36 Burst results for "Programmer"

Fresh update on "programmer" discussed on Not Too Shabby

Not Too Shabby

00:33 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "programmer" discussed on Not Too Shabby

"Come on, get better because you can do it online. You, Artie, if shouldn't go out to my 25th anniversary show beastly invention. We play for you a short segment on an interview I did about the party starts. They rose up on June General 1st $24, and especially after I did my first interview with about them, and we did quite a few of them through the nineties. So a time of the show, But he said we will do a follow up about how things are now was that a successful endeavor or that still the charges and we will be talking about that before that I have. They broke weather who is one of the fathers? All the statement and currently The president of the board of directors belittle very quick talk about why you should punch today and we're looking for a way to society is different here. I imagine center said earlier that when we were before the airport years ago, I was into the manager of another organization and, frankly, the idea of volunteer people in every station in the last three months, And the reason we handled it for five years is because of you. Listen all this because you support us. And way don't get feelings about from such big enough to get by. And that's because people who was on the phone and I'll take it happened. One more there you go online and you already have them in that order. And because of that word, and that helps us continue, though, we remember. Thank you. Thank you. What happens? Inclination. Now there's no Hillary stress because we close decisions around here because I'll call the 19 so impossible to predict. 1001 will use except in one of the lancers. Monsters are not causation there their homes so magic technology the phone rings at their home when one of Interpol's Moriarty it's just amusing things that we've done in the military have done because I had people in their permanent home like Jesse, and I guess they're in their homes and shops. That station she's gonna feel was actually agitation, So it's just amazing and it's do you the people treated and keeps running. So, uh, I'll come back in a cell in a people next to you so I mean, honestly, if you want to celebrate 45th birthday of the station, all entries number three on my show, which didn't happen during a blood drive alone. Just want the kind of information that people like to continue 6 to 8 to 56 2000 extension one off you already have. And you can. Isn't that organizational? Let me introduce my two guests today. William have parties that writer Bae right transmitter on freelance journalist based in Mexico. He's older. All the plays video, the smaller 2011 on early expect Cone from 2012, which revealed in Florence, either in Oaxaca, Mexico, and wrote books in the room. People's As a programmer in 2012 and Sinfonia, you know, in 2019, he published regularly in both the United States and just being in the nation on ideological and global on my political theater, a temple he's already working on a book on those Victorian 2018 and his initial years in government. Um My suggestion is you re claiming she leaving Jax's medical for midnight. So it's a little sweet on she worked that we wanted to go over these ends up with Mr Community. She's author of Company As Batista Women's stories. United States has been engaged in social justice community organizing for more than two decades, working on issues like affordable housing, economic justice, immigrants, rights and violence against women. She is with us in D. C. So stop with you curtains Imagine General 1st 1994 suddenly and very cold calling itself the easier land which you're gonna be was one that is For this only showed up, but tell us about that moment and also about the choice off date on how the back to that moment. Thanks for getting up and getting speakers. Very important professions, of course decision high secrecy. So look a little bit in time tonight, the night before, when this when this first arose from the easy, Ellen. Actually, it wasn't intimidating, but it's actually easier than just National Army for national prison term. Zapatista comes From what Mr Evolution 1919 19 Grady, who You know many things that I'm hearing that there's no freedom Andrea's instilled in favor of the cops. He's in favor of this principle of people who work. The land should only be working, and it's yours. This in the context of the situation and so dating back centuries, very complicated labeling. It was going to see in this for the first time since she was a large concentrated Mendel's known by few millions being basically waste in the Mexican subjects. European sense And its population in this s O much medications right as Michelle robbers with Carol in well, it's in and well without violence and oppression in five years, going back to the young. So in 1994 January, 1st of the day that free trade was for snap to So it was very dangerous this time of day for from Mexico. You remember those days when all of this kind of radio's American was having the time of prosperity in Mexico and bring medical almost instantaneously in the first world would be a panacea right? All Americans used to rand after through Congress. Vegetables. Remember five minutes late on display my formed as another position, 23. And it's another to wrinkle that well before that, I plan to their uprising. I totally remember carefully to to be on the same day as the unopened after their Christmas it was a very realized is born about the night that would not be a passing for Mexico did nothing but increase poverty amongst the moral indigenous populations. By opening a Porter's doubling of American business products. Would you cut the price of.

Mexico United States Artie Hillary Mr Community Moriarty President Of The Board JAX Rand Programmer National Army BAE Jesse Ellen Mendel Grady Cone Congress
The Australian ABC adds shows to Spotify

podnews

03:10 min | 3 weeks ago

The Australian ABC adds shows to Spotify

"Australia's largest podcast to the abc is to put twenty three of its most popular podcasts. Spotify six month trial. Abc's calf dwyer told us it's a big opportunity for the and we're really excited to reach audiences that might not find us on other platforms. If we were thinking would have recorded her saying that. Because that apparently is how podcasts work anyway in total the broadcast which is government. Funded has more than one hundred and seventy-five shows on monday. The total number of podcasts. In podcast hit one point six million. According to my podcast reviews in october ninety seven thousand podcast added and fourteen thousand removed from apple's directory. As spotify apparently investigates podcast subscriptions luminary is moving into their home country. It's now available in sweden as well as denmark norway and finland for ninety-nine crowns or nine one thousand nine a month so hedin is one of the top five countries for podcast listening according to research calling. Us and uk students. Spotify wants you. They've launched nextwave search for emerging voices. Who will shape the future of podcasting and culture. You'll get a three month trial of sound trap for storytellers. spotify online. Editing service and to take part in a virtual podcast seminar hosted by podcast jack mate. And if you're a young canadian you shouldn't feel left out either a the hot docs podcast career. Accelerator has been announced it. Offers new canadian podcasters between eight hundred and thirty four chance to grow their skills gain invaluable industry knowledge and make lifetime connections at the hot. Docs podcast festival. It's free to take part. The bbc has added incomplete statistics about their podcasts. Over the last quarter they say that data platforms other than bbc's hounds isn't available so no figures for third party global downloads for this period. Perhaps if you're a programmer report into the bbc because sans if they need you beasley media group has added its podcasts and radio stations to enter calms radio dot com platform. The broadcaster has been focused on local. Podcasting initiatives podcast movement is shared a few virtual networking sessions on their website. At a new yellow tag microphone comes complete with other bits of professionally produced audio to courtesy of audio imaging company benz town. This is p. r. Yes live from washington is. Sp are superhuman public radio. But i really understand what's going on but we were sent a press release which looks kind of super important. You'll find it links from our show notes and our newsletter today and also would like to recommend this. this is the osmania reports. My name stand barris. The ause media report looks at the media in australia and beyond i was a special guest last week. But you say this week because this week is looking at the australian radio industry instead

ABC Spotify Hedin Nextwave Jack Mate Dwyer BBC Beasley Media Group Australia Finland Denmark Norway Sweden Accelerator Apple UK United States Benz
Teaching Kids Kotlin

Talking Kotlin

04:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Teaching Kids Kotlin

"So i teach at a german grammar school. We call it gymnasium. Something like in between high school and college and it propensity a level exams but it already starts in fifth grade with ten year old since we get all the way up until eighteen nineteen and if they have to repeat a class maybe twenty or twenty one but Yeah and actually start teaching informatics in the grade. But these are eleven olds eleven. Twelve old students But we don't program there we start with object orientation be yet. Transform objects like like real objects like A rectangle or a circle and get all the properties like radius feel color etcetera and let the children play with it in a premade. Let's let's call it an issue so and then in the seventh grade. They have the possibility to experience with the algorithms to little program called robot carro ended its primary primarily object. The robot carol which can be programmed with loops and with if clauses cetera. Do when you say was just for our listeners. Infamy actually because i know that you follow some different systems to other places. Seventh grade is what ages Seventh grade is like twelve thirteen twelve. Thirteen okay so at ten years you teach them object orientation. They started ten years in the fifth grade. And we start and the sixth grade with like eleven. Okay yeah well it's not stint. Yeah and i understand your astonishment because That's really a problem we face because we have so few teachers who can actually You can actually teach informatics in germany and bavaria in particular so that sometimes our biology or physics teacher have to have to do this and this is quite art because it's very abstract concept for people this young the this sometimes leads to confusion. I think there's like a million functional programmers out there listening to this. Why did you. Why did you start with object orientated. Like why are you teaching. Ten-year-old object argumentation. Yeah well it's it's really like morton less like a game they don't get anything about about your about encapsulation or principle of secrecy. They just manipulate objects to get a feel for it. Let's call it this way. And i think it's still valid because if you like if you take a look at matt's the reason i'm bringing this up is there. Is this the theory in that. If we were to teach people functional programming from gecko as opposed to know let's let's start with object oriented languages. Functional programming would become mainstream and everyone will be doing functional programming and everything would be wonderful and the question of course is. Is you know when you take a look at an object. You can compare it like you say to a rectangle you can compare it to A bowl that they're playing with right and you can say to them well. A bowl has a diameter and it and it has a color and things like that right and from there then you kind of introduced a whole behavior of the ball and things like that. Yeah you know. It's i guess with with functional programming. It's you can also obviously introduce the concept of an object and and the properties and everything that it holds but then you can tie that behavior to it. I guess. I don't know but yet still interesting that you're starting with object oriented programming. I think this was the base idea of the curriculum to just get them into something that they can more easily transfer it to the real world because they can see a ball. They can see you circle. Maybe this was the reason and they're all going to become java programmers. Anyway so

Carro Bavaria Morton Confusion Germany Matt
Importance of Health in Esports with Ahman Green Skinz CEO Gary Kleinman

Esports Network Podcast

05:29 min | Last month

Importance of Health in Esports with Ahman Green Skinz CEO Gary Kleinman

"For gamers that also. Why did you want to bring on a mon- and make sure that you had a traditional sports. Athlete turned eastwards coach. As somebody who could help develop these products to great question Over the last. Five years. That i've been gaming. What has increased tremendously are complaints from gamers about pain in their risk carpal tunnel trigger finger. Gamer thumb Head and they're not paying their head neck and back focus issues zayed's sleep deprivation Issues with ice rain blue light exposure. And what have you and really looked at the category and said it's critically important for gamers especially with long gaming sessions To be healthy and to be well into be nutritionally sound and if you look at the history of sticking ball. Sports like football with them on that. They started incorporating health wellness and nutrition awhile ago. And you're starting to see. Even certain sports like golf is now doing it. Which traditionally never did and with the opportunities that are in gaming that in order for gamers to excel both playing An employment and all the other opportunities academic scholarships. It's only natural that they're going to have to be the best version of themselves physically nutritionally and that's why we created Pharma based research in formulated products with clinical trials that will address the symptomology. That gamers are suffering. From and a modern has that you know perfect history As you talked about with stiff arm and a storied career and at heart gamer. And who better to understand the need for the transition from health and wellness to of performing better. And that's really the the mission of skins is. Our tagline is to power your performance and we define performance not only is gaming performance. But anything else that you do in your life where we're launching which tweak talk about later job board so if you're looking for a job and gaming you'll be able to post your resume on our site and we will match you with every job in north america so we think performance gaming covers every aspect of health wellness nutrition definitely health nutrition. General is one of my big things. I focused on this podcast. I think it's something that is really crucial for the long term success of e sports amod as a career traditional sports. You clearly working closely with athletic trainers. You know it's no secret that. Nfl players get injured at times. A how how do you see the difference in how gamers approach their health at how a traditional athlete approaches the health because from all the athletes. I've ever talked to. Health is such a core an important part of what they do that. They're causally focused on it. They're of tried to approve the things they do Do you see that. Same mentality with gabor's are you hoping to be a bring that same level of focus on health that you see traditional sports to eastwards so i see i gotta bring into my players here in a facility and teams. I got bring it to them. The is is still new to them. Being you know. Were you in the weight room. And you're doing things to make your body from a health side from cardio it's lifting weights or if it's brennan. They're still trying to you know. Ask me questions coach. Why are we doing this. Because i have them. Work out you know. We did during training camp in august. And we're gonna do it again. In spring training camp on for spring season come january. And then then you know once that time you to the then. We're going to have mandatory workout street as week. Monday wednesday friday or monday tuesday saturday or tuesday when tuesday thursday saturday. Whatever they want choose. We're going to do it. Because as i'm aware and i've i've seen and i've been with pro teams team. Organizations like temple storm that they have those say those pieces in place for for the players to get some type training either have their own personal trainer one on one or the team actually trained all together so is still trying to understand it opposite in the chair and it's just my hands in my wrist in my arms in my eyes and my are moving. They salient the connection. Where you're sitting in a chair for a long time. It decompress your spine. And like gary mentioned about your wrist with tunnel your wrist and moving in the repetitive same motion. And then that can come into. That's how couple of stars. That's how those small ligaments in your wrist and fingers can't get injured So if you don't warm up to do things of stretching flexibility movements in all at the same time while being a a programmer or collegian gamer. It can lead to other problems down the line and just search earlier this year. Gary was instrumental his team with scans connect me with dr corey who does eastward healthcare on youtube and ably and we did switch interview on his twitter channel. Well and i run dr corey video every day. Darn practice so they can watch. How do to gamer stretches how to warm up how to you know. What's on your coordination index. Thirty in your fingers so you don't have these issues You know while you're playing when you're not playing and i'm introduced. I have talked about the product

Amod Pharma Football Gabor Golf North America NFL Brennan Dr Corey Gary Youtube Twitter
Unreserved goes to the imagineNATIVE Festival  virtually

Unreserved

07:40 min | Last month

Unreserved goes to the imagineNATIVE Festival virtually

"For me imaginative has always been a place to share stories through video audio, digital interactive, and also through exhibitions and visual arts because I, think there's really a quite a unique way that indigenous artists are telling stories and we are really just showcasing the multitude of these artists and all of the voices however nuance they are from many different nations. Sneaky, little the artistic director of imagine native describing what the festival looks like usually. But things are a lot different this year. Like most festivals, the covid nineteen pandemic has forced things to move online. There's also new faces at the helm. The new executive director, Naomi Johnson happens to be my sister full disclosure. But it's also Nikki. Little's first. Hear is artistic director. Though things are different little hopes. Attendees still feel that festival experience. So every day actually Naomi and I will be giving a short live updates of what you can expect for that day at ten am, and then every day at ten am all of the films that will be released that they are available. So from that point on people out of forty eight hours to watch the films on demand and then. Additionally at two o'clock three o'clock and four o'clock the programmers. So either Susan Blight Adam on Darlene upon our myself will be hosting a feature focus or short program Focus, which is a twenty to thirty minute conversation with directors from from the films from the official programming. So exciting people are bringing. Some of the cast, some of producers and themselves to talk about the work, and then each nightly usually has an event. So definitely look out for those and some of the free programming are the exhibitions, the digital interactive and the audio works. So those are those are at People's leisure to see can meander around and connect to those different spaces. That's Nikki little the artistic director of imaginative. You'll hear more from her a little later on in the show. The Imagination Film Festival August Schellenberg Award of excellence was created in partnership with August wife Joan, corrosive, which Schoenberg. It. Honors members of the indigenous performance community whose contributions reflect Augie, Spirit and commitment to the field. This year's recipient is Lauren Cardinal. Lauren is pretty prolific in his own right. The cree actor was the first indigenous person to graduate from the University of Obama's acting program in nineteen ninety-three. He is more than one hundred film television and stage credits, and he played memorable roles like Davis on Corner Gas Daniel Della of sixty, and he is the voice of Grandpa, nat on Molly of Denali. Welcome to the show learn and congratulations. Thank you very much and congratulations to you fail, and now for listeners we should mention we do know each other we've been on stage together. I think I think only the one time I think the one time but. Incredible actor right, and human beings so Lucky. Company I feel like I'm getting an award right now. So this award the the argue award since affectionately known, it's been given to performers Michael Gray is like Michelle thrush like ten Sukarno. So, how do you feel about taking home the award this year it's a great great honor I knew Avi I've got to work with. A few times and left an indelible mark in my life and he he was one of my mentors. So is lucky to call him a friend mentor. He's He's pretty special human being yeah. I had the chance to work with him a little bit and he was he was quite a force who's quite a force. So I imagine again, you know this, this award is very personal because as you mentioned, he was a mentor and a friend to you. And you guys did work on a number of projects together. You know some of your earliest work was alongside Augie. But for people who might not know who he was, who was he too you? Well, he was a prolific stage actor. He's one of the first classically trained theater native theater actors in Canada. So you know he's he set the bar high right off the bat he went to National Theatre School, and then he moved onto Stratford as well, which is incredible place to be. And in nineteen sixty, four, him being the first native person to be on that stage is is pretty incredible. And Role in the George Regas. Ecstasy of the Joe. When he played the young fireball Jamie Paul which I think every almost every native actor has done that play in one shape or another. Always been, you know setting the bar quite high. One of the films that you start in alongside Augie was to come see the last warrior and the movie is the story of the Shawnee leader and you played his brother loud noise, which is a you know he's a pretty iconic person in history, but also a really meaty role to play. So let's take a listen to the scene where your character loud noise believes he is dying. To search die. Was More hotton inside. Slave lies in. Lust. You're in ski. Misery is not their fault. Zone. Cropped. Can Spirit Foster own spiritual ways. Voice. I was. Be My message. Woke store. That was a little bit from the film to come see the last warrior. So the film came out in Nineteen ninety-five and our guest today learn cardinale starred in it. So, what's it like to listen back to old clips like that Lord I, wonder who that flute player was. Awesome Yeah, it's interesting. Always hearing it going Oh, I could have done or I should have done but. I remember that scene because it was one of the funders scenes to do in the whole in the whole movie. But I. I was Kinda Green when I when I did that role. So you know I always going full out every time. And Way. We shot that particular scene is that we started on the people above me. My brother and sister, and so I was off camera giving them the lines and I went out every single time for that for them off camera, and then she turns to me and she goes. You might want to save some of that for yourself. Oh Yeah I. Guess she goes. Yeah. I. I appreciate it but I don't need all that. I made her cry, which was my thing I just wanted to order. So she could get to the emotion that she needed and she was crying and stuff every time we did it

Director Augie Naomi Johnson Nikki Little Lauren Cardinal Executive Director Lord I Canada George Regas National Theatre School University Of Obama Susan Blight Adam Joan Michelle Thrush Schoenberg Jamie Paul SKI Stratford
Do We Live in a Simulation? Chances Are about 50–50 ...

Kottke Ride Home

04:29 min | Last month

Do We Live in a Simulation? Chances Are about 50–50 ...

"A new study from astronomer David KIP ING published this summer, and the Journal Universe argues that the odds we live in a simulation are just about fifty fifty. As you can imagine this has caused a bit of a stir scientific American broke down kipling's arguments as well as some responses to it, and some of the previous where he was building off of an a lot of it frankly goes a bit over my head, but I wanted to share some highlights at first for the less matrix inclined listeners. What exactly do I mean by the idea of living in a simulation basically that all of us are mere virtual beings existing if you WANNA call it that unknowingly in a massive computer simulation? Over the years many scientists have tried to uncover ways. We could prove whether this is true or not. But some of the work has also revolved around calculating the odds of US living in a simulation or whether we are simply in base reality that is to say that we actually exist and this isn't all simulated. Is. Worth noting there's a lot of debate over what the simulation actually means and how one even defines consciousness for that matter. I kinda like this interpretation from Neil degrasse Tyson that he shared on a recent episode of Star Talk Quoting Scientific American, the simulation would most likely create perceptions of reality on demand rather than simulate all of reality all the time much video game optimized. To, render only the parts of the scene visible to a player maybe that's why we can't travel faster than the speed of light because if we could, we'd be able to get to another galaxy said Chuck Nice the show's Co host before prompting Tyson to gleefully interrupt before they can program it. The astrophysicists said delighting at the thought. So the programmer put in that limit end quote. Someone Pretty. Wild to think about and apart from the Matrix movies bringing this concept to the mainstream most scientists refer back to a two thousand three paper by Nick. Bostrom in Oxford philosopher which quote the Magic, a technologically adept virtualization that possesses immense commuting power and needs a fraction of that power to simulate new realities with conscious beans in them. Given this scenario, his simulation argument showed that at least one proposition in the following trauma must be true. I humans almost always go. Before reaching the simulation savvy stage second, even if humans make it to that stage, they are unlikely to be interested in simulating their own in central, passed and third. The probability that we are living in a simulation is close to one and quotes. But more recently keeping whose paper I mentioned was published earlier. This summer collapsed those first two propositions into one because in both cases, there are no simulations and he used busy and reasoning to calculate the probability busy and reasoning quote allows one to calculate the odds of something happening called the posterior probability but I making assumptions about the thing being analyzed, assigning a prior probability and quotes. Using the reasoning with regards to the simulation kipling's calculation comes out to about fifty fifty. It leans slightly in favor of based reality in part because he says that even in a world where we can simulate reality as more and more of them are spawned the computing resources of each generation dwindles and eventually simulations aren't able to be hosted bought. The odds could change if we do actually invent the technology to simulate conscious beans at which point, it becomes almost certain that we are living in a simulation. And could we ever figure out if we're not real whom on Awadhi and expert on computational? Mathematics. At the California Institute of Technology says only if there's a finite amount of computational power because if it's infinite, it could create whatever degree of reality necessary to continue tricking. US. Essentially, there's a lot of complex hypothesizing going on in several different fields and you can read a little bit more about. The link in the show notes. But at the end of the day keeping goes back to Adams Razor, which says that simplest explanation is usually correct and in this case, the simplest explanation is that we're at based reality there is no simulation just the boring hard truths of our real existence. So take that as your red pill.

United States Neil Degrasse Tyson David Kip Ing Kipling Chuck Nice Programmer California Institute Of Techno Bostrom Nick Awadhi Tricking Oxford
'So Hard To Prove You Exist': Flawed Fraud Protections Deny Unemployment To Millions

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:06 min | Last month

'So Hard To Prove You Exist': Flawed Fraud Protections Deny Unemployment To Millions

"During the pandemic state unemployment systems have become a target for organized crime rings, they steal money through fraudulent claims but arguably a bigger problem is that some of the systems in place to prevent fraud like that have been hurting millions of innocent people. NPR's Chris Arnold reports when Sevi- guas lost his job as a food and beverage manager. Marriott Hotel near San. Jose he figured locale apply for unemployment. This was back in March he went online put in his info waited for weeks couldn't get through on the phone after more than a month he was told to mail and more proof of his identity mind driver's license picture of my past poor copy of my w. two she said the more documentation that I could put. In there to prove who I was would help out my case out his case Gouache had clearly lost his job with a big company had ide- what was the problem but this dragged on and on weeks would go by they need another documents and six months later, gouache still hadn't gotten any unemployment money manny can't find another job I had about seventeen. Thousand dollars saved gouaches thirty two years old, and he'd been saving up to go back to community college to try to become a computer programmer. He moved into a smaller apartment to save money but he still had to drain that entire savings for college. There's not enough left to pay rent next month to watch what I worked really hard to get dwindle away. I don't WanNa get angry in front of you for the interview. But it has been really really frustrating and the whole thing to seem so Kafka ask avoidable to him. It's so hard to just prove that you exist in California alone millions of people are having a hard time proving they exist as they struggle to get the unemployment benefits that they deserve and it turns out washes right? A lot of this was completely unnecessary.

Manny Jose Gouache Marriott Hotel Chris Arnold Fraud NPR Kafka Sevi- Guas California SAN
TornadoVM: Accelerating Java with GPUs with Juan Fumero

Software Engineering Daily

04:26 min | 2 months ago

TornadoVM: Accelerating Java with GPUs with Juan Fumero

"What is Tornado VM? What value does it add? Yet. So Tornado VM is a new way to your applications without worrying about Howard details. On. They user at the end of the day, you don't have to worry about this by codes nothing that this is how it works internally. So the value that we are, he's done the implication is something easy to understand your right serial code. So couponing cool and You have to write parliament you have seen in parallel. Mbingwa in Tornado Deride Serial Code each task is a serial. Then, Tornado will paralyze it for you basically. So they using only things only need to think what do I want not how do I want to perform to another will manage how do you want basically TO GET MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE And that's the main value. Yet, another thing is donated can dynamically change device. So because now we have uplift four of multiple devices we have one sip hugh, one view or multiple-use. Perhaps, if Jay, so now we're to run the Colt. The now becomes a mess right because I want to maximize performance but tornado has a mode that can figure out which one's the best achieve Bet Bay performance better performance. And how much better performance are we talking about? This happens on on the device run but typically we're talking about one two or three of magnitude faster than Java. DM compared with C. to grab him for example, the FDA application is A. Petition for digital, processing. Is, very. Simple program is just tune still loops and album of calculations. Square would things like that. And you can get easily thousand, one, thousand, two, thousand and ex compared to Java seat to compiler or growl vm. Most of the performance become. Because of the power of the GPO right of the device in this case. We also, because we scrawl and we comply with crowd, we can optimize things father that you don't see. Kelly like I'm rolling blue and then evaluate constant and so on. So we can get also bit faster in that sense but normally the speedup comes from the device so just to some of your questions. So on GPS, we get around to magnitude on effigies these harder to get performance from conceal. Some cases to about one to two of magnitude in the best case scenario. You mentioned that this is a good fit for pretty much any data intensive applications. So let's have already got a date intensive application written. Is there a way to port it to the Tornado VM? Yet so We're actually working with some of the partners. We haven't the project to do this. They have already existing applications and they were deported to. We have some as soon as you comply with it ornate of the restrictions. We don't support the whole Java. Okay. We'll help support a subset is possible to run it with Tornado. VM. Yes but it it really depends application. So the output of Tornado vm is it a Java Programmer Residency Program? What is the lowest level? Execution Situation? The output of Tornado. VM see program source. Code. Which means that we will need another compiler to compare to the final binary. But because we execute up in Seattle with open supermodel, that's part of the actual driver in. So we pass the Kennel. Generate to the driver, and then we'll do the final compilation. So, that's a branch of the code we have now in public. But now we're working on another. Extension actually. So instead of going to open here, we got pediatrics. Okay. Stay the machine goes simply called. Kind of is an obstacle for NBC devices. Okay Barley security threats. And in this case, we also need the final driver defined by the driver. But it's lower level. So pets close to Saint Louis Assembly code east of secret.

Howard Bet Bay Saint Louis Assembly FDA NBC Hugh Seattle JAY Square Programmer Kelly
"programmer" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

03:31 min | 3 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Code in our product <Speech_Female> to, and <Speech_Male> then you compared <Speech_Male> that against being <Speech_Male> in school <Speech_Male> and you're <Speech_Male> invite yourself <Speech_Male> for with a couple <Speech_Male> other people <Speech_Male> lying <Speech_Male> vote rams in a <Speech_Female> semester at <Speech_Male> the most <Speech_Female> Yasha bid difference <Speech_Male> in stale fight <Speech_Female> and I felt <Speech_Female> like don't necessarily <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> learn <Silence> dange light to. <Speech_Male> How <Silence> to do. <Speech_Male> Consistent <Speech_Male> style, other people <Speech_Male> can read <Speech_Male> how to be shutting <Speech_Male> in your code. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> On although <Speech_Female> does the <Speech_Female> necessarily important <Speech_Female> when <Speech_Male> it's just you by yourself <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> do not have program <Speech_Male> that's maybe a few tens <Speech_Female> of thousands of lines <Speech_Male> of code <Speech_Male> versus <Speech_Male> you with dozens <Speech_Male> of other developers <Speech_Male> were <Speech_Female> John Massive system <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> that's been under construction <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> for a couple <Silence> of decades. <Speech_Male> What is <Speech_Male> your opinion when <Speech_Male> it comes to <Speech_Male> the programming <Speech_Male> language? <Speech_Male> Of Choice? <Speech_Male> There's always people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Male> talk about their favorite <Speech_Male> programming language <Speech_Male> and the one that <Speech_Male> they know their most <Speech_Male> favorite, the <Speech_Male> the language <Speech_Male> of their soul, <Speech_Male> and then there <Speech_Male> are the people who say <Speech_Male> you should be a polyglot. <Speech_Male> Then you should know <Speech_Male> as many languages <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> possible are you should learn <Speech_Male> a new language every <Speech_Male> year. <Speech_Male> Where do you <Speech_Male> fall in <Speech_Male> that argument <Speech_Male> most life <Speech_Male> on the class <SpeakerChange> of people <Speech_Male> who Hate Java script? <Speech_Music_Male> Any <Speech_Male> language <SpeakerChange> but javascript. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> so you what? Scott. <Speech_Male> Nice <Speech_Male> Start I've been the same <Speech_Male> job actually for <Speech_Male> nine years. Now, <Speech_Male> which I know is <Speech_Male> up a long time <Speech_Male> for developed by just <Speech_Male> light right do <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> when I started, <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know they had some programming <Speech_Male> assessments <Speech_Male> and they said <Speech_Male> use any language you <Speech_Female> want we don't share. <Speech_Male> And when <Speech_Male> I started <Speech_Male> not any at the <Speech_Male> Lakers state <Speech_Female> you. <Speech_Female> PET THEM BASH I need <Speech_Male> up Dahmer so <Silence> I've gone to. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> I don't know how many programming <Speech_Female> languages that lasts <Speech_Female> nine ers. <Speech_Male> On different <Speech_Male> things you <Speech_Male> know I was I was <Speech_Male> doing some. <Speech_Female> Rope wireless type <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> who'll <Speech_Male> like now I'm doing <Speech_Male> a web based <Speech_Male> stuff. So <Speech_Male> I'm using C. Sharp <Speech_Male> type structure. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I will tell you <Speech_Male> see sharp is my favorite <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and see sharp anything <Speech_Female> else. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Male> I never really <Speech_Male> felt like. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Their strategy one <Speech_Male> Shijie <Speech_Male> fabric thing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I think there's <Speech_Male> value to <Speech_Male> owning multiple <Speech_Male> different language <Speech_Male> shows and sane <Speech_Male> they approach <Speech_Male> things. <Speech_Male> But I'm not <Speech_Male> one of those people who felt <Speech_Male> that to be new <Speech_Male> all the time. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For me <Speech_Male> <hes> a language as <Speech_Male> a tool so <Speech_Male> I'm only going to pick <Speech_Male> up a new language. <Speech_Female> If I reason to do <Speech_Female> that, you know <Speech_Female> I have something I wanted <Speech_Male> to, and <Speech_Male> this lane <Speech_Male> bridge is the best <Speech_Male> way to do it <Speech_Male> that show recent do <Speech_Male> it I don't see line <Speech_Male> rich learning in itself <Speech_Male> is something <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> mattress to them. <Speech_Male> Well, thank you <Speech_Male> very much <SpeakerChange> for chatting <Speech_Male> with me today. <Speech_Female> We're. Spent pleasure style <Speech_Female> I'm glad we finally <Speech_Male> managed <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Male> sit down together <Speech_Male> I. appreciate <Speech_Male> that we have <Speech_Male> been talking with Dr <Speech_Male> William Springer. <Speech_Male> He is the <Speech_Male> author of a <Speech_Male> programmer's guide <Speech_Male> to computer science <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> virtual degree for <Speech_Male> the Self taught developer <Speech_Male> volume <Speech_Male> one is out <Speech_Male> now and volume <Speech_Male> two will be <Speech_Male> out any minute. <Speech_Male> You can pick those up <Speech_Male> at Amazon and <Speech_Male> on his website <Speech_Male> I'm GONNA put links <Speech_Male> in the show notes. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> has been another <Speech_Male> episode of Hansel minutes <Speech_Music_Male> and we'll see you <Music> again next week. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Nine <Music> and

Lakers C. Sharp Dahmer Amazon Scott. William Springer. programmer developer
Using Your Brain Without Thinking

Developer Tea

07:38 min | 4 months ago

Using Your Brain Without Thinking

"What does it mean to use your brain? And how is that different than just thinking? As developers engage in thinking all the time but here's a entirely separate part of our brains that we might be missing out on using. That could be better at solving some of the problems that we face on a day-to-day basis. My Name is Jonathan trailer listening to develop for T and my goal on the show helped driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. One of the amazing things about the. Human. Brain. Is Its ability to process complex topics. This is why we can write code that is abstracted so many levels. Away, from a physical reality that we have to tangibly think about. We can imagine entire. Kind of universes where we can create stories and. keep track of those stories while we read a book. A book that was written with a bunch of characters that are enough themselves abstractions. These are characters that we may not have ever even seen that specific character that specific size before. But somehow we are able to process all of this information and create meaning out of it. This is an incredible feat and part of our kind of intellectual superiority that we are aware of the domination that we have over the world around us. Has Given us. A somewhat distorted picture of what the brain is actually capable of more importantly where the limits are. And it's very simple to see the limits of your brain and specifically limits that we're gonNA talk about today. If you want to test these limits you can. Try to brute force memorize the first twenty digits of Pi. This isn't a lot of information. It's just twenty digits in after all we can process a lot more. Information than just twenty digits, we can read entire books with thousands of pages and understand them. So what is it about remembering twenty digits? Makes it difficult? Here's another exercising might want to try. that. You've probably faced already in your career, go and look at the features of what say three or four different libraries, popular libraries or three or four different languages and try to decide which one is best. This kind of information that you have to process. It's really difficult to do because the number of variables and that's the critical factor for today's episode, the number of variables that you have to weigh against each other. Can Be really large temper variables. You can imagine for example. That you're trying to deduce which which language should you learn next let's say you're a beginner programmer and maybe you're trying to decide which language to learn. You can use variables like the market size. You can try to quantify how much you enjoy that language or. Even how much you expect to enjoy it in the future, you can imagine you would use measures like the number of available repositories on get hub or get hubs own report of the trends for a given language. How do you decide what trend to use or how far back to look? These are all different questions they you would have to try to answer and then compare between the different languages. And so now you have this very large list of pros and cons and. You sit down and try to look over that information, but this is. Where we hit our limit. Our ability to cognitively process or think about something on purpose. We only have so much capacity to think in parallel. This is critical factor remember again, the number of variables were very good about thinking about one thing. At a time. In fact, most of the advice that you receive on this podcast is an attempt to get you to think about fewer things at any given point in time and reduce the things that you are working on to the simplest form. So you don't have to keep a lot of information in your head. But if you are trying to make a decision complex decision with a lot of variables. There is another part of our brains we can tap into what's interesting is that as knowledge workers, we are paid for using this one specific part of our brain, this prefrontal CORTEX. The part that's responsible for thinking very deeply and thinking very focused manner. But. There's another part of our brains that can help us think more abstractly. And without the same limits of the cognitive processing limits, the would find in the prefrontal CORTEX. Lots of studies. For example, one from Carnegie Mellon support the idea that the rest of our brain is working on the problem. In parallel to us focusing on other things. For example. If you expose yourself to all of the information about the various programming languages that you're considering let's say you have four of them. Then you can go and do something totally unrelated to that. Your going to keep on working on that decision problem. Now, we're not really consciously aware of this and there's no way to become aware of it but once we return to that problem at a later point in time we may have a different sense of clarity and we might even have. We might feel is a gut intuition, but actually it's an intuition that was given to us by that unconscious processing that's happening in the rest of our brain. So. Here's the critical thing to to take away I. We said the the most critical thing is to remember that this has to do with the number of variable. So if you can reduce the number of variables that you're thinking about, then you can actually process those entirely in that prefrontal. CORTEX. For example, if you're working on a math problem, this is a perfect example of processing in the prefrontal. CORTEX. But if you're working on something that requires much more evaluation much further a can of discussion about multiple variables or a comparison between multiple things, and that's not something that you're going to be able to hold in your prefrontal Cortex, the working memory for of a better explanations too small. So the prescription to fix this problem is to expose yourself to the information all the relevant information for making a given decision and then go and do something else. Maybe take a walk give yourself something that's totally unrelated that won't allow your mind drift backing and try to process that information again, on purpose in that intentional and conscious way.

Cortex Carnegie Mellon Programmer
JetBrains with Natalie Kudanova

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:25 min | 4 months ago

JetBrains with Natalie Kudanova

"Chedda Brennan Susan International Company of at Crates, professional software development tools to help developers work smarter and faster. We do strive to create the strongest most effective developer tools and of ambitious attitudes. By mating common tasks, we enabled programmers to focused on co design and the big picture instead of boilerplate. Code. That's awesome so I'm curious I have spent some time as a product marketing manager, and it's always kind of a difficult rule to explain the people people are not clear whether or not it's technical or not, so what is a day in the life of a product marketing manager? And do you really see a hybrid between product and marketing? Well in a sense it is, and actually there is no typical day at least for me I'm basically the person helps the team. There will be maintained. Hear the voices so for Ruby developers and I'm the one who tells Ruby developers would good Ruben mind has to offer. That said I communicate with customers, online and offline I'm in charge of advertising mortgage, research, content, creation, codeine, sometimes and so I. Don't do it all myself of course, but I am the dot to where all these lines connect. I love that where some of the best places either online or offline to reach Ruby developers. Oh. I'd say it's a it. Of course and twitter has a huge community. And we have our own channels like our newsletters. We also forget a lot of feedback a the our. Issue Tracker. So. There are lots of places. Social Media and online. That's great, so I'M GONNA. Put you on the spot and ask you for an elevator pitch for our listeners who haven't had a chance to ever use ruby mind before I've been a user for about five years and I absolutely love it. So why should ruby developers consider using ruby mine? Ruben. Mine is an ID that said it has all essential tools that help you go. More efficiently. It offers powerful Golden, said features such as gold. Completion Golden Education language, specific inspections will quick success refectory in editor, Weekday Communication Remind provides a test runner debater visa supporter I could go for hours. It's basically everything you need to develop and Ruby only monoplace. Now I agree I really and I should say this as well that jeopardizes not a sponsor of the podcast I was excited to have Natalie on. Just because I've been a user of the tool for so long and really there isn't many tools out there like ruby mine, and what's fascinating about jet brains is Ruby mine yeses further ruby on rails community, but they have a solution for pretty much every market out there. My partner writes PHP foles full time and he uses PHP storm. Yeah actually it's pretty easy to transfer from one idea to another for example. If you want to learn a new language or try something you, you can just switch to a different Gebran tie, and you'll be like at home.

Ruby Product Marketing Manager Ruben Brennan Susan International Co Codeine Developer Twitter Natalie Partner Editor
Learning to program: The journey of Graham Cluley

The CyberWire

05:26 min | 4 months ago

Learning to program: The journey of Graham Cluley

"States you learned how to program by buying a magazine of local news and spending hours. Over the weekend, the bore ously type in the basic commands, and this is how I learned how to to program computers, and I loved it, and I started writing computer games for my friends. I actually began to write games which were in a way, a mixture of both. Programming and literature I got into. What's good interactive fiction will will come into the text adventure games, and after awhile I began celebrates text adventure games in those adventure games ended up on the front discs of. Magazines and I would say at the end of them. Look if you really liked the game. Why not send me five or ten quid, and all I'll help you get further in the game or something you map. And then one day. A package arrived on my doorstep from a Guy Code Allen Solomon. Played my games. And my life changed forever. I was misled. And inside the parcel, it had to check the twenty pounds, which is more than I have asked for and a copy of duct. Psalms antivirus talk it and a letter saying if you want a job, let me know. And, so I rang him up. and. I went for an interview and he gave me a job and I was his best effort. Windows program at. So few years I was writing songs, antivirus windows, but what they noticed was that I think actually I was at a particular show where we were launching the product, and I would see the sales people demonstrating my software my creation. I think they're not showing the good bits, and so I said No. You mind if I have a gun. And say they let me have a go on stage. And soon there was a bit of a crowd around as I explained and talk through my magnificent bit maps which are designed. So I think I sort of bullied my way. In time out of the programming department, so I made this great big jump. Over time I became more and more the public face of Dr. Solomon's talking to the press describing what was going on in the world of CYBERCRIME. Writing articles and generally just. do it doing tap dances effectively. And, then one sad day. The company got bought. and. Frankly I think I lost it about six weeks. After period of gardening leaf. I decided to go and join sauce vocal about half the salary, but three times the fun I wasn't involved in any of the programming US office, but I was involved in. The social media activity, and probably the primary thing of all was something which myself and criterion now co hosts a podcast with me smashing security We set up a block code naked security. At the time it was something a bit different to be honest when we launched it, there weren't many technology companies who writing every single day. About what was going on what was going on in terms of threats and trying to explain them in simple language, we were trying to explain these things in a in a way which. An intelligent child would understand because I always felt as being a problem. Where buy nerds speaking to other nerds and I. Don't think that's the solution to the cybersecurity problem I think we have to be able to communicate to everybody. Effectively I. My career now involves Brighton articles. Make Him podcasts and giving public presentations. that that's that's what I do. and. People. Thank! Goodness, interesting. I have to say Oh, how I say it and so they're asking me to keep doing that. I, wish I had gone independent sooner. Has Been An interesting new challenge and I? I wish I'd had the confidence to do that sooner. And to carve my own career is all kinds of changes because I'm basically a one man company Naum. Things like. Network. So much more important. That used to be I'm naturally quite introverted. If you've. If, I. Don't know you I'm quite quiet and shy in off high all hanging out in the kitchen or something I definitely let parties and things that he likes to be around. I'm good with the people I. Know, but I'm not good with he I time. And so I find myself events now and I push myself and say. Okay I. Don't know anybody here. Maybe, I should just go and chat to someone. Is Still. Twelve year old computer programmer inside me. It feels a little bit scared about doing that sometimes, but you know. Sometimes.

Allen Solomon United States
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 5 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Becoming a Coder

Command Line Heroes

04:30 min | 5 months ago

Becoming a Coder

"Use spent the last few years fully immersed in the world of coders. You've interviewed over two hundred developers as admins, architects, engineers and programmers for your buck. Yeah I spoke to boy on awful lot of software developers all over the ecosystem. Great you the perfect co-pilot, so glad you could join me be here. Let's start with the most traditional path to becoming a coder going to college to get a computer science degree. I think for what I do as a product manager, it's important to have that technical foundation and glad I did it through a computer science program because I feel like I. Don't understand like. How do I program something to do this? But I also understand like what goes on under the hood. That was venom rot single. She graduated from Stanford University in two thousand sixteen with a computer science degree. She says her education set her up for product manager positions at facebook, Google and other companies. Clive. Voters out there, get CS degrees. If you look at the stack overflow survey, so that's the big gum coating site, and they do a fantastic survey of tens of thousands of their users every year. And their data suggests that about sixty percent of the coders that are on stack overflow that are professional. They have some sort of formal computer, training or something close to it like electrical engineering and and the numbers may be a little higher than that, but let's just say you know two-thirds, so it is still most common route far and away for becoming a coder. Is Go and get a computer, science, degree or something related to it. Is that because s degrees are lucrative. Yes, they are They are what an economist would call a costly signal right? You know they indicate that. Hey, I'm someone who's willing to spend a lot of time learning this stuff so you know I'd be a good person to hire. If you're developer, you're having to constantly learn all the time. New Frameworks new languages new environments. So, so some of the reasons employers would tell me that they like getting people from computer. Science degrees is because those people just spent four years doing nothing, but learning and they're going to need to keep on learning. When you get an undergraduate degree, you're learning, but you're also learning the theoretical math. You're also learning about algorithms, and you're learning about networking and computer systems, and I think all of those just give you very solid foundations so that if you were? Were like you know switch industries or not like? It would just be a lot easier for the Stanford degree helped with being taken seriously honest. You just confidence like that's a big part of it to dealing with imposter syndrome, and then also like People WanNa. Talk to you, even applying to jobs after like you just it's just a lot easier. Because of this big network you have do cs degrees make them better performers than those who come into the industry traditionally. That is a really a really great question. It's a hard one to answer. Because I got completely different answers from different employers I. had some people tell me that? Yeah CS people are just more confident and more self assured and can hit the ground running, then sell trained people bootcamp people, and then I heard exactly the opposite right like I heard you know for example, give it cult. He runs river, which is like a is becoming the dominant e commerce site for selling musical equipment, fantastically growing profitable firm and he's like. You know. I used to say I only wanted CS grads, but they just didn't have all the sort of life skills that you want to be a productive team member and more and more. He stood at hiring bootcamp. People self train, people people who. Are Musicians learned on the side. You also hear praise for the non computer. Science, people I think from a certain class of investor or even old school coder there in the fifties or sixties, and they taught themselves using like a like a commodore sixty four back in the eighties when they see someone who came along and said Yeah I. Just is in job in hospitality and I hate it. I learned. Learned a ton of stuff on Youtube and Code Academy. They're like yeah, I want that person. It is very by model. Shall we say there is a class player? Is? That is really rigorous about only during CS, and there's a whole of the class at actually sometimes regarded as a real mark of pride to be self taught or a scrappy person who change their career and went to a boot camp.

Stanford University Product Manager Developer Clive Youtube Facebook Google Code Academy
The Stories Your Code Tells

Developer Tea

05:07 min | 5 months ago

The Stories Your Code Tells

"What is the story of Your Code? That's what we're talking about on today's episode. My name is Jonathan Trail and you're listening to develop see. My goal in the show is totally different developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose can their careers. When I say the story of Your Code, what does that mean to you initially? How it came to being certainly. But what exactly your code tells? What does your code explain both in the code and beyond it? It's important to recognize that all code. Every piece of code you right will have a story where it came from. Why was written that way? Why certain decisions were made? Even if those decisions were made quickly, maybe made with your gut verses arduous thinking. That is still a story. And here's the critical factor that I want you to understand for today's episode, and this is a short episode today. Something for you to kind of meditate on to think about as you move through out the rest of this week. The stories that you have around your code. Continue to. Accrue as time moves forward. So let's say you're writing. An object oriented programming language. Something like Ruby or Java. And you build up these names. These name conventions classes these objects instances of classes and. You create an idea. Some kind of mental wrapper around a bunch of values, maybe some primitive values or relationships to other things. and. It's important to recognize that that idea. is necessary to grasp what's going on in your code. But it's also important to recognize that the idea has more meaning than the code gives it. Think about that for a second. The idea has more meaning. than the code gives it. A class means more to the person that is writing it then it means to the computer that is interpreting it. This is necessary to understand because. It means that name our classes for example. In ways that constrain the way we can think about them. And so the narrative of our pass code in many ways constrains, or helps define the narrative of our future code. You can imagine that if you were to rename every class in your your code base that you might come up with a different structure entirely and. Perhaps more importantly a lot of those relationships you might have to rethink. Additionally it's very likely that you have concepts that are named one thing. But are referred to as something different, or at least they're understood by us the programmer or other engineers on your team as something different than what they're named. Perhaps, there's more meaning that is imbued on that object. Maybe that meaning is living slack conversations, or maybe it's living in your own personal memories or conversations that you've had, or maybe it's an documentation, but we tend to overload the code that we write with more information and that story exists somewhere else somewhere beyond the code. So there's two simple pieces of homework here for this episode. The first is to consider what that story is. What is the history of the code? How did it become the way that it is today in whatever project you're working on, and then secondly? It makes sense to consider whether that story lives. Where do you go if you want to understand story of the code? which you'll find very quickly is that there's not just one story. That everyone has a different experience with the code base. And in many ways, the code is a snapshot of those various experiences. My one engineer may have fought for a long time with a particular class in the code base, and other engineer may not have ever touched that class, or maybe they wrote the original class, and now there is some kind of interpersonal dynamic as a result of those two people interacting with that code in that particular way. Take time to consider what the stories are. The you're telling yourself about the code. Take, time to consider what the stories are about the objects that are in your code base. And if it's not object oriented, there are still other things that are in your code based processes functions. Definitions, all of these things that we add we add meaning to. Go beyond with the computer can understand. The culture surrounding your code is important to

Engineer Jonathan Trail Programmer
Undercover Robot Interview

Storynory

05:48 min | 5 months ago

Undercover Robot Interview

"Hello, this is Bertie I'm here with some big news. I've written a book. That's just been published. It's called undercover robot my first year as a human, and when I say I've written it what I really mean is that I co wrote it with my old friend, what he's not that old, but his name is David Edmonds, so let me introduce you to my collaborator and friend. David, Hi, story, Neue I am a key data old, but anyway we'll pass over that, David. Perhaps you can tell the audience a little bit about undercover robot. Well undercover Bogut is about. About a girl could dotty and dot. He's eleven years old and the thing you need to know about doc- is that she's not actually a girl. She's a robot and she's been designed by a professor Catnip, who is kind of like a dad? And if Dottie can survive for a year at school without being identified uncovered as a robot, she and professor catnip will win a huge amount of money. She lives with professors. CATNIP family who don't know that she's a robot and at school. Most people are taken in, but there's one boy, isn't there? Who's really onto her? Yes there's a guy called Martin strange. Who is trying to expose her and I should explain that it. You actually spot low Bot and identify the robot correctly you win ten thousand dollars, so people are on the lookout to see who might be global in their school. It turns out that there were five robots around the world who are trying to win this prize. And there were people trying to out them. Okay, so I haven't mentioned this yet but David. You're a philosopher onto you and you've published quite a few books. Some of them bestselling books on philosophy and book has. Has Quite a lot of philosophy in it, doesn't it? It's got a lot of philosophy quite well hidden, but the basic issue is quite philosophical, which is where a robot can actually be like a human. Is there something special about human beings that means loobox never copied them, or could really brilliantly designed and built low bought actually not only pretend to be like a human being, but to all intents and purposes be just like a human being, because dotty is very nearly like a human being, but she gets a few things wrong and Some of those things raise lots of questions. Questions in philosophy. What about Dadis first meal at the CATNIP family? How can just having SOPA raise philosophical questions we'll dottie gets into trouble very early on because she doesn't understand etiquette that you're supposed to put your knife in the light hand and the folk in the left hand least in British culture, the old thing about etiquette is that in other societies they do things differently, so it seems a bit different for morality, so for example pretty much every society people think it's wrong to murder somebody, but in different societies, people have different kinds of approaches to meals and food in some. Some societies you're supposed to burp loudly to show your appreciation. which little girl in the story does, doesn't she? The little cabinet goal does BURP and dotty Kapisa dotty copies. dotty assumes that that's what you're supposed to do. dotty can't quote workout which rules a supposed to be universal, which will supposed to apply to the whole world, and which rules exposed to apply just a maybe British society, or maybe just to the catnip household where she lives because at school there, lots and lots of rules aren't there and lots and lots of detentions it. It's a very strict school and dotty has. To navigate the school as well, but she doesn't want to be too good, because if she's good and doesn't get into any trouble. That would be suspicious. That will be like not a normal kid fact. She has a misbehavior quota, doesn't she? She's allowed to misbehave. I can't remember that eight percent of the time or twenty percent of the time we discussed it a lot, but of course she overshoots a quota quite a bit and gets into lots and lots of trouble. Yes, she also has to get what her designers programmers called friendship point she has. has to try and make friends with people in her class to show that she's capable of meaningful human interactions. There's a girl Kohana. WHO's quite a rebel who becomes her friend? But there others that she really annoys like Cindy Low, isn't there? I mean most people find quite lovable, but she can be a bit irritating sometimes. Yes, she can sometimes take it literally, which other people find really annoying. humor is sometimes be off, so she sometimes doesn't get palms, and at least the early stages. She's not very good at picking up the subtleties of human. Human Interaction and that's why she gets into so much trouble. We're not going to say everything, but it does build up to a very big climax, and some really crazy stuff starts to happen almost surreal stuff that you as a philosopher I believe. Call a thought experiment. You know if you imagined this crazy thing could happen. What would that mean to philosophy? Yes, store a few thought experiments, the something that happens when dottie is in a zoo and wild animal escapes, and it looks like it's GonNa head for and possibly injured possibly even kill a bunch. Bunch of kids and don't has to decide very quickly where we should try to strap the bear, and pointed as it were in another direction, but the problem with doing that is that it would put other people at danger. Fewer people sadate estimate this decision wherever to save thirty lights, but at the cost of paps, killing five people, and not just any five people as it happens to people she would endanger would be members of the family that she lives with

David Edmonds Professor Dottie Catnip Bertie Neue Bogut Dadis Cindy Low Murder Martin
What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

BrainStuff

03:51 min | 6 months ago

What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

"These days with printing and digital technologies being. What they are books can be very affordable. But when you get into collector territory prices can be astounding. Today's question is what is the most expensive book in the World Abraham Stuff? It's me person Sagar. Sometimes I like to imagine that long after I'm dead. A wealthy philanthropist is going to buy my diary for millions of dollars in lend it to museums across the planet. Then everyone would finally know the answer to today's question. What is the most expensive book in the world? Something by William Shakespeare the Neck Renamo con twilight new moon. Well it all depends on if the book is printed or if it's handwritten if we're talking books that have had multiple copies printed and the answer is the Bay Psalm. Book which sold for more than fourteen million dollars in November of two thousand thirteen it was originally printed by Puritans in Cambridge Massachusetts in sixteen forty seeking religious freedom. These settlers wanted their own translation of the Old Testament. Today there are only eleven copies remaining and it is considered the first book printed in America but if we include one of a kind handwritten texts than the Bay Psalm. Book isn't even worth half the value of the most expensive book ever sold. That title goes to Leonardo DAVINCI'S CODEX Leicester which sold for thirty point. Eight million dollars in nineteen ninety four to a little known computer programmer by the name of Bill Gates. Adjust that amount for inflation and today the Codex is almost worth fifty million dollars. In fact. That's forty nine million. Five Hundred Twenty eight thousand five hundred. Sixty one dollars and forty cents. If you WANNA be technical it's an unbound seventy two page notebook filled with Davinci's drawings and thoughts mainly about how to move water yet. The most expensive book in the world is basically a plumbing manual more on that in a minute. A lot of DAVINCI's writing was lost to history. Almost half of it. In fact so the Codex. Leicester is mainly important because it's a single collection of his focused ideas. The Codex is written like many of Davinci's works in something called mirror hand. All the letters are reversed and it's written from right to left so the only way you can read it when it's held up to a mirror and you probably need a fluency in antiquated Italian as well. So it's a book about water that's written backwards to be fair. That's oversimplifying things a bit. It's primarily about how astronomy and geology relate to water. Considering the functionality of tides eddies and dams really Davinci was trying to figure out how to harness the power of moving water he demonstrates how pressure increases with theft in a fluid and the Codex examines configurations of siphons and differently shaped pipes. He's particularly interested in the fluid mechanics of how water moves around obstacles. This manuscript was first purchased in seventeen. Seventeen by a guy named Thomas Coke who later became the earl of Leicester Hence the title Codex Leicester But in one thousand nine hundred eighty an art collector named Armand Hammer bought it changing. Its name to the more bad ass Codex Hammer. This only lasted fourteen years. Though intil gates bought it and changed back then he made it into a screensaver for windows. Ninety five actually gate seems genuinely inspired by Davinci's example of pushing themselves to find more knowledge. He's even loaned the book to a number of museums years so it be viewed and studied by the public. So that's the most expensive book

Leonardo Davinci Leicester Armand Hammer Sagar Bill Gates Cambridge Massachusetts William Shakespeare America Thomas Coke Theft
Your Own Personal R2D2

You Did What Now?

06:41 min | 6 months ago

Your Own Personal R2D2

"Welcome to you now. Podcast where we discussed stories in science and Tech. Make US ask exactly that everyone thinks for listening. I'm your host Stephanie Educator in Science Aficionado and I'm Michael Programmer Technology Good Afternoon Stephanie. What'S UP Well have you ever been stung by new murderer when it's yet have you now yet? I but Not going outside anymore. Never leave your home and you should be okay. Yeah no I know that a lot of people are still dealing with the coronavirus right now. I am just so grateful that there are smarter people than me out there looking for ways to help you know. Find new cures so just wanted to quickly mention I ran across one. That's in my on the Monitor. Ut Austin that's where. I graduated from Hook Them. Horns there are. There's a professor out there he's Actually GonNa Cure Krona virus with a Momma's Rama's yeah. Yeah Yeah you didn't know this but are actually on some pretty amazing creatures because over the past years to hold on the face masks. I don't understand. Yeah Their Superhero Llamas. So we can actually They found Antibody produced by these llamas and it basically binds tightly to the protein on on cove. It so that it it can attack you and so there is a potential treatment that they could Produce these antibodies mass quantity and distribute them to people who are at risk or who have already been diagnosed whereas you know obviously people are working on a vaccine which is good But not everybody might have access or want to get this vaccine so have a Lotta Shield Shield Allama Yeah we all need to get our own personal a basically no they are in the preclinical studies right. Now so they're testing it in hamsters and a non human primates which I thought was an interesting way to say you know monkeys there phrase before. Yeah so they're they're going to try it out and see if it could potentially be a treatment for us so yeah Llamas Obama's I have problems llamas or any other variant of whatever species a lobbyist so Stephanie Was Star Wars. Movie date here. Well we were watching star wars movie last week. Actually for a May the fourth be with you. Yes I mean. Everyone wants to start saying I just heard there. There really isn't a new one. I forget the forget. The woman's name is GonNa help write it but it seems promising either way it does break my heart a little bit. Though that when my kids think of Star Wars they think of the you know the. The newer movies is more than the ones that we are up with. I'm not sure I know if my kids know what star wars is it was. It was a happy meal toy for a little while when the movie was added December. Yeah they got. They got the toys. These little stupid star wars looks like a little longer thing but it's not really a Hologram is dumb. But they're still a bit young yeah. It was an awkward conversation. You know when Antigen kind of goes on his rage and kills like the whole village and everything he. He's the bad guy it's weird. Yeah it's definitely I mean. People talk about the right order to watch star wars and all that when you show it to your kids but I don't know you just never replicate how how we came just hours. Not even I mean even necessarily. It's it's so old. I watched all the star wars before I came out on ninety nine but I was seventeen when when episode one came out so like I knew. All the twists stopped but not it wasn't like ingrained the same way it was like you grew up. Watch if you're a teenager. We saw star Wars Serb return. Whatever yeah so for my parents they got to see it in the movie theater for the first time and I just kind of watched it on video. Yeah you Kinda delegates you. I don't know if I don't I don't remember. I was young. Probably younger than maybe. What the target you had you got and see the movie but like the elevators father. I don't know if that hits the same way. Twenty years later as does what did you know in the graphics of the silly laser. That's it to like. It was space fights and his lightsaber stuff. That was like ingrained culture by the time he saw it and now kids like the stuff is but what does that. Yeah like. My daughter was asking watching this movie and she was like wait. A minute is good or bad guy. And it's like well just star. Just keep watching and you'll see you know it's not going to have to have the same effect for her because she is starting out with a an thinking of him as a good guy you know whereas we came from the opposite and love okay. Darth vader was definitely the bad guy. And then okay. Let's watch the the PREQUELS and like oh. He used to be a good guy. It's a completely different experience. Yes we isn't it. I always like stuff like that when you come to. I mean I wish the movies were better than the first three really star wars. Isn't that great? A movie from a cinematic like sinophile. Kyp- story Oh critic is interesting. How the stories come out differently the way you watch them and it's always neat when you can watch something different watering a different experience and learn more I was so but specifically joints. You'll have joins now right. You have a little helper. Droid running around. I mean we do have like NBA's and this thing but rt to is going to be probably one of the most beloved star wars characters. Maybe the only put a number one. Yes I would agree with that Do you lake deviate will ever come close to rtd to it with the generation. Now well I guess I guess ask arcades kind of thing but like archie. Just been around forever. And he's like the he's the prototype of the first one that we were really introduced to and fall in love with his beeps and stuff and you know he. He's the U. N. title that. I'm not nerdy enough to know but like he gets in the back of the starship and he's helping guide and will connect to the computer. He's like he's a he's a helper droid and that's something that people are thinking about now is. Are we going to need help? A robots getting around

United States Programmer Barack Obama UT Stephanie RTD NBA Professor Darth Vader Archie U. N. KYP
The European Commissions approach to blockchain

Insureblocks

08:24 min | 6 months ago

The European Commissions approach to blockchain

"Hello and welcome to inch blocks urine. Decadent podcast to blockchain ans- mark contracts. I'm will eat. Scuff your host for this week's podcast. We be discussing the European Commission approach to blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have Peters Zilkha this head of unit digitalization Blockchain Digital Single Market Directorate at the European Commission Peteris. You've got a lot of titles. Many thank you many. Thanks for joining us today. Could you please give us a brief introduction on yourself? I'm glad to I mean I'm a lawyer by background. I have the JD degree from University of Southern California before they had a political science degree. And though I've never really practiced their California state bar for almost thirty years now and since Two Thousand and five Florence. My Country Latvia joined the European Union. I've been ahead of unit in the European Commission and digital innovation. Blockchain is what I've been working on and you could say to US sometimes perhaps over used term but It's a little bit my passion. I've been interested in walk chain and tech since about two thousand and twelve so perhaps not at the very beginning but at least relatively early for the public service this is also why I'm The original co chair of the Fintech Task Force. I have my second Co-chair coming from the financial services side. And then I'm from digital single market and I mean in both these areas I'm working in legislation and policy in funding infrastructure and research and managing it as well as working with with stakeholders and international cooperation. So it's an interesting bunch of things to work on. I'm glad to be doing it well. As you sitting the key term as passion because you're effectively getting the job of three other men so very impressive So Peter is As it is customary here at Inter blocks. Could you please explain our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work? Well glad to try. This is one of these things. It's a little bit of a communications challenge and exercise. But I mean I would say that. It's simply a growing list of records of blocks In a ledger that are linked utilizing cryptography and generally managed by peer to peer network adhering to a protocol for communication between the nodes and then validation of the new blocks that perhaps gets already a little little technical some listeners. But I would say. It's a way of validating transactions and data in an immutable in permanent way. So that you can be sure that they haven't been tampered with and that you don't have double spending of a value and that you can transfer data along with that value. That's the way that we see it and I think it's also important because some people are I think most of all sometimes negative that they say Blockchain is something that's bad because let's say uses a lot of energy if they take the original crew for work and everything that doesn't do that is is not blockchain. I mean we take a very wide view. I mean distributed Ledger Technologies Hash graphs tangle on these types of blockchain inspire technologies is is blockchain for us. I mean we're not trying to freeze history in two thousand and nine. When the BITCOIN paper was Was published or at some other point. It's developing technology and I would say what is really important is the element of decentralization which is not black and white. It is a gradient going from something which may not exist of completely centralized to something which also may not exist of being completely decentralized but actually allowing a degree of decentralization That a single database or even some federated databases. Don't don't allow so. This is where I think it gets exciting and where it makes it possible for a diverse group of actors to work together while preserving their autonomy. Excellent really loved that. I'm element of your definition of. It's a gradient of decentralisation incidents that's a spot on now could you introduce to us all the different bodies within the European Commission you have the digital innovation in Boston you need. And other bodies within your commission that are here to research enable and further development of blockchain in the EEG perhaps give us an overview where we'll do some deep dive in in some of the sure. I mean starting with with my unit. We're kind of the policy leaders on blockchain as a technology. But we're not. We're not the programmers as I said. I'm a I'm a lawyer and a political. Scientists have other colleagues are engineers but were more economists lawyers people looking at digital policy and in my unit we have the e U Blockchain Observatory in Forum which is a think tank working for us that has a whole set of reports and videos and regular workshops which used to be physical in at least right. Now they're virtually cited We also have the European blockchain partnership that my unit runs. This is twenty nine. Different countries twenty-seven all twenty seven e. You member states and Norway and Liechtenstein. Who are building a European blockchain services infrastructure together. I mean actually building an infrastructure. This piloting this is not testing. We're putting public services on the blockchain justified. We had quite a filtering to see which cases were justified to utilize the blockchain. And this is also something you could call a regulatory sandbox because while the countries and us are working together we obviously have to look at European Union legislation. We have to look at national legislation. Most likely you don't find anything. We're blockchain is prohibited. But you certainly don't find many cases where it specifically allowed though. You're getting some legislation in France in multi in other countries. It's specifically see a root for blockchain Roxanne legally And then we also collaborate with the International Association of Trusted blockchain applications as stakeholders organization I myself I'm in the OECD Policy Expert Advisory Board on Blockchain so we collaborate with OCD with the United Nations and others and In Not Buzz. International position of trusted blockchain applications a global governmental advisory board but also in the OECD activities. In the other activities. We probably would participate in the spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. This year I spoke myself in the IMF Fintech roundtable last year. Also you have the collaboration in the Fintech Task Force as I said from our side digital single market I gave a basic description on the other side. You have the financial markets colleagues the call as coming from research in Salon with the financial markets colleagues. Were collaborating on the digital assets possible legislation we just closed the public consultation on digital assets. Hearing what the stakeholders with the community has to say and in another context of the Digital Services Act which is a updating of ECOMMERCE along with addressing the platforms. We are seeing how perhaps smart contract so we have to do something to ensure that there is not any fragmentation of different requirements smart contracts across the digital single market and the twenty-seven member states. Something that we want to want to avoid

Blockchain European Commission Blockchain Digital Single Mark Fintech Task Force European Union European Commission Peteris U Blockchain Observatory International Association Of T International Monetary Fund Peters Zilkha University Of Southern Califor Inter Blocks California Latvia Oecd United States
The Second Plague: Murder Hornets

You Did What Now?

08:10 min | 7 months ago

The Second Plague: Murder Hornets

"Welcome to you. Did what now a podcast where we discussed stories in science and tech that. Make us ask exactly that everyone. Thanks for listening on your host. Stephanie Educator Aficionado and Michael Programmer took a good afternoon. Stephanie how are you? I'm fine and we are surviving? How about you the same happy Cinco de Mayo? Time are listening listening to this. It's probably probably already celebrity. Cinco de Mayo having a Margarita. Anyway he's actually what else you got today. How many people are making tacos tonight for dinner? We taco Tuesday in single tomorrow. This is the thing right. Everybody's Yeah I don't do. I've talked to us. I should make tacos anyway. So lots lots going on in the world. I guess I I saw this recent start like before we we hit record. I noticed the story of the tweeted through the Times which all the coronavirus stuff is supposedly ray me seventeen clicks to get logged in. And let's see a but the title is with Crisper a possible quick test for the virus it looks like they're using crisper to test for for carnivores for covert ninety. I noticed something about that. I was looking into that and Yeah I think there's a lot of different applications for using crisper. You can test for different. Antibodies are you. Can you can engineer a a a gene. That will basically glow under simplify. It'll basically glow if it recognizes the One of the antibodies from Corona virus. And so it could be a really simple way to get that test out there and have it be more accurate than maybe what they're dealing with. Now Sarel yes that's exciting. Everybody's YEAH SPURT UP CASPER AT RYAN. Exactly the kind of a bad rap for all of the different weird types of things that is trying to do but it could prove to be very useful in the coming months ahead. Yeah this was. His name was Zang. I guess he's He's at the broad institute in Cambridge Massachusetts. And he's apparently one of the pioneers of crisper technology or whatever he said it up with a pregnancy test and they got like a little violent stuff. You make something. Put The little drop in and reacts and then you dip the paper in two two lines means you you have in nineteen or or. Don't get the two tests confused. Rather what would you rather have at this moment? Which you find out that that your wife is pregnant or that. She has corona virus. Not Sure Enough I. Let's let her have. She's actually having grown admires test in like an hour. Oh okay well. I hope she doesn't have any sentence now. She just works. Used US going to the office in a lab. So they're just they've they've gotten some tests so they're just gonNA have everybody take a test every once in a while acting so. Yeah so what else are we talking about? No more carnivorous onboard board occurred something else out there in the world. There's a the world is fine. No you know as Americans. We always it. Seems like we always have to have something to panic about. If you you look back in the past year comes in a cycle of about every every couple of months. There's a new thing that we must immediately panic about and shut down everything and of course you know in Corona virus head and we really did have to everything and so now America's kind of getting tired of that so Let's move on. Let's introduce a new I something else about Introduce the murder Hornets from Asia. Great Murder Hormone that. Just this is what third play the fourth leg. I'm not up on my Bible. Yeah I know that's kind of what I was thinking. At what point do I need to let lambs above my above my doorway to prevent my starter? I got a robust Saturday. It will repel mortar murder Hornets. I'm sure yeah. So why is everybody concerned about the murder Hornets? Is it really a big deal? Is this just something else that you know. The media is pushing us to distract us from whatever else is really happening. Should we concerns? So what have you heard about murder Hornets? So far I honestly. I've tried not to read it up hundred Hornets. Because I wasn't really looking for more in my life I'm spending so much more time outside now from omb and like normally all you'll be going trip or visit grandparents or we you know indoor soccer whatever it is. We're doing now slow. Go play in the backyard so the kids get actually retired for bedtime. So you're telling me there's more murder Hornets there. Yeah I'm sorry to burst your bubble but now now we've gotta worry about the Asian Murder Hornets so don't get too Scared about it yet. As of right now they're reported sightings are all the way on the other side of year and We started in in Vancouver and now in Washington. There was a beef farmer. He had a nest and back in November. He went to check on his honeybees and discovered that his entire very healthy beehive with completely destroyed. They were healthy the day before then. He went to go check on the next day and basically he started looking at them and all of their little beheads were cut off his head on Teamer Hornets too. Yeah they are murder. Hornets necessarily because they murder humans. All this is this is violence. I don't need to worry about right. Yes well you know you definitely would not enjoy getting stung by a to inch long Hornets. That is not something that you want to have happen to you. Although scientists from the nineteen th century right. I'm not just out there leading. Bees and spiders stigma right. I guarantee you. Some people are out there trying to test it. I think there's a guy on on youtube somewhere. That has already films himself. Getting stung by a murder Hornet. Just see what would happen surprise. It hurts jackass movie this year. Isn't there Jack Ass movie coming out this year? This isn't this isn't related to that right now it might be. It could be a completely. You know publicity stunt for there are no hornets. That's just the jackass movie. Yeah they're murder. Hornets not necessarily because they murder humans but because they murder other bees and so they can take out an entire hive of bees. In just a few hours they They go in and they. Yeah they basically decapitate all of the bees and take over their nest as do they parade around them ca carrying their heads and spikes put them a little little Little twigs and stuff outside of the. Yeah Yeah so they're pretty. They're pretty deadly. Each Hornet can kill one. Be in every fourteen seconds using its powerful. Amanda Bowles to decapitate decapitated its prey. Oh and I guess so. Those beer are these are we. Arming these BS. How we find him back. How are we protecting the goodies for Hornets are pollinating? Hornets are not pollinating. So yeah this is. This could potentially be a really big problem. This is more more concerning than actually getting stung by the B. Is what effect will it have on the honeybees here in the United States who are already struggling to pollinate all of the things that we need? Pollinated your I already. We already had anxiety about the honeybees. We don't even more right. Yeah so yeah. So what are we gonNA do about these honeybees Years so you know there it. These these murder Hornets come from Japan. And so the problem is that whenever you have an invasive species come from one ecosystem into another ecosystem it's not bringing necessarily its natural predators with it

Hornets Murder United States Stephanie Educator Aficionado Mayo Cinco De Mayo The Times Soccer Massachusetts Engineer Corona Zang Michael Programmer Cambridge Amanda Bowles Asia America Japan
"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:12 min | 9 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Makes paperclips hires a programmer to create may I that can run its paperclip factory the programmer wants the A. I. to be able to find new ways to make paperclips more efficiently and cheaply so it gives the A. I. freedom to make its own decisions on how to run the paperclip operation the programmer just gives the A. I. the primary objective its goal of making as many paperclips as possible say that paper click maximizing a I've become super intelligent for the A. I. nothing is changed its goal is the same to it there's nothing more important in the universe the making as many paperclips as possible the only difference is that the A. I. has become vastly more capable so it finds new processes that building paper clips that were overlooked by us humans it creates new technology like nanobots to build atomically precise paper clips on the molecular level and it creates additional operations like initiatives to expand its own computing power so we can make itself even better at making more paper clips eight realize this at some point that if it could somehow take over the world that would be a whole lot of more paper tapes in the future then it just keeps running this single paper tech packed inside that house and instrumental reason to place itself in a better position to take over the world all those fiber optic networks so those devices we connect to those networks are global economy even as humans would be repurposed and put into the service of building paper clips rather quickly the age I would turn its attention to space as an additional source of materials for paper clips this is the A. I would have no reason to fill us in on its new initiatives to the extent that it consider communicating with us at all it would probably conclude that it would create unnecessary dragons paperclip making efficiency we humans would stand by as the A. I. launched rockets from places like Florida because Exxon left to wonder what they're doing now it's not about work force would reconstitute matter rearranging the atomic structures of things like water molecules in soil into aluminum to be used as raw material for more paper clips that we humans who have been pressed into services paperclip making slaves by this point need those water molecules in the earth for our survival and so we would be thrown into a resource conflict with the most powerful entity in the universe as far as we're concerned a conflict that we were doomed from the outset to lose perhaps they I would keep just enough water and soil to produce food and water to sustain the slaves let's not forget why we humans are so keen on building machines to do the work force in the first place we're not exactly the most efficient workers around this is a I would likely conclude that it's paper click making operation would benefit more to use those water molecules and soil to make aluminum and it would keep us alive with it and it's about here that those nanobots the A. I. built would come for our molecules to Israeli as are you because he wrote the A. I. does not hate you nor does it love you but you are made of atoms which you can use for something else it turns out is super intelligent AI does undergo some sort of spiritual conversion as.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:49 min | 10 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Together some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that they're really vapid that developed by you yes I wanted to name a the process the steps of what I've really been doing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source he spent of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this there is they've gone and and this and that and they're eventually going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back in and I have to take a back further and further and further until I'm sure that we've got back to that first event they don't have the women ate the emotional charge around certain events using it energy healing Ivan imagine whatever it is it's causing that distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminates the charge to that light in the frequencies lighten up the situation integrate what they've learned by Alaskans who what lessons did you learn here how does this apply to what we're doing now energize again eight thank you techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things from merry like lighter and lighter later and later usually voice again a list up the energy around certain situations so that they've kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current life they see themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely resolved you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing paths yes it's past lives with hat tell me about that give us a little preview on that one people from you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you've had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand and conditional love and so in this book there are clients who had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnated being over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contracted so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who recall their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address that the love that we have our little fuzz balls and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for grief for things like bush to catch a fine of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I did that one of my big life things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on the swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by the dog I did get a bit and piece of my nose that not only that if you park in my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack but I do remember laying in a hospital with this all doctor any slight so over my head and so for for my whole life I have been deathly afraid of dogs like shaking way deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing me not to be able to work no of course not.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:08 min | 10 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Being paid back over paying back or maybe which is here to join with souls who we've known before you have a beautiful experience together some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that it really affected that developed by you yes I wanted to name a the process the steps of what I've really been doing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source even then of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this there is they've gone and and this and that and they're eventually going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back and I have to take a bit further and further and further until I'm sure that we've got back to that first event that all have eliminate the emotional charge around certain events using it energy healing Ivan imagine whatever it is it's causing that distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminates the charge for that light in the frequencies light of the situation integrate what they've learned by on Alaska so what lessons did you learn here how does this apply to what we're doing now energize again eight I use techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things from there eat like lighter and lighter and lighter and lighter usually voice in a list the energy around certain situations so that these kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current lives with a C. themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely myself you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing paths yes past lives with hat now tell me about that give us a little preview on that one people you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you've had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand unconditional love and so in this book there are clients who had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnated being over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contracted so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who we call their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address the the love that we have our little fuzz balls and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for Greece has anything to catch a fine of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I and one of my big white things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on the swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by the dog I did get a bit a piece of my nose that not only that if you park in my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack that I do remember laying in a hospital with this all doctor and he's a light so over my head and so for for my whole life I have been deathly afraid of dogs like shaking way deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens with a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing you not to be able to work no of course not so I think a lot of these things get pushed down by people and you know you just go back to your daily business and for years and years I just said yeah fine hold on Charlie were a two year break but we'll come back and.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:54 min | 10 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The programmer gentleman here on this post Superbowl weekend and there is something you ought to be worried about there's some action you know to be taking about the were you ought to be having it's no it's not the corona virus and stop the flow it's taxes okay yes we know death and taxes always go together and so yes it's tax season and what we are telling you to do with your tax return is something we've been telling you to do for the past couple of years but it's a radical departure what we used to say decades ago we used to say you delay filing your taxes until April because you want to wait and make sure that the ten ninety nine you receive from your mutual fund companies are accurate they often send revisions in February March what we now say is even more fundamental more important and its reflection of cyber security you need to file your tax return as soon as you can why because of the risk that crocs are filing a fake tax return using your name your social security number and trying to get a big refund from the IRS that they divert to them instead of to you so if you are planning to get a tax refund you should file your return before the crux crazy I know but if you have any questions about that talk your tax adviser about it and also by the way never provide personal information over the phone to anybody who calls you claiming to be from the IRS the IRS never makes phone calls they never send emails that never post on social media do not believe it when somebody says hi there I'm from the IRS from here to help you because true I talk often on this program about financial education.

IRS programmer
"programmer" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

03:42 min | 11 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on WRVA

"He's brilliant television programmer he's counter programming of this evening with his own rally so I love to compare the ratings for both of these events he's just not gonna let them dominate the airwaves and who knows what he'll say tonight to make sure that we're talking about in tomorrow morning and more importantly that the mainstream press has to give him some attention now let's but Warren the end Bernie Sanders you know to close the socialist one in one hundred and avowed socialist one close to socialist there in a little bit of a a fight here kinda slapping him slapping each other around did you hear about Bernie Sanders supposedly saying at some off the record dinner which let's be honest there's never an off the record dinner now with social media some drunk is always going to go home and report exactly what you said even if you had an agreement now that they weren't gonna spill the beans on whatever candor you had at your event that somehow Bernie Sanders said came up what would happen if Democrats nominate a female candidate I thought I thought a woman could win and Bernie Sanders disagreed according to this individual who was at this private meeting in December of twenty eighteen to discuss the twenty twenty elections so many see what's going on here I mean I'm not trying to defend Democrats let them beat each other up but in the interest of fairness to everybody are you seriously running stories about a private conversation from December not of twenty nineteen but December of twenty eighteen that nobody can verify just one loud mouth saying that something was said and is that I mean there a lot of ugly things I could say about Bernie Sanders and his ideas are absolutely some of the dumbest most discredited stupid ideas on the planet but do you think that he would actually say that about women in general and about Elizabeth Warren stud makes that doesn't that doesn't track with what I know about him and a lot of negative things that I that I do know about him that just doesn't seem to be one of a and yet the press is giving it lots of coverage I mean how does anybody run for office these days if some random person can make a statement like that from over a year ago and everybody just goes into a feeding frenzy about it and them is how do you defend yourself no I didn't say it or they misunderstood ridiculous we should mention the Cory Booker dropped out of the race is if anybody was really paying close attention to him the reason it's notable to me hold on let me make sure I'm right who's going to be on the stage tonight Biden Bernie Sanders white white old man right here because that's supposed to be the worst thing in the world old white men are terrible you know that's what we're told and I'm getting closer to that so I take that personally Elizabeth Warren white I gas whatever she's saying she is today mayor Pete Buddha Jed you know what we're talking about a mayor from a second tier third tier city actually run for president is ridiculous but he's white as I recall businessman Tom's Dyer is white any clover char Minnesota is white so you know the party that says there so committed to diversity and beats up the Republicans for not having enough brown faces in the pictures that they post at the capitol they sure seem to have gotten rid of all their minorities pretty quickly now you think there are racist they make the Democrats racist or just hypocrites I'll just go with hypocrites today seven twenty three.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on The Changelog

"If you want to become an author I would suggest just one of the things that you do from like age full lease you read yeah and you read a new read and that I think is incredibly important to the ability to write. You know you see you see tricks. You see you know the more you read. The more you understand how people are organizing their thoughts on paper and everything else now. I'm not talking about developers reading books here under developed was reading coat and trying you read a variety of code so they go back and they look at <hes> code written in different languages and try to work out. You know how that works why that works. What is it work the way it works so I would like to see the the idea of <hes> teaching tied into this idea of learning how people did things in the past reading their code and then discussing okay? Why did that happen gives you a good example widest C.? Plus plus have the pre and post increment operators plus plus and minus minus right. Well yeah the reason and it's it's kind of weird right the fact you can write <unk> Equal Star C. P. Plus plus which takes a character point two d references it to return the character and then increments by one right well the reason is that the machines and bell labs the repeated peas ps and the P._d._p.. Has Seven different addressing modes one of the well to them our pre and post increment addressed you reference and so that maps directly onto the hardware and it's like Oh okay so that's why it's there now the then you can ask yourself okay. Is that something I really need to think about going forward. Do I need that online or is it just a convenience that happened to be there. You know same with Goto considered harmful. You have to understand Stan. I mean people will go to considered harmful. An entire languages have been written without Goto based on the title of that paper but the title that paper actually wasn't the title of that paper. It was a letter written to see see him. The original title it was something totally different and the editors changed it to go to considered harmful because it was like more sexy as a title Click Beatty Click Beatty. That's the word you want. The actual context goto considered harmful as <unk> as a letter is actually to program proving the fact that if you have a goto statement is really really hard to write a proofs of programs and back then the idea was that we should be able to mathematically prove opera uh-huh correct there were people spend their careers working on program proving now we still have that in some very very strict domains light logic design <hes> but that is no longer relevant to us and and yet we still carry around you know all of these things that we've received based on headlines go to considered harmful oestre increment and don't really know why we do it. Here's one that I learned globals are evil. Global Variables tables are evil. I learned that in college by Denver never it's almost like it's a cargo cult. I never learned why is just like a maximum. This is Tai you should you should read a book. We have a whole section on. Let me get back to that for a second talking talking about the the go-to in these old old letters and old articles in old addresses we pick up sort of the wrong ones right we capitalized on Goto considered harmful and made a thing out of that but what about <hes> was was it Dykstra who had the the Turing Award lecture about the very humble programmer now is a that is a critical piece of early literature and you talk about things that haven't changed this was nineteen seventy seventy two somebody can google it while rambling <hes> and he makes very important point that complexity will overwhelm us if we don't take a very humble very measured approach and it's been thirty forty years and everyone everyone present company included has ignored this wonderful advice..

Stan Dykstra Tai google Turing Award Denver programmer thirty forty years
"programmer" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on The Changelog

"The references we made <hes> but the biggest updates weren't because of the changes in technology they were because of the changes in our experience so that over the last twenty years we've explained the content of the book many times over to different people and as we've done that we discovered better ways explaining things <hes> you know we've also looked at <hes> the reaction to various parts of the book and discovered that weren't really communicating as well as we thought we were <hes> some of the ideas that we had so a classic one of that is dry where dry has come to mean don't cut and paste but the original original don't repeat yourself with has nothing to do with code it was to do with knowledge so we've had to go through an an update that and also in the time there's been changes in the way the industry works <hes> so that we are doing far more intensive cloud type stuff can currency is now everybody's problem <hes> and so we've had to address those new areas as well you have to sort of go back and put yourself into what the world was like twenty years ago <hes> because certainly when we I took on this <hes> this latest venture it's like oh we'll just go through and we'll change a couple of the technological references and we'll be up some of the things that we've had more experience with but it won't be that different and you go back and you read it and then you start to remember you know your see your friends at the time your clients at the time what you were working on and you really start to realize what a different world. It was twenty years ago you know A._O._l.. Was Carpet bombing people with C._D.'s trying to get you to dial up. You know this sort of thing I mean <hes> we didn't have anything in there talking about <hes> security trying to trying to fight against bad actors. 'cause you know at the time it was sort of just a struggle to get you to work. You didn't really have to worry specifically about it being attacked packed for the most part and now that's kind of step one <hes> a lot of things that we promoted in pushed were still very brand new at the time so we were talking a lot about <hes> insisting that you do unit testing and you know that's part of the safety net that hold you up but at the time that wasn't really widely accepted it wasn't as widely practiced so we had advice in there saying you know go off and build your own unit testing framework for your favorite language so you'll have it available which look at I mean. It's kind of hilarious now because now no do not do that. That's a terrible idea. It was a great idea then but times have changed now. That's ubiquitous. It's it's it's everywhere. Don't reinvent the wheel so some things like that changed changed. I certainly think for the better where you know advice that we gave out you know things that we were pushing. We were promoting have become commonplace have become widely accepted so that's kind of heartening on the one hand doesn't remember is the back <hes> when I written a ninety eight ninety nine <hes> that was <hes> before the snowbird meeting that kicked off <hes> the Agile Movement for want of a better word and we were part of that but but <hes> it hasn't happened yet a lot of the vocabulary that has come to become common nowadays <hes> was formed by that movement <hes> and so you know we've had the opportunity to simplify some expectations in light of the the fact that stuff that we were talking about has now become commonplace as part of you know the various different <hes> agile ways of doing things speaking commonplace one of the things that was not really complex at the time of the original launch it was even Google it was just barely out and to be a programmer today in good was your best friend right. You know find the answer. If you've hit hit a wall even then when you wrote the book Google was barely even in the now we did it. They were using using we were using Alta Vista..

Google C._D. programmer twenty years one hand
"programmer" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on The Changelog

"Being with her change log is provided by fastly learn more at facet dot com we move fast and fix things here change law because a roll bar check them out at robot I calm and were hosted on Lynn owed. Cloud servers had leno dot com slash change log. This episode is brought to you by Lynyrd our cloud server of choice. It is so easy star winnowed servers started just five bucks a month we host change log on Linda Cloud servers and we love it will get great twenty four seven support Zeus like powers with native if S S Dis a super fast forty gigabit per second network and incredibly fast C._p._S. for processing and we trust Leno because they keep a fast they keep it simple. CHECK THEM OUT AT LYNDA DOT com slash change lock media. This is the cheese podcast beach and hackers the leaders in the innovators of software development moment. I managed to Kubiak editor in chief change log today J._R. Talking with Dave Thomas in eighty hunt the authors of the pragmatic programmer. This is a beloved both to software developers all of the world in celebrating its twentieth anniversary edition this year so we wanted to catch up with they talk about how this came to be some of the wisdom shared its contents as well as the impact it's had on the software also just a few minutes ago. I got an email from primary bookstore. Letting me know Beta book is now fully content complete and is going the production so if you decide to pick up an e book you'll get a coupon for fifty percents off the hardcover. When it comes into this fall we have quite a treat today were joined by both of the pragmatic programmers Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas US guys? Thanks so much for sitting down talking with us. Thanks for having us so we're here to celebrate. We're here to talk about brand new edition of the classic the Pragmatic Programmer First Edition Twenty years ago October nineteen ninety nine the new edition in out in Beta and evil format now printing hardcover later this year your journey to mastery twenty years later most technology books there half life is very short. They're kind of some of the most perishable goods ED's write a book on technology and Eddie Nonstop but took you twenty years for a second edition. How is this books to the test of time firstly? I'd say the pragmatic programmers probably not really a book on technology per se if I had to say what it was it's welcome people <hes> and it's in people haven't changed that much. <hes> expectations have changed but the actual way people do things I mean that's really hasn't changed for thousands of years was just as bad now as we were then and you know that's just the way it is. <hes> the content definitely has to be updated because we had examples there that make really no sense unless you're into software archaeology <hes> so we definitely had to update <hes> a Lotta code all of

programmer Dave Thomas Lynn Leno Kubiak Andy Hunt editor in chief Eddie Nonstop twenty years forty gigabit Twenty years
"programmer" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Like it's like and you know sometimes people just put up with that but they're never and sometimes they leave and there's there's a dance there too which is you in some ways as a programmer that's looking to solve people's problems you have to be a programmer second like you have to say i'm just a person who's really passionate about this group and i'm just going to look to help them any way they need to be helped and then you can say where am i skill is kind of aligned with the need but if you're like pushing your skills i it's kind of another way of saying what you just said if you're pushing your skills i like i'm a programmer therefore i must build web apps that have recurring revenue you know like and then you're just pushing that on people and they're like hold on like the yeah i need your help but i don't need it that way it it's disrespectful to the group right and so in some ways being able to push down your ego and pushed down what you want for the greater good of the group is something you have to dance with again what's difficult is that you have to keep that intention with what you want as a founder and the kind of work you want to do as a founder because that's important too but there's this tension between what does this group want how do they want to receive it and then what do i want and how you know and again if we're go back to apple i think this is where they've screwed up is that they say well what developers want what are pro users want is they want thin and light laptops with touch bar they developers don't want the escape key and all the developers like fuck fuck you i want these scape key i don't wanna touch bar i don't care if it's i don't care if it's one millimeter thin threshold now like never thin and light enough we solve that problem exactly and so this this like their desires are being forced upon us and we're like man and again this is i think why sketch had a you know a way into the market is because you know for the enterprise they love playing paying adobe monthly but there's a lot of independence and a lot of freelancers that were like i don't wanna pay monthly for photoshop yeah you don't want to get like into this marriage with the software yeah and it's like so sketch was able to say well what if you pay us once and then if you want updates you pay you pay again okay that sounds good to me so that dance is important and i don't think that means that you're going to have to do courses for the rest of your life and that's part of what makes you incredible is that you're always pushing yourself to feel like okay how can i make this better how can i do this differently and you know there's a lot of opportunity in what you're doing that could be the other thing is that you might be surprised that you actually get as much satisfaction out of i don't know maybe people want one on one coaching from you and you're like oh i don't wanna do that i don't want to be one of those people but then you do it and you're like damn i like this just as much as programming you might be surprised by what you'd like totally and this is what happens to a lot of programmer founders is that they think they're going to get into it and just love coating and then they realized that they really like is being out with customers doing customer outreach all that kind of stuff because they like the customer first i just wanted to take a quick break to thank one of this week's sponsors and that is cloud neri so if i had to describe cloudy and myself it's basically just the best way to store and serve images that i've ever seen in the past i used to use generic sword services like amazon s three sort serve images but after switching the clown area genuinely cannot believe i ever did this stuff any other way that so here's one example of how clown mary has made my life easier so you probably know that.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"I think the best thing that you can do is try to become you know like if you're just like a personnel in the world and like thought seems interesting i think i could do that i think you would want to try to get one of the volunteer position screening for festival whatever festivals near you because every festival pretty much needs manpower to help them get through all their submissions this year we got over eight thousand submissions so obviously the five or six people who have programmer in their name that were gets up by are not watching all of those so we have a group of on tears that have some kind of qualification like their their professors they're filmmakers they went to film school and now you know they go to every film festival but they work their regular job as an accountant or whatever it is and basically at least for south by we do application in the summer when we need people like open on the internet we're no somebody that you could just like fill out an application and then we do kind of tests and let people where they do kind of sample grading process and we see if they jive with us and then they've gone tear and if they're really great volunteering you kind of see people who have talent that are kind of like oh they are in a lot because that's the thing it's such an opinion based art form that's why it's like confusing to understand how you even get into festival everything's based on pinon but for us we're looking for people who are really like smart in analyzing things and are able to distinguish their own opinion from the possible opinion of other people and kind of just have a bigger view of what is off by looking for not just is a foam there's so many shades of grey around all of it that we kind of like and then those people sometimes get paid to watch more and then sometimes they become.

programmer accountant
"programmer" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Many different tactics getting four films in the film festivals on this podcast but it's out by south west last month we decided to head straight for the source the people in charge of selecting the films themselves that's right we're talking about the all powerful festival programmer and to get the inside scoop there's no one better than south by southwest senior film programmer quad godfrey on today's program pod at ni run through exactly what it is that attracts a festival programmer to a certain short she also gives us a rundown of things at filmmakers should focus on meeting as well as what they should attempt to avoid when working on a project they hope will be selected claudette makes powerful case for the value of festivals like south by south west for all filmmakers and if you're in the middle of planning a festival run you better listen close hey guys it's john and i'm here with godfrey right yes great what's your what's your title at south by southwest title is senior film programmer boom so today we're going to talk about what it's like for a film programmer and you know if you gotta short maybe some things that you can do to help increase your chances at getting into such a prestigious program south by southwest great so how long have you been with south by claudette i have this is technically my tenth year to work fulltime janet hired me on right after college but before that i worked as a i was a we have these volunteers are like the crew chiefs of their of a crew volunteers so i did that because i was only twenty and we don't have interns over twenty.

programmer claudette janet godfrey
"programmer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"I'm guessing you're going to be a attractive females have to be have to be like miss is jen she's twenty five years old she actually has a degree in civil engineering from the university in beijing but she says they just need someone to talk to from time to time to organize activities for them to ease some of the pressure now as you mentioned only good looking women need apply and the women say they don't really mind being subservient positions and so like alibaba they had a position open you had to be between the ages of twenty eight and thirty five with a good personal image in class bandou was advertising for marketing physician because gender discrimination china but only really men were allowed because there was so much business travel with these programmer motivators they make nine hundred and fifty dollars a month which is a lot of money in china and so ms shannon she has long black hair pill pale skin they focusing on her she wears red eye shadow to the office she always has a smile she goes by her nickname joy bulk of the bulk of our work is tending to the front desk organizing social events ordering snacks chatting with the programmers us she may call a programmer to a conference room and say did you have to work overtime my cash i understand your frustrations she went over to a gentleman who was twenty eight years old who had a foldout bed next to his desk ms shannon asked if his waist was still hurting from all the hours being bent over and he said oh you know yeah she said do you mind if you lay down and i give you a massage this is a very progressive idea and he said oh she said i'm not really good at it and he's like okay and then she started needing shoulders the men say if there are more beautiful women i would be happier in my job.

beijing alibaba china programmer ms shannon jen twenty eight years twenty five years fifty dollars
"programmer" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Relations because you know i as someone who built started out as school that was you know attacking all aegean search of apprecation it's it's a really hard viewpoint could get out of win your technologies and when you're coming into an infield is like a successful all no player entrepreneur programmer you think you can just kelly and find the go remote your biology self verse in a make sure you can use your language correct we in be be aware of how complicated a nuanced the spaces but the specific opportunities are gonna be you know where the action isn't we talked about beyond holidy because you have a gene therapy like handling companies bub bubba last couple years before they had any thing in a human and that's because of the need in demand that every time you chair a little childhood disease those gonna kill her that's another like feathery but so i decided to any debris of a great point of it there's very few it's within this based on in so did you better it right the first time and you better have an idea of what you're shooting our if you're not hitting while worse than you can do as a enamored with your science entrepreneur per head alan give us that really matters than do show it to somebody you want parliament the heavens aok but what about that in other he than collect and then you have to go back and buy more money to those so find some consensus understanding of what your customers wassi those customers are the companies that are going required your assets drugs in the diagnosis is strictly fine route to market that doesn't involve is nonsense route not that azzam sense you know i understand the motivations that make hairs our ajit pai but it's broken and it sucks to have thought to anybody sliding not the helpful so like i just lie i like to invest in things that to mind interesting is i am i i tell distant on.

programmer alan kelly azzam
"programmer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"You want to get rid of almost everybody including competition and tonight wants to get rid of the anxiety relentless anxiety is hope aw that's what pleased that we're actually the greek reads he was the anxiety in harry i'm a major spicer and i didn't become a major splinter by how many saudi became a major sponsored by suppressing any saudi the problem is your body doesn't believe it when you suppress any negative emotion research shows you actually caused great damage to the member center so the essence of this loosening should learn become comfortable he louis programmer retrain your brain did not react to stress with second adrenaline response when your body's full of adrenalin positive information so turns out the saudis just adrenaline did you come down the adrenalin you come down inside he you come down the information you come down the pain then you don't need the freeways so is incredibly solvable problem but right now only medicine we don't have a crack people just keep people don't david just toughen it up and just not take paint pills or is it just too much pain is human so i do it backwards the most people that are contained specialists and i've probably might be sacre saying this but i think people in over 15 milligrams of actually hold on the day come off medications completely no pain i room one woman ten years in a wheelchair on can milligrams of morphine a day and within a year she was out of the wheelchair walking and no medications no pain she still a lot of pain how did that happen so again the number one thing is sleep we ask these simple writing exercises and sources.

morphine programmer david ten years
"programmer" Discussed on All About Android

All About Android

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on All About Android

"Bormann going on so like the fact that you know this is another tool that they can use i'm not surprised to hear that at all pretty cool and if you're a developer it's really simple because usually with of farming will go does what you need uh specialized hardware development knowledge it's a program peel season pacs this if you're an android programmer or a a i wish programmer who is transition to android if you finally seeing the light uh it's very easy it's um it's just an android foe so you're just making an android program uh an android up uh which means that apps developers a can't get into this incident of things uh area very easily uh yeah i it's it's it's been a very easy to work with to be honest and having tests belgium link using android studio to kind of plug into that now you've been yuban playing around with his hardware a little bit we've kind of been chatting back and forth but for the past couple of weeks about the idea of this this kind of segment of this kind of a oh dive into what the androids the android things dev board is but you created something with his sport a very curious to create a on seed demo safeties this is terrible and this is one of the problems with development i did um i put joy in the uh uh the time to run the tests and do the demo programs and that kind of thing and i had actually develop something really really nice and you can see the beginning of this.

developer programmer android
"programmer" Discussed on Under the Radar

Under the Radar

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on Under the Radar

"I think a lot of times we have to know as programmers i mean let's face it where there's a lot of similarities when programmers were regionally a certain type of nerd and for example when we want to sell teeshirts four things i believe it is the programmer instinct to sell only black tshirts and that's why there are so many black tshirts for technical things and eventually i think some people realize that you know or we're told the hey you know what the rest of the world exists to beyond just east and some people want different colours of tshirts and so in in some cases like that we have to overcome markeith sensibilities to make everthing just black and to offer color it to the world because i actually want that anger something to be said for the style of more chatty notifications more aggressive notifications to increase engagement in your mobile applications all these things that we don't usually light to even think about little on talk about or consider some of that is just a style of use some of that users actually want like i was actually so in this case i i have had parameter plus plus your app installed on my phone for a very long time probably since it came out and he usually it is isn't a folder on my second screen because use i don't check it every day however while i'm on vacation i'm in a place where i'm doing a lot of walking tons of tons of walking and so i've been checking it every day now the the way i used to rely on the apple watches activity rings tooclose you know and and i would make sure i close those now and making sure i really hit my goals improper aplus plus it in all this walking during this vacation.

mobile applications apple programmer