18 Burst results for "Program Chair"

ICLR: accessible, inclusive, virtual

Talking Machines

05:53 min | 3 months ago

ICLR: accessible, inclusive, virtual

"I'm Katherine Foreman and I'm neal learns and today we are bringing you breaking our format. Our usual format our new usual format a little bit kneel at we have the opportunity to sit down with the General Chair and senior program chair or this year's interruption of the international conference on learning representations I clear which was entirely virtual this year Alexander Rush of Cornell and Shakira Muhammad of deep. Mind thank you so much for joining us today. I really appreciate it off. Excellent Catherine great to be here. I'd love to do a little bit of background on. I clear I just sort of like mainly to give us a sort of a context for the conference in in the ecosystem of other conferences. WanNa know how did the conference get to where it is today? Yes thank you neil. That sounds like a very good question. How the conference get to where it is today. This year was already breaking ground. It was going to be taking place in Ethiopia which I think is the first time any of the large conferences have been held on the African continent But then all of a sudden we had this massive global change and it was decided that the conference would take place entirely. Virtually so Sasha. I'd love to hear from you a little bit more about how you see. I clear fitting into the larger system of conferences. And what your experience with. It's been and how this change took place shore so this was the eighth international conference of learning representations but it was run as a workshop for several years so it started in two thousand thirteen. And I think what's remarkable about the conference it's been experiencing exponential growth for the last basically for its entire history and so it's a conference where everyone is kind of a newcomer each year. We have most people kind of experiencing it for their first time. I think personally I didn't really attend. I clear till about three or four years ago and I was coming from it from the natural language processing community so conferences like ACL P that she makes up a relatively large part of kind of this multi disciplinary area. It's a conference. That kind of welcomes a large group of people doing different forms of representation learning and deep learning and things of that form I think it differs from some of the other machine learning conferences in that. It's a bit more experimental. I think a lot of people know it for its experimental reviewing format and for the structure of how it's laid out and I think one of the reasons it was so interesting to work on is because it's a conference that kind of allows for more experimentation in its format in its structure and we took that to heart in both the venue this year and also in kind of change to the virtual conference format. So this sort of like the experimental stuff it does on its own. It was the first to open reviewing. And then there's the experimental stuff that's forced upon it so. I find so amazing. What you had to do this year is first of all you were taking a major conference to the African continent for the first time which was a major undertaking in itself. And then you had to cancel the first major conference on the African continent. Tell us how how I don't know who's best to sort of speak to that. She cared. Do you want to tell us how that came about? And how you reacted yes. I think we were actually quite far along in our work dealing with the European conference it was going to be in a great venue in the Millennium Hall. Very close to the airport in Ethiopia. Lots of things have been set up. Even down to the whole Shedu of the conference itself was set up. The we're going be three. Parallel tracks experimented the conference in that way. All the keynotes. All the speaking. The setup of the post is all of these kinds of things are done and then it was a difficult time the end of February the beginning of March when it was very clear that the long run of cove it and would come into effect and a lot of consideration and debate with many many different kinds of people around actually cancelling the conference. But I think in the end You know it was obviously a good decision. Forced us to experiment in the new way so I was pretty happy with the with the end to actually get to do it. So what was the thing that Chicago pops happiest about about the way the conference went the thing that surprised you the most because I know both of you I mean it must be in so much stress. Just organizing a major conference like this is like major stress in in the base case and then organizing one where you have to reorganize the entire conference within the space of a few weeks. I just can't imagine it but let's start with the positive things and and pats that recession. Say She Sasha. What was the thing that you most pleasantly surprised about about the conference? Yeah so there. I think there were a lot of things that kind of were unexpected or kind of emergent behavior. That came up during the conference itself. The part that I think I spent the most time on and was most excited about was the the social interactions particularly chat and the socials. That emerged I think that was the part we were most worried about. It's the part I get the most out of conferences talking to experts in the field kind of having conversations that you didn't expect or learning about papers that you didn't know that we're coming. We really built that around kind of slack. Like chat experience and seeing the different topic rooms emerged. There was a very interesting created. A I room. That came out of nowhere. The community had several very interesting events. That were just so neat to attend and then we also ran several mentoring sessions just kind of out of nowhere in the middle of the conference that were super interesting and kind of almost better than I would have imagined. That could have occurred. Say getting a drink at a bar at an normal conference

Ethiopia Sasha Katherine Foreman Catherine Shakira Muhammad Millennium Hall General Chair Cornell Alexander Rush Chicago Program Chair Neal WAN
"program chair" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:40 min | 9 months ago

"program chair" Discussed on KCBS All News

"It's impossible burger Chrissy Vandenberg is executive director of the vegan product certification group vegan action I don't see any benefit of penalizing Burger King for having this option people have never had a vegetarian or vegan burger have tried this for the first time ever and are liking it and that's huge that's significant Vandenberg says of lawsuits like this one persist it will only push restaurants like Burger King away from offering a vegan choice on their menu and that she says would be very disappointing while we on the subject of food Oakland is getting a massive new food hall that will feature famous bay area shops and businesses KCBS is Kerry who dislike says it will be located in Jack London square two story market hall will be a culinary destination for bay area food lovers the Oakland assembly opens next summer in Jack London square with space for nearly two dozen local shops genau Becker is a food writer for the San Francisco Chronicle I think this line up is really impressive and speaks to the ambition of the food hall there's the chef owner of routines and G. who beach club and Arabic queue and men show Rahman and and these are all really really popular the forty thousand square foot facility will feature a cocktail bar a large indoor stage for live entertainment a second floor banquet hall and an outdoor dining area with views of the San Francisco skyline in a time where many bay area restaurants are closing their doors Baker says this food all will create foot traffic in a prime location for tourists and families interesting mix of warehouses and water friends and access to San Francisco so I think in the in the grander scheme of making tack on a square like a tourist destination for Oakland I think the market next month Kerry had a sack KCBS the San Francisco fire department toy program is celebrating its seventieth anniversary as volunteers begin another year of giving out free toys during the holiday season the fire department will keep barrels outside all local stations between November thirtieth and December twenty third so people can drop off their donations toy program chair person Sally Quezada says this toy giveaway has proven to be rewarding experience over the years the the look on a child when they don or something on their special wish with their appearance haven't been able to get one but we as the surgical firefighters trooper comes out that that really insure part one last year the fire department handed out toys to some thirty one thousand families during the holiday season.

Chrissy Vandenberg executive director Burger King Oakland KCBS Kerry Jack London writer San Francisco Chronicle Rahman Baker San Francisco Sally Quezada genau Becker program chair
"program chair" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"program chair" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Yeah but you're but you're you're you're plugged in and you can salt to a lot of groups weather channel. Perhaps other private sector i. I know that you're involved in american meteorological site in fact you're one of the leads i think you're the program chair for the upcoming one hundredth anniversary meeting of the american meteorological society thaddeus. You still have your fingerprint d._n._a. On this community in a in no well so as we draw to a close i wanted to get your perspective active on the importance of the hundredth anniversary meeting with your essentially planning and in concert with <hes> president jimmy evans and a committee and also your view view as a someone as a consultant in this industry so those two different issues as we wrap up well. You know i mean i. I think the a._m._s. <hes> has has has been been a tremendous cohesive element in our community and it continues to be but just like we were talking about how we as an enterprise after change the a._m._s. It has to the trajectory that took the a._m._s. Through its first hundred years to today's not going to be the correct reading it takes us to the next lutely agree with that show we have to we have to wrap our arms arms around all of that. We have diversity. We have inclusive this. We have to deal with. We have an international. You know environment now not so much a national anymore whether doesn't have boundaries you know i mean you know it all starts at the sun right ninety three million miles away so you know we can't pretend that whether it's in the united states so the a._m._s. has to grasp the the you know the the the next century differently than than than we did in the first century and there's tremendous opportunity <hes> we just have to position ourselves to to be able to take advantage of it and i think the message has to continue to produce value to its members we have to relate to our remembers not only on on an intellectual level but also on an emotional level we have to connect you know in a way that that that excites the passion that drives the enthusiasm easy azam that creates one plus one equaling something greater than to <hes> and those are gonna be the challenges. The m._s. is going to be facing <hes>. I agree and i think the hundredth anniversary meeting in boston. What are the dates on that against the. I can't remember the exact date but it's in january twenty twenty second week. I think we start the second week. We're a little bit later this year. Then you know uh i think we start the second week of january. That sounds about right to me and i'm gonna shameless shamelessly plugged that you know we're we're the committee we have. The jenny has assembled is fantastic. We have some wonderful people you included. I'm happy to be on that committee and i am excited about what are our twenty twenty annual meetings. He's going to be and i think it's gonna be a inexperienced and fund and i would encourage everybody who's listening to this podcast and who is a member of the community or if you're not come to boston and help opus celebrate and hope that it doesn't snow us out we we we we we're meteorologist. We know the climatology of boston but it's a boston host special significance to the a._m._s. which is why the meeting is being held their last question ray. I mean you're consulted. We have a lot of younger people that listen to this podcast. What does it mean to be a consultant in a capacity with an organization like a weather channel or penn state or a.

boston consultant program chair jimmy evans united states president ray twenty twenty second hundred years
"program chair" Discussed on Talking Machines

Talking Machines

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"program chair" Discussed on Talking Machines

"You are listening to talking machines. I'm Katherine Gorman Neil Lawrence. And Neil, I've been thinking a lot lately about reproducibility. I know that sort of a really big thing tackle, but there's been some pretty concrete movements by the program, chairs at nervous this year to, to sort of bring that more actively into the conference and I wanted to, to chat with you a little bit about it. So after this year, we're seeing Joel anew is the reproducibility chair, Hugo, our shell who is the program chair for this year, along with his cO program. Chairs have written several blog posts about how they have introduced code submission and some other ideas that hopefully are going to bring us closer to reproducibility. And we've seen this trend in the field for a little, while especially round the conferences, like I believe these several of these ideas were piloted, ICM L, and I clear. But what do you think we need to do to sort of Br? This more into the mainstream of what's expected in sort of the daily production of papers, and sharing of information. Yeah, let's start there. I think there's lots of other issues to, to think about with regards to industry and redacted information and all that stuff. But do you think this is a move in the right direction? So I think it's very interesting. And first of all, I want to say how exciting, I think it is to see the Europe's keeps innovating, you know, and you'd go even at the scale and Akon. Imagine the work it, it's going to take additional work to do code review. The sippy of the thing that people puts people off, and I'm very excited about it as experiment. I think there's a number of fact is going on here because it's, it's an era. I've been very if we talk about release of code, I became very interested in that sort of from working in computational biology wetter, it's sort of like it's considered if you not releasing. In your methods. What are you doing because a biologist trying to deal with the, the, you know, that transcript Tomac data or something isn't gonna sit down and reimplement from your paper? So if they want if you want, you'll method to be reused make it available. And there was a whole self Wackle bio, conductor, and we actually in, in my team we used to end up like prototyping in Matlab, and having into bio, conductor, and to make it available very healthy community. And that's been the case nineteen years. If you go back beyond that, I think really interesting paper to read in this space is David Donohoe's work while David does, I think it's from days before post. I don't know what we used to call it then. Oh. Letters by carrier pigeon. Well, I'm actually play the days before, probably like the internet that widespread. He. And I used to have this on my homepage is because this was so rarely talked about and machine learning. And I mean Kevin Murphy, I think was the one that drew my attention to it after I'd started talking about it with experience from computational biology. And but the basic point he makes is the journal papa- or the conference, paper is just an advocate for the product, which is the code, and I think now you can tell how long ago when David Donohoe is, I think signal processing area, the time when he was doing this was all around wave Litz when wave Litz hot when they were the neural networks, you know, maybe they'll be the neural networks again. And they all pretty cool wavered, it's well, we see nervous. Well, actually, you know, we have had deep wave knit systems coming out, anyway. So, but that's like late eighteenth or something. I don't know maybe early nineties. Yeah. So this is being talked about for a long time. And if you read what he says, it's a no brainer. One of my curiosities is why has why has the. The wider community suddenly raised this as a big problem. And I'm not sure I have all of the us is clearly, there's all the arguments, David aches. But, you know, I was trying to make those arguments for years. And no one seemed to actually in the end I gave up because I just realized releasing code and creating shed source code base for my group, it was just such an effective way of doing massage. I don't care if anyone else is gonna do it. You know it works for us. But so now it's come up again in the second full. We there was a debate about it. Dahlie, in South Africa, which was a sort of it, which was designed as a debate just to explore the issues. And it was a Chatham house. Rules, debate say who was on which side saying what but just to try and explore the issues. But one of the things that was emerging from, I think, is, it's not just about reproducibility, if you want to build on what someone else's done, you kind of need access to their code. It's about I think back in the day. I think, and I participated in conference about reproducibility I think people are conflicting, a few different things here that actually reproducibility one thing, but running someone else's code is not scientific reproducibility actually, you could argue the reimplementing from the paper is sign from reproducibility. I think it's allowing an enabling the community to build on what others are doing an rapidly make progress. I think is the strongest argument why code releases import. I'd also follow that up with you, not releasing. Code. If you not releasing model unless you have done something absolutely outstanding unlikely to be part of that game. So I've sort of vid- personally from a design that we should make this more. We should actually explicitly introduce things deserves thinking, well if people don't do it that just gonna get left by the wayside. Now, having said that I'm not strongly against the, the neurons vision of having cocoa in it something that I've advocated for in the past, I just sort of gave up on it, but I, I would worry if we ended up being in a position where we're limiting people's ability to submit because if we look at reproducibility there's a few other things going on here. One is the to recreate these results massive compute, sometimes quite well beyond the capabilities of a small lab. And, you know, just by providing the code you not providing that compute, right? And also, like if you don't have the same data set and probably people don't want to release that data set or you know. Like that's another of the artifacts that you would need in order to actually reproduce thing. It's not just the code, it's the compute and the stuff that you used. And I would argue today the, the greatest value people doing creating tidying up and presenting data sets and that's almost totally on acknowledged. I also think we went through this very weird period of people publishing code if it's papers, and then then you get like an fog on Padre goes, who is one of the legal side is he has, like, like some extraordinary number citations because it's like, and if you talked him about he says, I kind of find it embarrassing because, yes, I initiated the project, but I'm not very much involved. And this is an enormous community effort, which number of people involved in and, you know, that every time someone uses it, I get another site. So there's a really interesting credit application to truly valuable code base. It something that people would share and contribute to, to sort of lay down the knowledge of the community. My personal feeling. I probably sound a bit. You know why I don't know? Yeah. I'm just gonna be quite old man about it into these youngsters finally coming up with things that we hit that ages ago. I feel a little bit like that about it overly simplistic arguments. Certainly webbing made the Dalai debate. I think it's a positive thing. But look it the idea that you soulful the challenges, we've around how academics can keep up with very well funded industrial labs, just because you release code just not just not, then it's abandoned and actually, one of the changes since some going back to say, let's say ten years ago. If you were talking about a quite complex variations algorithm with publishing say two thousand nine the code you had to release a lot more complex than the sort of thing you have to write today with all these auto packages. Ios. And the sort of these interesting ws to Catholic methods, people, creating, I would say the modern papers look to me, a lot more reproducible just from the basic fact, a lot of the software has sort of caught up. But having said that, you know, I think it's great. We're having a debate. I don't think I agree with everything Joel said in the talk. But I I'm excited about this initiative excited to see where it takes us. But I'm nervous about those sort of seemed to be associating a lot of the challenges facing the community just with code release. There's, there's a lot base. My friend would be we should have done code release fifteen years ago. And then we would be we would be facing a bunch of the other questions that will follow. So it's a great advance admits taken a long time coming. Absolutely. Yeah. But at least we're getting to that first layer, right? We can peel that off. Start to dig into the other stuff that's under their can complain about all the stuff. Yes, exactly. We could find new stuff to complain say now, something else is the problem that we thought of fifteen years ago that we didn't do is the reason that I come. Exactly. Well, you can find a link to the blog posts from the program chairs at neuro, this year on our website, the talking machines dot com on the post by David Donohoe from the days before the blog posts reach back into the way back machine and make a blog post, we might have to have seen him as David. He's still around. He's done something. I'm sure it will be this summer. We'll find..

David Donohoe program chair Joel Neil Lawrence ICM L Europe Katherine Gorman Kevin Murphy us Hugo Chatham house papa Dahlie Dalai South Africa fifteen years nineteen years
"program chair" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

16:41 min | 1 year ago

"program chair" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"At state road. Fifty is still under red alert with three right lanes blocked. Heavy delays. Fortunately, the rest of your eye for an accident free. This has been a news ninety six point five WDBO red alert, traffic advisory. I'm Beth perils. Speaking to heavier Garcia's. He's professor and program chair for Valencia colleges plant science and agricultural technology program. And I was so excited that you could speak with me today about the program. Shirley, we want to describe it for everyone. But I think it has such a direct connection to the idea of industry in Florida and the different types of jobs that people can get these days, so and and directly ties to something so critical for us all which is how we eat. So tell us about your program. Sure, no problem. And I thank you for inviting me to speak to you today any chance I get opportunity to to talk about the program. I'm gonna jump at because we have a a good program. A great program, I should say the plan sites in agriculture technology programs. We offer to your degree in AS degree with three specializations actually one in landscape one in horticulture and the new announced sustainable agriculture along with these AS degrees. We offer several technical certificates at twelfth credit eighteen credit and thirty minute Mark. And these are the more specialized courses, more programs specific courses like intruder, plant science insurance to sustainable, egg plant pathology, the study of plant diseases, etc. So really one of the beauties of the program is similar to the diversity in the agriculture industry. Whether it's ornamental plants or edible plants that there. Seems to be a wide wide range of opportunities. Available for those either in the field already. You're wishing to enter this great industry. Excellent. And yeah. And I even feel dimension may be the most critical aspect of that which you've pointed out, which is dealing with the idea a sustainability with with climate change, and sort of things changing here in Florida in terms of drought, conditions and everything else and learning how to keep up with that. Let's correct. Yeah. Let's let's actually talk first about your students who's interested in these fields. Well, our average age is thirty one years old. So again, going back to the diversity of the industry, we have anywhere from your traditional college student eighteen nineteen year old student just out of college to your non traditional student up there in age, you know, have students in the program in their seventies. And some eighteen nineteen year olds and everything in between. So we have a very very white mix. To say, the least, and there's definitely groups interested in the landscape aspect, whether it's design installation or maintenance of landscape projects and landscape plants. We have those interested in the ornamental industry. Apopka is located pretty close to our campus. It's it's one of the two centers in the state along with homestead they just have a large number of nurseries in a very small concentrated area, and these nurseries are dealing mainly with ornamental plants. So whether it's small foliage plants or trees, and shrubs, we have plenty of opportunities for those wanting to to grow these types of crops, and then lastly, the the edible portion, right? The food the fruits and vegetables, that's something. We're just getting into now with our are, you sustainable act specialization, and we're seeing a renewed interest, you know, by the public so to speak in this area in where their food comes from. And we we are blessed here in Florida. To have abundant sunshine. Irrigation. Water availability and year, round growing conditions. However, we have to use these resources, mainly water, fertilizer, pesticides, etc. And the sustainable fashion we need to make sure we're being good stewards of our environment. Whether it's ornamental plant production or the edible crop aspect. We just need to make sure we were using our resources efficiently and in a sustainable manner. Well, that's a whole lot going on there. And and one question I wanted to ask you the difference between the degrees and the certification. So the certifications specializations are are those and it hurts the motivation for them. Sure. So our certifications are are stand alone. But they also build up to the AS degree. So the ace degrees of two years agree associate of science with those three specializations, but for the two year degree the students will have to take general courses, like freshman composition. Humanities, etc. The technical certificates are more focused on the program specific courses. So for example, I certificate twelve credits is four courses, right? Intruder. Plant science being one of them entomology being another one the study of insects, right and how to control insect pests, and then you have a couple of options. So you could take courses in ornamental, plant identification or sustainable Ag in order to complete that first twelve credits certificate. So it's really the more program specific courses that we focus on for the technical certificates. But these are also courses included and required for the two year degree now when you mentioned that I think immediately of insects because I was I was talking to earlier about the changes in our climate and situation with water, but there's also been so many changes with insects. Did you build that kind of new knowledge into the program as you go? Absolutely one of the great things about Florida is all the trade that we have right all of our airports and seaports, however due to this. And this is something I heard some time ago. And I believe it's still true. We have one new insect established in Florida every month and that start introduced there's probably several that are introduced. But here we have one that's actually introduced and is able to survive our climate or a native, insect predators, and person, toys, etc. And then gets established in Florida. So I joking somewhat tell my students this is job security for you guys. You have to stay on top of what the latest pests and diseases are that are coming into the state working their way, either up through the Caribbean or from elsewhere and make sure we have the proper tools available to continue to be able to produce crops with the new introductions that we're seeing whether it's pathogens or insect pest here in the state seven, we think about the insects. Are you saying they they impact the plants that the students are working with because they might eat the plants or they might eat the bugs that do something. Good for the plants. Correct. Correct. It's actually both. So these new pest come into our state and either affect the plant directly right either damage leaves flowers fruits, one of the big things that we're seeing is the spreading of new diseases by these insect pest. We call them factors when they're spreading diseases. And we've seen that recap on our citrus industry with the citrus greening, and they also can't affect pollinators as well. Whether as parasites toyed new diseases on their pollinators, these are all definitely areas that we need to be concerned with and keep up to date on as well. I wanna talk about your horticulture degree program first because you you mentioned Apopka, and we all know about the nurseries and really just that long long standing issue of horticulture being an industry in the state. What does the program do for students, and how do they apply that? End great question. And as you mentioned Florida has a long history with agriculture, right? Even today agriculture is number two in the state after tourism, of course, and we have great climate for your grand grow year, round, growing, abundant, resources, etc. So the types of courses that we have really trained students in the methods of production, maintenance, landscape, design, even etc. And there's there's a huge demand right now. I like to one of the mantras to the students one of my sayings is if if you're not able to find a job in this industry right now, you're either not looking hard enough for a willing to move it. It's that simple study put out last year by the USDA or I actually be by Purdue funded by the USDA believed in the whole country nationwide. Over the next five years. Fifty five thousand job openings approximately every year in agriculture and aggravated fields only about thirty thousand advocates. That's every year for the next five years. So there's definitely a huge demand. And we just need to make sure, and that's what we're trying to do with the new courses that we're offering that we're keeping up to date with this ever changing industry and just like would like to mention briefly, we've added this specialization sustainable Ag. But we've also added courses as well courses such as introduced sustainable agriculture, but also principles of hydroponics aqua, politics aquaculture, right? So we are now infusing these new courses into our current curriculum. Because in the end when you think about landscaping there's more and more of that. I think good transition perhaps to choosing the right plans for the right situation there with the soil and the water and so forth. Whereas maybe back in the day. This is a pretty plant will make it work. We'll over water. Etc. Now, we have to be a little bit tighter with watering and such. So they've got to make some some decisions along those lines, correct? Correct. And another great point in this goes back to just being better stewards of our environment. Right. And this is why there's there's been an explosion really in the native plant industry. Right. So native plants or those plants obviously native here to the state they're better to with. They're better able to withstand. Our our climate are periods of drought or periods of flood. There's usually less disease, and insect pressure on these native plants, they're usually more efficient and taking up nutrients from our soil, and there there has been a huge movement really toward using more native plants in the landscape, which will then result in the use of less resources, like water, fertilizer, pesticides, etc. And so whether you know, we're speaking about ornamental agriculture. Ornamental horticulture excuse me or edible crops sustainability ski utilizing our resources efficiently. Now, you mentioned the hydroponics and so forth. You have an entire new greenhouse where you do this. Yes. Yes. We've added a facility to the program the last year or so, and it's a rooftop aquasonic greenhouse in downtown winter garden so on the top of the appropriately named garden Bill. I can't make this up. There are two sixteen hundred square foot greenhouses with five fifteen hundred gallon fish tanks. And we used these tanks for you. As you grow swim. Eat they produce fish waste. This fish waste is passed through a series of filters and be we then utilize this for fertilizer for our hydroponically grown plants. So. I will urge the science and arts really of hydroponics and aquaculture in one closed system. So this is a fully closed system where we're utilizing our resources efficiently, and in the sense growing fertilizer for plants, and this just happens to be in this case, a great example of urban agriculture 'cause we're on the roof of a three story building. I was to ask you why does it need to be on the roof, and that's just to make use of nobody else's up. There the space is there at my might as well be utilized. Correct. Correct. The gentleman who built this facility Burt Roper who passed away. So several years ago built the building right wish this facility in mind. So I had to be neared to be able to withstand all that wait for those fish tanks. And he wanted to showcase what was possible in an urban setting. And it's a really phenomenal facility. Or our students can't get enough of they love spending time love taking classes and labs over there. And it's it's really been a great learning facility for us. So the are not being raised to be eaten there being raised to just keep on doing. What we all do create the waste. Correct. Correct. And eventually we do harvest to lobby on cigarettes to a certain size, and we find a home or a plate for them. We still work with several nonprofits one of them central care mission where we have where we've helped them to maintain. I should say about thirty something box gardens, and we provide fish to them or the Salvation Army or our employees when the fish needs to be harvested. But the goal really I it's not to produce fish for harvest. We just happen to have them there to to produce fertilizer for the plants and then harvest as needed, and I have to ask why fish why is there? Excrement so much better than anything else. I mean, I is it simply about this space efficiency. Great question. Yes. Definitely space efficiency and just the ease of combining these two different systems. Right. Aquaculture hydroponics. The fish is just a perfect fit. I guess I should ask you to go ahead and define those terms. I think we can buy context gets a little bit. But you're talking about hydroponics and aquaculture what what are those? Yes. So great question hydroponics is the growing plants without soil, as we know plants need water, light air and nutrients for growth, so we can do this without soil, and we usually use what we call some type of soil this media in order to keep the roots in place aquaculture is the growth of I should say that production of fish right in a in a in a commercial setting. So aqua politics is the combination of these two under one roof under one system, right where we're going to fish. The fish are produced waste we then filter the waste and use utilize that as fertilizer for the plants. When students are getting these skills down in these experiences down. Will they be able to apply them is this a big thing a growing effort in Florida or or beyond? Currently there is about I believe twenty or so aquaculture aqua facilities in the state. And one thing I try and stretch students is keep in mind. Just because you're learning these techniques here doesn't mean you're going to be working in politics facility right now. What I mean by that is where whether you're fertilizing with this fish water or regular fertilizer organic fertilizer, many of the techniques and procedures used here in the methods are the same. So there's a lot of crossover a lot of carryover from one aspect of the industry to another. And I'm very happy to say over the last several years we've seen our placement rate for graduates one hundred percent or very they're very near two hundred percent again, just. Distress something I mentioned earlier there. Steph for them. He plenty of job opportunities out there. They may not be an uncle politics. Those do exist. But there there's plenty of diversity in this field where we're students are able to find a niche for themselves and find employment after graduating. And it sounds like they become very flexible in learning. You know, maybe down the line. Hey, it's not exactly that till Africa in a tank, but that premise, maybe I can use it in this way..

Florida Apopka Garcia Shirley Valencia Caribbean Africa USDA program chair professor Salvation Army Burt Roper Purdue eighteen nineteen year five years two year five fifteen hundred gallon
"program chair" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"program chair" Discussed on Revision Path

"If you pay six dollars, ten dollars, whatever when you leave in the morning, your mindset is different. So even if you feel slump in the afternoon, you know, this is what's happening lead the D sue you will drink coffee. You'll do what is necessary. To make sure will you can attend. So when I realized that the would press is the crew was no longer free tattoed. It was now six dollars at a freed up it made it a lot easier to manage because there are no I no longer have to hustle companies. I could look at the list of attendees at one pm that day before the event a make a decision on how I was going to handle refreshments, man. The quality refreshments shades from pizza bay to chicken nuggets festival. Trees. It changed. It was interesting seeing the mindset of the attending change as well. Because people realize if the meet up starts at six o'clock they need together at five thirty two grandma plate Brahma pleads grab a seat. If he didn't do that. You're going to be standing for who will meet up. So that's kind of how things kinda sought revolves over time. So there's a lot in here that you just mentioned that I wanna unpacked some of it. I'll get to later. But I think specifically the part I wanna talk about is about funding is about how people are attaching value to the money that you're charging for these events and win that happened that actually increased the attendees, and I think sometimes for designers pricing can always be a bit of a tricky issue, whether you're pricing for a website or your pricing front event. Like what you're doing? You feel like you might turn people off by charge. For money. And I mean, you probably will. I mean, let's just be honest. It's we live in a capitalist society. But it's good that people are attaching their value to them because of that you're also improving what it is that you're putting out like when you said the food went up, and that made me think like there are so many things that I know that I have paid tickets for and I'm like, I don't want to go the day. But then I'm thinking, well, I can't get this this fifteen dollars back. So let me just go. Already paid the buddy for let me just go ahead and go or if I know that there's going to be, you know, refreshments or something served, and it's not like cheese puffs or whatever then. Yeah. You want to get there early? Because also then that kind of word of mouth travels. I mean, it's almost like when you're in college, and you just show up to like random events and stuff because you know, that they've got a good spread. Or maybe that was you gotta college experience. But. I was I'm guilty of that. There's nothing I would definitely show up to Tupperware in my in my backpack. Like, yeah, I'm so interested in this topic. And I'm just shoveling food not to say that just showed up for the food. Although it's college I probably did. But it kinda shows that because that is part of the offering that is also what's driving people out. So maybe people will check it out. Maybe like, oh, this is open my mind a little bit or they're just coming out for the food. Either way you got people coming out. Yeah. You said refresh started in twenty eleven refresh. Charleston. Twenty twelve we price to two thousand eleven refreshed began in two thousand twelve so you started with the the word pressures group. And then in winter when did you get to where you are now? Because now you are the program chair for two other conferences that you've created syntax Khan and revolve conference was just wrapped up back in November. Right. So I mean all along I was doing it. But I was owning it. I still kept thinking okay in someone's gonna come along. And this ova I have I'm not treated as events professional on just figuring goule..

Tupperware program chair Charleston six dollars fifteen dollars ten dollars
"program chair" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"program chair" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Well, no one was hurt. The tyranny of the tear gas from the US border patrol agents against the helpless, Central American babies that were just there. We don't know. But we don't know how they got there. We don't know why they were five and still in diapers. But it happened. They were just innocently trying to break through the border, France. That's all they were trying to do. No injuries were reported. But we have the next thing we have photos, but right headlines for us. Here's a couple of samples for you. Photograph of children in diapers. Fleeing tear gas at border sparks anger or this. These children are barefoot in diapers. Choking on tear gas. Yes, that's the evil empire. The Israel of the Americas. Dare I say it if we can't catch mothers and children to lock them up in cages, well, then we just have to do all we. We can't tear gas them. At least. That's the convenient narrative when you don't care about reporting on the complicated truth of the situation and actually media that complicated. You have an agenda. It was just peace loving migrants. Having a peaceful protest against the me nobly, Uncle Sam who dares to enforce his own laws about entering the country. How dare him? So do we target babies with tear gas or was there another under reported reality? Well, here is the chief U S patrol agent. Rodney Scott he was there. Here's what he said. I kind of challenge that this was a peaceful protest or the the majority of these people are claiming asylum. We'd making about forty two arrests only eight of those were females and there were only a few children involved. The vast majority of the people were dealing with adult males similar to what we saw the first wave of the care. Van came up about a week or so ago, the group immediately started throwing rocks and debris at our agents. Taunting the agents at once our agents were assaulted and the numbers started growing we had two or three agents at a time initially facing hundreds of people at the time. They deployed tear gas to protect themselves into protect the border. Yeah. Doesn't really click with the Trump teargassing baby story. Does it? I mean there are photos. Well, there is a photo. What have I told you this whole border rushing incident wasn't really all that unique. What if I told you that the gas the teargassing? You know, not that unique. I if at exactly five years ago on Sunday, November twenty fifth five years ago. There are some migrants that rush the border fence at the same crossing-point those migrants. Also threw rocks and bottles at US border agents under Barack Obama those agents also responded by firing pepper spray back at the mob. Wait a minute. And that was for one hundred this was for a thousand there were no cameras there. No embedded reporters. No, sackcloth and ashes headlines. There are pictures. We have them. Nobody's been interested in seeing them. In fact, nobody still interested in seeing them in the mainstream media. There's no concerned about the then President Obama allowing such a barbaric response to innocent asylum seekers. Well, it's just that our priorities have changed since then. I guess I wonder how that happened. The photos, and of course, focus on mothers and children in is an attempt by the media to distill a very complex situation into an easy to swallow outrage pill, don't take it because we can tell you the facts. The media will not they could but they will not. So let's look into this just a little deeper, shall we? You're listening to the Glenn Beck program chair. What I hit a couple of things. This is what the media has said this is what the media claimed..

US Barack Obama Glenn Beck France Rodney Scott President Obama Trump Americas Israel program chair Van five years twenty fifth
"program chair" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"With that United seven thirty seven flying overhead gonna draw this segment interview to close Courtney. Thank you so much. Thanks, thanks. So your shirt. What? How Courtney, you know, corden I have actually never met, but for those of you who are newer listeners back in two thousand eight received an Email from some guy. I didn't know name Courtney said this domain name called airplane gigs wanna make a podcast, and he's absolutely right. There was never any never any plan we, we started off and when we reached our third episode, we said, well, you know what? Maybe this will actually work and kept going from there. So I'm really happy that Brian was able to meet Courtney hope heaven opportunity someday then yeah, we gotta get Courtney back on the show. Love to do that. David, would you think about, you know, listening to according to hear his voice? Yeah, it's funny because I lay ever got to do to episodes with them, you know, and and. He, he left the show with Dan and rob coming on just as I the day I did my first segment that I sent in, you know it was it's really kind of funny that you know we were like two ships passed in the night. I've been on the show with them because we he's been on anniversary shows. We never actually got to do a real show together. Well, maybe we'll change that someday. So with that though, I think we're going to wrap this one up. I guess this episode was docu Patty Clark program chair, the college of 'aeronautics Embry riddle, university worldwide petty. Thanks so much for coming on the show talking to us about what about the ten. That's always cool. Is I told you earlier? The ten is my my wife's favorite airplane. We somehow I've got a dig out the photo from the Pima Aaron Space Museum where she's got her arms. Lovingly wrapped around the the Gatling gun in the front of eight, ten. What she has great taste? Yes, yes. Well, I'd like to think so anyway. So again, tell us where we can find every riddle online..

Courtney program chair David Pima Aaron Space Museum Dan Embry riddle corden Brian Patty Clark college of 'aeronautics rob
"program chair" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"We're speaking with petty Clark. She's program chair, college, 'aeronautics, Embry riddle, aeronautical university, Patty again, thanks for coming on the airplane geeks podcast. Let's talk about this Mook. This massive open online course originate from the women in aviation international chapter Embry riddle, right, right. We started a chapter of lemon and aviation international chapter at worldwide. I guess we're in the door third year now and we actually were the very first virtual chapter because in worldwide, we're actually truthfully all over the world. So it's a, it's a virtual organization. We do have some people headquarters, but most of us are dispersed. So the the moot kind of came about as a way because we are all over the world. It is difficult for us to as group. Do a girls in aviation day, which is held every year in the fall this year on not over the thirteen to be able to do some kind of event for us as a group was difficult. So we came up with the idea since we teach online courses, we offer mooks on a regular basis. We thought about and came up with the idea to build a moot that was targeted or aimed at children. And of course girls, but this is open to children. Eight to twelve is our is our target group, but anybody actually can register each just a basic information course on parts of airplanes, names of things on the airplane. You know the forces on flight. I think we have a helicopter unit a helicopter module in them. We also have one on space as well. So it's just an introduction as a way to try to get the word out about aviation into young. Groups because we obviously are not are. We don't see. Suddenly research tells us that we're not attracting people in the numbers. We need to in aviation with the pilots or mechanics, or you know, dispatchers, air traffic, control whatever the case may be. You know, we're just not drawing enough people and and you know, speaking with younger groups in aviation, groups of whatever put we found was that people don't understand the industry, so therefore they don't talk to children about it. So this was just kind of our our way of kind of reaching out and hoping we can get more kids involved. We did run this glass Gier we've had. I think we had about four five hundred total last year. And I think the last time I looked, we were up over three hundred enrollments this time. Our goal is fifteen hundred. So were real. If we get there. What's the length of the course? Well, it's actually set up these modules which are, you know, they're self paced. We estimate it would take about six hours for a child work through it. There's some reading or some visuals n. h. one of the sections of the modules has an activity, they may build an airplane, whatever we, we give them the information to do it, or it might be a puzzle, but it's not more than about six hours, but the the courses open from October the through the twenty third. So students can register now. And then anytime after the they can take the course once they finish it up, they can't qualify. They can get a certificate for finishing the course. So it's it really is to the kids how long they wanna take to to finish it up in kinder- kits enroll themselves. Do they need a parent involved in that process? I'm glad you brought that up mex-. This was something as as a university, this. Kind of a a different path for us last year when we kind of went down this road of understanding when you're dealing with children in right police. Oh, is a mother? I truly respect this disappearance that we have laws that about children in being online in their privacy in the right privacy. So since it is aimed for children between eight and twelve, they have their supposed to be and should be enrolled by parent parents Email address. So there's not any opportunity for any kind of bad behavior were were biding by the laws. So it's it's pretty strict. And thankfully, the canvas people that we deliver the course from the platform, they were very savvy on what we needed to do and kinda made sure week we had all the TS crossed in the is dotted so to speak. And how did you arrive at the specific topics that are going to be covered in the course?.

Embry riddle program chair Clark Patty Gier six hours
"program chair" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Products that into it has whether it be mentored turbo tax or quickbooks or any of their other products that we have we want to infuse those products and makes them smarter with the use of air machine learning second we want to build systems that can do what we call customer care or customer success more effectively so that we help customers get the answers that they need quickly inefficiently third in area that we're focusing on is security risk in prod so building platforms capabilities using machine learning artificial intelligence to secure the data secure the customer's information to understand risk into prevent fraud another area that we're working in that we're starting to roll out now is what we call engineering optimization so if you think about it the company offer it's very large platforms with very significant and complex software and one of the key things that's of great interest to us is whether or not we we can build software that is more robust using machine learning techniques this is a new area of work for us and also for many people outside of the company very exciting for people who are interested in the combination of systems and machine learning another area that we're focusing on what we call central services to the company so using the machine learning techniques in areas like finance in areas and when i say finance i mean finance for into it or areas such as hr or other related places in a back to what you said earlier around automation one of the things i've served with regards automation this is something that one of our honorary program chair speed or norfolk will you might know is very interested in this recycling what you mentioned which is one of the areas for automation is manifesting itself this around data science and software engineering and i always explain it to people as a engineers are kind of lazy.

fraud program chair
"program chair" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Welcome to the riley data show i'm your host bend oregon before we jump into today's episode i want to remind our listeners that we do have to event series that they can go and attend and learn more about the topics covered in despite cast the first one is called the strata data conference which you can find at strata conce dot com the second one is the artificial intelligence conference which yuban find fda icons dot com this episode marks are one hundred episode so this podcast the out of video interviews i conducted arrives twenty four zoo camp and quickly realized that podcast for a better form factor than video interviews so the mark this milestone my colleague parkland nathan who is cochair of jupiter con turned the tables on me and ask me questions about history of this podcast amp particularly looked at the evolution of some of the heat topics we cover this show data size machine learning data engineering architecture a and the impact of each of these on businesses and companies i hope you enjoyed this episode and thank you for your support over the last few years so welcome to the righty data show i'm your host bend lorca here with my friend and colleague nathan who leads are learning group here at orion but it's also the program chair of jupiter khan and today we're doing something different this milestone episode this is our hundred episode so i thought i had turned the wheel the hosting duties over papa in he can ask me questions about despond cast in general and so alternative overdue by then you very much been antastic his so hundred episodes i guess my first question is out of his all start so this started out i believe in one of these righty events gone phuc camp which is a friends of o'reilly and at foo camp our video crew had a setup there into kind of thought about what we should start interview.

oregon lorca program chair papa riley nathan o'reilly
"program chair" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"Tone and they are not what i would call the forward forward motion way so does actually interesting you say the twenty years sources changed i've got some opinions on this but i'd love to hear yours on like how do you have you have you seen open source change over the last twenty years it it does seem like the landscape has shifted quite a lot well in two thousand ten we said that go one which i thought was kind of awesome so i was also program chair for us for five years and so i did a lot of broad open source messaging and and crossed paths with lots and lots of projects that way and the tagline in i think it was the two thousand ten oz con was open sources one okay it's now the default way to build languages it's now the default way to build large scale infrastructure projects you don't try to build proprietary stacks so much anymore the big shift that i saw which would have been right around that time was when my sql and oracle and all of the proliferated no no sql databases showed up they were all open source almost all or open stack coming in and saying no we're doing open source and new way we're doing lots of companies where doing it with lots of big tent view of bringing in lots and lots of project we can argue all week whether that was the successor of failure but it was in new way of doing it and it was a new default where we saw people say we have a problem and the industry and the vendors aren't solving it so we need to find a way to fix this ourselves it also feels to me and to hear your opinion on this the beck and fifteen years ago if there was an open source project it was run by one person and everyone was like that's fine like no problem whereas now it seems like an open source project if people come to it it's like if it's not company backed or there's not a large organization of some kind behind it then it's not nearly as well received.

program chair beck twenty years two thousand ten oz fifteen years five years
"program chair" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Welcome to the riley data show i'm your host bend oregon before we jump into today's episode i want to remind our listeners that we do have to event series that they can go and attend and learn more about the topics covered in despite cast the first one is called the strata data conference which you can find at strata conce dot com the second one is the artificial intelligence conference which yuban find fda icons dot com in disa of the data show i speak with jesse anderson managing director of the big data institute and my colleague pepple nathan who besides leading the learning group of the riley was recently appointed program chair of jupiter con this conversation grew out of a recent email tread between the tree of us where we were discussing this new role the machine learning engineer which linked in recently pegged us the fastest growing job in the us in our email back and forth there was some disagreement on whether such a job was needed in the first place and i would like to also point out that eric olson gave a beautiful keynote at strata santa say recently where he also argued that this may be creating specialized roles early could slow down your data team we record discount for sale at stratus nsa while jesse was in dominion of teaching very popular today training course on real time systems and i asked him what he was seeing as far as a data infrastructure and so we close spot gas with jesse steak on at patchy pulsar a very impressive new messaging system that is really starting to gain fans among data engineers i hope you enjoyed this episode.

oregon managing director program chair engineer eric olson jesse jesse steak riley jesse anderson nathan stratus
"program chair" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Talking very seriously and in fact there's been interesting discussion on the board as to clearly given different societal structures how do we make sure that you know there are common ground for all partners but that's a very big for the last shift to be really inclusive of all the possible cultures because there is no universal set of values of course and so you want stand what ethics can be spelled out in different cultures and the different nuances you know different ways of relating to robots just imagine a robot that you want to deploy in us europe japan people relate to roberts in very different ways in these cultures so there are lots of nuances you know we are making at in connecting to these other cultures and the initiative that they have there around the yard and around the ethics i still want to pursue the notion of how you embed ethical decision making into software maybe we could talk about the car context bringing up the trolley problem is the trolley problem something just for philosophers designers actually have to think about the choices of whether to run over the bicyclists to run over the the old lady i mean is this going on today in the design of transportation system then i got into grad school in grad school yeah i used to be a big dent with philosopher psychologist and cognitive scientists being part of it somewhere in the media will be became a pure ceus oriented discipline but now it's a game expanding because once we start having this bigger impact in fact these things are very much part of the discussion so we don't have answers but we are actually thinking about this questions so for example francesca is going to be the program chair for in sem council on ethics and social policy so these are places where people hopefully people not just a bunch of engineers philosopher from cognitive scientists can talk about the issues i as far as the trolley problem is come they've been interesting studies saying people are very happy to talk about this until their life is in question them say lambda ladies around the dogs everything down as long as i'm alive so that's.

us roberts francesca program chair japan
"program chair" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sony joined for example of any of the chinese major chinese players joined companies have been talking very seriously and in fact there's been interesting discussion on the board as know clearly given that different societal structures how do we make sure that you know that are common ground for our partners but that's a very big shift to be really inclusive of all the possible cultures because there is no universal set of values of course and so you want to understand what ethics can be spelled out in different cultures and the different nuances you know different ways of relating to robots just imagine a robot that he wanted to play in us europe japan people relate to roberts in very different ways in these cultures so there are lots of nuance says we are making efforts in connecting to this other cultures and the initiative that they have their around the eye and the ethics still want to pursue the notion of how you embed ethical decision making into software maybe we can talk about the car context bringing up the trolley problem is the trolley problem something just for philosophers designers actually have to think about the choice of whether to run over the bicyclists to run over that the old lady i mean is this going on today in the design of transportation system then i got into grad school in grad school yeah used to be a big dent with philosopher psychologist and cognitive scientists being part of it somewhere in the media will be became a pure ceus oriented discipline but now which they gain expanding because once we start having this bigger impact in fact these things are very much what off the discussion so we don't have answers but we are actually thinking about these questions so for example francesca is going to be the program chair for an aaa sem council on ethics and social policy so these are places where people hopefully people not just a bunch of engineers philosopher scientists can bark about the issues i as far as the trolley problem is concerned they've been interesting studies saying people are very happy to talk about this until their life is in question them say ran the ladies around the.

Sony us roberts francesca program chair japan
"program chair" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

"Out and say my name today ranked only dr robin three between dhaka and we'd goes there for years and years and you and your husband and then my wife y'all got out and everything on here i am calling is also a funny thing create jobs the out wilmington university is a private nonprofit doctoral research institution the main campus newcastle on route 13 founded nineteen sixty eight aid is accredited by the middle states commission on higher education is now a university and they're right now in front of us here we have two professors in business we have cheryl scanlon sherry right okay good and then artery bloom as well audrey chairs the business management undergrads program associate professor and if i could sort of on just say so uh or so she professor for the college of business and as he doctrine visit ministration you teach h r management which is very important as we talk about that this topic here as well and past president of the american council educations delaware women's network dane as well swap you all know we're we're coming from is there anything need to add to that thank you rank i think that was a very nice introduction we'll get your closer to the microphone here and at an sherry scanlon who is the program chair of the amazon programme online coronary don't you have a doctor teo yes dr sherry again one to familiarise we'd already should've for too long shows southgate dr share all els scanlon while us era and schett an i'm sorry but the thing is scanlon boise i'm a mess today name name gerard feerick today well we have so i don't know put the that that the thing is i mean and and i'm guilty this oh hey sherri how you doing it's like hey bob how you doing what would what does that mean so it here's how i as a person with a doctorate when i'm friends with someone i have no problem with them just call me robin were friends it's no problem but if you're introducing me professionally right i worked hard for that and it's relevant than it needs to be used only in that case mi real that and when you've semi letter still send me letters addressed to mrs but other than that.

scanlon bob us southgate amazon audrey dr robin mrs gerard feerick dhaka program chair sherry scanlon president professor associate professor cheryl scanlon sherry middle states commission wilmington university
"program chair" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New south australia we had yesterday on the program chair that you all from this area so very close time for you what what social stories are you hearing that right matching obviously from the very first hour if the earthquake the iranian leadership called on the military revolutionary guards oldest eight agency to go there but what we are hearing from the people on the ground there is a lack of coordination between those forces though that those aid agencies even today the president himself said we will promise you to bring you blunkett this is the second day of the earthquake many people have a spin night two nights out citing the cold some of them were injured even yesterday the ministy and the minister for the health said they're all around more than nineteen hundred villages have been affected even some of them up to eighty percent destroyed but he said from today we should into tomorrow which was today they will go unchecked and send rescue the rescue team to those places so which means almost forty hours after the earthquake noone has gone there i even see videos from local john as they went to the villages divulges was telling them you are the face people we see our she coming to visit us we are completely black clothing the news that was the city arshi which is getting the epicentre of the earthquake was there but noone after forty hours had a visit to those places that's why so many story we hear like this from the people on the ground and why is it that there's there's no help getting to them i mean it obviously is a difficult area to get to well the problem with iranian i think iranian government is obviously it doesn't seem they are purpose for this kind of natural disaster although iran is not the stranger through this kind of earthquakes we know in in the past decade we had the numbers of deadly earthquake and obviously after forty eight hours we talking about this is the second and third night is still the prison say we promise been you blunkett bring you food bring your water and people are complaining about this basic needs we should have been there yesterday that there are also being concerns expressed about the standards of the construction of buildings at there has been criticism of.

program chair president john iranian government iran forty hours forty eight hours eighty percent
"program chair" Discussed on The Peggy Smedley Show

The Peggy Smedley Show

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"program chair" Discussed on The Peggy Smedley Show

"To me on the work of britain's rebel connected world your host that you smurfs look to today's edition of the peggy smedley show so for the past couple of weeks here on this segment wine i've been discussing how the internet of things is impacting the construction industry because you know there's so much going on and you know we've been saying infrastructure needs to be changing we've covered a lot of trends and opportunities in construction but today i'm gonna talk a little bit about those hurdles because i think it's important because it's not just out about the promise and the opportunity of the eye ot it's about finding ways to overcome those obstacles that prevent growth in adoption and i think it truly important because we've got to look at those before we can move forward but i of some really great gas lined up i've got up pack show today all three segments have gas so i in segment two samuel ari rot phnom who's the professor for program chair of construction engineering an area arizona i should say state university will call in which i'm really excited to talk to him about that on segment to three i should say.

britain professor program chair arizona peggy smedley