35 Burst results for "Propublica"

Search warrants unsealed in probe of billionaire Sanford

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 11 months ago

Search warrants unsealed in probe of billionaire Sanford

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting search warrants are unsealed in a probe of south Dakota's wealthiest resident search warrants unsealed Wednesday show authorities in South Dakota probed an email account belonging to billionaire banker turned philanthropist T. Denny Sanford for possible possession of child **** there were also warrants for Stanford's cellular and internet service providers the investigation into Sanford was reported last year by ProPublica and the Sioux falls Argus leader after both news outlets went to court the state Supreme Court ruled last month to unseal the warrants and corresponding lists of what investigators found the eighty five year old Sanford south Dakota's richest man has not been charged with a crime he made his fortune as founder of first premier bank in South Dakota known for issuing high interest credit cards to those with poor credit hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi T. Denny Sanford South Dakota Sioux Falls Argus Propublica Stanford Sanford Supreme Court First Premier Bank Mike Rossio
"propublica" Discussed on Up First

Up First

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on Up First

"Is up. I from npr news. How are us border. Agents managing a massive people staying under border bridge. Images turn your stomach. It must be stopped trying violence. We get a view from the scene. Where the migrants came from how the us is rounding them up and what happens next also. Was it only a hurricane that was responsible for fatal power outages after hurricane ida investigation by npr and propublica fines. The power collapsed was years in the making. Stay with us. We've got the news. You need to start your day.

npr news hurricane ida hurricane propublica npr us
"propublica" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"The show that we're that we're working on that maybe we'll be able to announce very shortly but let's jump into this show. You know if. I told you the rich people. Don't pay their fair share taxes in america. I'd be willing to bet you would not fall out of your chair. I think we all sort of take it for granted. They're rich people are able to get out of paying the same amount that we do and you know maybe that goes to show how fucked up. Our entire economy is the fact that none of us are as angry as maybe we should be. But here's the thing we all know it's happening but until now we haven't really had a sense of to what degree we haven't known the exact figures and now we do because the nonprofit newsroom propublica in recent weeks has blown the lid off the tax secrets of the ultra-wealthy. Here's what happened. They received a trove of documents detailing the tax history of some of the wealthiest individuals in america and they were able to determine that those people in many cases paid literally no federal income taxes. At all four years. We are talking about straight up billionaires who paid nothing to support the roads schools or any other important things that makes civilization function and that helps them earn all their billions in the first place and by the way all of it somehow was entirely legal. Well most of it was. The stories are really bizarre. Let me give you one example. Peter thiel the founder of pay pal a major trump supporter elon. Musk's best buddy this dude. This billionaire abused his roth. Ira this is a consumer retirement savings vehicle. This is something that you know. You're supposed to use to squirrel away..

america propublica Peter thiel Musk
"propublica" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Senior reporter for Propublica who's just out with a book called Fulfillment, winning and Losing in one Click America. You can join us by calling 809 335372. All right, Alec. We have all these states and communities jockeying to be the site of Amazon's next project, Whatever that might be. Obviously, they're motivated by economic concerns broadly and jobs, specifically, especially in places that have been gutted by the evaporation of like good unionized factory work from the middle of the last century. How does working for Amazon compare with working for an auto factory or a steel mill in their heyday? This. This has ended up actually being what I really kind of Consider the core chapter of the book kind of the heart and soul. All the book. Um, I came at this exactly this question through, uh, through amazing place called Sparrows Point, which is a peninsula here outside Baltimore that used to be home to the largest steel mill in the entire world is a Bethlehem Steel works that had 30,000 people working at it in the late fifties. Um, just this incredible industrial skyline sort of massive of industrial might down on the water hole company town directly abutting it. Um And and that's that steel mill is gone now what they went bankrupt, Best steel went bankrupt. In around 2002 and the mill closed over the next decade, and it's now been wiped completely off the face of the Earth. And, um, it's just surreal to go down there because it's just gone in your car. You in your car drives around on this peninsula still picks up. The GPS still picks up the the old streets from the company town, you know, be Street, C Street, D Street. Um, And it's been replaced now in recent years by a huge business park, a warehouse business park, the logistics business park and and that business park now has, um to, you know, sound warehouses, and it's about to get a third. You can barely keep up with the growth of all the warehouses there. And I managed to find a gentleman who spent three decades working at the steel mill. Um, yeah, at steel, and after it was wiped off the face of the earth, he came back to Sparrows point to get a job at the Amazon warehouse driving a forklift. In his late sixties and what was so remarkable about him and his story, and the way he talked about those jobs is that he? The job of the steel mill was so dangerous. It was such difficult work. He got injured several times. He saw fatal fatal accident once Um, And it was just very, very grueling, risky work. And and yet he found at work so infinitely more meaningful and purposeful and really enjoyable and fulfilling than the work at the warehouse didn't help that the work at the warehouse was paying. Less than half as much as he made at the steel mill. The steel mill job was, of course, unionized. Um, and it was also has more than that. It was it was the camaraderie he felt at the mill was the sense of purpose. You're actually making something, um, at the warehouse. He was just all on his own, driving the forklift, bringing in pallets of stuff, most of it made halfway around the world. To be sort and packed and sent out and, you know, inevitably, a lot of it would end up in the landfill in a year or two and and he was just under constant pressure from these young supervisors to bring in more and more pallets to make making better and better rate. He often did not. He had to go to the bathroom quite a bit as an older guy and do not have enough time often for his brakes to go to the bathroom and a couple times. He told me kind of shamefully that he had to pull up his forklift in the corner of the warehouse. Just go, you know, used to use the The forklift as a shield to go to the bathroom there and it just utterly undignified and and and he just couldn't He couldn't hack it. He rarely lasted a couple years at that job. Um so here he is. Three decades more than three decades at this very difficult, dangerous job in the steel mill, um and and where he finds real meaning and purpose and then and then. And then just a couple years at the warehouse, and and I really saw that you know in his life that trend, the embodiment of the transformation of Of sort of mass employment in this country, where sort of tip at the typical working class job and what it now what it looks like and what one gets out of it. How has the growing presence of robots on distribution center floors that Amazon changed the work day for the human beings who are employed there? Because it's striking. Actually, you think that that the we're always told that robots that the growing automation of of of a given workplace is a good thing because it frees up humans to do higher order kind of stuff. It gives the robust the Treasury and we can do the more interesting Fulfilling kind of work, and, in fact, in the warehouses that it's really been kind of the opposite effect, the and I have to credit here. Former colleague of mine No, I'm shiver New York Times Business columnist who who made this very perceptive observation a couple years ago and An article and I quoted him in the book that that that that they that the addition of robots in warehouses and has in fact made the work itself more robotic. Um and you know, the best example of this is is this is the kind of iconic job of the pickers in the warehouse. These are the people who used to walk the corridors up and down hunting for items that we had ordered. And they would go around looking for them and put them in their cart and move on. And they would. And it was. That job, of course, involved a whole lot of walking. Um and we wear out a lot of shoes, but But there's a certain amount of autonomy and that you were because you were often your own looking for stuff and Now. Now the picker and most of the warehouse is simply stands in stationary institution reposition and the robot spring the stuff to them. The robots are these little kind of look like this little ottomans,.

Amazon 809 335372 30,000 people Earth Alec Baltimore Sparrows Point Bethlehem Steel late fifties a year New York Times three decades D Street Three decades Less than half Fulfillment, winning and Losin C Street Amazon warehouse middle of the last century two
"propublica" Discussed on The Mark Levin Show

The Mark Levin Show

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on The Mark Levin Show

"Propublica..

"propublica" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"That work into this conversation. for decade the conversation about Taxes has been kind of dominated by marginal tax rates right But those rates are only going to capture what happens when people do take income and so You know some some folks who are in the The top of the wealth distribution these these rarely wealthy billionaires You know they'll be affected to some degree by that but it's not gonna change much of the picture when we talk about how much to taxes versus their wealth growth Some economists do think That many economists think that The corporate taxes are ultimately paid by by individual people. And if you distribute that most of that falls onto the shareholder so insofar as there's moves on the corporate tax rate That would be more likely to be of raising revenue at least indirectly off of this group. You made mentioned in article as well about taxes being paid after somebody passes away and how even then a lot of people's estates are able to skirt paying taxes and and passing on that well to their heirs and all of that stuff. And obviously there's all sorts of loopholes all over the place but that just kind of figures into all of this even in death people escape paying these taxes. Yeah there's an entire industry around Wealth management and a lot of that is geared towards figure out how to sort of minimize Tax burden right And so there are complicated. The trust that you can set up If you are interested in trying to move a portion of your estate without having it ended up being taxed at the estate tax level. When you when you pass on And a lot of these Sorts of Trust are only accessible to people who are in you know in the top top strata which is also who's affected by the tax course. Jeff earns thousand seniors data reporter at propublica. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me after all that planning it's happening. Diy closet renovation is finally becoming reality question is where do you put your things while you work cube smart. Has you covered with month to month. Lease and self storage solutions that make it easier to get organized online or in person getting self storage is convenient and fast and because diy renovations can easily go over budget. It's great to keep smart as offering up to twenty five percent off your monthly rent. Say goodbye to before and hello to after with qb smart self storage visit cube smart dot com for more details at children's national hospital. Everything we do is just for kids are top. Ranked specialists are here for kids of all ages from babies who need help. Before they're even born to teens and young adults are pediatric experts. Work together to diagnose problems quickly and thoroughly and use treatments designed exclusively for growing children with convenient locations. All across the dc metro area finding specialists today at children's national dot org slash stronger when the brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happens. Engineering empowers medicine. Data scientist rice. Agriculture geology fuel space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning and research. The ideas that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive potential something momentous becomes possible at the university of florida ufl dot. Edu for your business joni sometime feels like the world is throwing everything that has you and succeed. You need someone to guide you through technology advisors. Do they have the tech advice to help you navigate challenges. You're up against a gate you safely to where you wanna be for advice on solutions. Xps p. s. thirteen laptops powered by intel platform calling advisor today at eight seven. Seven asked del for this week. Virtual brands are taking over your favorite food delivery apps. The pandemic has transformed the food industry and in a time when many restaurants were closing food brands have proliferated chains and even mom and pop restaurants are expanding the brand's house in their kitchens and offering burgers pizza and especially chicken wings. All coming from the same kitchen just under different names for more on the rise of virtual brands and how to spot them. Make sure to keep an eye out for all those chicken wings. Spots will speak to josh jessica investigations editor at the verge so goes kitchen which is sort of the better known. Concept is basically a restaurant that only does delivery and so it's kind of like a commissary kitchen and you might have a couple of different restaurants working out but and the idea is that they'll be more efficient have lower overhead and be able to operate in this very tight environment of food delivery. A virtual brand is related but it can be in a traditional restaurant so you might remember last year. Chucky cheese launched a brand called the scalise pizza and winning. It was not clear at the time that that was trucking cheese but people are ordering from it discovering it was actually tricky cheese and so that this scalise was a example of virtual brand something that brick and mortar restaurant puts up on delivery apps in order to get new customers. Tell me a little bit about tie. Brown and a restaurant called the bergen. Because you focus on him a lot in your article about how he expanded through all these virtual brand i mean you know. He started off as one restaurant but all when all is said and done he kept adding so many other brands do his thing. I mean he was running. I dunno eleven restaurants may be more out of just. The one launched his restaurant through just before the pandemic and approach pretty quickly by one of these their virtual brand companies in his case. I think the first one was future foods and so they offer restaurant owners menu of brands to choose from. And you know it sounded like a great deal you know he's already sort of takeout. Spies is making burgers and wings future food says we have these other burgers and wings. Brands will run them when an order comes through. You're just fill the order. You got the revenue so he did it and you know it worked. Well sort of helped him get on his feet in the restaurant. Business and then he kept adding more and more sort of these other companies launched. They started recruiting more aggressively. And so when we last spoke he was running dozen or so brands out of this. One restaurant opening restaurants that he was gonna open with also a dozen brands. And he's a big fan of the concept you know it in an instant sales for him. He's been quite happy with it. Yeah so you had a list of them. And i just need to run them down so people can kind of understand how many different concepts he can run out of the one kitchen so he had chef burger murder mansion. Hey burger mr beast burger and then wings had chicks wild wild wings crispy wings killer wings fire belly wings the list goes on and on and that's also part of the magic. Guess you can say about these. Virtual brands is a lot of it has to do with search optimization. You go onto an app and you're searching for product type not necessarily product name so you're looking for burgers you're looking for wings. You're looking for pizza. And then you know whatever else you know the menu and everything kind of entices you to pick one at that point so that's also one of the things that's a really key. A lot of these virtual brands. The names of these brands are pretty. I guess familiar enough to know what you're getting generic enough just to.

Jeff last year dozen josh jessica this week joni eleven restaurants today first one Seven propublica One restaurant intel one kitchen thirteen laptops dc national dot org university of florida one one restaurant
"propublica" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

Radical Personal Finance

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

"The better question would be. Why did the legislatures sorry legislators why did the legislature tours designed the system this way. Why did they design a system of taxation on profits and a system of taxation wages. Well later in the article. They the authors talk about this. It's kind of an interesting argument. But whenever a legislator sits down plays with the tax code they're trying to incentivize and things and disincentivize other things now one of my favorite tax planning my favorite quotes aphorisms about tax planning this when congress passes tax law or tax benefit they call it an incentive and then when you use that tax benefit they call it a loophole. So remember that. Today's incentives are going to be tomorrow's loopholes. This is one of the sobering realities which again we'll talk about the end of the show. Today's incentives to you are going to be tomorrow's loopholes. Whatever you do today that's considered to be an incentive because congress is trying to incentivize you to do something tomorrow. There's going to be an article published about how you're taking advantage of tax loophole. She wants to be very careful about this next. America's billionaires avail themselves of tax avoidance strategies beyond the reach of ordinary people. Their wealth derived from the skyrocketing value of their assets like stock and property. Those games are not defined by. Us laws taxable income unless and until the billionaires cell. Here's the question do. America's billionaires avail themselves of tax avoidance strategies beyond the reach of ordinary people. Think honestly you say of course to some degree. But on the whole i would rate that statement is completely false because there is no extra special tax code for billionaires and a different tax code for you and me there's one tax code there's one tax code and all of us live under the exact same tax code. Anyone can start a business or invest in capital assets. When i've taught you in the past about tax planning tax codes there's one for personal taxes and there's one for business taxes. Make sure that you're using the one on the business tax side because congress wants you to start a business. Because businesses create economic growth economic growth creates wages that congress can tax. Because you go and start a business. Anyone can start a business. Anyone can invest in capital assets. You don't have to be a billionaire to do that. In addition anyone can borrow money on their assets without without tax. People have done this all over the place. One of the most common questions a financial advisor gets well a second mortgage on my house or or refinance. My house so that. I can pay off my credit card debt. Do all the time doing exactly what billionaires do you have an asset you refinance the asset you take the money and use that loan money and spend it so it's absolutely false. And here's what's what. I found so interesting okay. And here's where i wish. I am not doing a video the moment on this. But some cases. I wish i were the ultra wealthy. By the numbers they go and they give a calculation and they're showing that according to their true tax rate meaning the increase in wealth that an individual has so. Let's go through the numbers. warren buffett. The graphic here says he had twenty four point. Three billion dollars of wealth growth between two thousand fourteen in two thousand eighteen. He reported a total income of one hundred and twenty five million dollars and he paid a total of twenty three point. Seven million dollars attacks by the way. Do you think. Warren buffett got twenty three point seven million dollars in tax in benefit worth in benefits for his tax payment. Maybe maybe so. They calculate the true tax rate. Twenty three point seven million dollars versus wealth growth at twenty four point three billion dollars. They calculated zero point one percent. But what's interesting is that warren buffett's actual tax rate total taxes. Paid twenty three point seven million dollars. Total income reported one hundred million is eighteen point nine percent more or less. What any tax planner would have backed right. Twenty percent evidence warns not gonna make much salary. He's gonna pay eighteen point nine percent. Isn't that interesting. Jeff bezos nine billion dollars of wealth growth four point. Two two billion dollars of income reported four point. Two two billion dollars of income re reported nine hundred seventy three million dollars of taxes paid from two thousand fourteen two thousand eighteen true tax rate. They would say zero point nine eight percent. My calculator tells me it's twenty three point one percent of about what you'd expect right that quarter number now this one. I don't understand michael. Bloomberg evidently had twenty two point five billion dollars of wealth from two thousand fourteen to two thousand eighteen ten billion dollars a total income reported but two hundred ninety two million dollars of taxes paid which they calculates tax rate is one point three percent. I- calculus two point nine percent. But i would be fascinated to see how we lost so much money. What on earth happened. During that third year we can see on the graph that he had a major decrease in taxes. Paid but what happened. He had some major losses somewhere. I would love to know what he invested in then elon. Musk over that period of time. Thirteen point nine. Billion dollars of wealth. Growth total income reported one point five two billion dollars four hundred and fifty five million dollars taxes. They say three point two seven percent. I say twenty nine point nine percent so this should show you the same thing. Let off the article with that. These guys are actually paying a lot more than a lot of people think in terms of taxes. There's this common idea out there that rich people don't pay any money on. Don't pay any tax right and the trump story didn't help right. Oh trump as zero dollars tax but here you see that three out of four of these guys are paying for these four years. Eighteen point nine percent twenty three point one percent twenty nine point nine percent of their income in federal income taxes. The only exception was michael bloomberg. Who had some crazy lost somewhere kind of like trump did and does just happens to be for these four years so be careful with the numbers. Be careful with the analysis. Now if we were going to argue this straightforwardly.

michael bloomberg Twenty percent one hundred million five billion dollars Seven million dollars Three billion dollars four hundred Musk three billion dollars tomorrow Bloomberg Jeff bezos today nine billion dollars michael seven million dollars trump eighteen point nine hundred seventy three mil zero point
"propublica" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily

Coronavirus Daily

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily

"Stay with us for the news. Happening here in the dc metro region from the w. am. Newsroom that's right after the top story from npr on consider this one of the biggest debates in washington dc right now is about taxing the rich. I don't wanna punish anybody. You entitled to be a millionaire billionaire. Just pay your fair share. Just pay president biden wants to raise taxes on corporations and on wealthy individuals in order to pay for massive infrastructure investments. His plan would increase the top federal income tax rate from thirty seven percent to thirty nine point six percent and that's for the top one percent of americans thirty seven percent is where republicans at the top rate is part of their seventeen tax lawn. That's where they want to stay our red.

"propublica" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Because i think there's a perception out there that they don't pay their fair share. Which is what all the the you know the democrats Say pat toomey In one of the stories. I read kind of pushback on that a little bit the senator pennsylvania and he cited these Numbers the top. Ten percent of american earners make half of all of the income earned. I mean that's a separate question which is the income the the income inequality piece of it but they pay seventy percent of all of all of the income tax and that that does sound like a fairly progressive tax system. I if you look at the overall wealthy americans It's very different from what your you reported today. Is it not yes and try to catch that early. Which is to say that Absolutely right. I've seen the same study and was struck by. I think that americans who make what you know ordinary people not these top twenty five if you say to somebody. Someone makes a million dollars year as a salary. That sounds like a lot of money. I mean right. If you're if you're a basketball player you might make five million dollars a year by the way. If you're a basketball player you will be paying about thirty percent of that taxes and so you're paying a lot of taxes and i don't think this story necessarily says that the wealthy in american wealthy people in america pay no taxes that was not our intent it was more to say that the ultra wealthy have managed to Through you know out means that makes perfect sense. You don't tax wealth. Why wouldn't you try to create a large pond of taxable money that you can put over here on one side and as little as possible income and so i think what this goes to is a question of fairness at the very very top which i think is fair to ask that question. Why are people who are the very most fortunate our society Paying almost nothing more nothing but also the size of the pie right because if there are these vast reservoirs of untaxed money the whole conversation about what's possible or not possible. The changes right now. We have thirty seven percent top marginal income tax rate the administration. Maybe we push it up by two points to thirty nine to fund some badly needed infrastructure projects. It is true that if you take that vasko. People that senator troops talking about two percent. You're going to get some money. It won't that change from our analysis will not touch any of the people were writing about. It is completely iran. Which is why you you may need the kind of wealth tax you were talking about before. Well it depends what the country wants to do because ultimately we have to decide. How much do we wanna tax people at the top. The vast majority of people the top the top ten percent Too much could we. Should we tax them. And if we've reached the edges of what you can do with that and you don't want to raise taxes on the people below them. Is there room above them to do more. And if so what would it look. Like and i think to me. I'm not a policy guy a journalist. I'm not a tax expert. A major district. Thank you very much so I don't really have a prescription today. But i think seeing these numbers potentially opens a different conversation than we've been having because the main conversation we've had for all these years is should the top rate be thirty seven thirty nine four and that puts us in a very narrow band of conversation and frankly folks the people who bear the brunt of this is a much larger group of people you would not necessarily think of this whole superwealthy. I think that's fair so one of the one of the justifications that some of the the ultra billionaires you discuss in your in your article raise is. It's actually warren buffett who makes his case. Why should i pay more on my taxes to the federal government when i can give it all to charity and it'll be more effective in terms of improving the public good and and so i'm sure future articles of yours are going to deal with a charitable contributions of some of these People who you write about but what do you make of of that argument. First of all I've tour because propublica that's propublica dot org Is an organization. News organizations that gains enormously from charitable giving Which people deduct probably because in part they love us in partially because it gives them a tax deduction so you calculate how much right nothing more you. Propublica strictly selfishly. We wish that the philanthropic deduction would last forever and ever and get even bigger That would be great But outside of these self interest which is self interest of philanthropic organizations like ours and others. There is this question of logic and we are going to be exploring other things and other stories. I don't know where we're going with. Laser what i suspect. That's on the list. Here's a question when michael are you or i give a dollar. The federal government. They do a lot of things with some of which i totally agree and of which. I don't agree with it all so it's really disturbing me. We don't have a lot to say about that. If i could avoid giving any of my dollars the federal government and set up a charity. That did the things. I like That would be for me much more satisfying And most americans are not able to pick and choose how those dollars get spent. You know if you're a deeply committed republican you're sending your dollars to a tax and spend liberal congress and they're gonna spend money ways you hate and when it switches vice versa and that happens every single year and for people like might wilbert and i'm not disagreeing with any. He cares deeply about. He cares deeply about obesity in public health and in gun violence. These very important. It gives a lot of money. That in his view does a lot of good. That's just not a privilege that everybody has well steve. Like any time we in the fourth stage can change the conversation about an important public issue. i think we are doing our job and that's something you've done here so i want to thank you one last question though you've got this stack of material Will we be seeing more and will your source. Whoever he or she might be be providing more on the second question of course Even if i knew. I wouldn't tell you but i don't know What what is in the mind of of our source but on the first question absolutely yes we believe that we are looking at the surface of a very very very interesting question and bass on the response to this I am now more convinced than i was in any way shape or form. We started this. That people are gonna read with interest seemingly arcain things because the strategies and we have written about in this very story or the simplest ways to avoid taxes. Coming in future articles will be more exotic and more interesting ones Many of which are legal in potentially gotten at his yet perhaps on which pushed the edges of league alley. There's more to come and i would have said that. The audience for tax stories is limited one. But really it's not so we hope to skulduggery you're into a whole new strategy. I've never done before all right. Thanks thanks.

seventy percent Ten percent congress america thirty seven percent two points five million dollars first question republican thirty nine might wilbert michael today about thirty percent ten percent second question warren buffett pennsylvania one side a dollar
"propublica" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on Skullduggery

"To now but when he starts to criticise the crown prince and plot ways to counter repression kashogi and his allies find themselves in the crosshairs of a global campaign of surveillance. I think in be side as moments brag saying. Yeah we it was us our guy twitter. There's a direct trail of blood drops from this hat to the murder of jamal. Hobie coming june fourteenth. A new season of yahoo news is conspiracy land. The secret lives and brutal. Death of jamal khashoggi. It turns out in spirit. These are real well. I hope That wets some appetites or starting. Next monday they'll be Eight episodes in total to each week and yeah skulduggery listeners. Please subscribe if you haven't already to conspiracy land and will be very interested in getting your feedback and on that note. Let's go to our guest. Steve engelberg of propublica to talk about his bombshell scoop on taxes. Let's get to we now. Have with us steve. Engelberg the editor in chief of propublica which is just a published. This bombshell scoop about how little the rich pay and taxes Steve welcome to skulduggery. so i quite a splash. You're making with this. I and it's extraordinary on so many levels both for its content and also for the many questions people have about how it is that Propublica ended up having the tax returns of many of the richest people in america. So let's start out with what you got when you got it and how you made the decision about what you're gonna do with it. Happened to that Michael like you. I'm sure we make a religion out of protecting our sources. So i'm going to be maddeningly vague about some things But it is for a reason you know. Some time ago The organization organization propublica was approached by a person who has to this day. Not known by us who said that they could help inform our tax reporting and they had a number of documents material. I should say really of interest and so Some exchanges ensued between our people and this person or persons. We don't know who we're dealing with here. And at some point we were given a throws large amount of data relating to the tax returns at you now seen publish and others can. I just have to run one real quick questions. Because i didn't realize and i totally get why you'd to be vague about all of this and we support that one hundred percent so that we can continue to do the work important work that we all do. But i didn't. I didn't realize that you didn't know the identity. You don't know the identity of the source or sources but Presumably you verify the authenticity of the documents. Did you authenticate them with the people whose tax returns they actually are. How do we. How did you actually go about in Make sure that they were real. Yes this was a dan. you're absolutely right. This was the biggest question for us. Not the motive or motives of the source But the accuracy and completeness of information. So that was a very big question. There are a number of ways if you think about this that you begin to verify this If tax returns contain information about stock sold and It's a publicly traded company That information might eat public if somebody wants ran for public office soon. Disclose their tax returns. You could compare them. There are individuals wealthy individuals who in these source base of your reporters might be personal friends and you might be able to call up somebody you know and say this is gonna sound weird but you know a couple of years ago in line. Three three seven. What did it say And so we had more than fifty points of confirmation in this material before we went in approached the the larger characters in the story in each to those cases we presented them with information Which was accurate. They confirmed cases where we had productive exchanges was accurate down to the penny so that gave us a good deal of confidence that you know. The vast majority of this material is likely accurate. But i think as we sat in the editor's note accompanying this. We cannot vouch for each and every line of each and everything we have. And we've taken care to not publish things about individuals without giving them chance to set a strike because you know it is possible that all kinds of things could have up to and including the data entry errors remain the beginning That would have caused us to be wrong so we are proceeding with great care. This is not a situation that you've seen sometimes on wor news rise asian gets a database. And just let's put the data and let everybody figure it out. We're not doing that because we are acutely aware that there is a privacy concern here And also possibility a that something isn't perfectly right without. Who does that without extensive extensive check. You've got elon musk's tax returns. You've got karl icons tax returns. You have george. Soros's michael bloomberg's warren buffett's. I mean it's a it's a buffet of of billionaire. Tax returns that you you have in front of you. There must have been a big debate within propublica. Not only about the accuracy of the information. But also about the privacy concerns. Take us behind the scenes. Had you consider it. What sort of decision making did you use before you decided to go. Go out with. I mean this was a rolling conversation As you know because we're journalists here on this on this podcast You know the movies are seldom like real life so there isn't sort of one moment where Wise slammed my fist. The tables editor said we will publish. Danny does that all the time but it never happens like that but i you know i as as as i mentioned that moment on. You asked accuracy. Do we know we have the right material. Do we know we have complete material. Let let let's start with that. And that was a process and as we began to get to a point where we felt pretty confident in the material we began to frame up story Question of what names how many names were absolutely necessary for the public to appreciate what is. Let's face it an arcade topic. I mean we are trying to look at. Currently the income tax rates as the federal government would present them which is firstly defining. Come now give you a tax rate and we would then say as it turns out that these individuals pay something on the order of fifteen point seven percent of their income to the federal government each year but as we point out in the story most of what they get In terms of gains in fortune our wealth is not income at all it is an income tax not a wealth tax. And if you all your money isn't a game in the price of stock shares that you hold the new might be worth two billion dollars more in a given urine you might pay nothing in taxes as is the case some people you mentioned so that was a question. How are we going to bring this to light. We thought that using household names The the sort of types of.

Steve engelberg Steve michael bloomberg america Michael twitter Danny jamal Eight episodes jamal khashoggi Next monday george two billion dollars each each year elon musk more than fifty points Wise each week both
"propublica" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"Income. I wanted to work in some of the discussion around taxes when it comes to politics and all that because we've been hearing that from the biden administration wanting to raise taxes on the wealthy On wealthier americans also on corporations that are making a billions of dollars You know we've been hearing a lot about that. How does that work into this conversation. Well for decades the conversation about Taxes has been dominated by marginal tax rates right but those rates are only gonna capture What happens when people do take income And so You know some some folks who are in the top of the wealth distribution these these Wealthy billionaires they'll be affected to some degree by that. But it's not gonna change much of the picture when we talk about how much to pay taxes versus their wealth. Gross some economists do think that Many kind of think that The corporate taxes are ultimately paid by individual people. And if you distribute that most of that falls onto the Cheryl there so insofar as there's moves on the corporate tax rate That would be more likely to be sort of raising revenue at least indirectly off of this group. You made mention article as well about taxes being paid after somebody passes away and how even then a lot of people's estates are able to skirt paying taxes and passing on that well to their heirs. And all of that stuff i mean. Obviously there's all sorts of loopholes all over the place but that just kind of figures into all of this even in death people escape paying these taxes. Yeah i there's an entire industry around Wealth management and a lot of that is geared towards figuring out how to minimize Tax burden right. And so there are complicated. The trust that you can set up if you are interested in trying to move a portion of your estate without having it ended up being you know tax that The estate tax level. When you you pass on And a lot of these Sorts of trust are only accessible to people who are in you know in the top top strap which also who's affected by the estate tax course. Jeff earns thousand senior data reporter at propublica. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me change the way you think about your home with home. Sense the newest member of the homegoods family. They've got everything for your home inside and out home sense. Lets you re imagine every room with fresh discoveries furniture you bet rugs lots of them. Table lamps floor chandeliers. Yes yes and yes. Plus there's wall. Art oversized mirrors and enough outdoor furniture and decor to make your backyard the envy of the neighborhood. Grab the elemen- dishes you've been looking for or that six piece outdoor set with same day delivery you can have it today. Home sense is a new shopping adventure. Every time you visit new fines arrive all the time so everyday you'll find incredible savings on different must have decor pro tip if you see something you love. Don't wait because at home sense fines. Go fast get the brands. You love at prices that make sense so you can make the most of your home for less. Take a virtual tour and find a store near you at home sense dot com after all that planning it's happening. Diy closet renovation is finally becoming a reality question is where do you put your things while you work cubes. Smart has you covered with month to month. Leases and self storage solutions that make it easier to get organized online or in person getting self storage is convenient and fast and because diy renovations can easily go over budget. It's great to keep smart is offering up to twenty five percent off your monthly rent by two before and hello to after with qb smart self storage visit cube smart dot com for more details of cable. Companies have scaled up have increased. Their production facilities. are getting better deals on the basic ingredients. Just as grocery prices in every other category has Skyrocketed joining us. Now is laura riley business of food reporter at the washington post. Thanks for joining us. Laura thanks for having wanted to talk about alt- meet alternative meat proteins right now. They were having a moment before the pandemic and throughout in. Nobody knew exactly what was going to happen. How things were going to get affected. We saw a lot of supply chain with a normal meat production but these old proteins really kind of stood out throughout the pandemic and one of the key things that help them was the price. The price was coming down just at the right moment for them as other traditional meat beef and pork their prices were going up so laura. Tell us a little bit about what we're seeing with these plant based meets right now well so before the pandemic. Ipo's like the incredible beyond me. I mean there really was incredible investment in the space and celebrity investors and it was really kinda blowing up. It was to me. Twenty nineteen was all about all protein whether that was milk substitutes or you know vegan exit cetera et cetera. The plainfield field really expanded and twenty nineteen. The pandemic hit and no one knew what was going to happen. You know what what was it going to mean for this fairly fledgeling category you know. Was it a fad. Or did it have legs and i think that a lot of things have conspired to solidify that it really is a trend or movement rather than just you know something kinda fleeting one thing that happened was that meat prices Especially for beef and for pork have dramatically increased. You know they really grocery prices overall have really exploded but those categories have or kind of outstripped all the other grocery categories and so now at the grocery store people are comparing You know impossible. Metoo ground beef and saying Yes the impossible still a little bit more expensive but not way more expensive so before the pandemic it was clear that you know people who wanted to enjoy these new products. These kind of you know animal. Free products were paying a premium for him and so those companies have scaled up have increased their production facilities Are getting better deals on the basic ingredients. Just as grocery prices in every other category has skyrocketed. Let's do a little bit of price comparison because before this you mentioned the article a pound of ground impossible burger was like double that of even the fanciest ground beef it was pretty expensive and for those people coming into it wanting to try it. I mean that could be cost prohibitive for them but right now it's almost equal.

Jeff Laura laura riley Cheryl six piece billions of dollars one propublica today two double Home sense thousand twenty nineteen dot com up to twenty five percent home sense dot com one thing plainfield Twenty nineteen
Latest IRS Scandal Coincides With Biden's Plan to Increase Taxes

The Dan Bongino Show

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Latest IRS Scandal Coincides With Biden's Plan to Increase Taxes

"The eye ours. Government agency can ever trust them either. Did you see this story in the journal today? Wall Street Journal Return to the IRS scandal. Propublica apparently got ahold of a bunch of tax return information for the wealthiest Americans. Jeff Bezoza, Warren Buffett and you know when your institutions are collapsing, and you have a media enterprises doesn't care. They should be asking the question like Hey, listen, I am no fan of Jeff Bezoza at Amazon, Believe me. Jeff Bezoza as an American citizen entitled to Big Our God given rights. It's not just well, I don't like this guy's politics so he doesn't have the rights I have. That's not the way rights work. Who the heck of the IRS leaked a boatload of their information to Propublica. Whether you think they should be paying more taxes, less taxes, no taxes, whether you think we should confiscate all their wealth bezoza buffet. Otherwise they are entitled to the secrecy. You're entitled to when your tax return. And somehow that information leaked out of the IRS. What did I tell you? Institutions are collapsing everywhere. And why did that information leak out? Let me read to you from the journal Cause this is fascinating. They say, quote allow us to fill in the last blank. This tax league story arrives amid the Biden administration's effort to pass the largest tax increases to share the economy since 1968 What a quickie think folks. The main Democratic argument for a tax hike is that the rich should pay their quote, fair share. Propublica story is a long argument that somehow the rich don't pay enough. The timing here is no coincidence,

Jeff Bezoza Propublica IRS Warren Buffett Wall Street Journal Amazon Biden Administration
Man Charged With Murder of Boy in California Road-Rage Shooting

AP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Man Charged With Murder of Boy in California Road-Rage Shooting

"Aritz is charged with murder and a road rage shooting that killed a six year old boy on a local freeway last month. Police say they believe Eric's girlfriend was driving and he fired the shot that killed the boy while his mother was driving him to kindergarten. Propublica, using information

Aritz Eric
Richest Americans Like Bezos, Musk Avoided Income Tax

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Richest Americans Like Bezos, Musk Avoided Income Tax

"A report finds that America's billionaires are good at dodging the tax collector an anonymous source delivered reams of Internal Revenue Service data to ProPublica a nonprofit investigative journalism organization the report found the richest twenty five Americans pay less in taxes than many ordinary workers do an average of fifteen point eight percent of adjusted gross income tactics include the use of charitable donations and benefiting mainly from investment income tax around twenty percent instead of thirty seven percent for wage income among other findings Amazon founder Jeff Basil's paid no income tax in two thousand seven and two thousand eleven and Tesla founder Elon musk paid zero income taxes in twenty eighteen financier George Soros paid no taxes for twenty sixteen to twenty eighteen which is spokesman attributed to the billionaire losing money on his investments IRS commissioner Charles Rettig testifying today before senators on the finance committee said that when it comes to enforcement of tax collection the agency is out gunned as far as the pro publica data he said they are investigating the leak I'm Jennifer king

Propublica Jeff Basil IRS America Elon Musk Charles Rettig Tesla George Soros Amazon Finance Committee Jennifer King
Racism, Opioids and COVID-19: A Deadly Trifecta

Short Wave

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Racism, Opioids and COVID-19: A Deadly Trifecta

"Two thousand seventeen the governor of illinois implemented a plan to halt the explosive growth of opioid deaths in the state. The plan was to cut those deaths by at least a third by the end of twenty. Twenty twenty twenty was gonna be the turning point for illinois dua l. deeb is a reporter with propublica they're starting to see a decrease and opioid overdose deaths and they were really kind of making progress across the state and they were really hopeful but early last year duo got a tip that the number of opioid related deaths might actually be on the rise in the region so she and her colleague melissa. Sanchez started investigating the analyzed death records from the cook. County medical examiner's office. And what they found was alarming. We found that opioid overdoses surged and cook county and specifically in chicago and that those overdoses were disproportionately killing black residents. I think by the summer we had seen about hundred residents who had died of suspected or confirmed opium overdoses which is about double the number from the year before drug overdose deaths are on the rise all around the country. This was a nationwide problem that we're seeing kind of start to rise before the pandemic and then just continue as a pandemic ravaged our communities absolutely. This is the obvious question for me. Here is whether we have a sense of how much of this increase can be tied to the coronavirus pandemic so cova didn't cause the spike but like everything else that made it worse the financial stress the isolation The desperation all of that seems to be really exacerbating things and then when we talk about isolation with opioid. Use one of the things that they say. Is you know if you're gonna use use with someone else so that then they can administer naloxone the opioid overdose reversal drug. But you know people were not using with others

Illinois Deeb Propublica Sanchez Cook County Melissa Chicago
A Complicated Tax Season is Coming

Business Wars Daily

03:59 min | 1 year ago

A Complicated Tax Season is Coming

"From wondering. I'm david brown in this business. Wars daily on this friday february nineteenth. Happy friday everyone. I think ben. Franklin put it simply enough. Nothing is certain in this world exempt death and taxes so yes even in the midst of a global pandemic after a year that was completely upside down. Tax season is upon us and boy. Is it going to be complicated this year. That's because of the covid. Nineteen pandemic of course and all the changes to the tax code that came with it. Think unemployment insurance. Ppp loans for a one k. Withdrawals stimulus checks recovery rebate credits. Pretty head-spinning isn't it. If there's one year to switch from filing your taxes to enlisting help well this just might be the year to do so at least. That's what tax assistance companies like turbotax h. and r. block. Want you to think the first day you can file and get a refund. This year has been pushed back around two weeks to let the irs get itself sorted but the delay hasn't stopped both turbo. Tax donation are blocked from getting out in front of potentially tax wary customers. Perhaps you saw quirky earworm filled ads for both companies during the super bowl around forty million people filed taxes on turbo tax which is owned by into it in two thousand nineteen far more than any other tax preparation product according to propublica the company. Let you file for free if your income is under a certain threshold and if you only need to file simple returns without claiming any deductions or credits. But this year a situation that simple is unlikely which means turbo tax could make a pretty penny they also charge more for folks who are self employed and for filing state returns in multiple states. Who would file multiple state returns. You ask well people who work remotely and don't live in. The same state is their employer and offices shut down early last year. A lot of people made the move to do just that which could cause some serious tax headaches. Turbo tax will help you through those at cost of course meanwhile h. and r. block had about half the number of turbo tax users and twenty nineteen. But it's also a bit less expensive filers using h. and r. block have the option of dropping off paperwork at actual brick and mortar offices. Sounds wild right now. Turbo tax in hr blocker just to the big dogs in tax preparation. But there are hundreds of locations across the us where qualifying individuals can get help filing taxes for free in any other year. If you make less than a certain threshold if you have a disability if you're over a certain age if you are learning english if you're currently experiencing homelessness you can sit down with an irs certified volunteer. Who'd help you prepare your taxes. But this year well kovic has changed that of course in person volunteer programs have largely moved online. And that's a barrier for folks who can't access technology leaders of these free federal programs fear that millions of americans could miss out on free tax help according to cnbc. Now there's one thing that could fix the headaches that usually come with taxes every year and help more americans keep more money in their pockets. And that's the us government choosing to make filing tax returns simple and free for most citizens. The government has the power to do this but according to a twenty nineteen investigation from propublica Certain company is making sure attempts to make free. Filing widely accessible are thwarted. What company would that be. You ask we'll that would be in to it. We jones turbo tax

David Brown IRS Franklin Propublica BEN Headaches Kovic Cnbc United States Propublica Certain Company Us Government Jones
"propublica" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"propublica" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Propublica said that that officer actually communicated With his own brother over text message that night on seemed to be fine on Lee related that he had, uh, run into pepper spray and otherwise was feeling well. Before subsequently dying, apparently of a stroke. It's all very confusing, but that's the type of confusion that would normally alleviate. Um you know, criminal accusation of somebody leading to something leading to a homicide. Right, Joe? Yes, I don't think there's any doubt that the president did not instigate an insurrection or rebellion or insight arrived. Nothing that he said or did on that day constitute sufficient evidence for that. However, as you said, this is a political process the impeachment process. It's a political constitutional process with no rules on with the rules established by the majority of the Senate. And that means they can say and do anything that they want. I doubt if they have enough votes to convict the president. It doesn't appear that they do at this point, So whatever happens is going to be Kabuki Theater. It's designed to make political points. The entire house managers case is designed to paint an ugly picture of President Trump. It's not about trying to convince 67 senators, they know that isn't going to happen. But as far as the legalities of this, there isn't any question that the president did not commit a crime. Nor did you or did any of the other speakers at that event on the mall. So and we now know that the Landing for the riot that went up on the hill occurred well in advance that many people involved in it that had nothing to do with people who attended that rally, and certainly the people who did the planning had nothing to do with president or Mr Giuliani or any of the people who spoke at that rally behind the White House, Joe very quickly and 20 seconds here. The Supreme Court is scheduled on Friday. Tonto to review Some Election Challenge lawsuits from 2025 lawsuits, including two From the president. One from my Kelly, one from Lynwood, one from city pal. Do you think that they will wind up taking up any of these election lawsuits? Hard to say, but they should, Because what that will be one of the way to help prevent some of the things that went wrong with the laws were passed. Or executive orders that were issued in some of these states that violated the U. S Constitution. So I would hope that the court would take up some of the more important cases and issue of rulings that will help States fix the mess that they created legally on D. It's obvious that there were things done in various states that were unconstitutional in terms of the way they changed Election law. All right, Joe Degenova. Thank you so much. Always a pleasure to have you and you always leave a smarter than we started. Thank you. I did stop.

president Joe Degenova President Trump Lee Supreme Court Senate Kabuki Theater Propublica Lynwood officer Mr Giuliani Kelly White House executive
Amazon faces spying claims over AI cameras in vans

Techmeme Ride Home

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Amazon faces spying claims over AI cameras in vans

"Amazon has started deploying. Ai powered netra dine cameras which are always on an automatically uploading footage so that amazon can monitor drivers out in the real world quoting cnbc. Amazon is to play the cameras in amazon branded. Cargo vans used by a handful of companies. That are part of its delivery service partner program which are largely responsible for last mile deliveries. The cameras could be rolled out to additional. Dsp's over time and amazon has already distributed an instructional video dsp informing them of how the cameras work. Dsp's are contracted. Delivery providers usually distinguishable by amazon branded cargo vans responsible for picking up packages from amazon delivery stations and dropping them off at doorsteps. The program launched in two thousand. Eighteen has allowed the company to quickly scale up. Its last mile delivery capabilities and compete with shipping partners such as ups and fedex amazon's dsp program has faced criticism for lax safety protocols in the past investigations by nbc news propublica and buzzfeed news identified safety issues and described poor working conditions at some. Dsp's based on interviews with drivers and former amazon employees. The cameras could help improve safety but privacy advocates and several. Dsp drivers said they're concerned about potential privacy offs. The drivers who asked to remain anonymous out of fear of retaliation from amazon described the cameras as unnerving big brother and a punishment system and

Amazon DSP Cnbc Buzzfeed News Propublica Fedex NBC
Why Black Officers Find Breach Of U.S. Capitol Particularly Upsetting

Forum

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Why Black Officers Find Breach Of U.S. Capitol Particularly Upsetting

"To secure state capitals and president elect binds inauguration there. Also responding To racism and extremism within their ranks. And joining me now is walking SAPIEN, a reporter for Propublica. His recent story is no one took us seriously. Black cops warned about racist Capitol police officers for years. Just before the break, Joaquin SAPIEN. You were describing some of the horrific incidents and I'm wondering if you could now tell us how the department responded to allegations and complaints. Well, these lawsuits have been tied up in the courts for a really long time. The allegations in them are still unresolved and one of the main You know, folks is of frustration for the black officers were involved in taking a stand and in making their voices heard on these issues is that they felt Congress never really took them seriously. A number of them had met with the sergeant of arms. That number had met with key members of Congress. Uh, they help demonstrations outside of this building that they were sworn to protect. And so they've been doing the best they could draw attention to The racism that they endured day in and day out for many years and they're feeling is that it had been ignored that it was it was falling on deaf ears and one of the issues that many of them raised us. And our interviews was that They felt as though black officers were too often passed over for promotions and were unable to secure positions and leadership. And so some of the black officers that we talked to drew a direct line between The lack of officers in leadership and the response to the protests. You know they're feeling was that if there were more black officers at the higher ranks of the Capitol Police Department that things may have unfolded a little bit differently that the threat from some of the white supremacist groups who led the assault on the Capitol May have been taken more seriously. Had there been more diversity in in those higher ranks.

Black Cops Joaquin Sapien Propublica Congress Capitol Police Department
Congressional probe raises safety concerns about booster seats

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Congressional probe raises safety concerns about booster seats

"By CBS News and Propublica and now a congressional probe is raising serious concerns about the safety of some popular Children's car booster seats. I have to credit you folks with really shining a light on this issue. Their findings obtained by CBS News conclude booster seat makers endangered the lives of millions of American Children. And misled consumers about the safety of booster seats by failing to conduct appropriate side impact testing, deceiving consumers with false and misleading statements about their side impact testing protocols and unsafely recommending the Children under £40 and as light as £30 can use booster seats. The report also calls for the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general Tow launch consumer protection investigations And that

Cbs News Federal Trade Commission
Congressional probe raises safety concerns about booster seats

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Congressional probe raises safety concerns about booster seats

"And Pope Propublica investigation is raising serious concerns about the safety of some popular Children's car booster seats. I have to credit you folks with really shining a light on this issue. Their findings obtained by CBS News conclude booster seat makers endangered the lives of millions of American Children. And misled consumers about the safety of booster seats by failing to conduct appropriate side impact testing, deceiving consumers with false and misleading statements about their side impact testing protocols and unsafely recommending the Children under £40 and as light as £30 can use booster seats. The report also calls for the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general to launch consumer protection investigations that is CBS News Transportation correspondent Kris Van Cleave.

Pope Propublica Cbs News Federal Trade Commission Cbs News Transportation Kris Van Cleave
Over 51 million Americans cast early election votes

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:48 min | 2 years ago

Over 51 million Americans cast early election votes

"Day is november third but of course the election is already well underway with even more early voting than usual this year the elections project estimates that nearly fifty one million people had already voted as of friday morning about thirty five million by mail and fifteen million of them in person. Although states don't necessarily break that out in the way they do the reporting the voting process has also been legally and logistically chaotic this year as election agencies move too much more mail voting than usual and the political parties sue over the rules under which people vote. This has some voters worried. About how smoothly the voting process will go about how to make sure their votes are counted. So jessica who's been joins us to talk about that now. Just as a reporter at propublica covers voting rights and election administration. Hello jessica thinks much for having me absolutely. Thank you for joining us. So how is early voting going. We've all seen these pictures on. Social media of long lines at polling places. Is that typical. Is that a reflection of of this being a really problematic process. Is it just enthusiasm. Is that unusual. What's going on in usually expect to see long lines it. Just this is the way that american democracy functions for better or worse. There's there's no suggestion that this year the lines are markedly or different than they than they once were. And we're seeing a lot of unexpected enthusiasm and places And then what. We're also seeing that a lot of folks who requested a ballot by mail do end up voting in person and canceling that mail in ballot out at the polls which takes several minutes which slows some things down and we can kind of ponder about why people might be making that choice but But i think that election administrators are largely doing fine with the committee curve balls. They've been thrown this

Jessica Propublica
Baltimore students grapple with distance learning

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:59 min | 2 years ago

Baltimore students grapple with distance learning

"Like other districts around the country, the city of Baltimore is weighing whether and how to return to school in person right now, most public school students here are attending classes virtually half of those. Come from low income families, and about fifteen percent have disabilities which add to the challenge of teaching and engaging students. Remotely Sonia Elisa's is the CEO of city public schools. I asked her how the district was fixed for technology going into the pandemic we have ratio of about one device for every four students what has rapidly changed. Over the past few months is we have. Purchased fifty five thousand devices so that we hand distribute those we've distributed probably close to forty, five to forty, eight of those. The other piece that's changed is we have far more technology in use with far more adult trained than we ever had prior to the pandemic more than half of Baltimore City public school students come from low income households. How has that added to the challenge given the the huge digital divide we have in our country you know we had probably close to twenty thousand families in Baltimore City that did not have. To broadband a lot of what we've also had to do frankly is is work with others in the community to leverage relationships and partnerships to make sure that the majority of our families would receive broadband. So everything from. Negotiating and frankly paying for some of the Internet access, we have about fifteen thousand hotspots that we have had to give out. But even when kids have the devices and the Internet connection at home, there are challenges I'm sure you saw the New Yorker Propublica story by Alec mcgillis profiling a child who was constantly searching for the right link to get into class because it was always changing and his access was. Available How's the district making sure kids like that don't fall through the cracks, his piece captured what happens after the ground level challenges of devices and Internet access or even addressed, and we've had parents through no fault of their own who even win they're calling our central lines for assistance aren't sure where the space bar is or in the case of the student that Alec profiled. If you don't know how to switch from one platform to another can be a real obstacle. It's one of the reasons why we needed to add more support through our hotline. Because it you know it takes longer if there's something new, we're really seeing what happens when we allow whole segments of our community to not have access to really what is an essential in twenty in the twenty first century. Do. You feel too much is being asked of schools to close that gap given the a lot of the reasons behind the digital divide our societal. So I think that that happens a great deal within public schools in our country and just the way that we approach and I've said this on a variety of cage of occasions. The way we approach policy and supports for families in this country is often very silo D- it's truncated in one area and it doesn't connect in another and so families are left really navigating the landscape on their own when really those of us. In. Service should be the ones navigating. We knew that the obstacles we faced in the spring, we're not going to be a sufficient enough excuse nor should it be for young people learning and so you do what you need to do. But that being said I do think it is a moment for reflection and pause that we are asking schools to be centers of feeding for families, centers of technology for families it really should. Very frankly, quite quite obviously a surface larger questions about what our family support policy is as a country overall with all the devices, you've had to purchase the internet connectivity. You've had to buy the training, how to do how much does all this cost. What we found was about a twenty one, million dollar gap between the resources we were able to garner from not just government, but our own repurposing of resources as well as. Some donations from the philanthropic community and in the case of Baltimore everyday citizens who donated everything from either full device or whatever financial contribution they wanted to make to the fund are really helped. Begin to bridge that that that divide however, we still found ourselves with about a twenty one, million dollar difference, which is why we began taking the financial. Measures that we did because what we knew was that between technology between our protective equipment cleaning supplies being able to make sure that families we heard loud and clear from our families that they wanted. Evidence that, we were going to be able to keep their students safe in any discussion about returning to school and even in the virtual environment. We knew that for that to be viable we would need to continue to help make sure that Internet was Availa ball and that again we were closing the divide on the devices.

Baltimore Sonia Elisa Baltimore City Alec Mcgillis CEO Availa
The Shady World Of Call Center Work

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 2 years ago

The Shady World Of Call Center Work

"Many of America's best known companies figured out a way to cut customer service costs. They've been doing this for years they classify customer service workers as contractors and have them work from home Amanda Iran Chick of NPR's planet money reports on potentially illegal business model. When Yvonne. Quarter I heard about arise virtual solutions. She was trying to find a way to home school her kids arise Zane worked from home pioneer. It's been around since the late nineteen ninety S, and it offers the opportunity to get paid to customer service work from home to me. It just released sounded like it was fun in an easy way to make money maybe not quite so easy quarter had to. Pay For three months training clause she bought herself a headset computer installed a new phone and fax line. So for a few years there if you were to call up Disney dining, you're gonna get me outside little. Rock Arkansas right now, quarter didn't work for Disney dining and by the way, Disney did not respond to our requests for an interview and she didn't exactly work for arise either she was an independent contractor. So she wasn't entitled to things like paid sick days. There is one point I was so sick I had a hang up on one of my Disney guests I had to throw up they're like, well, you need to schedule time off and I'm like what? It makes no sense quarter isn't the only one wondering about all this Arianna Tobin is a propublica reporter whose team spent over a year investigating work from home call centers arise to hire agents are is only will contract with what they call an independent business. A lot of the time it's just one person arise shifts a lot of training and gear costs from a Disney. Onto the customer service Rep, what you hear them say is we quote unquote squeezed the wastage out of your employment costs arise told us in a written statement that they've built a platform where agents can choose when where, and how often they work. But Labor Lawyers Shannon Lewis reardon argues that's not quite true in reality she says, arise maintains a lot of control over these workers. The really more like employees than contractors they've been mis classified the misclassification. The umbrella issue here list weirded is like lawyer famous for fighting cases against UBER LIFT DOOR DASH and other GIG economy companies. She says misclassification is increasingly common and she's fought a series of these kinds of cases against a rise. She's not allowed to say exactly how many though because deep inside the contracts of the Asian sign it says, if you have a problem with the rise, you have to go through private arbitration. It's basically like a private court you go to a private decision. Maker not a regular judge. The whole thing is confidential. Basically, what happens in private court stays in private court arbitration as a very effective means of companies keeping their workers in the dark about their legal rights. So people like von Quarter had no idea that some of her fellow arise customer service agents had filed complaints against the company. I didn't know there were so many other people that were going through the same thing feeling the same thing and based on Propublica is reporting many of the WHO fought arise one their cases according to an American Bar Association report from earlier in the year, the use of mandatory private arbitration has been increasing dramatically over the past three decades Amanda Renchik NPR news.

Disney Zane Yvonne Amanda Iran Shannon Lewis Reardon America American Bar Association Arianna Tobin Amanda Renchik Arkansas Reporter
How Climate Migration Will Reshape America

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:46 min | 2 years ago

How Climate Migration Will Reshape America

"Joining me in the studio is collateral producer off multiple twenty, four hours the urban Est.. Calendar. Will Not so much first of all, what's going on in our cities but the possibility that people might not want to leave them very much anymore. Yes. This is a story quite a long read on the New York Times how climate migration will reshape America this is my Abram looks Tarkhan who is a senior environment reporter for Propublica and he has for the past two years are so been. Investigating exactly how climate will impact cities and countries around the world. Now, we do have a tendency to when we think about that to think you know about rising sea levels to think about other places, not the US but if there's anything that this recent fire season has showed that America will very much be defined by this I. Mean we don't even have enough time on this show. To go through everything he writes but I would like to highlight a few things If I may one of them is just how much Americans don associate climate migration are something that might happen to them. Now does a few pointers here of why that might one of the ones I found. My most fascinating is because it is a very rich country and it does sort of thing. I think that's the commonality those rich and fortunate places. They think bad things happen to other people exactly and it's like if I have money I can solve it. But you know we the fact that you know a lot of the houses in Florida for example, in a few decades will be below sea level is something that people know already but for example, one of the things that he. Highlights. Here is how across the United States around one, hundred, sixty, two, million people. So that's nearly one in every two people will most likely experience a decline in the quality of life of their environment, the environment throughout their lifetime, which is quite insane and by twenty seventy, the analysis on this report suggests that you know if carbon emissions are not cuts after continuous extreme levels at least four million Americans could find themselves living at the French. So places that are con- considered to be outside the ideal for human life. He poses a really interesting question, which is what is the cost of actually resisting this new climate reality and especially in an election year when you have one side completely advocating for some change in another complete denying it seems like a question that is more pertinent than ever is a very fascinating and daunting investigation that he he spoke to four dozen experts from economists, people that work demography climate scientists even insurance executives to realize all of this and I encourage everyone to look at it might be scary but. We need to be aware of

Propublica America United States New York Times Producer Florida Reporter Tarkhan
Unthinkable Trauma

In The Thick

06:01 min | 2 years ago

Unthinkable Trauma

"Hey welcome to in the thickness is a podcast politics race and culture from a POC. Perspective. HORSA and I'm Jerry Galloway. Rela. We have a very special guest joining us from Southern California Jacob Sobre. He's award winning journalist correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC and Hey a best selling author. Now, what's up Jacob? So good to be with you guys you know have wanted to do this for so long with you and I'm I'm just grateful to be here with you together I know he's a fan. He's a fan of in the thick fan. Yes. We love that we love fans of the pod so. We're going to be talking about an issue that you have called an American tragedy and this is the issue and the history of family. I don't even like that term because it's really families being ripped apart torn apart. In your new book separated inside an American tragedy you readers through a very intimate look into the policy into the families that have been torn apart and traumatized. You also talk to policymakers and government officials who ultimately were responsible for creating and really promoting this is stemmed separation of an estimated five, thousand, four hundred children from their parents at the hands of the government and I. Say. And still counting. Yeah and despite the fact that president trump signed an executive orders supposedly ending the policy of Charles Separations in two thousand eighteen, the ACLU alleges that there have been more than one thousand family separation since that executive order and more recently propublica reported on how the trump administration has used the corona virus as a pretext to circumvent the normal legal protections allowed to migrant children. So since March ice has circulated thousands of migrant children through hotel black sites making it virtually impossible for lawyers, family members and advocates to locate them and deported them in order to quote prevent the introduction of Covid nineteen into the US. Even though many of the deported children have tested negative for the virus. So Jacob here have reported on these issues for many many years. These policies you know predate trump. So before we get into the current iteration of this shit show, I wanNA talk about looking back into that history and actually. You great job of setting it and in a moment we'll talk about how it's touched of us. Really personally. But Jacob. From your perspective, talk to us about the origins of family separation and how the stage was being set for these policies way before trump entered the white. House. So yeah, you gotTa tell us how did we get here? Yeah. I think Maria. That what the trump administration did and we talked about ripping families apart family separation what to call this really what it was in the words of Physicians for human, rights and Nobel Peace Prize winning organization was torture at met the. Definition of torture according to the United. Nations it was government sanctioned child abuse according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and you know make no mistake. This is on the trump administration's hands. No administration in the history of the United States of America had ever attempted or done anything like this in a systematic way. But the fact that the trump administration was able to execute this policy was only possible because of decades of failed deterrent based immigration border policy by Democratic and Republican administrations. This will come as no news to you. But for people who don't know in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, the Clinton administration put into place their border patrol a policy called prevention through deterrence. That's why our administration has moved aggressively to secure our borders more by hiring record number of new border guards by deporting twice as many criminal aliens as ever before by cracking down on illegal hiring, which was designed went along with the first wave of border infrastructure walls. Fences what have you and the idea was that by doing that people who are migrating to this country quote unquote illegally would have to go on more dangerous or deadly journeys to get here and sure enough you know many people have died trying I e let them die trying. Let them die trying. That's exactly right. After the Clinton administration. We had the Bush administration which obviously created H S and expanded the border patrol exponentially dozens of agencies charged with Homeland Security. Will now be located within one cabinet department. With the mandate and legal authority. To protect our people, the Obama Administration obviously deported more people than any other president ever no matter how they are. No matter their reasons. The eleven million who broke these laws should be held accountable and we got to this place where we had donald trump is president saying when Mexico census people, they're not sending their best they bringing drugs. Crime, their rapists, often not the pictures of Jay Johnson walk through the same facilities that I saw separated kids in and look yes. The Obama Administration Limited circumstances did separate parents and children from each other and the reason that they did it was circumstances where you had parents who were perhaps violent criminals or dealing a narcotrafficking but they never did on a systematic basis Jay Johnson? The Homeland Security Secretary, or Cecilia Munoz from the Domestic Policy Council. Bowl said to me on the record in my book we could never do. What the trump administration did it doesn't mean the idea wasn't proposed. It came up, it came up in the situation of the White House but they never did it and the minute Donald Trump became president. This idea was on the table right about a Valentine's Day meeting and twenty seventeen and the officer Kevin McLean then the acting commissioner of Customs and border. Protection they wanted to do this from the get-go and now the results of of this policy are very familiar to all of

Donald Trump Jacob Clinton Administration President Trump Obama Administration Southern California Jacob Sobr United States NBC Msnbc Domestic Policy Council Jerry Galloway Jay Johnson American Academy Of Pediatrics White House Executive Cecilia Munoz Covid Homeland Security Kevin Mclean
"propublica" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"propublica" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Case. Later reporting by Propublica would reveal the CEO of Smithfield has sent a letter to Governor Rick It's a month before the press conference, pressuring him not to shut down the plant's it read Social Distancing is a nicety that makes sense only for people with laptops. And warned that if meatpacking plants were shut down to contain the virus, quote, food shortages would lead to social unrest. We started to realize that the meatpacking plants we're going to continue to do whatever they needed to do to keep running. Two days later, the Children of Smithfield decided to take more direct action. They decided to hold a protest a socially distant drive by car protest. We drove around the plant a couple of times, and then we came back to the parking lot. A couple of us got out of our cars and held out our signs on the sidewalk. Workers coming off their shift here and support and all my wrist says there were about 50 cars that day, mostly Children and family members. Workers themselves weren't willing to join in. But the protest did spread statewide involved People of meat packing plants and Grand Island Lexington Increase. Protesters say this is a scene create will continue to see every single Saturday. If Kobe consciousness does not get better at Smithfield Foods, just south of the downtown area. So far, there are six confirmed cases from those working within the plant. All the people want is just a little transparency. And enough pp. To feel see we wanted to show solidarity and the purpose of that car vigil was to bring some attention to it, but also let the workers know that they weren't alone. Just a few days after the protest, the number of covert positive cases of the plant jumped sharply to just under 50 and that seemed to be a wake up call for Smithfield. In late April, employees learned that the plane would clothes from two weeks for the Children of Smithfield. It felt.

Smithfield Smithfield Foods Propublica Rick It CEO Grand Island Kobe
Trump criticizes a Texas border wall segment that is said to be eroding, claiming that it was constructed to make him 'look bad'

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Trump criticizes a Texas border wall segment that is said to be eroding, claiming that it was constructed to make him 'look bad'

"Trump is criticizing a privately built border wall project in South Texas. As NPR's Joel Rose reports the stretch of wall near the Rio Grande shows signs of erosion a few months after being built. President Trump took to Twitter to complain that the privately built border wall was quote on Ly done to make me look bad, even though the wall was built after a month's long campaign by the president's supporters. A group calling itself we build. The wall raised more than $25 million after Congress refused to fund trumps demands for a border wall. The three mile section stands much closer to the Rio Grande than the government ordinarily places border barriers. Propublica and the Texas Tribune reported this week that erosion of the river Bank is threatening the wall's integrity. It was built by Fisher Industries, which has since one a border wall contract from the federal government worth more than a $1,000,000,000.

President Trump Rio Grande Texas Tribune Joel Rose LY South Texas NPR Fisher Industries Twitter Congress
Mail ballot surge places Postal Service under spotlight

All Of It

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Mail ballot surge places Postal Service under spotlight

"Last year the United States postal service delivered one hundred forty three billion pieces of mail this year the postal service to deliver tens of millions of ballots due to health concerns around the crown of virus outbreak police that's the plan the states have shifted their primaries to using mail in ballots on a large scale for the first time the U. S. P. S. it's been struggling there been problems with delayed delivery of completed ballots and requested mail in ballots that never appear sometimes it's been a handful of ballots sometimes been hundreds the USPS faces a huge budget shortfall thousands of workers have tested poet positive for cover nineteen and the president has called the agency a quote joke joining me now to look at what's behind the recent problems and what they mean for the election in November is Ryan McCarthy's reporter and editor who covers elections at ProPublica Ryan welcome thanks for having me great to be here all right so I'm going to use the word unprecedented speed you seem a lot a lot but is it accurate when it comes to the number of mail in ballots that American voters will be casting this year totally accurate you know in twenty eighteen about a quarter of Americans orders castor ballots by mail this year based on estimates from election experts in some states up to fifty percent could vote by mail this year so half the state's roughly had go by mail rates last year of under ten percent did you think about that increased state and local election officials have to build these large really complicated logistics operations at a time when there's a pandemic at a time when they're under budget pressure on the state level and a time when the US postal service itself is under huge pressure and and budget pressure itself so I want to be clear about this president trump has said in a statement that has been debunked repeatedly that mail in ballots would be substantially fraudulent that's not we're rich you're reporting on it isn't about any kind of fraud real or made up what are the issues that you have the issue that you've been diving into sure so we spent several weeks looking at whether or not a cash strapped severely diminished US postal service which as you said it's become a political football on a target of president trump could rise to the challenge of delivering an unprecedented amount of mail in ballots this year tens of millions in in the picture that we got in part from the US postal service track record which was not totally promising did they think they know about the US postal service is that after years of plant closures and cutbacks it's really not living up to its own delivery goals particularly for first math class mail which is how most election ballots are sent it has not hit any of its goals for first class mail in five years and according to a recent inspector general report the US postal service delivered ninety five percent of election mail on time last year which presents actually pretty good but if you think of four to five or six percent of ballots being delayed international mail in election then you get considerable chaos and it is also worth noting that in some of the work lowest performing areas of the country for election Malin twenty eighteen including in swing states like Florida Ohio and stuff like that almost eighty four percent of election mail was delivered on time so that's a huge difference that actually could be proved pivotal and I think election officials and voters this there isn't a widespread acknowledgement that the US postal service has been struggling and may not be capable of performing to the level that most people simply because let's talk about Ohio since you mentioned Ohio specifically there were problems in Butler County during the primary on April twenty eighth what happened yes so in Butler County which it would actually have been affected by some of the plant closures I talk to you about eight two US postal service employees showed up in the office the local director elections there this was three days after the deadline to count ballots it really is a tray of three hundred and seventeen open ballots that were too late to be counted and essentially those ballots have been sitting in a U. S. postal service warehouse uncounted for two weeks in the context here is that Ohio's election was crashed some of the rules that once were set up by the state legislature went against the advice of election officials and voting rights advocates and there had been such bad delays in mail delivery that the secretary of state Republican warned voters and pushed not only for the US postal service to add staff to process balance but also to make sure that ballots all ballots from Ohio voters were processed at at Ohio mail facilities in northwestern Ohio in cities like Toledo because of this wave of plant closures mail within two to three day process and Detroit it turns out was hit by some really bad code related delays with malice like a lot of places around the country and so so the Butler County incident was reflective of what's been happening in in a handful of states if your primary where there is this sort of circle of blame between the US postal service and local election officials were kind of baffled why did their ballots are not getting to voters in in some cases it's because of poorly conceived election operations in cases it seems to be U. S. postal service there in some cases it seems to be a mixture of the two

United States
The Mescalero Apache Tribe declares a state of emergency as COVID-19 cases start to emerge

Native America Calling

03:42 min | 2 years ago

The Mescalero Apache Tribe declares a state of emergency as COVID-19 cases start to emerge

"This is national news. I'm in Prenton Gonzales. The Mescalero Apache tribe in New Mexico declared a state of emergency Monday as tests confirm the first cases of covid nineteen on the reservation in New Mexico. At least four people tested positive for the disease. The tribe says it's waiting on the results of some six hundred other tests. Mescalero ordered lockdown businesses and public establishments for at least the next two weeks. The tribe is also closing tribal government offices to the public. The order puts restrictions on individuals movements and asks that one member of each household use Tuesdays and Thursdays for buying food and other essentials. The tribe is closing entrances to tribal land although the main highway through the reservation remains open. Mescalero president gave Aguilar told Q. E. T. V. The measures are away to protect the tribe. He says merely urging people to practice physical distancing failed to keep the virus from spreading an out of state. Seafood worker is the first person to test positive for coronavirus in the city of Valdez. Alaska officials say the infection was caught through. Routine. Testing Louisa. Castroville is Acting Infectious Disease Program Manager for the Alaska Department of Health and social services in video conference Monday. She said it's not clear yet. How the individual contract the virus it's individual came to Alaska from the lower forty-eight in late April and Co was quarantined. Onsite there for two weeks because as some demonic during that timeframe as well and there's been working on campus since then and has not left. It's not clear the source of the infection whether this was something that was picked up locally since the person had been there for a month or whether this is the test that we're seeing the positive result if it's picking up virus that might have been An infection in the distant past. And we're just seeing residual virus from that Castro deal says health officials are working to determine anyone who may have come in contact with the infected person. Alaska officials remain vigilant as the commercial fishing season is getting underway and thousands of people. Come from all over the world to work and processing facilities. The state has a little over four hundred positive cases of covid nineteen total as of the start of this week. The regional hospital in gnome close to the public. After an employee tested for the coronavirus. The Norton Sound Health Corporation expected employees to go back to work Tuesday after all of them are tested for the virus. Katie Oh news reports. The facilities were subjected to afford a extensive cleaning on Friday. The city manager issued an emergency order restricting travel into nome and mandating a two week quarantine for anyone traveling into the city from the outside. Some face masks sent to the Navajo nation through a company established by a former White House. Aide may be inadequate to properly protect those who wear them the news organization Propublica reports almost two hundred fifty thousand of the masks sent by a company headed by former White House. Deputy Chief of Staff Zach Pontus may not fit the guidelines established by the Food and Drug Administration propublica reports. The total cost for the masks is around eight hundred thousand dollars. The report goes on to say that in another one hundred. Thirty thousand masks are not the kind specified in the procurement data. The News Organization Says Flint is secured. The three million dollar deal with the Indian health services. Eleven days after he formed the company the sell personal protective equipment. Ihs officials say the masks are unsuitable for medical use. The regional office is determining whether to return them flint told propublica his connections to the White House played no role in his company selection as a provider for IHS the Navajo nation has the highest per capita rate of corona virus infections in the nation with National Native News. I'm Mark Hughes.

Alaska White House Mescalero New Mexico Prenton Gonzales Aguilar IHS Alaska Department Of Health Valdez Acting Infectious Disease Prog Norton Sound Health Corporatio Nome Flint Food And Drug Administration Mark Hughes Castroville Katie Oh Propublica
"propublica" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"propublica" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Between the press and the president but first Italy and other European nations now looking to ease restrictions and regulations as the rate of infection slows over there lawmakers in Rome joining Denmark Austria and Norway saying workers in construction food and tourism could return to the job shortly the cotton is biggest outbreaks are currently in Spain and Great Britain maybe secretary at Thomas motley quits over his handling of the USS Theodore Roosevelt a nuclear powered aircraft carrier were hundreds of sailors were infected with the virus motley be raided the ship's captain Brad crozier after he ask for medical evacuations from the ship now Mosley is gone while New York City mayor bill de Blasio warns the city could run out of ventilators a new report by ProPublica shows his administration actually sold hundreds of the machines just five years ago the equipment was acquired by mayor Bloomberg but the Blasi sold it because of high maintenance costs this is quite a story roughly twenty percent of police officers are sick in the Big Apple more than seven thousand cops staying home with virus symptoms another two thousand members of the force have tested positive for cove it three have died so far some doctors believe smoking marijuana on a regular basis could increase a person's risk of contracting the virus experts say the habit along with consuming tobacco makes the longs weaker despite those warnings the sale of cannabis is up about a hundred and fifty percent in California and Colorado where it is legal for in a moment the press and Donald Trump should be working together to diminish the virus not happening right back a former White House economist says is a hundred percent chance of a recession and projects one million jobs will be lost in April so many Americans are moving to physical gold and silver as a.

ProPublica White House Colorado New York City Thomas motley Britain Donald Trump California cannabis marijuana Apple Blasi mayor Bloomberg president bill de Blasio Mosley Brad crozier Theodore Roosevelt secretary
"propublica" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"propublica" Discussed on KOMO

"Newsroom ProPublica and the urban institute Liz Weston is a certified financial planner and author with the website NerdWallet she joined ABC Cherie Preston to talk about this new data what's because this trend and how people can navigate through what she calls the most dangerous decade this really hit home because as a woman in her fifties I have a lot of friends who have lost jobs recently and it's a it's a real problem for those of a certain age isn't it yeah it absolutely is and the interesting thing was it was a friend who was in the situation that made me start thinking about the fact I've seen this a lot I've seen people at this age bracket lose their job and then if they do get another job it tends to be one that pays a heck of a lot less so I started digging around it turns out there were there was a study by pro publica with the urban institute that looked at a bunch of research showing that this happens all the time in fact they thought thought with people who have into their fifties with long term stable jobs more than half of them lose those jobs and most of them never recover financially Hey our P. just recently did a cover story on its little magazine that sends out about this too is an idea of ageism or is it just companies who are moving younger workers into the work force which I guess would be that wouldn't well yeah it's all kinds of things going on and there's definitely age discrimination going on they'd have done studies showing when they send out resumes that are when it looks like the person is younger they get far more interviews than the if you make the person seem older I mean they've done actual blind sort of scientific studies about this and we all know once we get up there we noticed that there's all kinds of things said about age that would never be sad about ethnicity or sexual orientation or anything like that that seems to be still okay to say about age so it's it's definitely out there but the good news is there are things you can do to anticipate this so that you're not caught unawares and there are ways to make yourself less of a target so let's start about that one of the things that you mentioned in your article is you should get any kind of training that you can while you're still working it's super important to pay attention to the training opportunities right in your workplace there tend to be a lot of them and a lot of people just pass those on by the reality is you cannot close to retirement you may feel like it can make the movie really tired and you just want to you know get across the finish line but remember coasting means you're going down hill and everybody around you is going to notice it eventually so that's not something you want to communicate you want to be looking for opportunities to say I'm here I'm learning I'm adding skills I'm still engaged and that's another thing the A. R. P. found out in general older workers are much more engaged than younger workers but you need to communicate that make sure that's coming across clearly so when you have a situation where you're trying to learn more things you also have a situation where you're trying to meet more people it's really important to keep your your network's going because a lot of people just let those slide as well and kind of hang out with people their own age people they already know and they don't meet anybody new yeah exactly and think about it you know this happens with your friends as well as you get older they some get six a move away some die the same thing is happening in your workplace if you are not actively reaching out to make younger contacts and just to keep your.

ProPublica Liz Weston Cherie Preston ABC
"propublica" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"propublica" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"We just a moment ProPublica which is a research organization journalists journalists group that does fully independent work has found that people in the health insurance business are now signing up with data brokers to develop deep data about you so they can decide based on your lifestyle or other things about you deep dive whether or not they want anything to do with you or what you'll have to pay so we're moving more and more into an era where insurers once again are going to be able to read line for health insurance they're gonna be able to exclude people for pre existing conditions they're gonna be able to charge more and many circumstances based on your individual factors so what kind of things to pro publica find out that insurers are trying to find out and track you based on your race your education level what TV shows you watch whether you're married or not what your net worth is what you post on social media how you pay your bills every month whether you order things online what you order online what you eat and to be able to take all these what they call lifestyle factors and be able to develop a wrist score one you individually not based on with pre existing condition what illnesses you already have have been diagnosed with and what you've been treated for but instead to use a deep dive on let's say what clothing you buy what size those clothes are and then decide this is somebody might end up with diabetes so we don't want to insure them we have the idea of insurance historically has been that you spread the risk among many people health insurers are looking forward to an era where they will be able to slice and dice each individual and create a risk or for each of us and decide to give us the heave ho or charges much more much less based on their formulas their algorithms and I say that.

"propublica" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"propublica" Discussed on KQED Radio

"ProPublica investigation finds that strategy failed which mackenzie obscured with bogus numbers ProPublica's Ian McDougal's been leading the reporting is on the line good morning good morning can I just note mackenzie is a business consulting firm why would you send them into a jail one of the city says that it's because they are well known for dealing with complex organizations that have problems what I've been told by people who were in meetings with city officials back then is that there was this public outrage about the violence our records and they wanted to the city wanted to address it quickly and also had off likely a civil rights lawsuit by the justice department okay reasonable thing to want to do people even if they're in prison or especially when they're in the custody of the state should be safe but what did reikers employees tell you about how the mackenzie strategy went wrong well I had problems from the the starts as they were formulating their anti violence strategy they really spoke only to corrections department officials despite being told they ought to talk to inmates clinic staff others have direct insights into drivers violence at records they can do that and so did they try things that didn't actually address the problems they did that one of the big focuses was these sort of advanced data analytics tools that you know and could have been helpful to do things like that address again violence and so on but at a place that's as low tech as writers were there aren't really computers and all of the jails those were not very helpful solutions they were however helpful to McKinsey which was trying to expand into corrections consulting they couldn't hold up these shiny objects to other corrections departments meeting to they came up with great data that wasn't based work based on anything yes so they they had they had that problem too they they in these units where they serve combined all of the reforms they call them restart units the claims to have these really dramatic drops in in violence and and they did but a big part of that a significant part of that was that they had from the very earliest stages stack those units with inmates who were known not to be unruly are prone to violence particularly so they they focused on the people who weren't such a problem and declared them not a problem now while they're doing this where people inside writers who in many cases not been even been convicted of a crime they just accused they're continuing to be intimidated beaten sometimes even killed yes yeah the the violence continued to to get worse you know their lips up and down here and there but the trend has been has been increasingly worse violence in fact monitors federal monitors report that came out just in October said use of force by guards has just continue to escalate in the hold that appear that the monitor has been in place also it's not just your employer I. and an inmate on inmate violence and violence is also violence by guards on inmates yeah yes and also inmates against staff as well okay this McDougal thanks for your reporting really appreciate it thank you so much the end of make Google is a reporter for pro publica which looked at a mackenzie effort a strategy to reduce violence inside Ryker's island in New York City this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king thanks for listening to KQ reading I'm Dave Freeman it's coming up on seven fifty John McConnell also joins me for another look at traffic.

mackenzie Ian McDougal ProPublica
"propublica" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"propublica" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"About twenty minutes if there's one thing more frustrating than trying to get into the right college it might be paying for that degree that's with thousands of parents discovered daily while discussing how to foot the bill in online communities like Facebook and reddit some parents share standard suggestions like saving more money or choosing a less expensive state school others are proposing more drastic measures more from Chris king Tana national education reporter at USA today Chris gives examples of it all goes back to the status of that came out of the university of Illinois earlier this year we spent ProPublica Illinois found that people were giving up custody of their children to pay less for college essentially I thought that was kind of curious about where that came from in in kind of trolling Sam comments board online but I'm reading case because some parents were talking a lot about different ways they might lower the cost of what they would be expected to pay for college I mean I mean it is just moving money around from different accounts some of that you know maybe taking a year off but then you do have the extreme measures like divorcing in which case you only have one person come to complete her or he transferred you were a student assets to a younger sibling and they don't have access but I think there is kind of like an unspoken assumption that you'll still be able to get your money back I know of a family who went through just a divorce the woman remarried but when the the son applied for college like he kept things separate and used his mom's income you know for that purpose so wasn't it was sort of like an indirect approach to do that director but but I mean that that just seems to be like you have to do it these these days because it's so expensive right I I think that's kind of speaks to the larger issue that a lot of families are running into it's just you know when they went to college you isn't quite as expensive and and now college is more expensive than it has ever and and I think that we've been people naturally to you know try to find new ways to pay for it on both ends of the spectrum yeah I mean my wife and I one point said maybe we send our son to live with you know is grandparents in South Carolina declare residency after six months or a year and then you know find a lesser expensive state school dist I mean is any of that a message to the colleges that things are too expensive it doesn't seem to be resonating well so colleges do seem to be aware that middle class families can't afford the tuition they're charging I mean being sample I played the story here is going to burst in Michigan got a program for anyone to make under sixty five Kate Wrobel cover most of the cost for for a student in you you see that in other places like you at the university of Virginia university of Illinois at Urbana Champaign as well so I think some are aware that you've been in state tuition for families is expensive but I don't know that it kind of caught on more widely yeah big with Christine Tana national education reporter at USA today is gonna fascinating story which is called as a financial aid confusion grows parents consider drastic measures among them divorce or perhaps marrying off your kid go back to that when the marrying off of it not so much the marrying off you could be giving up custody who were those due to the world those families giving up custody to or they just labeling the kids as independent then I was struggling to recall the exact details of the way that it usually works out is if if your independent your earnings are often what's in you were eligible for more student loans in that way and you're also eligible for things like that hello grant which you might not be if your family is making over you know an average American family you're probably not be eligible for the program so it opens the doors for for that we typically associated with more needy students is Chris Chris Keane Tana national education reporter at USA today twenty one minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend coming up next.

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