35 Burst results for "Program Manager"

UN health agency sets higher, tougher bar for air quality

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

UN health agency sets higher, tougher bar for air quality

"The World Health Organization says the negative health impacts of poor air quality kick in at lower levels than it previously thought and is setting a higher bar for policy makers and the public the U. N. health agency released its revised air quality guidelines today since the last update of the W. H. O. recommendations fifteen years ago better monitoring and sciences cleared up the global picture about the impact of six major air pollutants on human health according to the agency ninety percent of the world's people already live in areas with at least one particularly harmful type of pollutant exposure to air pollution is estimated to cost seven million premature deaths and affect the health of millions more people each year and air pollution is now recognized as the single biggest environmental threat to human health according to the agency's European program manager I'm Julie Walker

U. N. Health Agency W. H. O. World Health Organization Julie Walker
"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

06:34 min | 9 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

"Impact on the future of buildings? I see myself. So one of the things as a person of color as a black man in science and stem, I think, there are many times that I'm the only person that looks like me at a room. And there are many times that I see the technology that's being developed, not really represented or not really being deployed or really having the possibility of being deployed to all communities. And so as I see that one, we're not represented in the kind of participation or participating in the process, but also that we don't have a little true diversity or equity in how we are deploying. What are the things that as I in this position that I mean, I think in addition to being a leader in the technical space, whereas demonstrated a level of technical confidence over these years. And now I want to make sure and really raise the banner and make sure that we raise awareness of how do we ensure that we're achieving a 100% clean energy for a 100% of the population. And that's people of every best communities that all over the country. And so that's communities of diverse communities, advanced communities, rural communities, urban communities, everywhere. How do we ensure that we are developing technology that apply everywhere, demonstrating, deploying technology, if we can get there where now we see that those who ask the question, everything that would be necessary to take think about building a heating and cooling thing about transportation, we ask the question, who benefits first and most? Who benefits lasso leaves? If the answers to those questions are answers that we all are comfortable with, that's impact. That's what I'm talking for. There you go. Listen, I think it's great that you're kind of leading the charge. So to speak. And I think you're a great leader and you're a young man. You've got a lot of years to go. I think you can do a lot of good over the coming decades and I'm glad to be associated with you and be Friends with you for the last few years. And look forward to continuing our relationship and making it even better. As I think about it, been in real for about four years. I think this beat watched my fourth year anniversary. And one of the things that I can say is one of the things that inspires me the most is being able to work with a team being able to work with the staff that are just super passionate for every day, everyone wakes up and comes into the office when we were going to the office. They come to work ready to save the planet. And so when you are working with folks who have that genuine passion to save the planet, it's just inspired. Everyone, there's every day there's something that kind of, but when you know that everyone on your team that bring in the best and the price from all of the world and bringing that passion, coupled with world class brilliant to say, how do we make the world a better place? I mean, it sounds kind of high and a guy but literally that's what the future of billions will do. It will make the world a better place. That's what I get to work around and one of the things that I think most of us that I'm grateful for, I think having a spirit of gratitude is important and really grateful for to be able to work with folks who are really trying to say the world through building. I guess in part in this super exciting. Yeah, well, I know I could see the big smile on your face as you're talking about that and you have the passion and just keep at it and keep charging forward. Do you have any final thoughts that you wanted to share with our listeners? I guess the final thoughts I would say is we look at where technology is going. It's a very complex time. A lot of complexity, but I think when we look at how we can use science and engineering to answer some of the tough challenges that every day, people are sitting and buildings are facing and will face because we see more events like in Texas this last year, you see more events I can California with blackouts. We have that because I get a chance to work with not only in reality across the DOE specimens across space and just from the industry to the academia to the national lab. People are working on it is that the thing is the saying used to go that we're from government and we're here to help. I think that actually now is a good thing. We actually do have we're from government and we're here to really help solve some of these big challenges for everyone. And so I guess what I would say to everyone is that that's trying to fight the fear that many people on board is maybe people who suit up, so to speak and work for us from the whole expansion that really helped probably challenges throughout the game. Yep, that's great. Ryder, well, I think we're going to wrap up now and appreciate your final thoughts. What's the best way for our listeners to connect with you? I think the best way is the in real life. I think you go to our website in rail and REL that go. We see the work that really, I get to be a spokesperson for all the great work that the team is doing. See the work that the team is doing and really kind of see where the future building is going. And I think that's one of the best ways is because I kind of up to date and contemporary, so I think you'll be able to answer some of the great things that the team that we're doing there so. Okay, that sounds great, roderick. Well, I think that's it for today's episode. Thanks everybody, joining us on the episode and thank you to roderick for being here today. Our next episode I will be talking with Talia's arabi who is the regional support services manager for swinnerton builders at their headquarters in downtown San Francisco. Talia is a brilliant woman. I've worked with on a number of projects over the years, a very sharp MEP person, understands mechanical systems. She's a mechanical engineer, has moved up the ladder with swinnerton rapidly because she's done fantastic work for them. And she will be my next guest next week or the week after that. Feel free to subscribe to the podcast and don't miss that next episode. And please leave us a review if you can. Until next time, I always close with my grandfather said about 6 months before he passed away at the age of 84, several decades ago. He was a wonderful person and very good to people. And he said, if you help someone, you did something good. So I encourage everybody to go out there and help someone and do something good and make the world a better place. Roderick, thanks again. Thank you. Thanks for listening to the future of buildings. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast in your favorite podcast app. Please rate and review the future of buildings with Joe Haiti. The podcast inspiring innovation and change in.

swinnerton roderick Talia DOE Ryder Texas California San Francisco Roderick Joe Haiti
"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

07:37 min | 9 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

"That acutely wearing really trying to address it. Yeah, the way that I see the world right now and that the need for filling these various positions that need to be filled right now. There's an enormous labor shortage. In the skilled trades, there's an enormous shortage of building engineers and building operators. The shortage of getting worse by the day. And it's not only a shortage. The existing staff that Johnson Johnson and Siemens and the other controls companies have. The existing staff that the building owners have now that are running their buildings, many of them are lacking training. So we have an enormous in even bigger issue with existing people that are in the industry tied to what we're talking about right now. That need training. And there's funding needed for that training. And we're talking about an enormous need here. And then there's the whole issue of social equity and bringing more people of color and bringing more women and more people with disabilities and more military veterans. This whole labor pool needs to be expanded tremendously. And all these opportunities exist for everyone. It's part of my mission of this podcast and a lot of the conversations that I have with people for the last few years is to raise awareness about this. And to try and do something about it. I totally agree. We are at a point in time where the challenges we face as a community as a country as a society in general are some of the hardest challenges. These are really grand challenges, particularly as we think about the changing climate. And to think that we can solve those with only half the team being engaged is ill advised. In order to solve big challenges as a challenge, we need everyone. The whole team ready to go in and really play the role that is necessary. And so that means that we have to really expand because to be honest, we haven't everyone has it suited up in the past. We've only had only certain targets or certain parts of the population of society that have really contributed to this whole section. And so now as we move forward, how do we rethink it so that we have a workforce? It is truly reflective of our society. So now we're getting the best and the price of the world. Our communities to say, we want to target those that have been historically disadvantaged, or those communities that have been historically left behind, because those communities, the brilliant and the best and the brightest and those communities can help us solve these problems that we have. Also, in addition to just the fact that we need the best and brightest, there's a math problem we don't have enough people to feel the jobs that we have. And so if we don't have a pool of resources of people that we are failing these jobs to, we won't be able to meet the needs. And if we can't meet the needs, then we won't be able to operate our buildings in the way we want. So many levels, it makes sense to really focus on the whole perspective and the whole spectrum of her population. Yeah, Ryder, I like the way you put it. Everybody needs to suit up. It's kind of an old football term if I remember correctly that on game day for football, I played football and for about 5 years and on game day, you suited up or you didn't. You were injured. You probably didn't suit up. But I like that analogy we need everybody to suit up and I almost compare it to what we're dealing with right now when you think about what had to happen in World War II. In order for the allies to be successful in World War II, everybody had to work together. Everybody had to suit up. Everybody had to be involved. It wasn't, you just couldn't pull a portion. You had to have everybody involved. And I'm sure there was some inequity back then that occurred and I'm sure it wasn't perfect. I think we're dealing with a situation like that today, roderick, where we need everybody suited up. This is akin to a World War with dealing with here to solve these labor shortages and solve these issues. We follow these issues. We need when you look at where we are, we're basically transitioning our held lead generate energy. And we're transitioning how we use energy. And if you think you can do that in the time frame we have without having everyone suited up. I think you're missing it. If you think that we can meet the knees or even right now, you can meet the needs where he's building now are going to have to have folks who are ready to take on how buildings who operate because now, as you're building owner, they won't be just the case that as a building owner, it just has to make sure that the people inside are the structures stays up and folks are safe and comfortable. Now that's going on. You're also going to have to probably start thinking about how do I manage the electricity loan. The EV law, because now you're going to have the EV charging as we transition our transportation fleet in those cars and those buses and those trans mobility options will be charged. Most likely that building. We're not preparing the workforce of the future to be able to understand those complexities of synergies and be able to operate them in a way that allow us to achieve what we're trying to get. We're going to have talent. So we got to suit up, but we won't be able to get moving on. Yeah. Well said. In your opinion, what does the future of buildings look like? I know it's kind of a real overarching question. But what does the future of buildings look like? I think that's kind of a great question because I think the future of building will be first and foremost, the future of billions will serve the people that are in them. As we talk about technology, let's talk about every bit in the third. I think we always have to remember that buildings are leading the needs of people. But what that requires is, we have to understand the people that are in the building. And that all people are the same. And that all people operate the same. And so as buildings of the future will still be about the people. So that means that we have to have buildings that can understand the people within it. Amongst all these other complexities that exist, a changing climate, because buildings will be you have more extreme events. We will see more heat waves on the West Coast like we see today. We will see more coleslaws in Texas as we saw earlier this year. So now these buildings will have to adapt to all these extra bits in addition to leveraging all of the advances in technology. Because we're seeing with communications, the controls can do things and predict and understand in ways that we haven't seen before. And so the same optimization that is used in our vehicles, electric vehicles that say I should charge for this amount of time that this place being able to go this distance. Those are the kind of things that are buildings will be able to say, okay, I need to cool for this amount of time for this amount of people and I predict based upon the weather. And based upon the available energy that is available at a certain cost, I will be able to do this and still keep the people still be about the people. That's what buildings will go. Then on top of that, buildings will have to think about even how we construct buildings because we have a housing talent right now. Affordable housing is a talent. And so looking at how in the way we've done in the past, we'll get it there. So we're going to have to rethink using approaches such as visor constructors such as construction that allow us to advance and build affordable housing for all of people going back to buildings is all about the people and it's all about all the people. So that's where I think being smarter being connected, leveraging all of the resources that technology has provided being connected to a clean energy future, but also managing the lows of vehicles. But all that being said being about the people first and foremost. Yeah, I like that. I have one more kind of overarching question. How do you see yourself making.

Johnson Johnson football Siemens Ryder roderick West Coast Texas
"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

07:19 min | 9 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

"Folks in building folks. Now we decided to do it together. Yeah, and boy, is there ever a need for it now? You look at all the problems over the years with blackouts and problems in California and other states with grid reliability and grid overload, et cetera. So this is very much needed. And in the future, it's going to be even more important as we transition to renewable energy. And if there is any tight supply, the demand side is going to have to be dressed through the grid interaction. It's way out there that you're thinking about this and working on this. And I have to commend you for that. I think it's really a part of the national assets and the country's old and look at how can we, as we think through as we look at, okay, we'll transitioning to a clean energy future. And this cleaning is a combination of different generation mixes. And it just makes sense, right? If you change the generation, how you generate electricity. But building you 75% for every three out of every four electrons generated is used that building. If we don't think about how we use those electrons, we change how we generate it, but we don't think about how we use it. Because that's why we are taking the social. How do we balance the two? So we optimize both at the same time. Yeah, absolutely. It makes all the sense in the world. Next question. What do you see as the difference between an overall energy offensive strategy and a decarbonization strategy? Can't we just make buildings as energy efficient as possible? And as a result, decarbonize them or what's the difference between the two? That's a great question, because if you think about it, like, well, just make them as possible when we're done. However, the carbon is generated, most of the carbon is going to be carbon that's generated on supply side, where we generate. And so you know, fossil fuels generation or we can transition to clean renewable solar and wind. That's where how we truly kind of push down. That's those biggest savings are on the generation because that's where the carbon is actually lit it. And so if you only look at efficiency, that means you're typically not focusing on how to shape the load so that it better matches the generation because if you look at the cleanest form, you look at solar and wind. Those have a time variant generation profile. And so going beyond efficiency efficiency is super important. That's what we need. But as you take efficiency and add to it, demand flexibility. Now you can make the demand more flexible which gives you more options on how you generate electrons and those options allow you to select generation mixes that are not as carbon intensive, or as you apartment instances. And so that's why the difference is the efficiency is where we need to start it. That's what we need to continue, but adding two efficiency demand flexibility allows us to better be carbonized and supply side and be carbonized and supply side is effectively how we're going to achieve that decarbonized feature. Yeah, that makes sense. And that's very well said. So roderick as a community we're talking about the community of buildings, community homes. As a community, incorporating equity, how do we incorporate equity in the future of buildings as a community? That's a great question. Because we look at it claim energy feature of TV's goal. I like to start with math, 'cause I say when you fight against math, you lose. It was once a commercial. He said that. And so if you think about a 100% clean energy, that means you have to have a 100% for a 100% of the people. And so if you are not having an approach, if you say you wanted one 13, a 100% clean energy, but you only focus on all your solutions. Technology only approach your applies 30%. The math says you move. So a 100% to 30% is not equal to a 100%. Achieve a 100% has your 100% or a 100%. So taking that step back then means that we have to have solutions that prioritize the needs of all of a 100%. And so that is equity. That makes that sense that we have to ensure that we have solutions that not only work in certain communities, but they work in our community. That's a different approach that we've traditionally approached. We've traditionally gone through kind of market transformation approaches that says that's kind of first adopt prioritize getting into the market through first the doctors and then eventually through market diffuser, it will get to everyone. Well, that hasn't really worked as well in the clean energy space. And the energy space. And so because there are barriers beyond the market diffusion. And so what we're saying now is we look for how do we truly get that 100% for a 100% is by understanding all of the needs, all of the berries are the technology adopting towns and of all 100% in prioritizing that and not only the deployment making sure that we deploy it all but understanding is a development. Now, are we developing solutions that apply everywhere? And then we deploy it everywhere if we do that, that's how we get a more equitable solution. Okay, I like that. And you're right. There has to be a focused effort there, and it has to be a high priority for that to happen. You can square pay. And forcing it into a round hole, just for blind to the needs of all communities and just develop these square eggs and say, okay, let's go push these grip eggs everywhere. If it's a square hole around hold, it doesn't matter. We're just gonna just go push them out. You're gonna have a lot of challenges there. You also won't be able to overcome. But how can we develop square page round page whatever is necessary so we can meet the needs of everyone? I like that. Let me ask you the next question. This is more of a kind of a high level question, but from a future of buildings perspective what do you see as the biggest challenges that we're facing to achieve a clean energy future? I think some of the biggest challenges are getting technologies to everyone. Getting clean energy as we move towards this energy transition. Traditionally the way technology has been diffuse into society has been one that hasn't been echoed away. And so the large segments of the population that don't receive the benefits of the transition. However, if we do that, that means we won't achieve that clean energy feature. And so now the problem is that's a whole paradigm shift with how we think about not only the point we can focus and quickly shift to the point to everyone. However, how do we make sure that we are going back to the previous conversation is how do you make sure you have technology solutions that are applicable to everyone so that we can record the other one? That's a big challenge because that means that we have to ensure that we are bringing forth the prioritizing the needs of all communities. And now you have to ensure that you have a workforce that is representative of all communities because if you have a workforce that is not representative of all communities, you may unintentionally not really prescribe or not really define the communities and wish this technology will be developed. And as a result, when it's time to deploy, you may miss an opportunity. So at first starts with an intent on an equitable solution. Now, how do we ensure that we have a workforce reflective of all of the needs of all the communities? So now we can apply across the board. That's a big challenge because that's a fundamental difference in how we approach deployment, development, workforce training, all of the above. But I think we're at a time when people now see.

roderick California
"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

07:49 min | 9 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on The Future of Buildings with Joe Havey

"And roderick, I'm really pleased to have you with me today and welcome to the show. I'm glad to be here. Thanks for having me. The fun topic that I really am passionate about super passionate about accident. Very good. Roderick, well, I know you are. I know that you and I have done some presentations together over the years. And I think we've made a very good tag team in that regard. And I'm very excited to have you on here today. So we're just going to kind of go through things right now. Rhetoric, I know you've got a very impressive resume and including your PhD at Georgia Tech. I know that you've been very fortunate over the years with good mentors personally and professionally and could you tell us a little bit about your first mentor that your father Louis Jackson and how working with him and package you? I tell the story of my dad he had my dad ten brothers. It was a 16 kids total, 11 boys and 5 girls. And of those 11 boys, they all do house. And so my dad was one of the other, and so he was in the building construction field. So as long as I was born, so when I was born, but it was around 83. So it's his age was about three years, taking out his job, but I remember my first album taking up straight now. And so I remember just recall any day I wasn't in school just working with my dad on the family side. And then I went on out, but I had that passion was along the lines of energy inside the mad that science. Instead. So I went on to join sex with my bashes, but I came home and had a job in manufacturing, but my dad was still there, and he was like, they were tired of the point. He's like, but you know, if you want, you and I can go in business together. And in building houses. And so it was an opportunity to now kind of take on that family legacy going back with my dad and his friend brothers, but how is it that actually now my dad and I inform me the general contract affirmed together. So that was kind of cool that I had really I just read a book about the importance of understanding family legacy and being able to leverage family legacy to build more and build social capital. So, okay, so I got a chance to partner with my dad, but then, so that was a good dad about three, four, three and a half years. But that passion for stem kind of pulling me back to where I went back to Georgia Tech to get my PhD, however, I could never kind of divorce myself from the family legacy. So once I finished my PhD, the opportunity to actually do the science and research on building construction was made of beta web national associa, wow, do you mean I can actually merge with married my passive precise passes with energy and my family legacy that started from the age of three with my dad taking on a job site, I could marry all those together to have a career. And so that career started around 2009 and been able to have been in this industry ever since. The only research. That my dad and his brother started and fielded me. So it's pretty pretty awesome to me, I would say. Yeah, that's a great story, rhetoric. And then I know before national renewable energy lab in Colorado, you were at oak ridge and you led projects there that were on the forefront of you and I talked about grid interactive buildings and connected communities and search. Can you tell us a little bit more about that what you did at oak ridge national lab? And I worked there for a while actually I had been in oak ridge for about four or 5 years 5 years in a leading project both in the residential and the efficiency space and how do we look at building how do we continue to improve them? And I remember that I got caught into my boss's boss boss office once. He's like, Brian, what are you doing? We're probably leaving. That was telling me, hey, that's not why you quit your job and went back to graduate school to go to. That's not why you came to an office after that. Literally think about ochre, that's the place that was part of the Manhattan Project that really, of course the history of change is a part of that. He's like, why are you here? What are you doing at the question because we be different? I was like, wow, that's a challenge from your boss's boss boss to get. Leading on from that, actually, we went, you know, he mentored me and we had this project. Think about kind of the future building. We're building in the future of the energy system. We're building and vehicles will share power. You see a lot of electric vehicles using the same power that buildings using. So now there's a how do we think about this kind of where they can synergistically interact together where the buildings will interact with the grid that's usually renewable systems. It also has the share power with electric systems. And how can we envision that, particularly with some of the advances and building construction in technology and manufacturing for the 3D printing for one? So we took all of the admin story short and we actually did a project. This was about 2015 or so. But we had a 3D printed house that was powered by a 3D printed car that they could wirelessly transmit electricity that was generated through solar power. We did this back in 2015, super crazy, but super open in my eyes to just how you can rethink how creativity the creativity merge with world class expertise and facilities can really set the stage. And so now as you look at some of the where people are going and you see now, you see building, you see vehicles, they're charging, they're being charged by electricity. And so they think. By solar. They used to think that this was a project that was started when my boss was boss boss told me. What are you doing? They'll literally change the course of history and so to be a part of the forefront of that. That was some of the work that I did back in Oprah. I was super cool. That's very cool, very, very cool. Well, Ryder, I wanted to ask you then, as we move on here, what are some of the trends that you're noticing when it comes to residential building integration or even commercial building integration and creating connected communities? So that was one of the things that was one of my last projects there was I got a chance to work with southern company. The utility company was largely energy companies in the country. And we thought about it, okay, well, if you have a community. And it just starts to look at these communities. You start to see that what happens when solar becomes a natural part of the community where we use the solar energy. How can we or the question is or hypothesize is well, can we do more as a community than trying to approach it at a single building level by saying, let's take a community of 60 homes per day and operating these 60 homes in combination with solar power and combination with such a via guitar. It'll get an optimized system that allows us to better complement the existing grid. And so is that kind of thought or that hypothesis that maybe we know from just commute that you can do more as a community as you can by yourself, taking that kind of philosophy and applying to 7 billion, you embarked on a journey of connected communities. We're now taking advantage of communications of electrical connections and being able to optimize each building for the occupant to being also being able to co optimize with the grid so that as an aggregate you have a load that is complimented to what the overall gracious needs. This is a cloudy day. You may be reduced below to be compensated with available energy, or I could say they need to kind of shift the load to be more aligned with generation. All of these things, how can we optimize this using the best and algorithms using the best in this communication approaches? That was one of the things that we did. And so that was that we started project around. We kind of embarked on this project that was I would say maybe 2016 or so. And so now, as a result of that project, nothing came to in real during the time period, but the project continues to move on to be a success. And now the Department of Energy is taking that kind of approach of collection doing more of the collection of buildings and saying, how do we advance this across the country? And they're putting up these connected communities across the country. So now we can take advantage of controlled algorithms, control that understand the individual, but also individual building, we also can receive communications about the state of the grid and how as an aggregate we can better shape the load overall lower this collection of buildings to better matter. And we were seeing these pop up all over the country so that eventually will be able to really have this grid that is optimized because the historical great.

Louis Jackson Georgia Tech oak ridge oak ridge national lab roderick Roderick Colorado Brian Ryder Oprah Department of Energy
New Russian Lab Briefly Knocks Space Station out of Position

Buck Sexton

00:18 sec | 10 months ago

New Russian Lab Briefly Knocks Space Station out of Position

"International space Station, was briefly knocked out of position this afternoon after Russian space lab accidentally fired its boosters after docking program manager Joe Montana Montalbano on how they fit. State Service module engines started firing to recover us in the attitude. There was no damage to the space

International Space Station Joe Montana Montalbano State Service
How Jesse Weigel Pivoted Into Tech

Learn to Code with Me

02:17 min | 11 months ago

How Jesse Weigel Pivoted Into Tech

"Hey jesse thank you so much for coming on the show. Oh you're welcome. Thanks for having me so. I'm really excited to talk to you because you enter. Wife are the first husband wife duo. I've ever interviewed now. I spoke to your wife about a year ago. She's also a self talk. Kotor which i think is really awesome. And i'm really glad to have this new milestone to have a married couple on two different times but to self-talk odors it's really great. Yeah it's it's awesome to have her be into coding as well. We can talk to each other about our work issues in understand each other. It's been really cool. Yeah so. I think that's a perfect segue into talking about your story in how you started coating yes so. I've always been interested in electronics growing up. I didn't really have a computer access to the internet until i was a teenager. But then at that point. I was fascinated by i would frequently break my parents computer in rush to try to figure out how to fix it before they found out about it. And so that's why. I got into just learning more about computers and how they works in high school. I did some basic html and css in in notepad so i had a class where we did typed everything out in no pat on microsoft windows and was very basic. The made a website about the movie the matrix because that came out around that time and i was very into the matrix. And i didn't really do do much with programming. I went to college and i took a basic programming class. And i actually. I think it was c. Plus plus yes so. I did a c. Plus plus class. And i remember building a calculator and i. I liked it. But i didn't go on with it. My degree was actually in business. So i just. I didn't do much with programming. I had a couple of different various jobs that had nothing to do with programming Manager at a restaurant waiter. I actually taught at a high school. I taught the latin that a high school and after a few years of that i realized my family started to grow. And i said you know what i really can't support my family on the salary and need to find something else

Kotor Jesse Microsoft
What You Should Know About Frontend Development With Laurie Barth

CodeNewbie

02:12 min | 11 months ago

What You Should Know About Frontend Development With Laurie Barth

"So. Laurie you for a lot on a bunch of really amazing places. You were formerly gatsby and then you start working not too long ago. Tell us about how you got started on this. Awesome coding journey. You've had so For a couple of months now. But i started my career about a goodness a decade ago. Now and i started actually in the federal government not as a software developer but as a program manager and it was my dream job. And i was really excited about it and i worked there for two and a half years and i hated absolutely every second of it it was just terrible fit for me so bad so there's sort of two things that made it so bad. I was bored. Okay that was one piece but to is. I had a mathematics background in a minor in computer science. I was getting my master's in computer science while i was there and the federal government. Does this funny thing where they try and make the workforce looks smaller than it is Politics and the way that they do that is that they hire a bunch of contractors to do all of this work and that's super frequent in the technical states and so they have government employees which is like federal civilians. Which is what i was. An our job is to manage the contract of the people doing the work and okay so it was just a really bad fit for. I don't care about cost schedule and performance really at all of computer and let me do something. I didn't get all this education for nothing. When i decided i was gonna leave. I didn't think i had the chops to be a fulltime coder. I was like oh get. Some technical analysts hybrid kind of job. And i talked to internship bosses that i'd had and other sort of family connections which i'm very grateful for and they were all Gobi junior and i did and i was a consultant at a couple of different places over the course of seven years. And when you're a consultant you see so many things and you work all over the stack and with all sorts of different technologies and so. Let me sort of figure out what i liked. And i kept navigating towards. I call it middle end now but it's sort of like front end tooling and i got really used to not i'm super dogmatic about this one technology but what is the best tool for this

Federal Government Laurie
Cryptocurrency Has Raised Environmental Concerns  Local Governments Are Stepping In

Environment: NPR

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Cryptocurrency Has Raised Environmental Concerns Local Governments Are Stepping In

"It was big news when he lawn. Mosque said tesla would accept bitcoin as payment for cars but just a few days later he abandoned the policy citing the rapidly increasing use of fossil fuels to run the computers. The general bitcoin similar concerns have us jurisdictions now writing. New rules for so called crypto. Minors meghan my scott ski reports. This video shows the space that bitcoin mining company called block used to occupy in a former plywood mill. Just outside of missoula montana jason von. The former site manager says entering. The building was almost like stepping into a giant erector set and most of its steel and metal. There's just like hundreds of thousands of little blinking light. Someone those lights were on racks and racks of computers. They used to generate the crypto currency. Bitcoin by solving complicated mathematical problems that requires intense amounts of computational power and electricity and hyper wlac grew rapidly to become one of the largest bitcoin mining operations in north america concerns about how much energy it used. Drew the attention of missoula's county commissioners these say at its peak. The data center used as much energy as about a third of all households in the county. They started crafting. New regulations missoula counties sustainability program manager. Diana mineta we thought quite a lot about this not wanting to prohibit this industry in the county but wanting to figure out. How do we make this compatible with. The county is values in the county schools. 'specially the goals related to climate. Change the new. Rules require crypto currency companies to develop or by renewable energy equal to the amount they use jason bond with hyper block says the rules along with a pandemic dip in. Bitcoin value drove his company to bankruptcy. Just as it was preparing to expand its operations by three times

Scott Ski Missoula Jason Von Bitcoin Tesla Meghan Diana Mineta Montana North America Jason Bond
A Conversation with Shilpy Chatterjee of Sakhi.org

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

02:18 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation with Shilpy Chatterjee of Sakhi.org

"Are so excited to welcome chevy chatterjee of sakhi dot org. She'll be chatterjee received a degree and legal studies at the university of delhi and started her career as a farmer in tribal rights. Activists advocate shelby has worked extensively with survivors of gender based violence and worked as a domestic violence program advocate at the police precinct in queens new york city which gave her the unique opportunity to work closely with law enforcement in a current position as anti-violence program manager at sucky dot org she'll be continues to work with survivors of gender based violence. She'll be was awarded. The two thousand nineteen advocate of new york city award and received a citation from the new york state assembly for her work on behalf of survivors of domestic violence. Show be welcome to the show. Hi sonya thank you for having me. We are very excited to have you. And i did want to start out with a question. Pertaining to the fact that stocky dot org is one of oldest organization of its kind. And i want to know. How did you get involved. And what motivates you on a day to day basis in this incredibly critical wolf So i had been working with survivors of gender based violence in students and nine. And i knew that sake. The leader in the field and i was working directly with sake. What's the key was one of the critical partners so when time so presented i joined sucky team and it was three years ago and since then it has been one of the most fulfilling experiences of my life and it is so because it is an amazing team be. It is an amazing team of some really committed people and we bring in our stories and understanding of gender based violence so this whole journey of growing very very important to me and says i get to do that at five here gift to expedience at. Its second that. I value my time here. So

University Of Delhi Chatterjee New York City Shelby New York State Assembly Queens Sonya
.NET 6 Preview With Rich Lander

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

.NET 6 Preview With Rich Lander

"Allu- and welcome into six-figure developer. Podcast the podcast where we talk about new and exciting technologies professional development clean code career advancement and more. I'm john calloway on clayton on. And i'm john nash. With us today. As richard lander riches a principal program manager on the dot net courtroom. He works on making dot net core work great in memory limited docker containers on arm hardware like the raspberry pi and enabling. Gpo programming and iot scenarios. Welcome rich thanks. Great to be on the show before we sort of jump into things. Would you give our listeners. Like a little introduction to yourself Perhaps tell them how you got started in the industry sure Yes so i'm canadian. Boarded bread From ontario and Went to school in. Well i guess my you know my. My dad wasn't exactly a computer and suzy but he thought we should be too so he He would bring home hardware thruster to play with in years on. That's what was kinda my start. Which i an incredibly thankful for you know twenty four hundred hundred baud modem than all the rest of it and then i went to school waterloo and then microsoft natives people knew somehow and which i did know a lot about And in two thousand. And i got hired at school and move to Seattle are ready for microsoft. And i've been there percents so that's kind of my origin story lounge. Yeah so what what What do you do these days from. Except yeah so. I work on the team at worked on like i said i joined microsoft in two thousand. I've been on the team since two thousand three. So i've worked on every release since including framework to. Oh

Allu John Calloway Richard Lander John Nash Clayton Suzy Ontario Microsoft Waterloo Seattle
Build an Online Knowledge Based Business as a Health Professional with Eva Synkowski

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Build an Online Knowledge Based Business as a Health Professional with Eva Synkowski

"This episode was speaking with c. cynic hausky and she is a biochemist engineer. Cross china who teaches athletes. How to eat well. She's extensive education and the life sciences with a bs in by chemical engineering a first m s environmental sciences and a stake in nutrition and functional medicine. She was the program manager for cross fit inc altering the training course materials in savings a subject matter expert. For this station's she has also accumulated more than six hundred hours of public speaking teaching fitness and nutrition Including ticks baga out with more than twenty years experience and academic training seamlessly translates even space scientific data into practical solutions for everyday success. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me on society. I wanna give out some context as to what you do where your expertise lies at a new passion lies in before. We're kind of talking about a lot that you do with educational programs so it gives a bit of background on you how that relates to that. Yeah background on me. I always had a passion for athletics. And that kind of background constantly as i of pursued engineering and career environmental consulting and all these other things but i was always doing on the side and eventually led to a career in cross it and cross at the base of bear. Teaching methodology is actually nutrition so it was a great way to combine my passion with some of my background in biology in the biological sciences. So yeah that's sort of the background and nutrition is interesting and and really yet with my programs. I try to make some of that. Basic education to be to be in bbc format. Nakai talked me about what you do with with educational progress. What does that mean to help. People build them build them for others. Would you do. I build them for customers to take them whether or not. They're members at a gym whether or not they're sitting by themselves at their house. I build a program that people go through to learn about nutrition and there's a couple different levels of them are sort of more basic. Hey let's get you go and then there's more of the heavy hitting you wanna learn about insulin and all the other details questions. People have

Cynic Hausky Cross Fit Inc China Athletics Nakai BBC
Astronauts flying reused SpaceX rocket, capsule for 1st time

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Astronauts flying reused SpaceX rocket, capsule for 1st time

"NASA and SpaceX are about to take recycling to a higher level as a crew readies to head of the international space station NASA commercial crew program manager Steve Stich says a coming launch is on or go for launch on Thursday morning an international crew of four astronauts will board a previously used SpaceX dragon capsule on board a previously used a falcon rocket for launch from Cape Canaveral to the international space station Benji Reid of SpaceX prefers the term flight proven reuse vehicles on flight proven vehicles is key towards greater flight reliability and lowering the cost of access to space each capsule is designed for at least five missions with the crew the falcon can be used ten times for satellites SpaceX and NASA are assessing how many times it can safely launch astronauts I'm timid wire

Spacex Steve Stich Nasa Spacex Dragon Benji Reid Cape Canaveral
What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

BBC Newshour

01:57 min | 1 year ago

What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

"Libby Jackson is human exploration program manager of the UK Space agency, part off the E essa. So what does it take to be an astronaut? You have to be calm under pressure. You have to be willing to work as a team. You have to be happy to go and spend six months living and working on the international space station where there's no shower the portal. Ooh. And if it breaks it breaks often has to be fixed by. You know, plumber on orbit Long days, but with amazing views. You're carrying out science that can only be done in space that will help everybody down here on Earth. New to lead better lives to help discover new materials with researching drugs on of course, astronauts are the sort of faith of the space industry, but they are absolutely not the only part off the space industry. The space industry is global. There are jobs in every possible skill set that you can imagine. And if people want to join the industry if they think space is something that its sights and they should feel empowered I'm able to do so we'd love to have him so calm. Scientists who conducted of plumbing on bond maybe speaks few languages. You have to be fluent in English. Knowledge of other languages is an asset but not essential. But you do need to have a grasp will be able to learn other languages because the international space station works in both English and Russian. You've got to learn Russian. No, I'm a Russian speaking. But unfortunately I am. I'm just north of 50. So that counts me out. There is a maximum age limit, isn't there? There is it takes out 5 to 10 years to train our pastor rolls and you only will get a mission perhaps every 5 to 10 years so they can't put on upper age limit on it. But it's higher than the last call back in 2000 and eight all part of this drive to increase the Paul to be as diverse and inclusive as possible. Mrs. Really lovely to see that it's increased to 50. Actually, it's a shame we had to put in angel bid

Libby Jackson Uk Space Agency International Space Station Paul
Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:56 min | 1 year ago

Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

"The managing director equity initiatives for koya partners melissa is responsible for ensuring that quiz commitment to diversity equity and inclusion is infused into every aspect of the firms work with clients candidates staff in leading this work. Melissa applies experience as search leader for numerous organizations as well as for background in social work in staff development prior to this role melissa served as managing director equity executive search with partners primarily focusing on identifying senior leaders for social justice organizations melissa lead or co-lead executive searches for organizations including innocence project diaz community changed foundation for justice society move on southern poverty law center and hentrich martin institute though her earlier nonprofit through her earlier nonprofit work melissa developed a deep understanding of variety of nonprofit roles and organization cultures prior to joining coy in twenty fifteen. She held positions with unicef. Usa safe horizon and cities of service. She also served as a founding core member and program manager with city year. New york melissa serves on the advisory council of equity in the center a national initiative dedicated to creating a more diverse equitable social sector talent pipeline. She actively volunteers time to provide coaching and mentorship to leaders of color and members of the lgbtq plus community. Melissa holds a masters of social work from the school social policy and practice at the university of pennsylvania and she earned her b a human services and theater performance from northeastern university. Well listen thank you very much for joining us and sharing your insights today. Thanks so much for having me john. It's great to be with you. So folks are drew bio and is one of the things. I just love about people in search. There doesn't seem to be. Maybe there's a degree in it but i very infrequently talked to someone who has such a thing my friend. Derek clarke failed. Who from dri who also been a podcast. Guest runs another search firm. She's an ordained. Rabbi every search leader seems to have this kind of wacky wildly diverse backgrounds. So how did your professional path leader to search. Please don't leave out. How cedar performance visit scrape up. Dick place for the start and especially i love. Dr and i agree similar to her and said lord is so many people in search we. You know it's it's things that line us up for this work even though we have no idea and then all of the sudden one day it's the only thing that we can do and so funny thing. It's actually a funny thing. Because i don't i mean maybe there are lots of other professional You know sort of professional career paths. That are like that. But this one seems uniquely wacky in that way definitely definitely and i think it's people think about what their superpowers might superpower. I rarely the smartest person in room. Sometimes the most interesting but what. My superpower is figuring out who the smartest in who are the most interesting people aren't any room and then introducing them to each other and just so you just shared my bio. I've had the chance to be in so many different types of organizations then community based work and national work in global work and in different parts of the organizations mostly in development but also on the program side in operations i. I'm social worker by training as you said i've got this theater background. Which is an interesting and so when it gets down to it. I love talking to people. I loved networking. I love having genuine and authentic relationships and seeing how i can be a resource folks and i was extremely extremely lucky and fortunate when i was at you at nsf usa to have Onondaga as my leader. When i was there and he was a believer. Not you know him. Joan of stu. He believed in creating ten percent of everyone on his team's time to carve out for them to do other work something. That benefited the organization. In some other. Way wow yeah. And and that's unusual. Especially considering he was leading development team and so what we found was that i love recruiting. And i liked going out and talking to people and letting them get to know unicef usa and in so. I was having a great time doing that. But it wasn't. My core job is really a fundraiser. And it was just threw a perfect stroke of fate that i was introduced to katy baton. Who's the founder of partners and she talked to me about what her vision was the work that clay was doing. She talked to me about her values and just as she talked to me about. I had no idea what an enormous sector the search field is and how many variations exist of nonprofit search professionals. But i i just decided that this is what i needed to do

Melissa Koya Partners Melissa Lead Or Co Diaz Community Changed Foundat Hentrich Martin Institute Council Of Equity Derek Clarke Southern Poverty Law Center Unicef Northeastern University USA University Of Pennsylvania DRI Rabbi New York Dick John Onondaga NSF
World's first face and hands transplant gives New Jersey man a second chance at life

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

World's first face and hands transplant gives New Jersey man a second chance at life

"Man who received a face and double hand transplant procedures so rare it had only been attempted two times before this. This is really quite unprecedented. Trish Henry, program manager for the reconstructive transplant research programs, this has only ever been 18 face transplants and 35 hand transplants in the U. S. Also worldwide, only two other combined face and hand transplants have ever been attempted. On those were unsuccessful before his surgery six months ago. Scars from third degree burns covered much of Joe DiMaggio's eyes. He couldn't smile. His 10 fingers were mostly gone. We are thrilled to be playing a small part in giving Mr de Mayo a better chance at life after his horrific accidents. Christi King W. T o P News the

Trish Henry U. Joe Dimaggio Mr De Mayo Christi King W.
Getting Women Excited About Tech with Facebook's Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

Technically 200

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Getting Women Excited About Tech with Facebook's Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

"This is the first of a series of technically two hundred talks or roundtable conversations. Where it's not just a one on one. But one onto plus. And i am very excited about this one because we have miss jessica odor yemi once again from ibm technical product manager. And we've got Ms katy call technical program manager at facebook. Such a pleasure to have you both here to night so i just wanna start with one question for each of you in. Why don't we start with katie. Katie what's your first memory of being excited about tech my first memory of being excited about tack. It has to be. I think in my freshman year computer science course. It's like an introduction a computer science. I just remember. I had started at princeton as a chemical engineer and i was just like i was in my first chemistry class. I was like this is like watching paint dry like this is not like the chemistry. I know from high school and i was just really excited about this idea. Setting chemical engineering. But when i took my first computer science course everyone had worn me before the course that was going to be so challenging difficult and i just remember just like enjoying every assignment and every assignment just felt like it felt like a puzzle. Felt fun and i. I felt like i was spinning. Just an inordinate amount of time. Just focus on by computer science work over my chemistry homework and i hadn't even got into sort of like the chemical engineering courses yet and i was like this'll make sense. Why by studying. Something that i am like. Great like begrudgingly. Getting through versus has studying something that i love so i just remember just being super excited about the next assignment and computer science like always wanted the next one wanted to do like the extra credit. I love that and jess unless you that same question. Yeah so let's see. I got into the tech industry per se a little bit later in life. But i remember the first time i was excited about anything. Simulated was an elementary school. When i found out I don't know if you've ever heard of them ike rube goldberg projects Like i don't know if you've ever seen a movie pee wee's big adventure. But at the very beginning he has all these contractions that connect to each other to do different things. But i kind of find out found out an elementary school. There was. We were introduced to the the concept of a rube goldberg project. In thought it was so cool. So i did something similar for science fair project and i thought it was the coolest thing ever As far as you know the tech industry goes. I think that happened much later in life for me. So that probably didn't happen for me until i was working and i think we've chatted about this a little bit before but i was working in the oil industry and it just occurred to me that i was out on the rate drilling wells and that was great but there was this whole other world behind what we were doing. You know software insistence. That was kinda powering. Everything that we were doing out in the field. So i think that's when i first got into Tech per se jessica. I did the rube. Goldberg is file. When i was younger. i've loved it. I went to the. I went to the national competitions. Like and since. I'm so close to purdue growing up so i would go to indiana. Just go see what the students The cooking up so had logged. Rube goldberg did that. When i was like what is the most extravagant way to crack in a like the prices so so member game mouse trap. I love that like that.

Jessica Odor Yemi Ms Katy IBM Katie Princeton Rube Goldberg Facebook Jess Goldberg Jessica Indiana
"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"We have. Laura want closer. Who was recently named the sports car racing program manager for general motorist racing. and laura. I just wanna start out. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. This is really exciting right well. I know that you're down. Daytona beach is well been exciting week for you and the race pergram. I want to get to that. But let's just start i without you. Were just recently named sports car racing program manager for general motors prior to that you were the program manager for gm's cadillac. Dpi program in the weathertech sportscar championship series. So just tell us about your job your role and how it's changed in the last week with this new position. Sure yes so by going over to be the sports car racing program manager in simple terms. What has happened is i now have all of our sports car programs which includes cadillac. Of course the camaro gt four program. And then the big one that i just picked up corvette which thrilled to be a part of of that team in that program and essentially the roles the same except just working with the different teams <hes> program manager's job at gm. We control the budget for the various programs. And that's laid out differently depending on if it's a customer program or factory program or you how we want to do that and then we also are the single point contact for the teams back to gm and also for the chassis suppliers and engine suppliers is so if they have any questions or any concerns that they want to relay back they see you go through me and then i'll take it to what i need to do. Either make a decision or or go above me. If i need to to solve a problem and then also very much. Integrated into design and development of the race cars at this point for all of those three programs. I just mentioned the cars are done. Which is exciting. So the new design and development. That i'll hopefully be getting into will be anything we do for future programs. Which is something that i'm involved in you know looking at. What would we like to do for from gm's perspective. Where do we wanna race. What brands do we want to race. All of that in the sports car arena. So it's nice. I have all different things. I get to be focused on which keeps the days different every single one and also keeps it so that i never get bored. Doing one thing like you said i mean. You've had a lot to your plate here with this new role. Previously mentioned you oversaw cadillac. And now. you've got corvette racing under your umbrella as well general question like how many people would you say you over at the company. I know you work with teams. So i guess it's probably different than if you were like a team manager but like in your role as a as a program manager that works with several sports teams. How many people would you say. You're you're looking here that's a. That's a good question <hes>. If you count the teams is being part of the family. Which very much do even though. I'm not gonna go tell a mechanic what to do. That's not my job. But you know i wanna make sure that i look out for all them. Each team is at least you know what the rolex bring more people but twenty thirty people depending and then. What is this year at the rolex we have nine cars three camaros for lax and two corvettes. So i guess if you add it all up it's quite a few people especially with delara and ecr and then our engine team at gm included in there <hes>. But like i said i. I don't really directly manage you. Know what the teams do in terms of telling the mechanics how to put the wheel on or anything along those lines. It's more so just giving them the connection. And then i control the purse strings for a lot of it especially the corvette program so you know ultimately it's like one of those love hate relationships. We have to work together to each. Get what we need

jimmy johnson daytona beach twenty four hours mike rockefeller chase elliott fernando alonzo Daytona beach Last year three Two years ago four days elliott twenty thirty people rolex last week nine cars one hundred hole Each team cadillac three programs
Laura Wontrop Klauser, Chevrolet sports car program manager for Corvette Racing, Cadillac Racing

NASCAR on NBC

03:29 min | 1 year ago

Laura Wontrop Klauser, Chevrolet sports car program manager for Corvette Racing, Cadillac Racing

"We have. Laura want closer. Who was recently named the sports car racing program manager for general motorist racing. and laura. I just wanna start out. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. This is really exciting right well. I know that you're down. Daytona beach is well been exciting week for you and the race pergram. I want to get to that. But let's just start i without you. Were just recently named sports car racing program manager for general motors prior to that you were the program manager for gm's cadillac. Dpi program in the weathertech sportscar championship series. So just tell us about your job your role and how it's changed in the last week with this new position. Sure yes so by going over to be the sports car racing program manager in simple terms. What has happened is i now have all of our sports car programs which includes cadillac. Of course the camaro gt four program. And then the big one that i just picked up corvette which thrilled to be a part of of that team in that program and essentially the roles the same except just working with the different teams program manager's job at gm. We control the budget for the various programs. And that's laid out differently depending on if it's a customer program or factory program or you how we want to do that and then we also are the single point contact for the teams back to gm and also for the chassis suppliers and engine suppliers is so if they have any questions or any concerns that they want to relay back they see you go through me and then i'll take it to what i need to do. Either make a decision or or go above me. If i need to to solve a problem and then also very much. Integrated into design and development of the race cars at this point for all of those three programs. I just mentioned the cars are done. Which is exciting. So the new design and development. That i'll hopefully be getting into will be anything we do for future programs. Which is something that i'm involved in you know looking at. What would we like to do for from gm's perspective. Where do we wanna race. What brands do we want to race. All of that in the sports car arena. So it's nice. I have all different things. I get to be focused on which keeps the days different every single one and also keeps it so that i never get bored. Doing one thing like you said i mean. You've had a lot to your plate here with this new role. Previously mentioned you oversaw cadillac. And now. you've got corvette racing under your umbrella as well general question like how many people would you say you over at the company. I know you work with teams. So i guess it's probably different than if you were like a team manager but like in your role as a as a program manager that works with several sports teams. How many people would you say. You're you're looking here that's a. That's a good question If you count the teams is being part of the family. Which very much do even though. I'm not gonna go tell a mechanic what to do. That's not my job. But you know i wanna make sure that i look out for all them. Each team is at least you know what the rolex bring more people but twenty thirty people depending and then. What is this year at the rolex we have nine cars three camaros for lax and two corvettes. So i guess if you add it all up it's quite a few people especially with delara and ecr and then our engine team at gm included in there But like i said i. I don't really directly manage you. Know what the teams do in terms of telling the mechanics how to put the wheel on or anything along those lines. It's more so just giving them the connection. And then i control the purse strings for a lot of it especially the corvette program so you know ultimately it's like one of those love hate relationships. We have to work together to each. Get what we need

GM Daytona Beach Laura Delara
NASA's 8-Minute Rocket Test Shuts Down After 67 Seconds

WBZ Morning News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

NASA's 8-Minute Rocket Test Shuts Down After 67 Seconds

"Core rocket at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Had to be cut short yesterday. The procedure was meant to test the rockets for massive engines. By firing up those rockets. The test was supposed to go about eight minutes and only went 60 seconds. NASA program manager Jim Hunnicutt. Any parameter that went awry on the agent could could send that. Failure. I d, but at the time that they made the call, which did still have four good engines up and running at 109%. So for now, the rocket remains on schedule for a November test launch with an unmanned Orion spacecraft. 707 to Wall

Stennis Space Center Nasa Jim Hunnicutt Mississippi
Moon rocket test firing aborted after engine shutdown

WBZ Morning News

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Moon rocket test firing aborted after engine shutdown

"For the art amiss. One core rocketed. NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi was cut short yesterday this after the hot fire procedure. It was meant to test the Rockets four massive engines by firing up the rocket for a launch. Without actually launching, just simulating a climb to orbit. The test was supposed to last a full eight minutes with the onboard software initiated a safe shutdown after just 60 seconds, NASA program manager Jim Hunnicutt explains one of the four engines experience an unknown problem that triggered a major component failure that led to the shutdown. Any parameter that When a right on the edge it could could send that. Failure. I d. But at the time that they made the call, which did still have For good engines up and running at 109%. Now there's a scheduled launch for November. 2021. It's a test launch with an unmanned Orion spacecraft. It's five

Stennis Space Center Nasa Jim Hunnicutt Rockets Mississippi
First healthcare workers receive COVID-19 vaccinations at Washington DC’s Giant grocery stores

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

First healthcare workers receive COVID-19 vaccinations at Washington DC’s Giant grocery stores

"With with D D C C health health and and get get essential essential health health care care workers workers vaccinated. vaccinated. They're among the first retailers to begin offering appointments. Jim George was among the first ones here, the giant food stored in Northwest to get the Moderna vaccine ahead. A slight tingling for the 1st 23 minutes like any other any other vaccine injection, he says. The choice for him was easy, sir, very honorable population, so we wanted to make sure you protect yourself. Sameer Belial is the clinical programs manager here and says offering the vaccine is about providing more access because I think that's a lot of the barriers that Associated with Theo covet pandemic and overall health care free sources. The vaccine is being offered at select Jang grocery stores to healthcare workers by appointment only seven days a week from 10 to 3. Very exciting time. I think for the district and just Our community. Melissa. How old W T OBY news Now

Jim George Sameer Belial Northwest Jang Grocery Theo Melissa
Seedbanking a Floristic Province with Cheryl Birker, California Botanic Garden

Cultivating Place

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Seedbanking a Floristic Province with Cheryl Birker, California Botanic Garden

"So tell listeners. What your job title is in in what you do share is it you do. Yes so i am. The seed conservation program manager here at california botanic garden is actually the largest seed bank dedicated to conserving california's native flora. so my job. I get to go out in the wild and make seed collections of the rarest plants in california. Bring those leads back to the garden process and store them in our c. bank because if you process in store seeds correctly they can potentially live for hundreds of years in storage you making those collections essentially an insurance policy against species extinction in the wild. You know so when. I'm not in the field collecting seeds. I'm back at the garden working with those seeds. Curing the collection managing the data and conducting these experiments trying to determine the best way to grow these plants from see. It's it's it's a very fulfilling job to have. I bet i bet. The current holdings of the seed bank there are how many we currently have over. Fifty four hundred collections representing over twenty two hundred taxes on plant tax a native to california so we focus on california and the california listrik province which also goes down into baja and a little bit up into And our our overall goal is to seed bank every single species native to california which is a a huge gold. Have i mean. California is about diversity hotspot. there's over sixty five hundred. Native plant species are tax up more accurately and many of those. You know all all the pao diversity is so threatened by human activity so we have our job cut out for us definitely and so when you use the word tax you are referring to a single species so with with the word species right. There can be multiple subspecies or varieties. And those are those are distinguishable dis- different plants so there are sixty five hundred different kinds of plants in california. We would call those tax that includes all of the different subspecies and varieties. But probably there's only three thousand species if you're not counting those varieties so usually try to use the word tax. Okay so for Let safer example and we're talking occurring tax not human cultivated cultivars. Is that correct. So it was a so that the given example. I'm thinking of my beautiful woman. Hetero files that's in bloom right now and there are several cultivars on the market. That people would have run into like margarita. Bob yes so in the bank we actually do. Have accessions of those cultivated varieties but our our main focus is trying to Conserve the genetic diversity. That is naturally present in california. So those those true species and not the cultivars

California California Botanic Garden California Listrik Baja BOB
"program manager" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Sacramento brought you by nor cal ram Jack so you know how excited you feel when you going to do something nice for somebody in this case Molly merits the program manager for rebuilding together Sacramento says she's looking forward to this local non profit making repairs to homes that need it I really can't wait some of the homeowners that we have selected this year are just some incredible folks who you know have some sort of physical or financial reason that they can't maintain their homes so they have Amazing Stories and they've been doing this for like twenty nine years we've worked on small repairs and accessibility modifications in over seven thousand homes throughout the area and their biggest work days coming up mid April and they could use some assistance so we really look for any volunteers from no skills all the way up to license contractors who can come and help out and and provide some additional expertise spans mollis is extremely rewarding to make comes better and safer for those who need it for working with four different veterans this year and I'm I'm just really excited to see that kind of work that we're gonna be able to accomplish with all the folks that come out and if you're interested in learning more go to kick the kid out come the afternoon news with Kitty o'neil just ahead on our afternoon news we'll check the top trending stories and go in depth on the latest on the corona virus statewide and nationwide on news ninety three point one K. if you can live everywhere on the I heart radio app always says you trust Christine Johnson Sam Shane tomorrow while you drive to work of course will cover coronavirus but.

Sacramento Molly program manager Kitty o'neil Sam Shane Christine Johnson
"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

09:56 min | 2 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Next step aside. He's professional engineers. We all have a a drive arrive if you will so the fact that you can fulfill that neither of meeting with people that talk like you look like you that you can learn from more power to you switching gears a little bit. I was wondering if you could share with me again. I love the folks that listen to this day. Liked to switch jobs like every two to three three years or so someone like what has kept your info for for this time. You know what has driven you to build your career. They're great question because I tell a lot a lot of people like you know if you had asked me when I graduated college what would my life be like or what I would want it to be what I thought it would be a said like I would be traveling leveling the world in many different jobs and I would be just hopping a lot quite often and it just happened that that I ended up staying at until for thirteen years it has been a combination of liken where you are in the area of Oregon. I have liked it. They're you're having a family and having kids and then the kids going to school. And maybe you don not wanting it to disrupt disrupt. It happens that in Oregon again until is the biggest name in town. So I'm probably in the best company that I can be in that area now. If it were in the bay the area I could switch companies without disrupting a lot of those other things that have kept me in Oregon right. I also three years ago. Move my parents so so to From Puerto Rico to Oregon so I feel what I'm not going to move now. Let's say to California. After I moved my parents here I would have to move them with me and California's Elliott a bit more expensive than we. We have perfect weather BUBBA. We pay for it but overall I mean I think it's every person has different circumstances and what I tell people. Is You know what whatever you do as long as you have a recent and you can explain it is okay. The same answer or or disclaim solution doesn't work for everybody and it's okay. If you're says different yeah and some people are nourish the stability and people appreciate the community. you have these deep network of folks at Intel. You know how things to get things done. You know how to speak the language. I guess like after five six seven years if it's almost like you're moving to different country. Yeah when you're doing different at the same time you have to embrace change and sometimes if we stay too long in the same situation can you forget about embracing change or you start feeling it and we on as I did and really changed like I said jobs for the first time so when I thought in my years eight torso to switch even to different part of until it was a little frightening it was like man I mean. Can I do something new when you're in college. You don't even think about that because you're already doing many different things having who blew Niclas and then doing a different one you are with change but if you stay somewhere too long it could would be that that effect of the frog right but to be honest once I switch I felt this adrenaline rush of the learning and than you and and that was really powerful so even if people change jobs to yours right some people may see that as well you're not wear you're switching jobs you cannot stay with one thing like if you have a reason right eight. I switched to this new thing. I learned it first. Year was a lot of learning second year I mastered yesterday. I want something new. That's fine. That's present some things you know. He's also the economic realities is a big deal for some folks that I can say at this. This company does good and I give me up three percent raise every year but if I switched jobs I get Ten Percent Fifteen percent twenty percent race. That's a great point because actually what a lot lot of people say you know what the best way of growing in a companies to get out of the company and comeback. I heard many many times and I have seen people people doing it. Yeah so the economics are very important to anybody. has their own journey right. So like Over I believe he's a chapter six. So is the episode six of these guests. We actually have a friend. The cuando America knowing some machine learning engineering. He double his salary. In two years switching companies he worked at a startup for six months and he told me that working that startup environment basically accelerated his career five five years just being in that startup environment. So like he didn't have weekends for three months. You have to put himself through that gauntlet but in the anti paid off and just so you know. He actually achieved something that I mentioned every time because I think it's very admirable the fact that she moved his parents to from Venezuela to the US. She bought them a house in Florida and he has bought a house in California. And he's only I wouldn't have been able to do this unless I had done these switching around because I wanted to provide to them so it's a it's a way of looking at things like what's your purpose. What do you WanNa get out of what you value again? Everybody has their own journey. Yeah and you know what this this is going a little back more. I was talking about A group of an old like five hundred kids in high school and particularly with US Latinos. You'll have to provide for her family right so a a lot of kids graduate and they decide not to go to college because they want to help their parents they just need to get a job right now and help my family and we had to just still have general and will what the best way to help your families to go to college. Go to college. And you'll multiplied by a factor of five to ten what you can make and then and you can help them that relates to that example. You said the work in Byron. It's different if you're going to move for a three percent increase right yacht. Got Your moving for a twenty percent increase on one hundred thousand dollars salary or more. It's a big difference at the same time. It's it's very personal if you aside you know even though I had that opportunity not taking it because I want to do X.. As long as you're doing an informed decision I think that's okay. Yeah so just leave your own journey. Dan You know you. You have any idea of what you like what you're good at and the things that you need to learn so you anything else you'd like to have these audience of well one. The one thing that you ask that I didn't address. What's the Difference Between Program Management and project manage right so this is one of those words that people use interchangeably and they could mean many different things right? So I'll give you my definition and what I have read on kind of ended up deciding it so when you're talking about project management it's at a little bit more depth level right you're talking about milestones you're talking about. Let's say getting the project on schedule an executing that project from start to finish. It's very centric on the project and making sure you get all does things right When you're talking about program management it's a little broader? You may have many different products under a program and also you may have a lot more influence on the strategy or how you're trying to achieve that right so like which project is prioritize which along as they prioritize. Finish wish this first before we the next or even how let's say that You have a diversity program right. That's the bigger umbrella our like to call it. And then you have the friend in super projects. We should be okay. We want to match representations to the market that is one project right and even within that product there could be many different projects right but another part of the diversity program may be external engagement so external engagement with the community external engagements gay shipments with the universities. Right so you're talking. They're like different projects and areas within a bigger umbrella. So that bigger umbrella. is the program room. Those smaller umbrellas under are more projects with that said. Let's say you're looking for a program management role when you're doing your certian linked in or anywhere else for project management. Because you want to first go interview and then bureau out with that employer what this project management then mean to you. What does program management mean to you? And then you'll be able to assess I always recommend it is good to have project management experience before program management. Because you understand a little better of what does it take to get. Those projects done particularly software projects. One of those things that we talked about engineering and business is that when you're talking about engineering and management they one thing just to be done quick right. They understand why it's taken so long ride. When when you're at that project level with the software folks you understand how things are interacting with each other? How you change a code in one side and it could I have impacts on other just moving data from one place to another may be who heart? Maybe data validation even the agile process right. How something could take longer or you? The team may switch focus. And you don't get that unless you are deep into the project management barked and knowing how how that has handle will help you do that. Program Management Role Better and explained to management better. Why things are delayed or why? We cannot expand expand this code to cover. Let's say two databases to three databases. You'll be able to explain those things better than if you didn't have that experience so hopefully that helps hopes thank you so much. Thank you so much..

Oregon California Intel Niclas Puerto Rico America Elliott Byron Florida Dan US Venezuela
"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

10:56 min | 2 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Myself an and hopefully hung a little bit. Yeah it's critical because actually I do a lot of what is called Matrix management which means so you have to manage a lot of people that are not reporting to you so you have to manage by influence and like I said a lot of people are senior to you but you you still need things from them meaning that they need to complete some tasks for your group and you need them to finish it but they don't report to you so it's a little bit tricky because what is your leverage. So so what's your leverage. How do you approach that? I have evolved on this overtime by a lot of times particularly already beginning was a lot of talking with them and convincing them. Why this was important? That's still valuable right but A lot of times we might previous years was escalation. Listen which means that. Okay if you do it I have Lescott it to your manager because I needed that in theory works but it leaves us our taste and It depends also how culturally accepted. Eat is in their division. I was before it was. Actually there were so many escalations that it was not at something completely out of line where I'm at right now. It's definitely something you shouldn't do unless you really really tried to work it out with that person and told them ahead that I will have to escalate this. If it doesn't come through bod what I have found that has been the most successful is that I tried liked to say it ahead of time. meaning that hey we need this information and the is done in two months. Is that doable. And they will most of the time they would say say two months. Yeah sure that's doable. Right if you for something for next week most likely those eight years I mean that would be really tough but yes for something for here in two months and you say okay. Most most of the time you need things from many people and you have to put it together so you do a documenting wish. Everybody Connecticut right and they put their own information there. And you say okay so when it for two months and then I sat up on I tell them we have a meeting with his. VP in a week after that so we are presenting and and that meeting becomes a forcing function because they don't want to look bad in front of the VP. Right and they know schedule already so they will meet that headline and that becomes actually emotionally for me. It becomes a lot better because I don't have to bug people as much and yes if we need to move the meeting getting we do it but for the most part it works. I live at a week so we can massage it and have a pre presentation I but they cannot have the excuse accused of. I didn't have enough time. We set up this meeting two months ago so I wanNA talk a little bit about the the Ova finding your purpose Kosovo. I know you've been at info four thirteen years now. Yes and how many jobs you had with an Intel. A you can count off. You know what it's interesting because my first church job at until it was an facilities manager. Something's the titles. Don't even go with what it is right now. I T's like all all the job. Titles you see are are made up. Yeah and sometimes like the company's job title doesn't match what do so what you put in lengthen. It's totally obscene. You you in the end of the day is like what skills are you using. What does the deliverable look like? That's a great point but in the my first job I basically was managing facilities are in tow and it was probably a job. That was way ahead what I should have been done at the time but I grew into it and then I continue you and we said that we operated into our own little islands and I I feel I was kind of almost like you own part of Your Business. Division division individuals attributable your scope is so big that I mean we were building factories very much and were responsible or I was responsible for saying how big big should some of the facilities fee. I honestly wasn't that Joe for my first seven years now the scope increase but technically the job was the same. The job title was the same but the scope increase and increase and increase and increase to the point that I was like I need to drop. somethings and and didn't get to that point so it was pretty exhausting and high stress. And you don't realize that while you're in there we're talking about the frog earlier. Yeah Yeah. But it's sitting in the boiling pot and they don't realize it if you raise the temperature later by Lehto you don't realize it right so work can be like that and Now that I'm in a different role I was like. Wow that was tense. Right but yet find purposes is a great question because us. I say you can do something. You're good at or something you're made for and to be honest I I'm doing something I'm good at annoy. That's what I'm made for. There are some times where good is good enough right. I mean could I find a better job probably but this as of right now. Oh it's fulfilling some of the things. I'm good at it so for now. It's okay right Bud finding a purpose something that I I don't even know if you ask ask yourself. Honestly what is your purpose. I don't even know if you know I ask myself that. And sometimes say the Noah. My philosophy is more I may not know it but I'll see a recognize. Recognize it when I see it exactly and the and again just the full disclosure. The reason why bring this up is because a recording this at the shop National Convention mentioned in two thousand nineteen and can put us are forever so maybe people in twenty forty realism to this of new pressure. So a young professional approach me Eh. And he asked me you. Are you recording with jury today. Yeah I am. Oh that's awesome. Really look up to him and his you started. I didn't tell Oh. And then he was asking me about like finding your purpose and making sure that you are aligned with Would you WANNA do. I feel the same way like. I don't look at it that way. Look Gab I have a list of skills things that I know. I'm really good at and at least of things that I wanted to learn and things that I need to learn to be better at my job and then some things that I just hate doing and those sorts of things that I tried to delegate yes automate or or what have you but in the end like the way that I found mine. Hi My dream job if you will that I align these opening this job opportunity with my strengths so things like storytelling public. Speaking speaking and I love my job because I get through them every day so to me. Is that my purpose. I don't know but I'm a good at it and I feel really satisfy than growing so I'm going to keep going so I'm going to keep adding value to people that way. So is a different way of looking at it. It's tricky right. I mean it's like the other question is should you. You do stuff if they are not your dream or sure your this wait for the drink to show up and then to stuff is like different people. Think different ways. I think you can not just a a still so you should do something even if it's not what you're one hundred percent schneider as long as you don't hate it right. I have the concept of staying in shape and be within striking distance right so that when the right opportunity comes in you can jump to it versus if you are in your bed. Ah and something comes in. That says okay. It may be too late. You may not have enough time right so you have to stay active enough and that to your point in scales heels in networking and all that that if the right opportunity comes in it doesn't take you too long to jump into it because by the time it takes you too long by the time you're ready they'll paternity may be gone and the other thing that I said it's Sometimes your job may not fulfill all your needs But you can find other ways to do that. For example you are very active in the Latin community right and Italy's not paying you for that. But what you do it on your own and Intel or to position you have right now allows you to do that so within like the whole you probably feel very fulfill I do and and again if a went back the technical route as macgyver Java programmer and I was coding six seven hours a day. I think I would start making even more podcast because that way I would satisfy my social knee. The doctor different people so so there's a balance for sure any my case. I feel that I use some of the skills they have in my hobby and at work and some good at them and I enjoy them. It doesn't feel like work. Sometimes I stay up to a one in the morning on the Sunday goes. Oh guess what. Have a Monday episode to put out on Monday morning. I'm Groggy Bob. Hey Coffee's free at work yeah I'm sure you have learned some skills that you wouldn't have learned at work. Yeah yes while. I'm managing multiple multiple pipelines of content and cold humane people so yeah definitely so and for example that I say like with the employee resource groups writer. I'm active with the into Latin Latina Network and I tell people you know you you can use this as a career growth opportunity to I do things in Ireland that I cannot do it on my job because I have some good people or co workers that I mean we set up division right I can set the strategy. I have a budget. There are are many things that I do not have that level of freedom in me my particular role so you are able to do some things. Imagine like if you are Ah Basketball player and you are in accompany or in a team. They don't want you to shoot three pointers and then you go to your volunteering deem there you can do that. Then that you develop that skill in a way that later on you can go to your real team and say hey I have gotten much better at this. Give me a chance and I believe it has been. I'm very strong and when we sat trying to sell people in joining I as a board member we tried to highlight that this eight. This is not just one of doing. This is growth growth. Fine a position where you want to get better at. Let's say. Communications is a great example. Someone that doesn't have a lot of background. POWERPOINT goal to the communications team and learn about all that and that may become an opportunity later on. So yeah I believe things like this that you're doing right now. Open your level of skills else into areas that you wouldn't be able to do at work. Yeah I agree A thousand percent. You need to have a hobby or volunteering. Whether as your employee resource group you're an affinity grew at any company or unknown for profit by.

Intel VP Lescott Kosovo Connecticut facilities manager Basketball Lehto Italy Joe Bud schneider Groggy Bob writer Ireland programmer
"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

13:12 min | 2 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Slash Latinos. Gos- afford them since they support us. Thank you you really meet us. Welcome to Latinas attack. Thanks for having me my pleasure wanting to do this for a while because your one of the a few people. I think you're the only person I know the has pedes the and an MBA. visine time. So tell me a little bit about yourself. Well I'm Marie from Puerto Rico. Went to school at the University of Puerto Rico. Ecuador's graduated with a Bachelor's from industrial engineering. After that I went to Wisconsin Madison and I did a masters and PhD usually and I completed the NBA there. So this story with that is I went to Wisconsin to complete epecially. At that time I needed to do a minor and and I always wanted to be that person that yes it wasn't engineer. But no what the implications of the business were and I started taking business classes to complete that minor minor. It was pretty cool. I liked it a lot and I ended up taking a lot more classes about even though I didn't need them and at some point I was like man maybe I can get a degree out of this right so I ended up finishing an MBA there. And I figured that you know that this won't help me right now. Got A job this I was I had just two. Your six year ends Sunday. We it's pretty raw and no one was going to hire me for an MBA manager. Oyo but I figured you know five years on the line. When I'm looking for a job Bob? This may be a differentiating factor right and at the very least it captures the people's attention they ask. Why or how and I feel that it's actually a very into her. Apart of who I am because I am a person that I looked looked at the engineering details but also tried to elevate it to what the business impact is and to be honest a lot of that. It's a lot easier to sell that when when you say you have. I mean the background education just versus. I just think that way. So it has helped me in some ways snug that I've got an job because I'm an MBA. But I feel in the way that execute ejup just is just part of me so it helps me that way because you have an MBA as having these toolbox wchs bad. You can almost like Batman by little belt. Put All these tools so you can reach out to them. Oh we need to do forecasting I not. Oh we need to do product marketing. I know how to do that. So that's Kudos to you. That's amazing and I think it's always the question of depth versus breath right and I see the engineering degree at having a lot of them. Then I see the NBA as having a lot of breadth. Can you elaborate on that. Yes so something deep may be. I mean when you go to very technical talks they are going into not just when it is bridge to a strong. No we need this bridge to have this work. I'm in this mass this very detail things that you're wondering something that does that matter. Yeah it matters engineering level right then. The breath comes into okay so now that the which is good right and there's a lot of engineering behind that. What do we do with it right? What problem does it? So how can I leverage that I can I make money out of it so all those are things that I associate a lot more with breath. And that's where the business implants comes on and now you get this even in stereotypes thirty types right you get the marketing folks like to talk a lot about the engineers about how they do so much. That really is not going to sell stuff. And then they engineer folks are talking about the marketing guys is like well they just want to market this and they don't really care how this works or why it works this way right so pretty and they may cool look in presentations. Exactly and the truth is that it's a little bit of both right. You need a good product stuck in order to market it pretty well. And it's just different routes wind engineers to do good engineering. We did the marketing guys. Do good good marketing now inbetween. Ideally you need someone that can translate. Oh that mediate and actually look at some engineering thing on say. Hey that there's value there and maybe a marketing person may not see that value but you would background in engineering can see it and now as your role to translate that so that the marketing folks see it and now it's a very good value proposition right so it is something very needed in the people that can bridge the the gap between engineering and the business world. It's very important right. And a lot of people may career show that there is actually a program what I did the NBA. It's a it's all TM. It's go operations and technology management and it's kind of like that is a bridge between engineering gene and business at work. Actually I mean the board for the University of Portland in one of those programs that I think is very important. It's not a PhD program it's not MBA program. It is the bridge between engineering and business and I think we need a lot of that Nikolas ultimately you only want to build a product you also want to hopefully sell it to our peoples who can reinvest that gain back into the company's organization but I wondering 'cause you're technical program manager manager at Intel and I'm wondering if you can tell me a bit about that role in technical program manager and I hear like project managers at the same. Is that the front like what is T-. PM Do alone that program versus project in a minute but I joke with people that A program manager is one of those roles that can vary from being someone's assistant to almost running the show. It depends a lot of your work for four and it depends a lot on what you make out of that role if you take a step back and you let things happen and you're just transferring information or taking in minutes Things like that. That's one part of the role but you can be an influence or you can bring ideas you can drive them and execute get them things that sometimes some peace do right back but you're doing them as a program manager but you need to empower your manager to do that though they don't say hey why are you going to this. Vp without my authorization right so you need the right environment to be a good program manager but in my particular role I do. Different things. Things from running initiatives meaning that there's an idea let's say enhance productivity of our organization and we have to do a strategy for that unemployment and implement that so one example. When I came into this job we were really high on the Autobahn was driving? And things like that and I came in and The job that I do or the the group I work with basically they built software so that the software developers could optimize into hardware right so daintily harbor were. It's a ship that It is what it is now. The software developers pass coat through it and it goes at a certain speed. How can they changed changed that they use our software and the software says? Hey your software. He's graduating this problems in the hardware. If you change it this way it would run faster. So they run this kind of like the border and they changed our code now runs faster so I'd come into this team and they have all this software plan fight platforms. I asked my manager so who owns how tournaments driving and he says well autonomous driver part of its own by this product part of this product art of this product and part of this broader because if I products do different things. Yeah but who owns autonomous driving to make sense to make sure that all that. Because you don't want to have duplicated efforts or even how how they complement each other so we came up with a strategy of okay. We need an owner of autonomous driving. That will be someone from this five teams that will make sure that things are lining so they'll create their own forum or meeting in which they are going to be talking to each other. There is a big change or strategy or something that they want to do they have to bring it to that forum get it approved and then execute and we did that for like five initiatives and that's what we call gone off Horizontal integration versus the vertical. That would have been the team still road the the products and that created big big optimization. Listen in the team and things are run a lot smoother so that's an example of big initiative that my manager said. Can you do this. And we executed and that S A program manager my role is to talk to the stakeholders which a lot of times in a lot more senior than me and convince them that this is the right thing to do or get them to do the right thing. And that's part of the skill. How do you talk to those folks without them seeing you across as someone junior trying to tell show them what to do it? Sparta what you develop A. I mean it's how you ask it's sometimes convinced lansing them that the idea is cannot more dim than yours. I for Mesa very interesting role. You can mow that many different ways. There are some time that I'm doing presentations for my manager. Right so he says hey. We need to address this topic and part of my job is to create something that is at least eighty percent. Ideally of what it should be and then he goes to exit and that's when he may have to do keynotes or things like that or sometimes we need to address our organization quarterly. So I help him with that and many other initiatives now. I'm working and creating different conferences where we can promote our products so again turn a league people aware of all the things are going or do you mean an externally early. That's point actually because one of the key things that we establish there was that a lot of our customers or people that use our tools or external but actually a lot of people are internal that people that are building the platforms so they want to use our tools so that they can optimize said before it even goes out in the market and at some point we were kind of deprioritize in that because it we're not real paying customers right so part of the other thing that I was asked to do with how. How do we change that culture? And we just started an internal customers for him right in which we brought brought in some of our main internal customers and have them explain how are tools impacted their product and actually as some things that are told. Were not doing good enough right so all of a sudden it turned into okay. We can improve our products and improving the products on this area. Would actually help was once the other external customers he has got it but my question then is How do you approach that Conversation with somebody because they see that you're we're talking about somebody's baby and you're telling them hey. Your product is not doing that good. Maybe you can do this to optimize it. Make it better. So how the person that conversation of weed out costs hurting the relationship yet. Well so I the customers would approach it. Were say to us the internal customers right. Meaning the Data Center Group. And I think that the saying of customer's always right right. You have to take it as I hear you and actually let's evaluate it and also let's see this as an opportunity to make the product better right so part of what we tried to tell. Our team is like we need the criticism right because we want to get better and we need extra late to hear this things versus not hearing them. Yeah so I think that's something key for for building accessible culture the fact that everybody is great at spreading good news but something that my mom me now told me and I believe deeply. Is that good news. Should travel fast but bath. News should travel faster. Because an I'm not gonNA get mad at you you because we're bringing that up. I'm not GonNa kill the messenger of you will because I want to have that that sentiment of worrying this together. And I'm no. I'm not gonNA penalize you because you're bringing something up it's a cultural thing and and it's really difficult to break and What we started hearing hearing from manager was discounts up? Fail fast right but communicate it. So it's like yes. If something is not right say it as soon as you know it. But don't wait until the last minute and then say because then it becomes a price and we have a lot less time to deal with it so mulligan. Expectations is is part out of the job right. So I'm wondering because the manage any people right now or that's interesting too because Joke with my daughter. I said When I got this job job so what is your new title? I'm technical program manager. Oh cool so. How many people do you manage Zero.

program manager NBA engineer Wisconsin Ecuador Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico University of Portland T Bob Intel Vp Nikolas Data Center Group
"program manager" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Is the program manager at banking on our future they are a program of operation hope I'm doing pretty good so tell me about self so I know we tell the listeners about yourself well I am the program manager is set for baking our future Dallas which is a youth financial literacy program that we operate primarily in you know the Dallas fort worth area we are all volunteer driven so we have volunteers to go out into the classroom day or community organization they teach kids about how to make a budget how to bounce a check book they learn about credit cards and loans and investing we do a discussion about financial dignity and what that means to be a a financially dignified person a little bit of financial empowerment and we've been doing it for about six years now and I've been running the program for the past six years passengers basically started I opened the Dow's open yes I'm sticking around you are here and basically if you look at the website would give everybody writes about what his operation hope dot org okay and there are several different programs under operation hope we're gonna talk about their beginnings as well yes one of them obviously being banking on our future and when you go to that section there for making our future pretty much just here's what you just said making our future elevates the dignity hope and economic self sufficiency of people in low wealth communities throughout the finance through financial literacy so couple things on that you're pretty much dealing with a lower income families and children of lower income yes we can arbitrary target low to moderate income communities is not a requirement to participate in the program but that's our goal to target the communities that we feel like or maybe not getting the education at home that they need or that their families are are needing education as well and it's really just to try to get people like you said empowerment is the big words were to get people to kind of what you know better you do better so once again early age right you can get the basics of understanding just how money works in your attitude towards money and and kind of your attitude towards how you would manage your money we're trying to lay that foundation for kids we start in the fourth grade we go all the way through high school try to get that conversation started and then get the the community in the family is involved as well okay and as you mentioned you open the Dallas office is about six years ago yes okay and there's other locations where Audrey yes and since its inception the program's help over half a million students more than seven hundred schools community based organizations in the U. S. as well South Africa we'll talk about that initiative as well all these classes are free their offer yes okay for schools and communities we do churches were the girls clubs basically anywhere there's a group of kids and they want us to come out and we can find a volunteer that will be able to work with that schedule and come out it teach the class usually the volunteers are financial professionals are coming from the banking industry or financial industry but we have a lot of volunteers that are just people that think financial literacy is important and maybe they've learned the hard way they're they're self taught or financial executives in transition so to speak LA are affected right now from the economy and such and have the expertise if you were talking about not necessarily from the banking industry but being an executive and having do had run a business right knows financial literacy and financial responsibility so they're able to teach at absolutely we provided training to all of our volunteers they go through our program to give them the skills that they need to kind of facilitate the class we provide the curriculum which is of all you're gonna see the guys all the materials are provided and it's really just basic personal finance so most people are dealing with this as an adult you know in the yes hopefully dealing with it it's whether they're deride smart manner right that's to be debated so there's a lot of people that have experience which is able to then be translated into lessons for the kids and I always encourage my volunteers to use their own personal experiences because the kids are going to be able to relate to that if you tell them you know this is a mistake that I made this is what happened to me this is the consequence I had and here's how I learned to do it better the kids can really kind of relate to that so makes it more personal for them absolutely now these folks obviously know what they're doing they've received the US treasury department's John Sherman war for financial literacy excellence as well as Oprah's angel network use your life award yes crash is pretty awesome yeah also the partner the Nelson Mandela's children's fund in South Africa to promote financial literacy empowerment in Africa where banking on a future has educated over thirty thousand students in with their we're gonna come back to North Texas your mobile with their you and I were talking off Mike a little bit it's a little bit different mindset whereas in South Africa it's more of a mindset of helping to rebuild an economy and and teach entrepreneurship yes yes there is definitely a focus on entrepreneurship in the South Africa model and you know the financial dignity piece was a very big part of the South Africa curriculum as well that's actually we took that kind of model and incorporated the dignity into the United States curriculum as well which is really talking it's more of a message of empowerment the idea that if you have the education and you have the the drive in you you know can doctor said if you do what you need to do to succeed that you're really going to be able to to do whatever it is that you want to do whatever your passion is in life so we talk to the kids about that really trying to get them excited about the idea of you know accomplishing their dreams okay as we mentioned in the onset they are a program of operation hope which whether website is operation hope dot O. R. G..

"program manager" Discussed on SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

13:29 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

"Have deeper more meaningful relationships and when you learn how to better relationships you just it just changes you. It changes everything. So that's the the I would think would be the number one thing especially if spouses dealing with an identity crisis like I was this in now. I'm not that You know did the fulfillment from being that thing. Begin with Stem from seeking. You know perfectionism or or something else that maybe you could work through You can still find your true purpose in your true sense in something else with the greater purpose And let's see I would definitely mentioned already but to be in touch with your story and just celebrate the failures whether it's ugly or beautiful Stopping in appreciate where you are today it. You're you're in. You're you're you're you're supposed to be to you into what you're gonNA become and just I would say except that being that space and be okay with a give yourself grace to if you're not ready to go back into work into a work environment give yourself grace to be where you are If you're ready in struggling like don't let the the nose I heard. I got rejected by so many companies that it would have been easy to say what I was getting into that pattern at times. They don't want me I'll never get there But mope for a minute and then get yourself right back up and get back on the journey. They don't stay there. Don't stay there that C and then the biggest thing I would say is be in the space where you WANNA go If it requires taking a class Attending networking events. You know listen to a lecture. There's so many online opportunities just to between youtube or or learning courses you can learn about anything At home so even if you're not ready to go back to work you can just be in the space. What are the trends? What are the news things that are happening here? How can I educate myself about the industry? And if you're also going to networking events you can just go with more questions on your on your plate. Then what you WANNA say because people love to talk about themselves. They love to help other people. They love to work and they're willing to do that. But take some time and you know you can also find that online. Look up a good set of questions to bring to a networking events that you feel educated and powerful in that moment in confidence so that you don't end up like me at my first one saying I don't belong here. The food's good. I'm glad that's there is a distraction but just to to to have a purpose while you're there trying to connect to people builder network online. I Love Lincoln has become my favorite place to be Anybody any of your listeners. Feel free to add me if you'd like. I'm happy to help in any way I can. But yeah it's it's it's a great place to here to see what the trends are in various industries to to have a professional take on things to build a network to see what what the people who are successful in your field are doing and you can imitate that like please imitate that. It's it's great. Do what they learn in one day. You're you probably be sooner than you think actually like. Wow I actually feel comfortable here and where we're comfortable. We tend to to flourish so more work you put into that. I think the the moral when you're ready you'll be real be really ready and yeah that's three. I probably shouldn't do like five hundred and fifty because that'll be on jacqueline witnesses gap or something really to sum it all up Talk to yourself more than you listen to yourself. You know you know what you're good at. Tell yourself that an stop listening to the voices. The the the the negative delays things that other people have put in. Your head is not as that aren't true you know yes speaking of wise on troops. I think it's really important to also ask you wait. You think employers what truths in employers should learn from you about your experiences going through trying to find employment and finding employment now what are what are some key takeaways for employers who are considering military spouses as potential hires. I think really one of the greatest things is that I could if I were going to sit with the CEO of a company in and talk to them. I'd probably WANNA plot my own resume in in point to that gap in and say that's that's the personal development face. That's the part right there that made me so valuable to you as an employer and to embrace that gap and not be afraid of it Because you know like life grows us up in it changes us in one thing I know for sure is the military spouse community has had a whole lot of life thrown at them often short bursts of crazy. And then you know. Maybe there's a lull but then it just goes right back up again and I would challenge them To look at that more than like what? What bullet points on their. You know and then I would challenge them to to consider what they're turning away in the same vein in one story with that where I was going to a job fair and the reason is going because Disney was there and they have a little. I don't know how big the cut their presences and Seattle. But I know Disney tech is here and I saw him at a career. And I'm like I'm going to go Hamilton lyrics playing. I'M NOT GONNA throw my way. My shot up there in convinced them they need to hire me and and I talked to the person there and he was very candid and I appreciate that On your kind of not ready yet. But we're not going anywhere you need to do this this and this to to get here and I was a little crestfallen inside but at the same time you know I was saying in my head. You don't know who you're turning away. I was just standing in line next to other people. Were like. Oh It'd be cool to work for for this company and I'm like no I would be passionate about your product I already am and you know I would give so much to this company because I love it already in. You know the skills turning away in the personal growth in in the life that you're turning away because why because you would need to train me a little bit I can learn that I mean even in the the job I'm in now has nothing to do with the class that I just took it. Microsoft is similar. The company is there but I'm learning everything new already In doing fine in it's just you can train a good person to do a great job but you can't take somebody who hasn't who is in touch with themselves or has a lot of laws and Make them better. People want more work to do that than the teach them how to do something technical so be look for good people and higher higher for the unteachable skills and in many ways I mean because obviously not every company has the ability or the timeline or the resources to to to bring those great people on board if they don't have certain skills or certain experiences that have led to skills in the in their toolbox right but I you know at the same time if you do if you are a company that does have that opportunity and you can't you know I've A couple of weeks ago I went to slalom consulting big shout out to them because I feel like one of the cool things I thing they do is they. They have a a sales force academy for example they recruit people For four teachable skills. First and then they spend a good amount of time training them up so that they're prepared to do something specific with specific skills. I think that's brilliant Because you can't teach people passion. You can't teach people you know being had to be awesome. I guess you know an easy to work with and and all those kind of things you just can't teach those things but you certainly Can find those kind of people and open your eyes to them. And I've I've heard a few different stories from other people who have been on the podcast about employers that look for that that they are looking for people with those unteachable skills that happened to me military spouses a lot of times So I I love that. I think that that's really good advice for for employers. I don't disrespect. They're need for certain skill. Don't get me wrong but you know if you can always there companies that have the resources where they can where they can't train somebody but I. I would still challenge. Even if they think that they can't if somebody has any experience similar to the job that they'll probably come on board even faster than maybe they would anticipate You know it's you know. Military spouses particularly were bright bunch educated and often and You know we learn we adapt. We were so so quick on our feet in many and You know of course. I'm fully bias in admit that not at all. We're not biased. So yeah I I would encourage them to if they if they have those resources and they can do it then You know don't turn away gay people and you know on the on the other story with me walking away at the Job Fair. I should have also turned around. There's a there's a me why should it turned around but like do you know who you're turning I would do that now if I went back. But not now 'cause I'm happily employed right now. It's like you have no idea who you missed absolutely so. I think what I'm going to get your inspiring me to do something today Before I end the podcast I want to know when one gratitude that you WANNA share with people before relief because I do think gratitude or such an important part of my every day I think just coping with life in general but What's one thing that you're you're grateful for today or overall that you could share with everybody for me? Faith is really a huge thing so i. I'm always grateful that you know my entire story. I believe we'll also have meaning on a greater you know eternal scale so I always just thankful for for life you know. Nobody's guaranteed tomorrow and I've already lived longer than so many people I know and I don't WanNa take that for granted and I. I'm just thankful for relationships in and.

Disney youtube Seattle slalom consulting CEO Microsoft Lincoln jacqueline Hamilton
"program manager" Discussed on SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

11:35 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

"And it was terrifying. Of course it's terrifying scared as normal. It's learning walk through that. Where power and you start learning that the lies you've been telling yourself are they're not who you are. You're so much more than that and You know I love. I love my story. I love that I struggled in was lost and I love that. I didn't see how all these things built who I am. I saw glimpses of it. I knew that better with each little milestone in the exciting part is I feel like I've arrived somewhere now. Being full-time working restore is just starting. Who knows where I'll be in five years where I get to mentor others and you know? Take the volunteer Got Trained as a counselor with my church so that you know that volunteer opportunity. I hope makes me a great mentor? One day to to maybe now I feel like it's already kind of their because of that. You know it's like they all add to the story in it just needs to be in touch with who you are and what makes you unique. Because companies want that in military spouses have that experience of things shift and change in. We adapt in were strong and we may not feel strong. Of course we're falling apart. Sometimes you know nothing was harder than I when I held a one month old baby with my five year old next to me watching my husband be individually augmented to Iraq. Off Right before I retire. You know was the cushy job before you retire wire. Ub Now And you know that was happening the day before my daughter was born. I was like now. That's what sent Mansa Labor but we had doubt and we earn. And it's just it's beautiful to watch that in any person and it's really if any military spouse will look in the mirror and give themselves the credit for what they've already walked through. I have go. They could see how powerful and how much potential they have in that even in holding a baby that's Kalicki and you don't know what to do in your loss you're in. There's you know something. Just broken the house in your spouse's deployed that's all building who you will become in. It's going to be beautiful. It has got to hang in there and you know. That's that's what I've taken away the most from this whole process. I love that and before I ask you the next question. I'm going to offer advice based on exactly what you did for anybody listening to sit down and take out a notebook or sit at your computer and do exactly what Jacqueline just did which is going through all the different things whether it was you know being a stay at home mom and home schooling children or being a personal trainer or all the things that you have done along the way that have nothing to do with quote unquote work. Write them down and then write down what you learn from them because really you it goes back to what exactly you just said. Jacqueline as we need to give ourselves credit for those things because if we can't give ourselves credit for all the things that we've done and learned in ways that we've grown and failed comeback. Hauer employers going to give us credit for those things too like. We need to believe that those things are valuable because they absolutely are and As far as military spouses going back into traditional workplace in traditional employment environment. One of the things that we need to champion is an employer believing that yet these even. If you don't have a job specific job on your resume you have life you have experienced. That isn't showing up on a resume. That's much who much more interesting probably and we're talking about. I mean if I was in your interview if I was your interview if you were and had heard all the stories that you just said about I did this and this is what I learned. I would be absolutely enthralled with Mike. Suffering did come up and it was news really in those areas where. I thought they never would come up. And it was unrelated. But you know I. I've interviewed with a product manager who started describing the software product cycle in. It just sounded exactly like what I did with training in the client and eggs able to bring that in. There is that connection made in once that connection was made everything else flowed And but I had to even through the Tech Academy that I was in. I grew a lot just in those twenty two weeks that we were doing this. Because I had to come to peace with where I failed and There were things in I think we I. I can't say it's just military spouse. I think humans are quick to go to the to magnify the failures and the successes. And I'll also write stories. That just aren't true for ourselves so I would look at something that I really struggled in and think well. I wasn't good at that clearly. I can't do it I'll never learn it. And then go into that pattern to where you start you can start believing it and coming into the program. I actually was kind of in that place where well this is. Just GonNa be another thing that maybe I don't do so great at and through the through more personal development You know I got in touch with the failures and said you know what? I'm glad I have them. Because without that failure I would have never learned you know such and such I would never have actually been where I am you know. Had I succeeded in previous like part? Time Job then. I don't think I would have ever looked for another space to be in. I would have just. This is my job and this is all I could get and But it was feeling like I hadn't done great there that that spurred me on to say well. I'm not good at this one of my good at what am I. What can I do and you just don't know what your story is going. It could be right. It's not finished and those failures may be that path on to something that you're actually meant to do. Absolutely I read reread yesterday. This article about the founder of spanks and a story of how she's A. She's a billionaire now but you know how her father as she was growing up would ask her. What did you feel today versus? How was your day? What did you do great in and you know you it was like did you fail at something. And she had to come up with something she failed at and he would say hey. You like good good on you and I think that that's such a game changer. Mindset wise because I I certainly feel like failures or challenges are opportunities no matter what I mean. They're they're an opportunity for you to figure out what's look at something more deeply because I think a lot of times won't like you said we roll pass our successes and we don't sit in them long enough. I know I I certainly don't And I think we miss learnings there too you know whereas we sit along time with our failures right right like what did I do but But at and we can sit a long time in our failures of want to as long as we're taking taking lessons out of them and I think there are many many lessons-to-be-learned out of out of Times when we've not done so great things so three on that may just super-quick. Sure my husband sometimes where he's like. Well that's not that big of a success because it was easy for me and I have to remind him like. Yeah but the things that are easy for us. Maybe like our gifting and our talents where we have that special MAC. And I think that's where we may be sometimes gloss over the success is because we're like well. We have always been good at that. It's no big deal but somebody else finds out a very big deal in. We need to focus on those things. That are easy for us. Maybe where your passion also lies if somebody's struggling like what is that passion. And what should I be doing What does come easy to you? What do you enjoy? It makes you feel happy at the end of the day and I bet somewhere in there that passionate tied and that may be a good clue as to what to look into what to do. Yeah I sure what what do you do? That doesn't feel like work. They do all day. Lying really wanted to do. Yeah I love that all right. So what three pieces of advice would you give other military spouse? You've given great advice already anything. We've certainly told a story that a lot of people can relate to but we had to give advice to other military spouses who are trying to get back into having a career while they're active-duty or in transition because you certainly dealt with with both what what would you say. I think one of the most helpful things for me was to deal with my junk You know whatever background you have coming into life as as an eighteen year old or beyond Bad relationships bad parents. I have no idea but we all bring some type of junk into our life and I had to I mean for me I actually joined like almost like twelve step program but it was. You know not for alcohol or anything like that not and if anybody's struggling please you know get help. But you know isn't there's nothing negative about it but Yeah I had to go into that. Same Place And and I was struggling with you know I went in there thinking I I was dealing with tendencies to overeat and things like that or to emotionally nurse with food and came out learning that I had a heck of a lot more to deal with. There are so many layers to unpack but it gave me a chance to heal from all those and address them and to journal them and to write letters to myself as a kid in light. You know write letters to people that hurt me and find forgiveness and give forgiveness and it was the probably the harder journey then returning to work was to deal with that junk but now that it's out there it's not ruling knee anymore It's the find that positive voice In talk myself into into the right direction because again it's like marathoning. I've already done a hard thing. I've already dealt with so much. And to add development on top of that unite. If you're going to get rid of the junk you need to fill. That space was something positive I love podcast. I love audiobooks particularly something. I could do on driving the car in their name. Your topic. There's something out there for you and as you hear the positive and you hear success stories. it it starts in bed and you just a little bit at a time deal with junk and put more positive things in it. Leonard. Hurting others I definitely found fulfillment and Hosting Pool Parties and movie nights and all to build community around me.

Jacqueline Iraq Ub Kalicki Hauer product manager Mike Tech Academy Leonard founder
"program manager" Discussed on SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

12:57 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on SO Unbecoming with Jamie Muskopf

"Wchs welcomed so unbecoming. I'm Jamie Musk off. A navy spouse a mom of three a student in the doctor of Social Work Program at the University of Southern California. And I'm here to do in unbecoming thing. Disrupt the narrative around who military families and military spouses are one personal story at a time. I buy spouses veterans and subject matter experts to tell their stories and have some amazing conversations. And then I get to share them with you. So let's talk real talk the good the bad and you just can't make this stuff up and let's teach one another and the world about how we can thrive through separations moves personal struggles career challenges in transitions from this shows beginnings. You have taught me that. There's so much more to talk about beyond how we can succeed at work. Whatever work might look like for you and I think it's about time we talk about. Are you ready to grow along with his podcast? I am so ready. Thanks so much for being here. Let's get started. Well Hey everyone. It's been a long time. Since I recorded an episode.

Jamie Musk Wchs University of Southern Califor
"program manager" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Look and so Wilson looked sounded and eventually found a program manager the corporate attorney in the security manager and they collectively denied him access this is a private firm is not the anti personnel speculation is that the private firms Lockheed Martin although it's not been confirmed and they just said now we determine the crate here is like what the criteria is that they look great we determine that you to determine if you're out and he went to complain they actually said if you wanna complain be our guest they didn't seem to care he did complain and was told if you want to keep this up your career is going to suck real taking early retirement you'll never make director de I a and you lose one or two stars along the way and so that he he was very upset about it but so this need for the contents of the of the notes and so we're talking about a highly classified special access program and the circling back to Europe your question here now why these when no comments instead of the Niles because in in truth they could have had to Niles when you're talking about these programs and this is written about years and years ago by an author named bill Sweetman who didn't article on that black budgets back in two thousand any pointed out that an unacknowledged special access program as a black program is a program which is considered so sensitive that the fact of its existence is eight core secret and that means of course secret is actually defined in the U. S. Air Force regulations as any item progress strategy or element of information the compromise of which would result in unrecoverable failures so another words revealing the existence of a black program with undermines military value and no comment for some of these is even a breach of security in the so the statement emphasized by it could make himself back into the alternate another words you can't just say no comment for some of these you really that would be a breach so you have to categorically deny it good night for existence gentlemen are not denying it right comment is very interesting yeah is it just replying is a comment I did just and just that simple side of it what we need to take a break right here birthday guy so we'll do just that but we are talking tonight about the amazing revealing Davis Wilson leaked you of all documents our guest Richard Dolan I'm yours to be church this is coast to coast AM we'll be right back.

program manager attorney Lockheed Martin director Europe Niles bill Sweetman Davis Wilson Richard Dolan U. S. Air Force
"program manager" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The only found it after he asked around the Pentagon including former secretary of defense William Perry who gave advice on where to look and so Wilson looked sound if and eventually found the program manager the corporate attorney in the security manager and they collectively denied him access this is a private firm not the anti personnel speculation is that the private firms Lockheed Martin although it's not been confirmed and they just said now we determine the criteria is like what the criteria is that they break we determine that you to determine if you're out and he went to complain they actually said if you wanna complain be our guest they didn't seem to care he did complain and was told if you want to keep this up your career is going to stop real taking early retirement you'll never make director de I a and you lose one or two stars along the way and so that he he was very upset about it but so this needs to the contents of the of the notes and so we're talking about a highly classified special access program and the circling back to your your question here a why these when no comments instead of the Niles because in intrusive they could have had to Niles when you're talking about these programs and this is written about years and years ago I am not turning bill Sweetman who did an article on the black budgets back in two thousand any pointed out that an unacknowledged special access program as a black program is a program which is considered so sensitive that the back of its existence is eight core secret and that means of course secret is actually defined in the US airforce regulations as any item progress strategy or element of information the compromise of which would result in unrecoverable failures so another words revealing the existence of a black program with undermines military value and no comment for some of these is even a breach of security in this is the statement emphasized by it could Mitchell myself back into the alternate number where you can just say no comment for some of these you really that would be a breach so you have to categorically deny it the night shift systems gentlemen are not denying it it is running out at this very interesting yeah it is it just replying is a comment I did just and just that simple side of it what we need to take a break right here birthday guy so we'll do just that but we are talking tonight about the amazing revealing Davis Wilson leaked you of all documents are gassed Richard Dolan I'm yours to be church this is coast to coast AM we'll be right back.

Pentagon secretary program manager attorney Lockheed Martin director Niles US Mitchell Davis Wilson Richard Dolan William Perry bill Sweetman
"program manager" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Can we get that person on the show now? That's a good idea. It everybody's got their own views on data as well. I think it's very challenging to organize. Mulk is Troy you listed a few. But you did leave off like as your sequel as your post grass as your mice sequel. Like, there is a lot of ways started, Azure. Right. So not a simple problem. So Troy, thank you so much for your comment. A copy of music OBE is on its way to unit you'd like a copy music, oh by right icon on the website at Don rocks dot com, or any of our social media. Well, Facebook, we publish every show to Facebook to become there. And we read on the show. We'll send you a copy Musica and definitely follow us on Twitter. I met Carl Franklin he's at rich Campbell, send us a tweet and make sure that they're at least one hundred forty five degrees are the ones that got to be safe grow to save on them too. Yeah. That's it. Okay. Let's introduce Mark Mercouri. Oh my God. It's been so long since we talked to Mark. He is now a principal program manager for blockchain at Microsoft. He leads the. Team for Microsoft's blockchain product portfolio. Welcome back to dot net. Rocks. Mark nice guys get you back way. Too long sir way way too long with equerry talking about before like the Mars mission. We did that that's like two thousand ten they're was robo champs two thousand eight. Wow. Yeah. I talked to you is what all the cool stuff. I'm working on. So this is well, you have something really cool to come back. You get to work on the cool stuff. How do you? How do you swing a job like that? I am just very very lucky guy. Obviously doing something. Right. Yeah. It's it's it's good fun. And this latest thing is just is just fantastic. So first of all blockchain is what bitcoins based on this isn't going to be a blockchain primer. But I wanna know what Microsoft is doing in the space. Sure. So one of the things that's very different about this. And it also ties back to the cloud model is, you know, if this was one of the first conversations we had way back when I be here telling you about the virtues of Microsoft, blockchain server enterprise edition twenty. Eighteen. A CPA one. Trying to sell you a license, and I would really hope that you used it. But if you didn't use it, I would still get paid. But that really isn't the way that the cloud works anymore, which is actually very great and very liberating. And so what we do is we talked to the community and an we say blockchain, it's really a category of technology there actually one hundred like news, no sequel or relational databases, for example, JIRA. And so there's one hundred twenty different types of Blockchain's when I stopped counting just probably three or four that are are the most popular today things like Korda, a theory, and hyper ledger and customer said, please don't make number one Twenty-one. Can you do it? Microsoft does best in really whether it's identity networking talk about Deb ops, or integration, or or tooling. And that's for stuff. Like, can you do that? Really, really? Well, in augment what people are doing in the community because we had lots of blockchain people are doing great blockchain. Can Could you you do? do what you do best? And so do the chocolate Pless peanut butter equals, something better as the commercials go. So let me get straight. So blockchain is like a it's sort of a set of services rightey as and then people build protocols on top of that is that what it is. Well, so think of it this way is today. Like, if you if Carl if you wanted to buy some Microsoft stock for me today, it would you could go online, and maybe you go to fidelity, I go to J P Morgan or like that we'd find a way to find each other..

Microsoft Carl Franklin Mulk Blockchain Don rocks Facebook Mark Mercouri program manager Twitter equerry Deb ops Korda rich Campbell J P Morgan principal one hundred forty five degrees
"program manager" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Can we get that person on the show now? That's a good idea. It everybody's got their own views on data as well. I think it's very challenging to organize. Mulk is Troy you listed a few. But you did leave off like as your sequel as your post grass as your mice sequel. Like, there is a lot of ways started, Azure. Right. So not a simple problem. So Troy, thank you so much for your comment. A copy of music OBE is on its way to unit you'd like a copy music, oh by right icon on the website at Don rocks dot com, or any of our social media. Well, Facebook, we publish every show to Facebook to become there. And we read on the show. We'll send you a copy Musica and definitely follow us on Twitter. I met Carl Franklin he's at rich Campbell, send us a tweet and make sure that they're at least one hundred forty five degrees are the ones that got to be safe grow to save on them too. Yeah. That's it. Okay. Let's introduce Mark Mercouri. Oh my God. It's been so long since we talked to Mark. He is now a principal program manager for blockchain at Microsoft. He leads the. Team for Microsoft's blockchain product portfolio. Welcome back to dot net. Rocks. Mark nice guys get you back way. Too long sir way way too long with equerry talking about before like the Mars mission. We did that that's like two thousand ten they're was robo champs two thousand eight. Wow. Yeah. I talked to you is what all the cool stuff. I'm working on. So this is well, you have something really cool to come back. You get to work on the cool stuff. How do you? How do you swing a job like that? I am just very very lucky guy. Obviously doing something. Right. Yeah. It's it's it's good fun. And this latest thing is just is just fantastic. So first of all blockchain is what bitcoins based on this isn't going to be a blockchain primer. But I wanna know what Microsoft is doing in the space. Sure. So one of the things that's very different about this. And it also ties back to the cloud model is, you know, if this was one of the first conversations we had way back when I be here telling you about the virtues of Microsoft, blockchain server enterprise edition twenty. Eighteen. A CPA one. Trying to sell you a license, and I would really hope that you used it. But if you didn't use it, I would still get paid. But that really isn't the way that the cloud works anymore, which is actually very great and very liberating. And so what we do is we talked to the community and an we say blockchain, it's really a category of technology there actually one hundred like news, no sequel or relational databases, for example, JIRA. And so there's one hundred twenty different types of Blockchain's when I stopped counting just probably three or four that are are the most popular today things like Korda, a theory, and hyper ledger and customer said, please don't make number one Twenty-one. Can you do it? Microsoft does best in really whether it's identity networking talk about Deb ops, or integration, or or tooling. And that's for stuff. Like, can you do that? Really, really? Well, in augment what people are doing in the community because we had lots of blockchain people are doing great blockchain. Can Could you you do? do what you do best? And so do the chocolate Pless peanut butter equals, something better as the commercials go. So let me get straight. So blockchain is like a it's sort of a set of services rightey as and then people build protocols on top of that is that what it is. Well, so think of it this way is today. Like, if you if Carl if you wanted to buy some Microsoft stock for me today, it would you could go online, and maybe you go to fidelity, I go to J P Morgan or like that we'd find a way to find each other..

Microsoft Carl Franklin Mulk Blockchain Don rocks Facebook Mark Mercouri program manager Twitter equerry Deb ops Korda rich Campbell J P Morgan principal one hundred forty five degrees