35 Burst results for "Program Director"

Former Producer and Program Director at WJOX, Pat Smith,  Reminisces About the Show's Infancy

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:08 min | Last week

Former Producer and Program Director at WJOX, Pat Smith, Reminisces About the Show's Infancy

"Pat is The program director. W j. o. x. and of course he He's part of the global system trouble. I'm as i've assisted. Pd in co host. Because our good friend ryan heins program. I i'm always thinking. I had but i apologize but i'm always trying to to do things that i'm not supposed to be doing but it's really good to have you those days. I wanna i wanna go back. Because i ended up moving to a station where you. I think you were an intern But it wasn't too long after that that that you became a producer on the program. And i'm gonna let you kind of tell the story of how all of that ended up to where we are. Now oh wow Kind of a cliff. Notes version Basically like you said you're at another radio station. I think your contract had had come up and and you had Looked elsewhere and i happened to be at a news. Talk station which the sports talk. Show followed rush limbaugh's program and all the sudden you showed up Along with bob walked me at the radio station on that On that fateful I think it was a friday night after had done a show and then Just so happens. You guys came on the air on monday. I happened to be at the right place at the right time. And i was finishing up school at uab. And and you know you. And i developed a quick relationship and and decided from that point in time to kind of try to take the show to the next level and a few years later were able to get syndicated throughout the state of alabama and then mayor obviously sirius xm and then ultimately espn and where you are today at the sec network so just very blessed to be part of it from day one. I want to go back to that moment. Where we were on the affiliate in we are on the station in birmingham. And and you really started thinking You know bigger picture. I i was. I was at the time doing local television. I was still riding a newspaper on. So i i wasn't that the forward thinking but You thought to show could go beyond that area and what was so interesting about it. Is that once. it did There were a lot of people that that thought. Your idea was was insane. Now you're right You know it's so hard and difficult to tell people about this. Because i remember paul when the fax machine became you know a prevalent thing and offices and i never forget when we started getting stuff backs to us like before you came to the radio station because typically you would either be at the newspaper finishing up a column ridgetop by tv station. Then he committed the radio show and people around the south east would be faxing us newspaper articles because we didn't have internet internet was not invented yet. And so it was fascinating for us to be able to to get information from outside of the state of alabama and so that kind of up some different topics that we could do on the show and the one that started thinking. Well you know what you know. People outside of birmingham. We're on a five. Thousand watt am radio station and more people need to hear this program because we're inundated by voicemails and people you know would communicate with us anyway. They could until it's how much they love the show and more and more of the show and so at the time was able to go to to management and and pitch the idea of potentially getting on a few stations in the state of alabama. And that just kind of steamrolled and for many many years we kept adding stations and at one point we had. I believe in the mid thirties before we got on sirius. Xm so it was just a it was a great time in radio and we were very fortunate to have the people that believed in us. Just like you believed in the idea. So it will. And i'm gonna come back to some of the early stories but but i think for i want you to comment on this. I'll never forget. I was in pasadena We're actually newport together for the rose bowl national championship game between alabama and texas. And because i think a an illness in your family with I think your wife's mother or something you weren't able to make the trip and called me out there and you told me that You had gotten a call from somebody at sirius. Xm and i really. I thought you were kidding Because they wanted to run the show as a regular in an in an afternoon time slot in. And i want you to go back to that moment because there was a buzz around our Our crew at the time. And we you know. We have a fairly big crew now because of television and radio. I don't know if even matches the number of people that you had working with that particular moment in time. Because they were they were producers. They were Exa- they were assistant producer. They're dedicated phone. Screeners that That had their own contracts. But i did but i mean would you would. You agree That was the moment that things really started to change. No there's no question about that. And i'm glad that you wanted me to tell about this out of the story because i thought you were going to publicly remained me again for putting you outside the rose bowl at a outside party music. Play okay No no i was. I got i gotta call the blue Someone that are not you know. Never heard of before and they just said you know we'd love to show We want to talk to you about this show going. You know. Nationwide siriusxm You guys be interested in that. And i are you kidding me absolutely and then i remember calling you in pasadena and said you'll never believe this phone call and of course a lot of times like you would whether i'd call you and say hey. We got this coach on today or we got this happening today or whatever the case may be you know you a would you know i can picture you rolling your eyes going. Yeah whatever you know but then it finally sunk in it. You know. Once i told you exactly the full conversation and i think at that point in time you realized that we had we had a bigger entity on our hands than we thought. We did back then

Ryan Heins Alabama Birmingham UAB Rush Limbaugh PAT Espn SEC BOB South East Pasadena Paul Texas
Conservative radio personality Rush Limbaugh has died at age 70

Russell & Hunter

01:55 min | Last week

Conservative radio personality Rush Limbaugh has died at age 70

"A one year battle with stage four lung cancer, he fought to the very end he broadcast until the very end and someone who Has spent time in several stations with Rush Limbaugh is our program director Aaron Tremor. I'm glad to have you here because your insight has been helping us through this entire day. Yeah, It's a, uh It's a strange day. Right? Um, you know, we've been talking about how do we do it? And we're all a little sad and and, you know, trying to be maintained an upbeat message, right? I mean, we we knew this day was coming. You know, Russia announced that he had stage four lung cancer. That is not something you typically recover from. You know, And every day we came in, and he was on the air in this past year. It was a blessing to us. And, you know, I've heard you guys mention it that the fact that he got that diagnosis and the Stresses that he had to go through to do a show for hundreds of millions of Americans every day fighting a terminal disease that was he even admitted a couple of times was kicking his ass. You know that he couldn't you know it was it was taking every ounce of energy. To do a show when he had the money had the prestige had the had earned the right to go out whenever he wanted to The fact that he fought through that for a year. It's like heartwarming and you know, I never met Rush. You know, blood in over two decades career listen to him almost every day of the week for over two decades in a professional environment, I felt like I lost the best friend Today. It was a gut punch when, like everybody else and just so well inside, right? We didn't know

Aaron Tremor Lung Cancer Rush Limbaugh Russia Rush
"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:18 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"With lots of info you can find that at iowa humane alliance dot org if folks email me or reach out to me. Directly can shoot me an email at programs. Pr g. r. a. m. s. at iowa humane alliance dot org or anyone can call for jenner general information as well if telephone works better for them so our office line is three one nine three six three one two two five and is there anything else. You'd like to share with our listeners. Today sam i am just really excited that there's such a large and enthusiastic growing movement to help protect community cats especially feral cats and to invest in this life saving solution that not only is the most affordable and humane thing to do it is also.

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:49 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Number of in community cats as long as they're receiving what we call the ear tip package. The tip is required for for those walk in appointments And for community kitties as well unless they want to actually schedule an appointment which i mentioned earlier in the shows were looking quite a ways out for those regular appointments we do offer special pricing so for the community cat package the base rate for the eartips rabies and the spader surgery. That's thirty five dollars. They added his temper for ten dollars and have the option to add a treatment of revolutions for five cash. And so for the most part. It's probably it probably reflects a lot of other Return programs throughout the country. We do also work. On a case. By case basis on affordability is folks cannot afford our prices even though they're lower than a typical that clinic would be. We work with them individually to help them find funding to help their case. We do not want finances to be a barrier and preventing them from getting their colony that they're carrying or spayed and neutered and vaccinated a great my last question for you before we Have to say goodbye is out of all the degrees. You've got and you've got an incredible number of degrees. Is there one in particular that you felt. That was really important to help you with your work. Honestly the most recent one my my masters in philanthropy and nonprofit development while much of the degree focused on fundraising efforts and development worker nonprofits. It really gave me the confidence. Help me get the confidence. I needed to release step into leadership role with iowa humane alliance so that course. Work was helpful in introducing the to a lot of different topics and especially with Grant writing grant. Writing isn't something. That i thought i would ever be able to do but i have with experience from that education and through my work now here with i j. Luckily i have been able to write and receive several grants to help support our work. So my current work is definitely more programs oriented helpful having having that master's degree to give me a little pissed so if folks are interested in finding out more about the iowa humane alliance or reaching out to you. How would they do that so to find out more information about iowa humane alliance. We have a fantastic website..

ten dollars thirty five dollars five cash iowa alliance iowa humane alliance one
"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

03:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"At sports fan neuter program which is operating currently at a limited capacity due to partially the pandemic partially our expansion. Were actually in the beginnings of a three year campaign to raise a total of one million dollars to expand all facets of our organization and so next year phase is focusing on expanding the programs but talking more about the partnerships with the community cat organizations. So we have partner accounts essentially with iowa humane alliance and other local groups. We work with them depending on what their needs are really so we've gone to meetings and provided written support and information and acted as a local resource of for lack of better term kind of the experts when it comes to community cat issues and we have provided like said letters of support and have gone to meetings and city council meetings to communicate and liaison with different local officials and also providing the public with the training that they need to safely do trap. Neuter return as well the community. Kelly is a newer organization. But they're really fantastic group and they have started offering before the pandemic trap. Neuter return workshops which is something that we have done as well for a long time where we do a two hour training in person training workshop talking about why trump need a return works. How effectively do it and how to provide care for community cats including taking into consideration kind of the harsh iowa winters and what folks can do to help community cats there as well. We actually had a released. A colony caretaking tips and tricks that we do with Bryan curtis and susan richmond from neighborhood cats and so there's a lot of information there about how to handle the winters. Yes bryant's fantastic. I went so one of his seminars and trainings a couple years ago at one of the hsa us events so he's great you mentioned in your bio that you have what's called the iowa trap new to return resource assistance program and how is that different than sort of your standard trap. Neuter return program. So for the most part i have is a kind of a grassroots style. Assistance program and so anyone who is interested whether it doesn't matter what city they live in or if they're rule if they're local and can physically get to us. They're welcome to come to us to rent out life humane traps. We offer trap rentals. It's essentially free to take advantage of that program but we do ask for a fifty dollar deposit per trap that folks borrow from us. We offer walking appointments and so monday through thursday mornings we can take a limited.

Bryan curtis susan richmond monday fifty dollar one million dollars two hour three year bryant next year trump iowa couple years ago Neuter alliance thursday mornings one Kelly
"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

03:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Gain access to an ongoing facebook group for networking with other activists. The two and a half hour workshop is led by susan richmond the executive director of neighborhood cats and bryan curtis neighborhood cats national programs director to find out the date of the next workshop and sign up visit community. Cats podcast dot com. We were talking a little bit before we hit the record button about a program of how you are partnering with some of the local municipalities. Or or you're working with them to help pass ordinances that are beneficial for community cats. You share a little bit about that. Yeah that would be wonder fall so we are really excited about the progress. That's been happening in iowa. There's been multiple cities in the last year. Or so who has approved community cat friendly ordinances and by that i mean ordinances written into their city code which allow for trap neuter in return and essentially define eartips and community had and community cat caretaker. So there's a little bit more protection for outdoor community cavs and the people who are trying to do the right thing by getting them spayed and neutered so some of those municipalities we've worked with the city has been one that's recently made has approved those ordinances north liberty. There is a lot of work done by the community. Cat league in partnership with a couple of other organizations but community cat league took the lead on getting at tiffany which is a small town. Close ish to iowa city. They have approved trap. Neuter return friendly ordinances. Marianne iowa has trapped neater return and communicate frontally ordinances as well one that we weren't particularly involved in but i know of i'm excited about our capital here in iowa des moines approved community cat friendly ordinances and the animal rescue league took the lead there and as having quite a lot of luck with their city. Funded trump need a return program. So it's nice to see some progress in the area and regards to that because we you know folks who are passionate about unity cats have been doing trap need return often kind of under the radar sometimes when it comes to law enforcement or ordinances and so it's nice to see it legitimize a little bit more publicly and we despite the fact that we operate in cedar rapids iowa to my knowledge. I don't believe there's been any community ordinances. Technically past they reinterpret some of the ordinances back in two thousand eight to allow us to keep functioning with our community calorie sources that we offer so you talked about a lot of other community cat groups just in as you were mentioning what was going on in some of the different areas around iowa. How does the iowa humane alliance. How do you partner with other community cat organizations so as a high volume clinic we have partnerships with not only acuity cat groups but local shelters rescues as well so we work with those groups for special pricing and for looking woke appointments. We also have a transporter program.

susan richmond iowa facebook last year bryan curtis community cat league animal rescue league two and a half hour trump Cat league two thousand eight Marianne des moines rapids liberty
"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:24 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"To allow household cats of unknown ancestry to compete for the same titles and awards pedigree cats whether you adopt your shop. Tika is the one stop shop for all things. Feline tika is more than sixty five thousand members and clients in one hundred and four countries. Who all speak the language of cat liver by helping. Make an impact on the health and welfare of all cats members and clients served educate and foster spay neuter awareness in their local communities and our active volunteers at local animal shelters and animal outreach programs tika takes an active role in numerous citizen advisory groups to foster legislation to aid the health and welfare of all cats to learn more about tika go to www dot tica dot org row by now you know how powerful the do software platform is facilitating everything from transport to fostering with just a few clicks. But did you know that the team at do burtt also provides consulting and custom software development for your organization's needs the team at uber has extensive experience in website design seo strategies mobile application development and even advanced capabilities involving integration to social media and text messaging bigger. Small team at dubar can do it. All.

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

06:00 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"We hit about ten thousand spain leaders but this year with the pandemic it hit our area this spring about march which is pretty well when things started to ramp up. I think across the country by the end of march we are word of directors and our management team had made the decision to temporarily close the clinic so we were closed during very critical months of april. This is an extremely difficult decision for us. But by the end of april we were all very much anxious to get back to our work and to be here for the community and so on may first. We reopened with many new precautions. Like i mentioned i. J is a high volume clinic and so we typically do around twenty five to forty five surgeries per day. Monday through friday. This means that there is tends to be quite a bit of crowding and our parking lot and if you had seen our lobby during check in and checkout pre covid folks were dressed hacked in our lobby like thirty and filling out paperwork and helping each other figure out what they're supposed to do and we have two staff members who typically managed the check in process in the morning because of the pandemic. We have started having an extra person health in the morning who manages the flow out the parking lot. We have a flexible clear screen that locks our to check in employees for the most part and we do require face coverings for anyone insider building our staff members wear face coverings throughout the day and while interacting with each other and in the morning when redoing check in and in the afternoon when doing checkout we are only allowing three families in the lobby at a time. So there's a lot of extra sterilizing. There's a lot of extra steps to our new protocols but we are starting to get used to this after a few months so your numbers are at twenty five to forty five day or you at a lower capacity so we are still operating at about that many animals we do offer some limited walk in appointments for outdoor community..

friday Monday end of march end of april three families twenty five this year this spring about ten thousand forty five surgeries i. J two staff members april forty five day thirty around twenty five may first march day each
"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

05:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"I h as vision to create a state where all companion. Animals have safe. Long-term homes where feral cather valued and protected and where euthanasia is no longer used as a form of population control. Her work experience covers a wide range of genres from being a vet assistant and adoption counselor to doing mad science after school enrichment for children to caring for rhinos and sea lions at the henry doorly zoo educational path is covered a broad spectrum as well. She's an. as in pre-vet medicine a bs in animal ecology and an ma in philanthropy and nonprofit development being program coordinator she serves many functions for ha including coordinating managing and developing ihs outreach programs. One of these programs. Is i trap. Iowa trapped new to return resource and assistance program. This program allows citizens access to the resources needed to safely and successfully trap to return outdoor community cats. I trap is growing in popularity as we continue to work with citizens of municipalities to allow tr as a humane method of population control. Sam is excited to be sharing about iowa humane alliance and their dedication to spay neuter as a solution to the companion animal overpopulation crisis. Sam i'd like to welcome to the show. Hey thanks so much. I'm excited to be here..

Sam iowa One of these programs Iowa
"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"program director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Tuned into the community cats podcast. Let's go welcome to the community cats. Podcast i'm your host. Stacey lebaron. I've been involved helping homeless scouts for over twenty years with the merrimack river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews. We'll help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action and today. We're speaking with sam wilson. Sam loves all animals feathered skilled and furry. And what's taught to respect all life at a very young age growing up. The family pets were her companions and best friends. She knew early on that she wanted to spend her life helping the creature. She loved like many other children. She was going to up to be a veterinarian. That direction changed gradually through our education and experience which led her to iowa humane alliance iowa. Alliances mission vision and core values aligned with our own personal ethics and outlook on life animal welfare advocacy is simply in her nature and she feels extremely honored to work with a group of people who are as excited and dedicated to making a positive impact as she is hands down. The favorite part of her job is being part of the solution of pet overpopulation. And helping people take care of their pets in her position. She has the ability to be the voice for those who have none including community cats and families with pets living in underserved areas. Being relentlessly optimistic idealist. She has big dreams of helping to fulfil..

Stacey lebaron sam wilson Sam over twenty years today iowa merrimack river alliance
Country star Morgan Wallen apologizes after racial slur

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Country star Morgan Wallen apologizes after racial slur

"Morgan Wallen has gotten himself into Ah, a bit of a pickle again. Here's Nick McGahee's country crooner is one of the hottest artist so far, 2021 That may soon change. Cumulus Media, the second biggest radio chain in the nation, sent out a directive to the program directors of all its 400, plus stations to remove Wallen from their playlists after the singer was captured on video Sunday night, using a racial slur. The video showed wall and yelling profanities after a night out in Nashville and could be heard saying the n word. Woman has since apologized and promises to do better. Nick in my

Morgan Wallen Nick Mcgahee Cumulus Media Wallen Nashville Nick
Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

The Addicted Mind Podcast

06:57 min | 2 months ago

Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast today. My guest is jeff. Nash and he is going to talk about habilitated and their model for sustained recovery. Jeff thank you so much for coming. Onto the addicted mind podcast. I am really interested to hear your story but also to hear your model of addiction treatment. Thank you thanks for means a pleasure to be here this morning. All right so tell us a little bit. Where does it all start for you. Oh wow that's a long story like a lot of people. I ended up getting involved with drugs alcohol at a very young age twelve years low and it got really bad really fast. By the time. I was sixteen years old. I was shooting heroin and other substances saw and renew sleep and of course that brought a lot of legal problems and now jail lots of treatment and i was raised in texas dallas texas and i went through fourteen different treatment programs throughout my life and continued really struggle in and out of jail in and out of programs so the age of thirty actually twenty nine years old is when i finally got it together and for me rui. I realized later that i needed. I needed more than just. The normal substance use treatment. I needed a life. Overall are some point hind landed in. Hawaii ended up in trouble ear in jail and eventually ended up in the village. And i kind of took to habilitates philosophy like a duck. They helped me find a passion. Nail figure out who i was and on the final i had a knack for helping other people. They put me through a lot of training. They sent me to school to learn about a substance use treatment and administration and things like that and eventually i became the program. Director for tat. And i did that job for about sixteen years. I was very blessed. I was trained but actually the last person that was trained by the people who founded the program unfortunately our founder any marino us. Since passed away. But i was very blessed to be trained by heaven his wife and then i did the program director of the program for about sixty years and the ultimate two thousand fifteen. I became the executive director. So i've been with a village out now for about twenty four years. I think and different abilities very much. Enjoy what we do and this is so you know. I found my niche. I guess and got a nice life. Now been clean and sober for about twenty four years. That's awesome that's career. Comedy story pretty similar to people's stories right. Tell me a little bit about the fourteen times of trying treatment so here you were addicted pretty early. I guess you know. I think he said thirteen or fourteen years old drugs. By the time. I was sixteen hours using obviously right so using some really hardcore drugs at a very young age very young age of development and you into fourteen different treatment centers. I mean. that's really like someone who is trying to get help ya. Well i think to me jimmy rule honest. I think my family wanted me to get a lot more than i really. Did you know. I had a lot of people i mean i have some childhood traumas that were unresolved goes very angry. Disenfranchised with life you know the family was dysfunctional. Common themes wait was substance abuse on trying and trying really. It was when i got to be a little bit older and how to jail and withdraw in jail and watching life pass me by and to get a little bit more motivated like i need to give together. This is not fine. I was actually of a lengthy prison sentence that i was facing drums now for for drug for drug possession. That's what prompted me to trying. Really dig down deep and try and overcome all these issues until you know certainly wasn't fixed a thirty day curated took me a few years therapy Few years of mentorship but there was a it. Sounds like there was a change in you where you said. Okay i gotta dig deeper here. Something's gotta be different. I can't keep going like this really crazy to say i was on about ninety milligrams of methadone back in the nineties. And i i went to jail overstated. They didn't give me the doses. Methadone so i ended up withdrawing older. Eat from both methadone in heroin on the floor. Wow jail and it was a newsroom experience. I mean it a really miserable experience you know. It was in that fog than i decided. you know. this isn't fun anymore. And you know i mean most of the reason that i was using drugs to escape age of of that i created for myself really but it was a coping skill. Drug use was a coping skill. Not not a very resourceful coping skill but it was yulong and you know the payable. That really made me decide that. I needed to try something else. I was very blessed. Because i i was in jail here in hawaii. And there's a program here old milita which is known as the long hard core long-term aren't or program and the you know. The word on the street was that if you really wanna get your act together. That's the place that you go. And i didn't have anything to lose. That's for sure. So i reached out to them in jail and call them. They came to visit me in jail in a few weeks later. They got me into the program so they are able to to take you in and you really wanted to to get some treatment. It sounds like you were kind of ready at that point. Yeah find the right place in the right place mentally and emotionally that i knew something had to change about jails institutions and death while i was facing all that and it became very apparent to me that the gig was up and it was time to make a change are the only alternative was either gonna die or overdose. Several times nearly died but is facing lindsay incarceration because of by drug use.

Texas Nash Jeff Dallas Hawaii Yulong Jimmy Lindsay
Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:43 min | 2 months ago

Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast today. My guest is jeff. Nash and he is going to talk about habilitated and their model for sustained recovery. Jeff thank you so much for coming. Onto the addicted mind podcast. I am really interested to hear your story but also to hear your model of addiction treatment. Thank you thanks for means a pleasure to be here this morning. All right so tell us a little bit. Where does it all start for you. Oh wow that's a long story like a lot of people. I ended up getting involved with drugs alcohol at a very young age twelve years low and it got really bad really fast. By the time. I was sixteen years old. I was shooting heroin and other substances saw and renew sleep and of course that brought a lot of legal problems and now jail lots of treatment and i was raised in texas dallas texas and i went through fourteen different treatment programs throughout my life and continued really struggle in and out of jail in and out of programs so the age of thirty actually twenty nine years old is when i finally got it together and for me rui. I realized later that i needed. I needed more than just. The normal substance use treatment. I needed a life. Overall are some point hind landed in. Hawaii ended up in trouble ear in jail and eventually ended up in the village. And i kind of took to habilitates philosophy like a duck. They helped me find a passion. Nail figure out who i was and on the final i had a knack for helping other people. They put me through a lot of training. They sent me to school to learn about a substance use treatment and administration and things like that and eventually i became the program. Director for tat. And i did that job for about sixteen years. I was very blessed. I was trained but actually the last person that was trained by the people who founded the program unfortunately our founder any marino us. Since passed away. But i was very blessed to be trained by heaven his wife and then i did the program director of the program for about sixty years and the ultimate two thousand fifteen. I became the executive director. So i've been with a village out now for about twenty four years. I think and different abilities very much. Enjoy what we do and this is so you know. I found my niche. I guess and got a nice life. Now been clean and sober for about twenty four years. That's awesome that's career. Comedy story pretty similar to people's stories right. Tell me a little bit about the fourteen times of trying treatment so here you were addicted pretty early. I guess you know. I think he said thirteen or fourteen years old drugs. By the time. I was sixteen hours using obviously right so using some really hardcore drugs at a very young age very young age of development and you into fourteen different treatment centers. I mean. that's really like someone who is trying to get help ya. Well i think to me jimmy rule honest. I think my family wanted me to get a lot more than i really. Did you know. I had a lot of people i mean i have some childhood traumas that were unresolved goes very angry. Disenfranchised with life you know the family was dysfunctional. Common themes wait was substance abuse on trying and trying really. It was when i got to be a little bit older and how to jail and withdraw in jail and watching life pass me by and to get a little bit more motivated like i need to give together. This is not fine. I was actually of a lengthy prison sentence that i was facing drums now for for drug for drug possession. That's what prompted me to trying. Really dig down deep and try and overcome all these issues until you know certainly wasn't fixed a thirty day curated took me a few years therapy Few years of mentorship

Texas Nash Jeff Dallas Hawaii Jimmy
Disabled dog missing 10 months is reunited with owner

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Disabled dog missing 10 months is reunited with owner

"A disabled dog that went missing in February from Bourbon Missouri is reunited with its owner in the new year sixty miles away I think it was recovering from having her back leg amputated after being hit by a car when she disappeared from Dylan summers yard he thought she was gone for good it turned out his friend was looking for a job online and just happen to come across street contacted him he's like Hey whatever happened your dog gateway pet guardians program director Lisa V. analysis they posted a thing this picture on their website so she can be found or adopted everyone was super excited and I've talked to him a few times since then and he's so happy and really thankful and she said she's doing awesome hello says they got a theater from animal control after she was rescued from a property last year they took in more than eight hundred dogs and reunited twenty five with owners I'm Julie Walker

Dylan Summers Lisa V. Bourbon Missouri Julie Walker
Philadelphia's Beyond The Bars Teaching Youth Music And Anti-Violence Programs

KYW 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 3 months ago

Philadelphia's Beyond The Bars Teaching Youth Music And Anti-Violence Programs

"As the city continues to struggle with gun violence, One organization has been making an effort to change the landscape as they are teaching music to Philadelphia's youth. Came. What I believe is infinitely. The Louis Press for music finalist list is made up of eight leaders across the country who are creating positive change through youth music programs. Philadelphia's Beyond the bars organization is in the top three. We used to just teach music in jails. Now we're teaching music and an anti violence programs. We partner with the D A's office of diversion. We're now offering free diversion programs for you. Executive director Matthew Curses. Their Their ability ability to to pivot pivot programming programming quickly quickly during during the the pandemic pandemic is is what what made made them them stand stand out. out. Kerr Kerr and and program program director director Chris Chris Thornton Thornton Say Say they they spend spend a a lot lot of of their their time time in in their their cars cars delivering delivering instruments instruments right to students. Doors were working with youth and spaces where pretty much a lot of lot of times it wouldn't be any music. You know, in jails in shelters for you through experiencing homelessness sites where neither is youth who have experienced violence or sexual assault. They say the $500,000 they're hoping to win will help them compensate their teachers and continue to expand their programming leaders will find out their fate when the award winner is announced in January, and Simon Atlee Kevin W. News

Louis Press Philadelphia Matthew Curses Kerr Kerr Chris Chris Thornton Thornton Simon Atlee Kevin W. News
Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

"Well, the DC environmental film fest had to scrap its in Person festival in the spring. So it's presenting a virtual fall showcase. It's from November 12 through the 18th. We like to showcase the art of filmmaking. The other side of it, too, is we like to use these films as springboards for additional conversation about the important issues Programming director Brad for Order is excited to show entangled by David Abel. David brings a journalistic approach to all of his projects. He's a Pulitzer Prize winner for the Boston Low, But this particular film focuses on conservation efforts for the North Atlantic right Whale and the short documentary Union Town. By Frazier Jones. It's following grassroots organizers in union found Alabama fighting industrial polluters there, and Fraser does a great job of telling that story in a short period of time.

David Abel Brad Pulitzer Prize Frazier Jones David Boston Alabama Fraser
Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

"Festival in the spring, and this week it presents a virtual fall showcase from November 12 to the 18th the fall showcase. Really, It's a way to support the films that we weren't able to back in the spring. Programming director Brad for Order is excited to show Okavango River of Dreams. It's a put it look at the Great River, The Okavango in Botswana. The river really is the main character. It's beautifully shot, really showing kind of what's at stake. Ik in terms of conservation there in Botswana and the feature documentary Flint. It's narrated produced by Alec Baldwin, the director's Anthony Baxter. And he spent about four years on the ground in Flint, Michigan, following following citizens citizens activists activists who who are are fighting fighting the the environmental environmental injustice injustice issues issues that that follow follow the the water water crisis crisis there, there, Jason Jason fairly fairly W W th th a a Penis. Penis. The The Collins Collins dictionary dictionary has

Botswana Okavango River Anthony Baxter Great River Brad Alec Baldwin Flint Michigan Jason Jason Collins Collins
Los Angeles - Compton Launches Largest Universal Basic Income Program In The Nation

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Los Angeles - Compton Launches Largest Universal Basic Income Program In The Nation

"Is going to start basic income guaranteed basic income for the residents. The Compton pledges that's being called is reportedly funded to the tune of $2.5 Million by a variety of charitable foundations. Tamara Hainer, the program's director, says those will be getting a basic income check of several 100 to $1000 a month will be checked out to ensure their Compton residents and will be an ongoing effort to track the spending done with the income research and other cities with similar programs have shown Money goes to high priority items to the family budget food for their kids being able to pay rent being able to pay their monthly carpet. That's where the money generally goes for family that is foreign away. What we're seeing the program's expected the last two years and data will then be shared with other cities across the US have shown an interest in a guarantee Basic income program.

Compton Tamara Hainer United States Director
Activists, Betita Martinez

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | 5 months ago

Activists, Betita Martinez

"Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez was born on December Twelfth Nineteen twenty. Five in Washington DC. Her father immigrated to the United. States for Mexico in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen in some ways historic exemplified the American dream. Here. Arrived with little to his name and ended up becoming a professor of Spanish literature at Georgetown University? In other ways his story serve as a cautionary tale he face racism and prejudice and top Petita to think critically about US policies and structures. The Titas American born mother whose family had come from Scotland and Ireland also helped to shape titas perspective. She was a teacher and activist. Batista. Grew up in Chevy. Chase Maryland a suburb of DC or she later wrote she felt like an outsider and what felt like an all white community after high school she left the D. C. Area to attend swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in history and literature in nineteen forty six. After graduation but thiede decided to go by Liz Sutherland in an attempt to better fit in with elites in the arts and Publishing World of New York City? She worked as a translator at the United Nations before moving into research and administration. PETITA studied European and US colonies in Africa and the Pacific Ocean working to shed light on conditions in places that didn't have self sovereignty. She, then worked at the Museum of modern. Art before becoming an editor at Simon and Schuster. In nineteen sixty four Batista became the books and Arts editor at The Nation magazine. PETITA had successfully broken into the New York, city. Cultural, elite. It was no easy feat. PETITA later said that she was a woman in a world dominated by men. Even. So she was adept at moving between worlds. TITA was equally at ease socializing on Fifth Avenue as at the Johns frequented by beat poets of the day. She was a very busy lady. In addition to her day job, the TITA found time to research and write pieces that landed in publications including the national. Guardian Horizon and the New York. Times. She also volunteered for political causes she believed in. petito wanted more than a successful business career she was driven to seek and push for change in the world. In nineteen, sixty, five petito left the nation to work in the civil. Rights movement. She then became the director of the New York Office of the student nonviolent coordinating. Committee or. And Major Civil Rights Organization. She was one of only two Latino women who worked as a paid employee at snack in her role Tita raised money organized events did research on the racial climate the American south. She wrote a book called Letters. Mississippi. About her experience working in the movement not state. Also continued to write for major national publications in nineteen sixty seven but he left snack and turned her focus to feminism before being drawn to the fledgling Chicano movement. Chicano Connex refers to people of Mexican descent born in the United States. Nineteen Sixty Eight petito left New York City for New Mexico. She went back to going by PETITA Martinez rather than the more Anglican sounding Elizabeth Sutherland. In New Mexico petita joined propelled forward what became a movement to promote the rights and celebrate the culture of connects people in the United States. She continued to maximize the power of her pen. She cofounded Allegri. Toe Del Norte a Chicano movement monthly newspaper in Nineteen seventy-three petita back the Chicano Communication Center and Albuquerque and served as its director until nineteen seventy six. The center used arts and media to educate visitors about the culture and struggles at the Chicano community. During her tenure there Petita also wrote another book. This one called five hundred years of Chicano history. From New Mexico petita moved to San Francisco where she continued to fight for a better future she served as the program director at global options an organization working on issues relating to labour conditions and social justice in. Nineteen. EIGHTY-THREE PETITA ran for governor of California as a peace and Freedom, party candy. In nineteen ninety-seven PETITA founded yet another organization the Institute for Multi Racial Justice the Institute served as the embodiment of her life's work to break down barriers between people fighting for justice especially different peoples of color. Following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, petito book called Deca Loris means all of us. But. Thiede has written and taught throughout her long and impressive career and activism. She's lectured at odds three hundred higher educational institutions. She's received many many honors accolades including as a nominee for the Nobel peace prize in two, thousand and five. Batista is a living example of what it looks like to keep fighting the fight against injustice in our own communities across the country and around the world.

Director Batista Petita New York City Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez New Mexico United States New York Elizabeth Sutherland Thiede DC Chicano Connex Chicano Communication Center Mexico Liz Sutherland Chevy Georgetown University Chicano Community Institute For Multi Racial Jus
Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:19 min | 6 months ago

Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

"Are Introducing this week is not me telling a story but it's actually A really important issue that we wanted to bring to your attention and to help me do that I have asian-american advancing justices. Demographic Research. Program director. That's a mouthful. June Lim, who's WHO's here to talk about the census. So thanks for being here to do this and for our listeners sake especially those who have yet to fill out the census, they have relatives who haven't filled it out. Why is this census of particular great concern for us. Right. Now, what we see is is a very unfortunate because what we have seen as the administration's attempt to politicize the census s suppress participation ultimately really to shift political representation away from places with large immigrant communities, such as the Asian, American and Native Hawaiian Civic Islander Communities and other communities of color, and Water considered hard to count communities. and what we really want people to know is that regardless of political affiliation or ethnicity everyone needs to be deeply troubled by these attempts to undermine and risk misrepresent data from the census. And the reason is, is that we have so much to lose if people do not participate in the census. Yeah. I mean some states can lose congressional seats I was also reading that there's over a billion dollars in federal funding to over one hundred programs for the next ten years, there's writing on census twenty twenty. It's actually one point five trillion dollars federal funding. Okay. Okay. Okay. I was little off on my decimal point. Wow So, this seems this seems June to fit right in line with our current president and his administration Zena phobic anti immigrant position on. So many policies. Yes. Unfortunately, there's been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment and fear mongering. In Administration's policies and also like we're really seeing it. Affecting. People's participation in the census. And we understand that because of this for many immigrants both documented and undocumented, there are significant fears about participating in the census. But. We need everyone to know that the constitution mandates that every person living in the United States should be counted in the census regardless of Citizenship Status and that privacy is of utmost importance and that there are strict laws in place to make sure that information is kept confidential. So. That's really important to emphasize right that I think the trump administration is these seeds a fear that yeah. If you fill it out and you're undocumented in particular, like can come get you and that's completely not true. Exactly. There isn't even a question about citizenship status on the census or immigration on the senses. So there is no way using the census data that received from the twenty twenty cents is that that information could be received and regardless of that any information that is like that is received by the census. It doesn't actually leave the census it only can be. Used for statistical this tickle purposes and in like more of a like for statistical purposes in an aggregate form and never by an individual responses. And the Census Bureau They've done something to the due day to right I mean this this. This is one of the reasons why we're doing this special announcement here an encouragement for people to hurry up and fill it out. Can you talk a little bit about what's what's happened? Yeah sure and there's been some new happening since then as well it's it's that ultimately because of everything happening with the pandemic this Census Bureau had to pause some of its. So, the census deadline was actually Extended until October thirty first to make sure that there was enough time for for people to self respond. But also to make sure that the the non response follow up period, which is when enumerators go door to door to take the responses of people who have not yet completed the census can be done in a fair and thorough manner and also taking in mind safety However, that was shortened to be it was to be rushed than leader change to be moved up to. September. Thirtieth. however, right now, there actually was a I think it was A. Temporary. Almost like a restraining order against a restraining order. That's exactly. that. Judge actually did. Accept that. So it is right now there's there's they're actually having a hearing. To See. What the date is going to be, and for now, the Census Bureau has to continue with its operations as planned and that being not necessarily what the short deadline but we we see how that could cause some confusion in the in the community. So really what we want to do is to urge everyone to fill out the census to day job. Because I, it's like we're not sure what the deadline is now because of all the things that are happening because they're so much advocacy taking place for a community. To ensure that we can have an accurate dentists count and really pushing for the October thirty first line However, we don't we don't know if it's going to land there on September thirtieth. So really the messaging we want to put out to our communities is to complete the Senate today.

Census Bureau Native Hawaiian Civic Islander June Lim Program Director United States President Trump Senate Water
Interview with Dr. Brian Gearity

Moving2Live

04:11 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Dr. Brian Gearity

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live moving to live along with our sister podcast fit let ph believe movement is a lifestyle not just an activity with moving to live. We try to interview professionals literally across the world although today were interviewing a professional from Denver. Colorado. We are in the middle of covid nineteen and and high school and college sports are either canceled postponed or up in the air. So you read a lot in the literature in the newspaper about what's going to happen to the student athletes the stresses that are placed on the student athletes. And as I was reading this, I was thinking there is not a whole lot has been mentioned about coaches some of them who may be new to the profession. Some may be in a profession many years. So I reached out to Dr, Brian Geraghty who is program Director of the Sport, Coaching Program at Denver, university to get his insights on it first of all about the education of coaches and why it's so important and second of all to give some insight about what we can see with coaches with covid nineteen possible suggestions to help with what's going on in a crazy time. So Brian, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to lift. X Ray I haven't been is good to be back with you've been a while. Bryan Bryan was one of our first interviews for moving to live. We found out about his. Long strange trip from Ohio to the deep South all the way out to the rocky mountains. Now, now, look at him, and now you decide that big deal with spotify. Glad. Glad. You've taken me a long ride. I, know you and I have talked a little bit before it conferences and I think many people who are in the movement profession across the Board kind of think that coaching is something you kind of do and your athletic career is over or on the other hand. Some people say, well, if you can't teach or if you can't do you teach you you coach and if you can't do that you consult but there is a whole body of research that's growing on the importance of the Education of Coaching and the Socialization of coaching, which you're one of the people at the forefront kinda briefly describe what is the program at a Denver With Sport coaching and who is it intended for? well I if I Oscar Wilde was a terrible teacher that right? So, just just check that off my list here Oscar Wilde is rolling over in his grave because he couldn't teach him but. So, our program do you In. This is kind of my 'cause I founded the program I, created the curriculum. Guidelines and I took advice. Right. People in great minds that came before me and curriculums, structures, national standards but ultimately, somebody has to decide to Zeina curriculum. When they hire me I was the only person here to start the program. and. So it's a combination of sciences and arts and humanities that's throughout the courses throughout the actual assignments in the activities that we do. So we've got you know everything's about athletic performance in a bit about health and wellbeing too. When you've got to think about that because depending on the what we're using sports or sports are not necessarily earn inherently healthy. oftentimes they are that can be but right like nowadays if you're playing sports in. And you get sick Corey, you have long term damage or Some sports result in long-term Marthe, rightous no. Various tendonitis is or pains a psychological emotional abuse. Have to say these things and I'm not a cynical or pessimistic. With bad it's being realistic in more wide awake in truthful in in what you see in. Sport So we've got bom mechanics. Collagen sociology. There's a great I don't know if you part of it would have been the. Model now back in the seventies. And I believe it's angle I always get tripped up if it's angle or Berg. Forget what is called the bio psychosocial model. And it's a way that we would normally talk about interdisciplinary. Approaches to research as well as practice.

Oscar Wilde Denver Brian Geraghty Covid Bryan Bryan Education Of Coaching Program Director Spotify Colorado Tendonitis Ohio RAY Berg Corey Marthe
Dr. Brian Gearity Phd- Denver University Sport Coaching Program

Moving2Live

04:11 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Brian Gearity Phd- Denver University Sport Coaching Program

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live moving to live along with our sister podcast fit let ph believe movement is a lifestyle not just an activity with moving to live. We try to interview professionals literally across the world although today were interviewing a professional from Denver. Colorado. We are in the middle of covid nineteen and and high school and college sports are either canceled postponed or up in the air. So you read a lot in the literature in the newspaper about what's going to happen to the student athletes the stresses that are placed on the student athletes. And as I was reading this, I was thinking there is not a whole lot has been mentioned about coaches some of them who may be new to the profession. Some may be in a profession many years. So I reached out to Dr, Brian Geraghty who is program Director of the Sport, Coaching Program at Denver, university to get his insights on it first of all about the education of coaches and why it's so important and second of all to give some insight about what we can see with coaches with covid nineteen possible suggestions to help with what's going on in a crazy time. So Brian, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to lift. X Ray I haven't been is good to be back with you've been a while. Bryan Bryan was one of our first interviews for moving to live. We found out about his. Long strange trip from Ohio to the deep South all the way out to the rocky mountains. Now, now, look at him, and now you decide that big deal with spotify. Glad. Glad. You've taken me a long ride. I, know you and I have talked a little bit before it conferences and I think many people who are in the movement profession across the Board kind of think that coaching is something you kind of do and your athletic career is over or on the other hand. Some people say, well, if you can't teach or if you can't do you teach you you coach and if you can't do that you consult but there is a whole body of research that's growing on the importance of the Education of Coaching and the Socialization of coaching, which you're one of the people at the forefront kinda briefly describe what is the program at a Denver With Sport coaching and who is it intended for? well I if I Oscar Wilde was a terrible teacher that right? So, just just check that off my list here Oscar Wilde is rolling over in his grave because he couldn't teach him but. So, our program do you In. This is kind of my 'cause I founded the program I, created the curriculum. Guidelines and I took advice. Right. People in great minds that came before me and curriculums, structures, national standards but ultimately, somebody has to decide to Zeina curriculum. When they hire me I was the only person here to start the program. and. So it's a combination of sciences and arts and humanities that's throughout the courses throughout the actual assignments in the activities that we do. So we've got you know everything's about athletic performance in a bit about health and wellbeing too. When you've got to think about that because depending on the what we're using sports or sports are not necessarily earn inherently healthy. oftentimes they are that can be but right like nowadays if you're playing sports in. And you get sick Corey, you have long term damage or Some sports result in long-term Marthe, rightous no. Various tendonitis is or pains a psychological emotional abuse. Have to say these things and I'm not a cynical or pessimistic. With bad it's being realistic in more wide awake in truthful in in what you see in. Sport So we've got bom mechanics. Collagen sociology. There's a great I don't know if you part of it would have been the. Model now back in the seventies. And I believe it's angle I always get tripped up if it's angle or Berg. Forget what is called the bio psychosocial model. And it's a way that we would normally talk about interdisciplinary. Approaches to research as well as practice.

Oscar Wilde Denver Brian Geraghty Covid Bryan Bryan Education Of Coaching Program Director Spotify Colorado Tendonitis Ohio RAY Berg Corey Marthe
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 8 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
WHO warns countries could see 'immediate second peak' if restrictions lifted too early

WBZ Midday News

00:25 sec | 10 months ago

WHO warns countries could see 'immediate second peak' if restrictions lifted too early

"Of the pandemic conference W. H. O. emergencies program director Mike Ryan says falling code numbers could be deceiving just because the disease is on the way down now that it's on it's on it's going to keep going down and then we're going to get a number of months to get ready for second week we may get a second peak in this way which is why the WHO's advising continued social distancing and other measures to limit the spread until there is good treatment or a

W. H. O. Program Director Mike Ryan
Coronavirus: Philadelphia high school graduates struggling to figure out what comes next

KYW 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 10 months ago

Coronavirus: Philadelphia high school graduates struggling to figure out what comes next

"This will normally be a time of promise and excitement for graduating high school and college seniors what is K. whatever he said US customs reports the coronavirus has left many with uncertain futures precious minds is the program director for college possible Philadelphia a nonprofit organization that helps low income first generation students gain access to college she says right now the most pressing question from families of graduating high school seniors is what do we do about school in the fall many of our families have lost their resources have lost jobs and you know you have to make your deposit she says for some who are already facing challenges the corona viruses put in college even more out of reach now many of our students are put in positions where they may have to defer go it's a college in the fall that might be the path for high school senior jasmine Winchester the money that I want to put into college I wouldn't want to do it it just to do everything online it's widely known that students that are of a low income background they tend to not necessarily thrive when they have to do online learning Winchester still trying to decide when and where to attend college I don't want to commit to a college in the virus is still going around so I don't know which college I'm going to yeah das cousin it's K. Y. W.

United States Program Director Philadelphia Jasmine Winchester
Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

PEN America Works of Justice

08:56 min | 11 months ago

Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

"I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like

Justin Reveals Monson United States Eastern State Penitentiary Searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly President And Ceo Pen America Facebook Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute Of Social Cates Meissner Philadelphia Area Teaching Davids Liz Ryan Uk High Foot Martinez Karsh Writers Matt Murphy
"program director" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"It is not marketing pipeline. It's not marketing source revenue marketings pipeline. It is how do we drive business. Growth and if you drive business growth by enabling the sales by enabling the sales team to better close the deals that they source themselves fantastic tastic. The business grows and we need to think about to your point. What do we do so the business is green not just so marketing screen? That's absolutely absolutely right and we look at ourselves as business. People doing marketing function Now sales people are business. People doing sales function likewise with product and likewise with them. And I'm very lucky to have partners in crime leaders who are who think the same way and so we all have our goals right into my goal is marketing marketing source pipeline and marketing source twits but I submit that goal to the larger goal of the total business revenue and I know that my counterparts are the the leaders that I work with the leaders of product management Dev sales everybody subject to our individual goals to the larger goal. And so how do you do that. I I mean how does how does that work like you know we talked about you know sharing band or whatever it is like What does that look like? IBM It's It needs just to be completely right since it's not just the leaders coming together and being completely aligned. It's also the entire team being completely aligned so example PROC marketer in my team. They're on weekly calls with the product management people and salespeople in some cases the people who will so they know the pulse of very are what is going on where the pipeline say the pipelines tells us is very are gap that one two quarters from now and and we've also kind of helped Our our sales teams and other people kind of educated them on what the marketing marketing influences and Barbican influence. If it's going to be in quarter they know that marketing cannot help. Maybe a little bit here and there by giving them the right assets and the right time so also would be really really do quarters out to the four course right and therefore that's kind of outlook that we have and that's how we can work on. It's also the expectation setting on work in marketing. Help and and it's also these daily or weekly dialogues at behalf that the implication of that is that all of these things come together and then we look at it from a priority perspective. What do we want to get off drive in two thousand nine hundred ninety sat down together and said okay? These are the three key offerings that we want to be driving these conversations towards right. And how do we do that. We elevate that into a solution level messaging and then one step further into a business level missing because the salespeople and awesome talking to different audiences so sometimes go to it audience. You would want to talk about it in the context of it if you're GONNA talk to L. O. B. Audience you WanNa talk to them in the context of how I would help their business so we need to kind of doing that in that particular context and then you drive from that particular point of view onto saying these are the focus focus areas. These are the messages that were taking and these can affect duties. That'd be be driving and we bring that up on front right. Priorities are said very very clearly you know what are the accounts one account segments. If you WANNA hit how are we going to hit them And the activities of do some minutia that you know the other teams don't necessarily can of are in the know off. Like what kind of Lebanon How many how many concentration? That's more for us from marketing perspective aspect to look at and do but where we do things right as by we constantly keep looking at are we doing the right. Things are the metrics showing up. We are doing the right things What the things you need to swap? What are the things they needed differently? I'd love to dig in a little bit on the the sales marketing product till I'm an and getting so those weekly calls. Do you have weekly calls within your product marketer within all three functions or do they talk to sail separately and product management. TEPL early. How do you how do you make that relationship? The most effective firstly. We started off a couple of years. Back firstly up even standing right like I said very lucky in happy. You too have a good leaders in the functions and it's also personal connect you know. They're all nice people. There are good very business oriented very smart very the action oriented. But they're also nice people so I would love to hang out with them even outside of business and that kind of sets the tone right and and and and that started connecting with all of them. We were together in planning cycle and that helped them see that. Oh yeah marketing can actually bring some value you to them and from there on started having weekly meetings biweekly meetings as the case may be. NBA Meet more than one time a week. There is a call that all offers are in very specific. Topics are talked about and we bring to the table from a marketing perspective. But the priorities that you see your results of some campaigns that we've done important once our upcoming activities are going on and he also made fun. We last year we did a ice bucket. Could challenge the twist to write the said okay. We want to have a goal of reaching X.. Number of US and so on and and we've parted alignment right. Internal Marketing is as important as external market. You can do some reach but Some people may not necessarily know that we're doing all of that one of the reasons why is because when people Click onto our ads. We don't pay for IBM Clicks Right. We actually don't want to do that so people. They're coming in from IBM domain. Or if they're IBM leads we actually don't show that to them so they don't even know that it's happening But versus seeing our competitors ads like hey what the heck are we doing so we wanted to do some internal marketing to people to show them what we're doing and so on and so forth and we did this challenge and we had a tiered level of Gulps at five thousand Let's say abuse. I get dunked him is is book eight and so on so forth. The entire leadership team participated. We actually signed up our gentle managerial but we did not hit US level. So Ah the agony where it was fun because In the internal slack community that we have we were throwing numbers to people blend. There was just a lot of engagement. People were throwing emojis out and getting engaged. ICEPICK is all over the place and coming up with the second challenge right now. Oh ooh LAS dance. All my John in my team came up with this idea of. Let's get together. And if he hit a particular goal again again we'll do the dance. We hit our goals so John. I an abashed elite unapologetically did very horrible rendition of mazing. That's tough I would definitely rather poor an ice bucket on my head and then be seen Fossey in front of anyone on our mission. OFFSITE Jona who's sitting in here. Our in studio came up with the idea to have a dunk tank next year. And that you instead of light you can give like credits to all of our team team admission and then that's how many credits is how many balls you get to throw at the dunk tate. Don't the leadership so you know it's always always good to to get the the leadership soaking wet and freezing cold shared anything we did. When I was at Fox we did something similar? And we had A commercial sales later in a field sales later and if we hit a certain number The commercial sales later would basically pie with like a whip cream pie in the face of the enterprise sales later so we got they hit the number they go to do this and Leslie. The commercial sales later goes to like Pie. Tom Who runs enterprise sales he he ducks and gets her. Then everyone's like Oh and then all of a sudden the CEO runs up. Nobody sees him coming and he gets the enterprise sales later and this is in front of company all hands it was his derek and of course. We recorded the whole thing of these supposed to get Tom. Tom Gets Leslie Tom. Thanks Aaron gets funny. You know we all do very hard jobs right right. Yeah all super-busy everybody's meetings and then working after hours because the aft out to get work done you can make it fun and it's take the whole thing. I love what she said on how much you love the the leadership team you work with. It makes such a big difference. We are required hired to work forty hours a week. It's that extra time you put in. That is the difference from being able to you know to perfectly fine work and do exceptional work work and the desire to really go in and like do amazing work for your peers and your team. I don't know what drives May. It's what makes me work extra hours. It gets me excited. And it's sort of how you like a performance that little extra bit because you've got that we're in it together absolutely and it drives the whole team tonight. is dodger's atop down thing The team entire team is kind of both that way the the automatically connect because they all want to solve business problems from from their point of view Right and then they step into solid particular problem sometimes from a content perspective sometimes for about product perspective sometimes from a campaign perspective but they also reach out the other area just in case they need. The help was needed. And it proves that that attitude is so positive and pervasive. It's awesome so who also Quick Aside Lorena Surfing is not count towards those forty hours. I mean what if I'm surfing with with the shoes all that for my networking networking on on the boards. Count I stand fully correct point. That was my bad in. You did right Ah Lawrence Coroner about About lessons learned from every everything can be content content. I wanted to get into what sales asks of you because I think that that's one of the parts on we talk a lot about sales marketing alignment. But I'd love to learn. What are those things that you get asked on a consistent basis That that are the things that you have to go back. Take your team and try to jam on to figure out a creative way to do Do what they need done. Sure there are lots of asks asks right coming from different Sales members and therefore it is really important to be aligned and have our priorities right with our Our crew of ecosystem so that you're not always chasing the next big thing to be done. Yeah but you're actually doing the right things but having said that it's not like you know said the strategy and I'm done. That's the only thing that I'm going to be doing right now. There are always going to be two weeks. There are always going to be new things that come up that are seen as important partner of things of that nature. The typical things that we get asked are for content and continent varieties of forms would like to have a video. I WANNA WANNA have a paid solution. Brief one have a deck that talks to this particular new release. That has come out or competitive view that I can share with my The prospect or customer. It because she's asking for a for that bureau number competitive situation and so on so foot could be around an event in this particular area. How can you help me out here and so on and so forth by so this is where we can talk about? These are things that can do these other things that can be done by somebody else are. We may not not be able to do this. And being aligned helps us one more thing to do the right things even not be able to do all the things in the ask for but the things that we do we want to ensure that we hit a very high Marquan that right things category. How do you communicate when win you? Don't give them what they want. Because I think that that's one of the tough parts like. Hey here's the reason why we're not doing this And having that you know steady stream of communication that is exactly what we do. You know the sales team also knows that they won't be getting all the things that they're asking for. But we always provide them with an alternative writing home Hi here I am. It'll be able to invent here. But here's what I can do for you right. And it's a pretty communication do sales focus groups all the time. There are away in my team and Karen. They've they've gone through different geographies to better understand what sales are looking for more of the messaging that they looking for so that you know we don't sit here in Austin to build the messaging that may or may not be relevant in Australia Or Japan or China India or even for that matter Scandinavia Norway Finland and all. So we pull people. We talked to them. In fact Co create but some other yeah which is very helpful because it makes a global and relevant and it gets they're buying if your co creating readings with sellers and with region all of a sudden they they are more excited and more likely to evangelize messaging absolutely right and when they do that that there's a lot more uptake marketer. Doing your they don't know what they're doing. They're not connected. They have no idea versus. No no I helped. I helped build this with companies big as IBM obviously tons of different products. Tens of different Stuff going on been around for a long in time Within your specific product suite. How do you measure results Across all all the across lining all the different things that we've been talking about yeah. We had the typical.

IBM Leslie Tom US John NBA Lebanon L. O. Tom Who Fossey Karen CEO Fox derek Aaron Gulps partner Austin Scandinavia Norway Finland China India Australia
"program director" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"It is not marketing pipeline. It's not marketing source revenue marketings pipeline. It is how do we drive business. Growth and if you drive business growth by enabling the sales by enabling the sales team to better close the deals that they source themselves fantastic tastic. The business grows and we need to think about to your point. What do we do so the business is green not just so marketing screen? That's absolutely absolutely right and we look at ourselves as business. People doing marketing function Now sales people are business. People doing sales function likewise with product and likewise with them. And I'm very lucky to have partners in crime leaders who are who think the same way and so we all have our goals right into my goal is marketing marketing source pipeline and marketing source twits but I submit that goal to the larger goal of the total business revenue and I know that my counterparts are the the leaders that I work with the leaders of product management Dev sales everybody subject to our individual goals to the larger goal. And so how do you do that. I I mean how does how does that work like you know we talked about you know sharing band or whatever it is like What does that look like? IBM It's It needs just to be completely right since it's not just the leaders coming together and being completely aligned. It's also the entire team being completely aligned so example PROC marketer in my team. They're on weekly calls with the product management people and salespeople in some cases the people who will so they know the pulse of very are what is going on where the pipeline say the pipelines tells us is very are gap that one two quarters from now and and we've also kind of helped Our our sales teams and other people kind of educated them on what the marketing marketing influences and Barbican influence. If it's going to be in quarter they know that marketing cannot help. Maybe a little bit here and there by giving them the right assets and the right time so also would be really really do quarters out to the four course right and therefore that's kind of outlook that we have and that's how we can work on. It's also the expectation setting on work in marketing. Help and and it's also these daily or weekly dialogues at behalf that the implication of that is that all of these things come together and then we look at it from a priority perspective. What do we want to get off drive in two thousand nine hundred ninety sat down together and said okay? These are the three key offerings that we want to be driving these conversations towards right. And how do we do that. We elevate that into a solution level messaging and then one step further into a business level missing because the salespeople and awesome talking to different audiences so sometimes go to it audience. You would want to talk about it in the context of it if you're GONNA talk to L. O. B. Audience you WanNa talk to them in the context of how I would help their business so we need to kind of doing that in that particular context and then you drive from that particular point of view onto saying these are the focus focus areas. These are the messages that were taking and these can affect duties. That'd be be driving and we bring that up on front right. Priorities are said very very clearly you know what are the accounts one account segments. If you WANNA hit how are we going to hit them And the activities of do some minutia that you know the other teams don't necessarily can of are in the know off. Like what kind of Lebanon How many how many concentration? That's more for us from marketing perspective aspect to look at and do but where we do things right as by we constantly keep looking at are we doing the right. Things are the metrics showing up. We are doing the right things What the things you need to swap? What are the things they needed differently? I'd love to dig in a little bit on the the sales marketing product till I'm an and getting so those weekly calls. Do you have weekly calls within your product marketer within all three functions or do they talk to sail separately and product management. TEPL early. How do you how do you make that relationship? The most effective firstly. We started off a couple of years. Back firstly up even standing right like I said very lucky in happy. You too have a good leaders in the functions and it's also personal connect you know. They're all nice people. There are good very business oriented very smart very the action oriented. But they're also nice people so I would love to hang out with them even outside of business and that kind of sets the tone right and and and and that started connecting with all of them. We were together in planning cycle and that helped them see that. Oh yeah marketing can actually bring some value you to them and from there on started having weekly meetings biweekly meetings as the case may be. NBA Meet more than one time a week. There is a call that all offers are in very specific. Topics are talked about and we bring to the table from a marketing perspective. But the priorities that you see your results of some campaigns that we've done important once our upcoming activities are going on and he also made fun. We last year we did a ice bucket. Could challenge the twist to write the said okay. We want to have a goal of reaching X.. Number of US and so on and and we've parted alignment right. Internal Marketing is as important as external market. You can do some reach but Some people may not necessarily know that we're doing all of that one of the reasons why is because when people Click onto our ads. We don't pay for IBM Clicks Right. We actually don't want to do that so people. They're coming in from IBM domain. Or if they're IBM leads we actually don't show that to them so they don't even know that it's happening But versus seeing our competitors ads like hey what the heck are we doing so we wanted to do some internal marketing to people to show them what we're doing and so on and so forth and we did this challenge and we had a tiered level of Gulps at five thousand Let's say abuse. I get dunked him is is book eight and so on so forth. The entire leadership team participated. We actually signed up our gentle managerial but we did not hit US level. So Ah the agony where it was fun because In the internal slack community that we have we were throwing numbers to people blend. There was just a lot of engagement. People were throwing emojis out and getting engaged. ICEPICK is all over the place and coming up with the second challenge right now. Oh ooh LAS dance. All my John in my team came up with this idea of. Let's get together. And if he hit a particular goal again again we'll do the dance. We hit our goals so John. I an abashed elite unapologetically did very horrible rendition of mazing. That's tough I would definitely rather poor an ice bucket on my head and then be seen Fossey in front of anyone on our mission. OFFSITE Jona who's sitting in here. Our in studio came up with the idea to have a dunk tank next year. And that you instead of light you can give like credits to all of our team team admission and then that's how many credits is how many balls you get to throw at the dunk tate. Don't the leadership so you know it's always always good to to get the the leadership soaking wet and freezing cold shared anything we did. When I was at Fox we did something similar? And we had A commercial sales later in a field sales later and if we hit a certain number The commercial sales later would basically pie with like a whip cream pie in the face of the enterprise sales later so we got they hit the number they go to do this and Leslie. The commercial sales later goes to like Pie. Tom Who runs enterprise sales he he ducks and gets her. Then everyone's like Oh and then all of a sudden the CEO runs up. Nobody sees him coming and he gets the enterprise sales later and this is in front of company all hands it was his derek and of course. We recorded the whole thing of these supposed to get Tom. Tom Gets Leslie Tom. Thanks Aaron gets funny. You know we all do very hard jobs right right. Yeah all super-busy everybody's meetings and then working after hours because the aft out to get work done you can make it fun and it's take the whole thing. I love what she said on how much you love the the leadership team you work with. It makes such a big difference. We are required hired to work forty hours a week. It's that extra time you put in. That is the difference from being able to you know to perfectly fine work and do exceptional work work and the desire to really go in and like do amazing work for your peers and your team. I don't know what drives May. It's what makes me work extra hours. It gets me excited. And it's sort of how you like a performance that little extra bit because you've got that we're in it together absolutely and it drives the whole team tonight. is dodger's atop down thing The team entire team is kind of both that way the the automatically connect because they all want to solve business problems from from their point of view Right and then they step into solid particular problem sometimes from a content perspective sometimes for about product perspective sometimes from a campaign perspective but they also reach out the other area just in case they need. The help was needed. And it proves that that attitude is so positive and pervasive. It's awesome so who also Quick Aside Lorena Surfing is not count towards those forty hours. I mean what if I'm surfing with with the shoes all that for my networking networking on on the boards. Count I stand fully correct point. That was my bad in. You did right Ah Lawrence Coroner about About lessons learned from every everything can be content content. I wanted to get into what sales asks of you because I think that that's one of the parts on we talk a lot about sales marketing alignment. But I'd love to learn. What are those things that you get asked on a consistent basis That that are the things that you have to go back. Take your team and try to jam on to figure out a creative way to do Do what they need done. Sure there are lots of asks asks right coming from different Sales members and therefore it is really important to be aligned and have our priorities right with our Our crew of ecosystem so that you're not always chasing the next big thing to be done. Yeah but you're actually doing the right things but having said that it's not like you know said the strategy and I'm done. That's the only thing that I'm going to be doing right now. There are always going to be two weeks. There are always going to be new things that come up that are seen as important partner of things of that nature. The typical things that we get asked are for content and continent varieties of forms would like to have a video. I WANNA WANNA have a paid solution. Brief one have a deck that talks to this particular new release. That has come out or competitive view that I can share with my The prospect or customer. It because she's asking for a for that bureau number competitive situation and so on so foot could be around an event in this particular area. How can you help me out here and so on and so forth by so this is where we can talk about? These are things that can do these other things that can be done by somebody else are. We may not not be able to do this. And being aligned helps us one more thing to do the right things even not be able to do all the things in the ask for but the things that we do we want to ensure that we hit a very high Marquan that right things category. How do you communicate when win you? Don't give them what they want. Because I think that that's one of the tough parts like. Hey here's the reason why we're not doing this And having that you know steady stream of communication that is exactly what we do. You know the sales team also knows that they won't be getting all the things that they're asking for. But we always provide them with an alternative writing home Hi here I am. It'll be able to invent here. But here's what I can do for you right. And it's a pretty communication do sales focus groups all the time. There are away in my team and Karen. They've they've gone through different geographies to better understand what sales are looking for more of the messaging that they looking for so that you know we don't sit here in Austin to build the messaging that may or may not be relevant in Australia Or Japan or China India or even for that matter Scandinavia Norway Finland and all. So we pull people. We talked to them. In fact Co create but some other yeah which is very helpful because it makes a global and relevant and it gets they're buying if your co creating readings with sellers and with region all of a sudden they they are more excited and more likely to evangelize messaging absolutely right and when they do that that there's a lot more uptake marketer. Doing your they don't know what they're doing. They're not connected. They have no idea versus. No no I helped. I helped build this with companies big as IBM obviously tons of different products. Tens of different Stuff going on been around for a long in time Within your specific product suite. How do you measure results Across all all the across lining all the different things that we've been talking about yeah. We had the typical.

IBM Leslie Tom US John NBA Lebanon L. O. Tom Who Fossey Karen CEO Fox derek Aaron Gulps partner Austin Scandinavia Norway Finland China India Australia
"program director" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"It is not marketing pipeline. It's not marketing source revenue marketings pipeline. It is how do we drive business. Growth and if you drive business growth by enabling the sales by enabling the sales team to better close the deals that they source themselves fantastic tastic. The business grows and we need to think about to your point. What do we do so the business is green not just so marketing screen? That's absolutely absolutely right and we look at ourselves as business. People doing marketing function Now sales people are business. People doing sales function likewise with product and likewise with them. And I'm very lucky to have partners in crime leaders who are who think the same way and so we all have our goals right into my goal is marketing marketing source pipeline and marketing source twits but I submit that goal to the larger goal of the total business revenue and I know that my counterparts are the the leaders that I work with the leaders of product management Dev sales everybody subject to our individual goals to the larger goal. And so how do you do that. I I mean how does how does that work like you know we talked about you know sharing band or whatever it is like What does that look like? IBM It's It needs just to be completely right since it's not just the leaders coming together and being completely aligned. It's also the entire team being completely aligned so example PROC marketer in my team. They're on weekly calls with the product management people and salespeople in some cases the people who will so they know the pulse of very are what is going on where the pipeline say the pipelines tells us is very are gap that one two quarters from now and and we've also kind of helped Our our sales teams and other people kind of educated them on what the marketing marketing influences and Barbican influence. If it's going to be in quarter they know that marketing cannot help. Maybe a little bit here and there by giving them the right assets and the right time so also would be really really do quarters out to the four course right and therefore that's kind of outlook that we have and that's how we can work on. It's also the expectation setting on work in marketing. Help and and it's also these daily or weekly dialogues at behalf that the implication of that is that all of these things come together and then we look at it from a priority perspective. What do we want to get off drive in two thousand nine hundred ninety sat down together and said okay? These are the three key offerings that we want to be driving these conversations towards right. And how do we do that. We elevate that into a solution level messaging and then one step further into a business level missing because the salespeople and awesome talking to different audiences so sometimes go to it audience. You would want to talk about it in the context of it if you're GONNA talk to L. O. B. Audience you WanNa talk to them in the context of how I would help their business so we need to kind of doing that in that particular context and then you drive from that particular point of view onto saying these are the focus focus areas. These are the messages that were taking and these can affect duties. That'd be be driving and we bring that up on front right. Priorities are said very very clearly you know what are the accounts one account segments. If you WANNA hit how are we going to hit them And the activities of do some minutia that you know the other teams don't necessarily can of are in the know off. Like what kind of Lebanon How many how many concentration? That's more for us from marketing perspective aspect to look at and do but where we do things right as by we constantly keep looking at are we doing the right. Things are the metrics showing up. We are doing the right things What the things you need to swap? What are the things they needed differently? I'd love to dig in a little bit on the the sales marketing product till I'm an and getting so those weekly calls. Do you have weekly calls within your product marketer within all three functions or do they talk to sail separately and product management. TEPL early. How do you how do you make that relationship? The most effective firstly. We started off a couple of years. Back firstly up even standing right like I said very lucky in happy. You too have a good leaders in the functions and it's also personal connect you know. They're all nice people. There are good very business oriented very smart very the action oriented. But they're also nice people so I would love to hang out with them even outside of business and that kind of sets the tone right and and and and that started connecting with all of them. We were together in planning cycle and that helped them see that. Oh yeah marketing can actually bring some value you to them and from there on started having weekly meetings biweekly meetings as the case may be. NBA Meet more than one time a week. There is a call that all offers are in very specific. Topics are talked about and we bring to the table from a marketing perspective. But the priorities that you see your results of some campaigns that we've done important once our upcoming activities are going on and he also made fun. We last year we did a ice bucket. Could challenge the twist to write the said okay. We want to have a goal of reaching X.. Number of US and so on and and we've parted alignment right. Internal Marketing is as important as external market. You can do some reach but Some people may not necessarily know that we're doing all of that one of the reasons why is because when people Click onto our ads. We don't pay for IBM Clicks Right. We actually don't want to do that so people. They're coming in from IBM domain. Or if they're IBM leads we actually don't show that to them so they don't even know that it's happening But versus seeing our competitors ads like hey what the heck are we doing so we wanted to do some internal marketing to people to show them what we're doing and so on and so forth and we did this challenge and we had a tiered level of Gulps at five thousand Let's say abuse. I get dunked him is is book eight and so on so forth. The entire leadership team participated. We actually signed up our gentle managerial but we did not hit US level. So Ah the agony where it was fun because In the internal slack community that we have we were throwing numbers to people blend. There was just a lot of engagement. People were throwing emojis out and getting engaged. ICEPICK is all over the place and coming up with the second challenge right now. Oh ooh LAS dance. All my John in my team came up with this idea of. Let's get together. And if he hit a particular goal again again we'll do the dance. We hit our goals so John. I an abashed elite unapologetically did very horrible rendition of mazing. That's tough I would definitely rather poor an ice bucket on my head and then be seen Fossey in front of anyone on our mission. OFFSITE Jona who's sitting in here. Our in studio came up with the idea to have a dunk tank next year. And that you instead of light you can give like credits to all of our team team admission and then that's how many credits is how many balls you get to throw at the dunk tate. Don't the leadership so you know it's always always good to to get the the leadership soaking wet and freezing cold shared anything we did. When I was at Fox we did something similar? And we had A commercial sales later in a field sales later and if we hit a certain number The commercial sales later would basically pie with like a whip cream pie in the face of the enterprise sales later so we got they hit the number they go to do this and Leslie. The commercial sales later goes to like Pie. Tom Who runs enterprise sales he he ducks and gets her. Then everyone's like Oh and then all of a sudden the CEO runs up. Nobody sees him coming and he gets the enterprise sales later and this is in front of company all hands it was his derek and of course. We recorded the whole thing of these supposed to get Tom. Tom Gets Leslie Tom. Thanks Aaron gets funny. You know we all do very hard jobs right right. Yeah all super-busy everybody's meetings and then working after hours because the aft out to get work done you can make it fun and it's take the whole thing. I love what she said on how much you love the the leadership team you work with. It makes such a big difference. We are required hired to work forty hours a week. It's that extra time you put in. That is the difference from being able to you know to perfectly fine work and do exceptional work work and the desire to really go in and like do amazing work for your peers and your team. I don't know what drives May. It's what makes me work extra hours. It gets me excited. And it's sort of how you like a performance that little extra bit because you've got that we're in it together absolutely and it drives the whole team tonight. is dodger's atop down thing The team entire team is kind of both that way the the automatically connect because they all want to solve business problems from from their point of view Right and then they step into solid particular problem sometimes from a content perspective sometimes for about product perspective sometimes from a campaign perspective but they also reach out the other area just in case they need. The help was needed. And it proves that that attitude is so positive and pervasive. It's awesome so who also Quick Aside Lorena Surfing is not count towards those forty hours. I mean what if I'm surfing with with the shoes all that for my networking networking on on the boards. Count I stand fully correct point. That was my bad in. You did right Ah Lawrence Coroner about About lessons learned from every everything can be content content. I wanted to get into what sales asks of you because I think that that's one of the parts on we talk a lot about sales marketing alignment. But I'd love to learn. What are those things that you get asked on a consistent basis That that are the things that you have to go back. Take your team and try to jam on to figure out a creative way to do Do what they need done. Sure there are lots of asks asks right coming from different Sales members and therefore it is really important to be aligned and have our priorities right with our Our crew of ecosystem so that you're not always chasing the next big thing to be done. Yeah but you're actually doing the right things but having said that it's not like you know said the strategy and I'm done. That's the only thing that I'm going to be doing right now. There are always going to be two weeks. There are always going to be new things that come up that are seen as important partner of things of that nature. The typical things that we get asked are for content and continent varieties of forms would like to have a video. I WANNA WANNA have a paid solution. Brief one have a deck that talks to this particular new release. That has come out or competitive view that I can share with my The prospect or customer. It because she's asking for a for that bureau number competitive situation and so on so foot could be around an event in this particular area. How can you help me out here and so on and so forth by so this is where we can talk about? These are things that can do these other things that can be done by somebody else are. We may not not be able to do this. And being aligned helps us one more thing to do the right things even not be able to do all the things in the ask for but the things that we do we want to ensure that we hit a very high Marquan that right things category. How do you communicate when win you? Don't give them what they want. Because I think that that's one of the tough parts like. Hey here's the reason why we're not doing this And having that you know steady stream of communication that is exactly what we do. You know the sales team also knows that they won't be getting all the things that they're asking for. But we always provide them with an alternative writing home Hi here I am. It'll be able to invent here. But here's what I can do for you right. And it's a pretty communication do sales focus groups all the time. There are away in my team and Karen. They've they've gone through different geographies to better understand what sales are looking for more of the messaging that they looking for so that you know we don't sit here in Austin to build the messaging that may or may not be relevant in Australia Or Japan or China India or even for that matter Scandinavia Norway Finland and all. So we pull people. We talked to them. In fact Co create but some other yeah which is very helpful because it makes a global and relevant and it gets they're buying if your co creating readings with sellers and with region all of a sudden they they are more excited and more likely to evangelize messaging absolutely right and when they do that that there's a lot more uptake marketer. Doing your they don't know what they're doing. They're not connected. They have no idea versus. No no I helped. I helped build this with companies big as IBM obviously tons of different products. Tens of different Stuff going on been around for a long in time Within your specific product suite. How do you measure results Across all all the across lining all the different things that we've been talking about yeah. We had the typical.

IBM Leslie Tom US John NBA Lebanon L. O. Tom Who Fossey Karen CEO Fox derek Aaron Gulps partner Austin Scandinavia Norway Finland China India Australia
"program director" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

Swimming Upstream Radio Show

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

"Always leave me a message. She does answer during the day. I I've been quite surprised. That's really nice because you realize you're daylight hours not the same as mine so we have. We have to answer calls weird hours percents true okay. It's been some fun talking to you today. Tell me something that people don't know about you that they should know. Well let's say see. I'm a mother and I'm a grandmother that'd be huge. Let's see what else how many kids I have two grandsons. My daughter just turned forty. Joe Love that seven this year I think and my grandsons are getting ready to be twenty two and twenty three. I think in March. That's pretty excited isn't it. It is I have one My oldest I grandson is a TSA Airline person in Mobile Alabama and my number two grandson is in the air force. I Wide Been Air Force Base in Missouri and see if long as the kids are doing. Okay we're fine. That's well listen. It has been great talking with you. And maybe we can check in after the first of the year is how things are going into the meantime. I hope you have a wonderful in happy Thanksgiving because why wouldn't shit right. Thank you and you do the same. Okay I will try hard and this has been swimming upstream. I'm Dorothy Wilhelm and we've been talking this half hour to the program director at Society Bites Dot Com near.

Joe Love Dorothy Wilhelm TSA Airline program director Alabama Missouri
"program director" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

Swimming Upstream Radio Show

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

"The EGO that says I can be a radio host but windy the actuality of the project unfolds. They they realize okay. Maybe this isn't for me after all sometimes it takes a two before over the head before people realize that they're just not out for this well and also you know another thing that I found and I still is a complete mistreated treated me so far But I found that you really have to spend a Lotta time promoting it afterwards too. That's part of the work and You know you go back there. Like we happen to live in an area where it's comparatively easy but even so it's a real uphill slog. I mean I'm thinking two or three extra people a week. Well that's pretty good. You know this is good as it goes the old saying wrong. Rome wasn't built in a day. No it wasn't but my kids just came back from there and they said it's really really crowded now. I'm sure it is. But how many thousands careers is there a way long time away longtime and sure and that brings me me to another thing though. Have you been able to notice what sorts of program seemed to be more popular or d like there is such a thing Well I'm sure that there are Shows that are more popular than others. We have one that is a completely Spanish speaking program and it's our number one show Joe. Why because it's used in schools and central and South America to teach children about classical classical music and composers and the instruments so for them? It's an educational show. So we get a lot of feedback on that one particular Win But we also have shows in French Italian Su Su so You know you just never know for sure. Sure what's GONNA take off but once it does it goes and then that what what you're saying. Maybe is that now now. Those are all specific and people would be very eager to hear shows in their own language meeting specific purpose absolutely in English it on. It's like a a bag of skittles. There's red ones. There's blue windscreen winds through shallow ones. But each one has its own flavor and each one is enjoyed separately or together. Well how about. Tell me about society bites than is that's B. Y. T. E. S. by the way and that's your particular baby isn't it yes. It took about two and a half three years in development before we were actually able to go live and at that time I think we only ahead maybe seven shows at the point that we went live. And now there's probably over forty shows and that's twenty four seven and there's over five five nine listeners. Now I wonder if that is a Melissa to my show longshore they are. Why would they with with great disdain? When buying gems they'll turn right off? I know that I don't think we have a listener. Base of about one hundred million around the world. That's a Nice mm-hmm. We have partnered in what is known as Meena the Middle East in Dubai. We're in South Africa. North Africa and dad added a huge listener base for us. You know I am amazed. I don't know why I didn't realize it but it didn't realize and I am having a hard time working out what that means in terms of. I just had this terrible feeling that I don't have anything to say to them. You Lot a lot of self Self Promotion and that is a big plus for you because you understand it you know how to do it it and you do it well. If you're concerned that people would not be interested in your show. I think that you might be wrong about that. One one of our biggest shows in Dubai where women are the most Degraded is a minute show on menopause for women. And you would do that. That would go into but but it does. That's interesting style radio. Yeah Oh yes I agree but what I find. The challenges is working out like everybody does what the initials. But maybe but then and you know is kind of like a bunch of grapes. Yeah that's a great all right but then let it we do with it. It might be why and it might be Jelly. You just don't know for sure that was a little kind of northwest west. Homily you know Do you do you find you bring that your your mid Western. I kinda hear those solid routes you know it sounds to me like Mike now. We've never had the chance to meet in person but it sounds like you're pretty unflappable. Spent eight years in the navy reserves. You didn't really yeah. So unflappable is a good way to put that when we were in the Navy I was in the navy from one thousand nine hundred ninety one to nineteen ninety nine same time. My son was in the navy. Well there you are shield and Desert Storm. Yup Yup Yup. Yup He was he was there. He was a carrier You're pilot you see there are all it. Here's the thing they keep saying small world it really is though isn't it it is the FBI find. We're really all friends. We really all are for not offer ends. We've got something to be friendly about. We have shared experiences. And you like Missouri. My my brother lived in Missouri most of his life so and I used to a radio show from there so see we are offense neighbors and so since that is the case. What would you like your friends and neighbors to know about you? What would I like my friends and neighbors I I may not know? I think that I would like them not to know that. I'm not as tough as I look. No you're adorable. Seems to have gone away here. Okay good well see we will. Oh never mind I see what it is did I. Did I tell you I used to do this for liberty. No I got a little red. I've got a Little Red Square up here that I've never seen before but never mind okay. So then that means means we are coming up on the exciting dynamic close and so how would you like what. Let me ask you this question but did you think I'd surely ask you that. I haven't you know I really don't know because you've asked me just about everything that I expected I would not have any idea where to put that We'll let you try it this way. supposing you let's try this tip for for people who might be thinking about starting as might be thinking about okay. That is a good question. Do we apply to society bites or do we wait for you to come get us. I think if anyone is interested in having podcast that they definitely need to get in touch with me. A program director at Society Bites Radio DOT COM and that is B. Y. T. E. S.. If they we are truly interested in having their own podcast we will be more than happy to send them a welcome letter and a host Cuny so that we understand what it is. They're looking for and whether or not. It fits our vision for the station. If it does then we'll set up an appointment for either a conference call or an in person meeting and we will sit down and discuss thus what they see their future being on the radio. A lot of people don't know so the host Cuny gives them an opportunity to get out of their head and down on a piece Lisa paper where their thoughts are. That's very good. What's your pet peeves? My Pet peeve is people who don't don't follow procedure being Brat and military personnel procedures important because without those this procedures in place. We can't do our job. Which means that? We're not doing you justice. Tell me again where they should speaking of procedures. Then where where should they. Should they contact you. Let's repeat the APP for people that didn't have a pen in their hand. Who and I were talking about? Hey it's a really long.

Dubai Missouri French Italian Su Su navy South America Rome Cuny FBI Joe South Africa Desert Storm Melissa North Africa Middle East B. Y. T. E. S. Meena Mike program director T. E. S Lisa
"program director" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

Swimming Upstream Radio Show

15:47 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

"Hello welcome it's time to join Dorothy Wilhelm who had his very minute is swimming upstream. Because it isn't crowded there. This new show now is for people who want to break away from the ordinary and live as if it mattered. Let's get going. Dorothy gets crappy. If you keep waiting well hi there. This is Dorothy Wilhelm and that was Sam Longoria. Sorry other introducing me on the air and SAM has a way of getting around and being lots of places at the same time for instance even as we swim upstream today Sam has caught us with a message for the holidays Samya No is our Hollywood historian and he has some things that you you can be thankful for in Hollywood. Here's our friend. Hollywood historian Sam Longoria. Hello Dorothy Sam Longoria here. I'm I'm usually in Hollywood because I the Hollywood Hamster Haberdasher weight and Burger. I am the Hollywood historian. I'm I'm on a speaking tour today. Central time everywhere. You look the which is just like regular time only sideways and I am so thankful that you're doing a Thanksgiving episode today because Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday not just because of the food but the warmth and kindness and the friends and family family and yes the food. Pumpkin Turkey. cranberry Salad Hot Coca Cola. cheetos come Carney and krispy Raspberry Newton's for dessert I love your show. Dorothy and I am happy to tell you what I am thankful for in Hollywood the entertainment capital of the world. I would say first of all I am. Thanks for Hollywood itself. That there is a place for every nutcase to go and work on creative things. And that's basically what we do. It's a little town own. Orson Welles said that Hollywood was just like a small town. And he's right he's still right. It is a small town and the town is made up of people people who like to put together shows and show them to America and the rest of the world and they love our shows and I'm happy to have worked on some big ones that were we're also pretty darned good. I worked at ghostbusters. I worked at captain. EEO I worked on lots and lots of wonderful films. And I love them. And I'm thankful thankful for them. I am very thankful. Let's start at the top. I'm thankful for Walt Disney. What a man of integrity and what a great great worker.

Hollywood Sam Longoria Dorothy Wilhelm Orson Welles Walt Disney America Turkey. Carney krispy
"program director" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"program director" Discussed on KOMO

"I'm Kamel program director Rick fansites and if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though como news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to come. the home of the purple and gold husky sports is on the air I'm Kamel program director Rick fansites and if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though como news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to Kamel the home of the purple and gold husky sports is on the air I'm Kamel program director Rick fansites and if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though como news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to Carmel the home of the purple and gold husky sports is on the air I'm como program director Rick fansites and if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though como news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to Carmel the home of the purple and gold husky sports is on the air I'm como program director Rick fansites and if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though como news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to combo the home of the purple and gold husky sports. is on the air I'm como program director Rick fansites if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though Kamel news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to combo the home of the purple and gold husky sports is on the air I'm Kamel program director Rick fansites if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though como news one thousand A. am or FM ninety seven seven this stream will return to regular news programming at the end of the game thank you for listening to combo the home of the purple and gold husky sports is on the air I'm Kamel program director Rick fansites if you're receiving this message instead of combos university of Washington game action your device is probably outside the immediate como listening area if that's the case we're contractually prohibited from streaming the game online catch all the action on the radio though Kamel.

Kamel program director Rick Washington
"program director" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"program director" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"You have mad at a program director or anything sure i've got mad at them but i've never flown anything at them i mean never once has gone to that point of view eventually thrown a program director don't tell the story again oh now um ribs know i know you've you've broken his ribs three different out here there there are a oftentimes worry you know guys who spent a lot of time with each other and every now and again you might catch you got a bad day right and you may say something the guy that might just set him off so that kind of sounds like what happened between sure because these guys supposedly buddy holly but yeah exactly and it's like i said the ball bus the relationship it sometimes it goes too far you've seen it with friends like i have schrager two guys their friends with their always plus each other's chops in it's one thing that life sends him over the edge but like you you can't throw hot soup and a man i mean that's a positive thing you cannot do a heavy though is hot soup we'll because i ask cold sweet spot joey could be said quote soup the junior zeev rods ahmad cold butters bought a not squad supply why as eyebrow that some colds yukimi soup actually on our honeymoon i had a was a night really nice resort where i was hanging a rainy moss i had some good spot joe there's a rubber band than it nicely was discussed it he told that somebody i should have probably the people made them i'd but but i did not i know when i so that story come on on friday i was like man i wish we are on the air but i now the fact is i don't think it was all that big of a deal i.

program director joey butters joe
"program director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"program director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is the program director for the national science foundation's division of astronomical sciences he overseas solar physics there david welcome to one a thank you carrie black is the associate program director in the national science foundation's atmospheric and geospace science is division high carry hi thanks so much for having me also with this alex young the associate director for science in the he'll he'll physics science division at masses goddard space flight center alex welcome thanks for having me and ernest right is of visualize our app nasa scientific visualization studio at the nasa goddard space flight center thank you artist for being with us great to be here all right so the eclipse has a lot of people deep doubt including the four view which is why you're here but for people who never really got excited about eclipses the used to seeing their neighbors run outside i'd looking up looking down at a pinhol piece of paper kind of thing and they just don't pike kinda get why this eclipse is a big deal while they can't just wait for the next the clips carry black what is it about this eclipse that makes it's such a big deal well let's really fantastic atta is that it does stand the entire continent so people can see it it anywhere on across the entire united states actually people will be able to see at least some portion of at david balts talk about most of the eclipse is that the us gets to see if most of them don't span the whole country how much do they usually spanned is usually or their certain tracks that eclipses tend to take her they all different they're all pretty much different m the last solar eclipse that was in the us total solar eclipse was in 1979 and attract across had believe these coast of the united states this one is.

program director national science foundation associate program director atta david balts united states carrie black associate director for science alex ernest pike