate cancer. Now I pick up a lot of prostate cancer. Why? Because I'm looking for and not because there aren't just Astro the majority of prostate cancers, I pick up. They're not on. Casteran. I pick it up because the fact mile, let's go looking at baseline PSA, you're forty or forty five fifty whatever the ages boy, PSA normal zero two four. You know, your area three the only forty one but you SaaS from really low. Let's do this. I want you to go. See urologists get a digital exam or I'll do it. And maybe depends on that get an ultrasound of the prostate gland make sure there's no Admiral lesion that needs to be biopsy. So I've picked up a lot a number of prostate cancers..

prostate cancers Cancer six months three years
"prostate" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Breast is or how their prostate is or whatever. And this fan was worried about having prostate cancer, even though he had no family history. Even though is feeling fine even though he had really no symptoms and examined him and his prostate was small and yet. His PSA was elevated, PSA was six. And I asked if you wanted to get a biopsy of the prostate because normal PSA is up to four and you can have prostate cancer, when your PSA is two or three and I've seen that, and if you get a prostate video, and you're welcome to get that, just call our office at two and two choices you can call even now to get a prostate video at two and two choices of a special two part TVD in one of the patients that we talk to in the video had a PSA of three and he had prostate cancer. And he, he diagnosed himself, he saw his PSA going from one to two to three actually to three and a half. And he told his doctor. Hey, my time I pass has gone up. The doctor told him any everything's okay, you're okay, your PSA is normal. It's okay. And he says, Dr my PSA is tripled. And so the patient sought medical attention in the patient asked for vibes in the patient at a biopsy showing cancer. And yes at patient, now almost fifteen years later is cancer free. You can listen to him in the, the, the d which will send to it. No charges were out here, selling anything when asking for any money would ask for anything we're here, just for one reason, and that is to educate. And if you wish God forbid, going to come in and checked out for possible cancer then come in life this van.

prostate cancer cancer fifteen years
"prostate" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, one of the big hospitals who was diagnosed when he was unable to urinate. He couldn't pass is your urine was totally blocked up which is a very painful miserable experience yet blood in the urine. And then he was in kidney failure because the. Prostate blocked the year in the urine blocked, the kidneys and the kidneys went into failure. And he was on dialysis at that time. His PSA was two hundred. And the cancer traveled, and he came here to us because now that treatment he was on systemic treatment is stomach treatments not working anymore. And he does not want to get obstructed again. And he that's what he's come here for treatment. And he's come for treatment because we can treat the prostate quickly and help prevent the prostate from blocking up again, he knows how terrible it is not to be able to urinate and have bleeding from the urine and kidney failure all from his prostate cancer, and I should tell you number one is also from the Caribbean, and there's lots of cancer in the Caribbean. Lots of cancer in the black community and also he had a positive family history. As father died of prostate cancer. So I want him to enlarge for prostate. He has biopsy proven cancer, and he wishes treatment to help prevent. Calamity again. And this is the work that we do every day every day here. This is what we do when I'm such Liederman. Just introduce myself. I'm a physician born in Waterloo, Iowa, but the public school was university with medical school graduate at twenty five MD degree, just like my son who so fantastic. I went on and.

prostate cancer Caribbean Waterloo Iowa MD Liederman
"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Is converted via an enzyme called five after reduc days into a very similar molecule called dihydrotestosterone abbreviated DAT. Dat is actually any slightly more potent steroid and in men who fifty times more potent. Yeah. So the in men who are susceptible to baldness DHT, drives that process D H T also probably plays a role in the enlargement of the prostate is correct. Most of the five for duck days enzymes in the prostate. So yes, reducing Anderson's in the prostate by reducing effectively. Reducing DHT production reduces the size of the prostate. So a lot of guys take medication to reduce DHT either to reduce prostate volume size of something called benign prostatic, hypertrophy or to re minimize hair loss, and it's usually the exact same drug given it slightly different doses. And sometimes even come up with different names for the same drug. So proc-. Car is financed. Rated five milligrams. And I think pro-peace says the one milligram nets. Right. Okay. Now, I remember many years ago, and I don't I'm sure this has been revised one hundred times, but maybe ten years ago, maybe less, but a paper came out that said look in guys who have suppressed DAT levels when they get prostate cancer. They're more high-grade is at my remembering that correctly. And there's been definitely case reports of that. It's hard to really study that over I gotta yeah. So what is the current thinking on five algebra dictation habituation, and that relationship to prostate cancer? Well, there's was a very large randomized trial to see if you could take that medication with the idea that if you reduced the relative amount of Andhra Jensen the prostate by preventing the production of his potent androgen DAT. Could you reduce the risk of prostate cancer in those men and the answer was if you took that medicine that reduced potent Anderson? Hugh could. So there was a oatmeal study. This was in men starting out who did not have cancer. That's right. So it was called the prostate cancer prevention trial, and it was over seven years at the trial is conducted in Thompson was the PI on the trials of big study. It did reduce the chance at a man would develop prostate cancer overall, you know, reasonable amount of time. But one of the problems was that there was increased detection of more aggressive cancers in the men who are taking the finance. Right. And so then the question was, well, what is that? From is it inducing, a more high grade cancer, you know, and whether or not that's true or not as or is it selecting for it because any cancer that comes out of a low DHT environment. Well, yes. So I personally think that what you were just saying as is true. So yes, and there's case reports that people with low testosterone, or for example, people with low PSA's because PSA is only made when there's testosterone around, for example. That those individuals have more aggressive cancers. Now, this is what I've been focusing on in my lab for like the last four or five years now. And so one of the cool things we did in this collaboration with this company genome DX in this great, scientists alight of an she Oni was to look at the biology of prostate cancer, how grass if they were and compare the gresh Innis of the prostate cancer with the Anderson output of the tumor another nuanced way to normalize things a bit. Yep. And so we had this ipod uscis that the tumors that had the most amped up Anderson, signaling the most Anders output because prostate cancers and ginger tumor that they would be the most aggressive, and I say that way 'cause you know, the answer stieg's act posit the tumors with the lowest Anderton output or the are the most aggressive tumors. So it's somewhat relates to PSA, but not entire. Fairly like there's not a is on a true, you know, linear correlation. So the high Anders output tumors. They can be aggressive, but they are not as aggressive as Alterra low once's by modal distribution. And this is a good way to segue. Talking about these molecular tests because this is a commercially available test from genome DX might tell a funny story about ally. Before we go down there. Sure, I've told this story before but now we get to put a name to it..

prostate cancer Anderson dihydrotestosterone Andhra Jensen testosterone Anders gresh Innis Hugh Thompson stieg seven years five years ten years
"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"I'm sure have different versions. But even from a screening standpoint that they could be you'd have one tool that is so good in both yet. There is fortuitous. Yeah, they're good tools. And then so after if there's an abnormality in the P H I R four K score. Then I moved to an MRI. And then there's been good day. Can you just because I mean, we talk we geek out on this stuff because I'm super nerdy about what type of MRI to do for what thing, but for a patient listening to this Ted who's going to go to their doctor, and whose doctor is hopefully cooperative enough. What do you recommend because not all Emmys doing the trick here? Yeah. I mean on paper what you want a multi parametric prostate MRI, the most important phase the most important parameter in the multi parametric MRI is actually the diffusion weighted imaging which is the most operators dependent. So it really requires a skilled technician and escape. Killed interpreter. Radiologist to look at those DWI images, that's the most important one. So we do get patients contrast. But people showing you can get a lot of value out of just non contrast DWI based the one we use. No contrast, but it's their DWI's exceptional. I've sent you the images I think if they're Schaefer approved I'm happy. They're very good. Yeah. T one t two DWI an multiplayer MR is if you're listening to that. And if you and if your doctor refuses that I think those are the kinds of things that make me think you need another doctor because at this point and look your insurance might not cover. You may have to foot the Bill for that. And that's that's horrible. Well, wouldn't cover that? That was true. But there's recently reported a large multinational prospective clinical trial, looking at the utility of Mariah used for screening for prostate cancer. And the study was half the men got an MRI of their suspicious lesion. They got that lesion biopsy. And they increase detection of high grade cancer reduce it over. Detection of low grade prostate cancer. So it was a quote, unquote, positive study. We haven't had problems in the mid west Illinois getting 'em is approved. But that randomized trial based out of reported out of the UK that really has changed a lot about what companies are approving for Moore is for screening so rate to here. So so if somebody has an MRI if there's an Adra malady on the MRI, I'll recommend a biopsy. Now, there's a lot of data that says you shouldn't just sample the suspicious lesion that you should do the suspicious lesion plus doing a Sexton. Bob Sierra, kind of what I tell patients is right left top middle bottom that adds value. Not just in the detection of cancer. But if someone is gonna move to surgery, for example, and I don't do a biopsy in ninety year old guy. Even if they have an abnormal Marai, do it. If I think that person's gonna live a long long enough to benefit from treatment in those scenarios. I do those systematic by because I want to know exactly where the extent of the cancer and one of the problems of them arise it it doesn't. Actually, see the true boundaries are true. Borders of the tumors within the prostate, very well. So they're often especially the DWI because it's not really an anatomic. Yes. The way a t one way to images traffic. So if you take if you take the lesion on T to for example, it often under sizes the tumor by between five and ten millimeters. So pretty significant for prostate, which is generally pretty small. So so I do those to get a better roadmap..

prostate cancer Bob Sierra technician Ted Schaefer Adra west Illinois UK Mariah Moore ninety year four K
"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"On every cancer. And there's one other one other oh, the CDC is the fifth body to weigh in. And we show them. Here are the recommendations from all five of these for every cancer. And I remember when that shift changed to for prostate cancer. There's no more recommendation while the recommendation is talk about it with your doctor pass the buck besides the I think the American kademi of family practitioners, and they don't recommend PSA screening still. I'm not sure why. But you know, that's a different discussion. But the bottom line is that almost all the guidelines now say it's a shared decision making process, which I think makes perfect sense. That's how I view mod modern medicine. Yeah. It does it. In theory, makes great sense. What I worry about Ted is theirs. A bunch of patients they get caught. They don't have doctors like you or me who are willing to be able to have had the luxury of the time and the ability to educate themselves to do that. Because I still see a lot of patients that show up and they're not getting screened because their doctors basically saying, well, obviously, this is quote, unquote. Controversial, you know, I sort of remember hearing that we shouldn't have been screening. So we're not gonna do it. And that's that's sort of my fear with these things. Well, I think I think shared decision making it require also. So then to me conceptually, it makes a lot of sense in reality. What does that actually mean? Well, that's the next question. That's the next unknown. Right as well house. Our shared decision making process, how does it occur? And when a patient sees you that's different than when a patient sees an average internist, let's say, and it's different. When a patient doesn't see any doctor. So, you know, the idea that there's the bus that rolls up that just does your bloodwork and send it back in the mail. That's terrible. I mean, I did that when I was a resin they pay me fifty bucks. Go man the bus and do that. That's not really doing that patient, those individual men any, you know, any they're not helping those people because you don't know their whole health history. You know, and all that. So I experienced that. And you know, I got into it with Otis Brawley about screening, and you know, he raised that point in. It's valid. I did that when I was rather than because I was told to do it..

Otis Brawley prostate cancer CDC Ted
"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Forty percent of men coming in with prostate cancer metastatic at the time by two thousand it was four percent. Now, the skeptic is going to say this is such a controversial topic. So it's so good that we're. Doing this the skeptical say, well, that's just lead time bias. I mean, all you did was catch a bunch of men earlier. So you have a much bigger funnel. Right. Right. So by the way, the same controversy exists on mammography. So I can't wait to actually sit down with Ted Schafer quivalent of breast cancer at some point. Because I realized that an episode like this is probably a little bit more geared towards male listeners or probably the female listeners who have males houses or people that care about going through this. But it's interesting to watch the rise of mammography and the rise of PSA go through this parallel thing and Kohanovsky though to a slightly lesser extent that really being the big three mass employed screening while it's and it's been written about Al Peter you've written about this. So Peter Albertson is a nother Hopkins alum, he's Charon Connecticut, and he's an anti screener effectively for prostate cancer. And he wrote about this, and he showed that if you just look at incidents of metastatic prostate cancer incidence of metastatic, breast cancer. There's no change with implementation of. Mammography? There's a huge drop in the incidence of medicine prostate cancer with implementation. So why is he anti screener? Well, he just he was historically. He wrote this paper and showed that there is a huge difference. So now with screening you have increased detection, and what we've learned is unlike let's say pancreatic cancer where most of the time if if you picked it up early if you did nothing it, you would die not everybody who has prostate cancer has a lethal variation of it. And so initially we developed a biomarker to pick up all prostate cancers that was the PSA blood test. We pick them up we treated them, we reduced deaths. We also over treated people people who had a cancer that would never have been lethal in their lifetime. That's the dying with the dying from. And this is something you and I used to talk about nearly twenty years. I remember sitting in the cafeteria because you know, even though you know, you. We were still interns, and basically two knuckleheads you knew you were going to do this. And you were always head and shoulders above everybody else in terms, which when I said, I remember asking like, I don't get it. Like, why do some guys get prostate cancer? And it seems to be relatively uninteresting like, yeah, they and another guy though at it and they're dead in two years in it's his devastating pancreatic cancer. What is it about the biology of that because it strikes me as more a function of the biology than the environment? You're the host. But but I could be wrong, of course. But I remember talking about the Salahdin and really coming away scratching my head thing. I don't but clue what's going on this disease. I mean, I'm still scratching my head about it. Because that's my whole research program is all about his will what's the molecular biology, lethal prostate cancer? So we'll talk about that in a second. But to circle back to our story. So we diagnosed many men with prostate cancer, we.

prostate cancer prostate cancer metastatic pancreatic cancer cancer Charon Connecticut Ted Schafer Al Peter Kohanovsky Forty percent four percent twenty years two years
"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"For protection when they're out and about functionally totally fine now for a fifty year old, man. I think there's a over ninety percent chance that you can recover sexual function. Yep. But with each deck member, you know, erectile dysfunction is a disease of the aging male. So for each decade that somebody gets older there's decline in sexual function. So he's been people say that they're totally potent and their seventy they'll tell you if you ask them, no miam-, not as good as I was when I was twenty. So there's that component of things in the other factor is prostate cancer. And it's not like, there's the prostate. There's five millimeters of tissue, and then there's this nerve bundle. There's the prostate. There's no capsule or lining encasing, the prostate. And then there's the neuro vascular bundle of Walsh named after Dr wolf. So you have prostate. The prostate itself has different zones or different regions prostate cancers develop in the peripheral region or perforate zone. So right at the edge of the prostate. So you have to Mer at the edge of the prostate, and then you have the nerve bundle. And so you're talking about one or two cruel trick of fate of of the cancer's not developed centrally. They don't develop centrally they develop Rivoli. So I understand why patients by listeners to say, why don't you don't you just you know, what I don't get it? Because it in many cases today, we I published on this a lot. Now. You know, there's prostate cancers that we pick up today are just bulkier. They're more aggressive and so. When you have a tumor that you know is going to be outside the prostate. You know, it's extra prosthetic it's involving the nerve bundle. A lot of the times. And so you have to remove part of it. You have to remove you know, the tissue around to try to clear your margins. And so when you do that in sixty five year old guy, and you take out half of his nerve on one side. It's unlikely that he'll be able to regain sat sexual function on his own. Now, these days I'd try to be very upfront about that. And I try to set appropriate expectations. We can we have special tools that we have in urology that will enable Amanda get don't total satisfaction sexually. So we can maneuver around out. So to speak. And these days many of the people I see have very aggressive cancers that are quote, unquote, the real deal. So we really have to be careful you our number one goal for doing cancer surgeries to get the tumor out. It's talk a little bit about prostate cancer because it's not a cancer that comes without its controversy to let's start with the biggest Connor is really one of the biggest controversies or things that would confuse the layperson because about every year, the advice changes on this thing called P S A. So what is the prostate specific antigen PSA is a protein it's made by the prostate. And it's normal function is to liquefy semen. So it's highly expressed in the process of the way, I explained the process of people the best analogy, I can come up with his if you think about it like a sewer system, you have the main sewer leaving the city, that's the urea three that's the tube that we normally urinate through. But this channel also deliver semen out. A tip of the penis off this main sewer are slightly smaller sewers had go to different neighborhoods within the neighborhood. There's a sewer that comes out of the individual house and the individual houses in this analogy are prostate epithelial cells, they make components of the semen, and the semen is used to give nutrients to the sperm while it's trying to fertilize an egg to enable the sperm to penetrate, the cervical mucus these different functions PSA is a protein that breaks down the semen and liquefies it and people think it's an important for for this whole process of fertilizing egg. So that's what it does. And if you look in the semen, the PSA numbers are hundred million per m l mean, the numbers they mount of this protein in the semen is astronomically high. So that's what it is..

prostate cancer Walsh Amanda Dr wolf Connor sixty five year ninety percent fifty year
"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And I don't think I was I don't think could process it what it would have meant. Anyway, if I had asked, but when I was a medical school, and I was doing my PHD I asked. My parents what he died of and he died of prostate cancer. So I was at the NIH I was doing science. I had done some clinical work. I realized what people in DC not in science. But in politics were interested in their interested in cancer biology, and they are interested in prostate cancer. I saw at other people are interested in and I had this very vivid memories of my, you know, my father migrant, my grandfather, having prostate cancer and dying from it. And I decided that that's what I wanted to do. So when I came back to medical school. I knew that I wanted to be to be a prostate cancer biologist and understand the disease. I also knew that I wanted to be a surgeon. And so I didn't to be a medical oncologist. Although that appealed to me a lot, and I'm always flattered when people think of a medical colleges because those guys are smart, they're smart. But I knew I wanted to do something I love working with my hands. So for me, the I. The of being a surgeon. Scientist was just it just made sense. I loved the biology I love, but I still love the idea of not just conceptually deconstructing something and putting it back together. But actually, physically deconstructing something putting it back together. So as a perfect fit for what I wanted to do for the listener to put some things in context at the time that you and I began our residencies. I don't really think there was any debate about what the best urology program was in the United States. I think there is a good race for number two or lots of programs that would have competed to be the second best urology program in the country. But but Johns Hopkins was hands down in a league of its own. And they only take two residents per year. So if there are four hundred or five hundred medical students graduating who want to go into urology only two of them get to go to Hopkins, and you were one of them, which perhaps isn't surprising. Did you wanna go to Hopkins for reasons other than it was the best program? Was there something about the environment? There. There that drew you to it. Yeah. It was a people. It's an amazing place that I think about think about it all the time. So I interviewed there and the chair of the department. The time was is the godfather of my field. He made all the contemporary modern discoveries in prostate cancer. And it was real simple. He looked me in the eyes. And he said, I looked at your CV. I know what you have the ability to do. And I wanna help you get there so pet well selected you as much as you selected Hopkins. I guess you can say that. Yeah. You know, it was a perfect fit because as we've talked about mentorship is just so much of everything. It's everything in life. Really? If you're motivated, and you have drive, it's, you know, even if you're not motivated, you don't have drive you need a good mentor. So for me, I showed up for the interviews. I'd interviewed all over the country..

prostate cancer Johns Hopkins NIH United States Scientist DC
"prostate" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"I had prostate cancer. You know? Listen, I think the hardest part is the mental thing. Really? You know, you go through the wine knew how did it happen to me? But you know, if you're. So hosting you could you know, we're jersey strong. You know, so we could get through anything in my case. I caught it early. You know, we pay all this money and health benefits. Right. So I go like four times a year blood work. And what happened is my say, you know, for years was three point. Oh, then all of a sudden jumped to four point two doctor said to me. Well, that's not too bad. He says anything under ten is pretty normal. But if you wanna do a biopsy, let's do the biopsy. What the hell let's do the biopsy. So I didn't hear from them for like a month after the bye. Everything was okay. Right. I get that phone, call and dot doc. How you doing? Listen wants to come in and talk to me. And I'm like, why worker matter what did you have? I would say cancer, man. You know, what I gotta hit the brake. But I'm glad just remedy is arriving December first of all of the two year. My suggestion. Get back we pay enough in health benefits guys should start in their forties. Never will never smoke. And guess what? I got. Yeah. You gotta do it. You gotta get checked. And what do you do when you real.

prostate cancer two year
"prostate" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on Discovery

"The more targeted the radio therapy the less severe our side effects like bowel problems and incontinence but radiotherapy is not the best treatment for every man with localised prostate cancer the size of his tumor and his particular symptoms may mean the doctor recommends the other most common method of treatment radical prostatectomy surgery to remove the entire prostate gland that also comes with side effects which can include the loss of erections dr less to gertz so we have set up a system whereby patients who have problems of direction we give them tablets or injections to get barbaric direction so many of these patients can still have sex after roddick are which is a big worry that more species have armed the first thing they ask you can get you reckons after because you know this is how it goes the other complication riyadh is incontinence of urine and reaffirm techniques to reduce the degree of incontinence so the majority of patients will have good control of their urine usually within six months diarrhea but they do leak initially but it gets less and less as time goes by tell me about those reactions from patience to the potential side effects and they're worried about sexual function important is it for them it is very important it is very important but there's hope after radical prostatectomy it's a 5050 chance if you have a radical fifty percent of your patients will have good erections and fifty percent will have problems either nano very weak erections really can't of six.

roddick riyadh diarrhea gertz fifty percent six months
"prostate" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on Discovery

"You're the fell in the treatment room radio therapist denise and rubbi carefully position victor on a bad he lies beneath the machine that will deliver a finely controlled beam of radiation at a cancerous tissue in and around his prostate gland so we going to live your life you have any issues are all just review of recon lucky try not to move are all receive moving from outside we will stop on common see what's wrong about ten minutes we're going to leave you will notice that but not before turning on victors radiotherapy music from the other side of the radiation proof wall denise tells the patient everything's now ready for his final dose given sovietvintage the image marching on everything looks fine within a saudi treatment the nice instead of in a study full south along longest part is making sure that we have everything exactly where it needs to me on that machine makes to ox around them one clockwise one anticlockwise and after that we can go and take him down the two external beam radiotherapy systems at this cancer center in trinidad art state of the art pat sing is a senior medical physicist this is unexciting bit of technology for patients with prostate cancer because it allows us with the additional technological features of the machine to better conform or shape the radiation dose to the prostate gland and that's exciting news prostate cancer patients because what it means is if we can deliver the radiation dose to the two mom on spares much normal tissues than patients don't have issues with the complications that historically have been known to occur with radiation therapy i mean we can blast away at the prostate gland but it's of no use step patient if it's going to cause damage to deny their rectum so that's this is why the modern radiation therapy machines have really positively impacted the quality of patient's lives.

denise physicist trinidad ten minutes
"prostate" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"prostate" Discussed on Discovery

"I'm annoyed on and this is the truth about cancer on the bbc world service the series that investigates the most common global cancers and what's being done to tackle them i'm in port of spain the capital of trinidad and tobago in the carribean people are enjoying the food stalls and the music in this park their families all around us and you can really clearly see that some of the people are of african ancestry and others have very clearly of southasian indian ancestry and that's because their ancestors were brought here during colonial times as slaves and indentured labourers and you can really see that mixed heritage in the food busy young men of year serving doubles this is up fried indian bread with chick be curry and fiery sauce another lady over here grilling meats and serving fried plantains now trinidad and tobago has one of the world's highest rates of prostate cancer this is a cancer specific two men so i'm here to find out why that's the case and how doctors are dealing with it prostate cancer right no is the leading cancer in trinidad and tobago it's ahead of breast cancer it accounts for twenty percent of the council's prostate cancer is also the leading cause of death from cancer in trinidad cancer being the second most common cause of death in trinidad led by cardiovascular disease so what is the prostate and how does prostate cancer develop will head into a prostate examined just a moment but to run over the basics the prostate is a small gland in a man's pelvic region it sits immediately beneath the bladder behind the penis in most men the prostate gets bigger as they age but in some individuals cells in the gland develop abnormalities which make them grow out of control and become malignant this is prostate cancer.

trinidad african ancestry prostate cancer bbc port of spain tobago trinidad tobago twenty percent