35 Burst results for "Professor."

Metals That Work Like Magic

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:02 min | 1 d ago

Metals That Work Like Magic

"A few weeks ago. The wall street journal featured an article about a man who was mining bitcoin from a computer in his house. The computer was working so hard. It was heating up the entire room. It coin put your computer through a lot of calculations and many of us are spending most of our time at home these days so the man found a way to use all that energy coming off of his computer he siphon date to heat a greenhouse and grow basil and cherry tomato. That's how much energy has computer was wasting and it's not just the bitcoin guy. All of the devices were using. Give off excess energy. How many times have you noticed your laptop. Scorching your thighs collectively. We lose billions of dollars every year because of this so-called waste heat. It got me thinking about futuristic alternatives. That could work to reduce that waste. So i reached out to an expert. I'm marvin cohen. I'm university professor of physics at the university of california at berkeley. Dr cohen explained that this waste heat from all of our devices happens because of friction too much friction from electrons the electrons. Go down the wire and they bump into things sort of in the wire is heated so they knocked around and that gives you resistance and the wire gets hot. Cohen says that friction is called electrical resistance. And it's just what happens when you conduct electricity. it's normal. It means that some of the energy gets lost but there is a way to get around it to manipulate the electrons. So the wires don't get hot and energy doesn't get lost so if you could bring them together and keep them together you'll have a superconductor

Marvin Cohen The Wall Street Journal Dr Cohen University Of California Berkeley Cohen
Socialist College Professors Indoctrinate and Coddle Kids

The Dan Bongino Show

01:11 min | 2 d ago

Socialist College Professors Indoctrinate and Coddle Kids

"Now are coddled. They go to college. They were impressionable. They haven't lived in the real world where if you lived in the real world, you'd see your professor named Chad with his long hair spouting off about socialism, playing the guitar in the campus, small eating donkeys and you'd be like dinky Chad. This is the dumbest freaking idea I've ever heard. Can we say that? Sorry, if not just buzz me. Yeah, it's a I want to say something else, but the FCC would find us. It's the stupidest damn idea ever. I lived in the real world. Chad. I've been out playing baseball and having two jobs in some third. Team. You know what I got Friends of mine who didn't do squat. I had a paper route. When I was a kid I used to deliver news days is the statute of limitations open on the tax things Still not because I don't think I paid taxes on that job. I think I made like $100 in three years. But I'm just throwing that out to the IRS may come from me tomorrow, but some of my friends didn't work. They slept till nine o'clock in the morning. Sometimes 11 o'clock I was up at five, putting together the Sunday paper delivering Newsday's working for tips. Therefore, when I got to college, I kind of figured it out that Chaz or Chad, whoever it was teaching socialism, you know, sociology professor on the campus with his long hair singing love songs to students was probably a moron.

Chad FCC Baseball IRS Newsday Chaz
The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:35 min | 2 d ago

The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

"Lynn conway was born on january. Second nineteen thirty eight in mount vernon new york initially assigned male at birth. She experienced a disconnect between her gender identity and assigned sex from a young age. Lynn new she identified as girl due to the limited knowledge around gender fauria in the nineteen forties and fifties. Lynn was raised as a boy. Lynn was a shy and reserved high school student. She excelled academically specifically in math and science. Her grades earned her spot at mit at the age of seventeen at mit. Lynn studied physics for two years before dropping out as a result of psychological distress with her gender identity. A few years later in nineteen sixty one linen rolled at columbia university. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering during this time. Lynn married a woman and the couple had two daughters together. Violet columbia limbs work caught the attention of professor who is a senior leader at ibm. He offered her a job on the ibm research team. That was covertly developing the world's fastest supercomputer. Lynn had secured her dream job. Then in nineteen sixty seven. Lind learned doctor named harry. Benjamin the leading researcher on transgender people and sex reassignment surgery after counseling and hormone treatments lynn decided to undergo gender reassignment surgery. To ease your transition at work lin planned for ibm to change her name on company records and transfer her to a different lab. No one would have to know but ibm corporate disagreed. They feared employees would be upset. If limb secret got out some instead of honoring their promise of finding her a new department. Ibm quietly fired her. On top of losing her job wins wife left her and banned her from having any contact with their daughters. Fourteen years would pass before. Lynn saw her children again despite being ostracized by her company and family. Lynn moved forward with the surgery and completed her transition in nineteen sixty eight.

Lynn Lynn Conway IBM Violet Columbia Mount Vernon MIT Columbia University New York Lind Benjamin Harry LIN
Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:09 min | 3 d ago

Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

"I'm really looking forward to digging into our conversation and your work. Which is at the intersection of robotics and machine learning. And i'd love to have you start us off with a little bit of background. How did you come to work in the field. Yeah i grew up in california. Actually although my name looks german. And i live in germany. I'm actually american. And i was raised by a research psychologist. My mom who said now retired professor and a surgeon and i was always fascinated by how things work and i wanted to create technology. Head helped people. I also did a lot of art. And i like riding ahead. Many many different interest and i was an athlete and athletics that led me to study at stanford university which was also enough to home but far enough away and i studied mechanical engineering. I really enjoyed understanding physics than how all had also design and build things produce functionality in the world and i was always drawn more towards like smart systems with sensors and actuators. Programming actually delayed taking programming class. Because i'd heard so difficult on the other athletes libel player. They all said oh. You know the programming class so hard. I loved it beyond words. And then i just i took more computer science punching i decided to stay for master's degree and i worked actually in as a teaching assistant a machine shop for two years helping students learn design and manufacturing like welding and casting bronze and milling aluminum and making parts sticking the shop late at night and i really fell in love with working with younger pupil helping them design and create things and i also took this amazing metrics class. There like realized. I wanted to become a professor and i that i needed a phd. And i needed a phd adviser. So i looked around and found a new professor. Was his first fish student. his name's Niemeier and he was one of the first engineers at intuitive surgical a robotic surgery company. That most of you probably know make davinci robot and we got along soup. Well was also volleyball player. And yeah the mechanical engineering computer science electrical intersection. It's really robotics Turning to do something useful whether that's in health or in consumer products or at work on so many different things now.

Stanford University Athletics Germany California Niemeier Volleyball
Robby Soave Criticizes Leana Wen, Leftist Media for Blowing up Their Own Identiy Politics

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 3 d ago

Robby Soave Criticizes Leana Wen, Leftist Media for Blowing up Their Own Identiy Politics

"Robbie suave a piece he brings up a fascinating point. You know, Listen, a piece about the media. Being involved in misinformation and disinformation is honestly not particularly interesting. I'm not gonna Waste a lot of time of that on my show Media is lying here. Yeah, Great, Dan. Thanks. I got better things to do during today. Listen to you. Tell me the obvious. No, no, no, no. The reason this piece is interesting is Robbie suave. It puts a fascinating nugget in here. He basically talks about this? Woman, Leana Wen, who does some analysts work for CNN. He's a professor of public health in the CNN medical analysts according to the peace And how Leana Wen said. Oh my God implied it would be racist to entertain the lab leak theory. You know, the lab league members called misinformation forever. Suave. He has a fascinating point about that. How the left was so stupid in their rush to call the lab league theory racist. They were so dumb. That they actually Blew up their own identity. Politics argument. Check this out. Let me read the quote from pieces is good. So first. Here's the tweet from Leana, Wen's CNN analyst. She says. I and other Asian American Pacific Islanders are increasingly concerned that speculation over the lab league theory will increase anti Asian hate tweeted when How's that? Goes on. As we embark on a full scientific investigation, we must take actions to prevent the next escalation of anti Asian racism. Uh huh. Suave says in the piece. She did not explain why speculation about the lab League theory would increase anti Asian hate to a more appreciable degree. And speculation about the wet market theory. The idea is counterintuitive.

Robbie Suave Leana Wen CNN Leana Asian American Pacific Islande DAN WEN Suave
Asia Welcomes US Vaccine Donations Amid Cold Storage Worries

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

Asia Welcomes US Vaccine Donations Amid Cold Storage Worries

"Reports that the U. S. planning to serve five hundred million more traces of the fines of vaccine with the developing world has been warmly welcomed by health experts in Asia isn't Joe Biden was expected to announce the donation in a speech ahead of the start of the group of seven summit in person a south Korean professor in preventative medicine J. Hann young said the need to ISIS could prove to be its hunting points in the global fight against climate nineteen but he was concerned about the storage issue to the vaccine the professor said the extremely cold storage temperatures required to find the shots would prevent challenges for countries with poor health systems he called for US officials on the New York based drug maker to explore the possibility of easing the requirements on Karen Thomas

J. Hann Young U. Joe Biden Asia Isis New York United States Karen Thomas
More Than Writing Code With Dr.Neeta Trivedi

Software People Stories

02:00 min | 3 d ago

More Than Writing Code With Dr.Neeta Trivedi

"If we can start with your origin story how did you get into though you hi. I'm really excited to be part of this and allows me to also to fresh lots upward memories and so i was disciplined by the back end reflecting. I come from a very very modest background. Lower middle class family and the video all down. Even the dreams are modest because nineteen eighty-four The was not so much there was no internet not division netflix's nor discovery channels in salon. So they didn't know too much outside world end Across a small town. So maybe you just one thing has shown that i wanted to do something like it should be different. Should be big. What is that big. That clarity was not bad so we talked about maybe we can become college professors or maybe not engineering college professors. That was largely a dreams. One thing for sure bet. You should study a lot of maths and physics because that's when you'll be essential that's on. I knew and we grew up. Got very good teachers. From primary school onwards they were passionate about building human resources not not just teaching and making many. Thanks the very fortunate in rhode small incidents that when my parents started the would not afford the fee and they wanted to would mean a government. School leaders came to my house. And saying you can pay the fee later. Don't take her out. I mean that's unheard of in general so grew up in that environment really nine thousand people in ninety nine hundred seven whenever completing busy in physics chemistry math because we didn't have engineering college in the town and i don't think my parents would have sent me outside at that age then even financially. Maybe they could not so of. I was finishing my own. That fame be heard about this diario program

Netflix Rhode
The Science Behind That Fresh Rain Scent

Short Wave

01:11 min | 3 d ago

The Science Behind That Fresh Rain Scent

"Your eyes Listen take a deep breath and try to smell the smell of this sound. Oh i can do this. Actually that is rain smell. Ding being your winner now bonus question. Do you know what causes that smell. Oh god no absolutely not game over so there are a few different things that contribute to the frustrating smell but the main one is a chemical compound called it's made by bacteria and our noses are incredibly good at detecting it and besides festering. You might also associate it with something else. This compound courses to form people that attractive smell soil. Who yeah i do. Love the smell of soil. So do i. And sodas class flared. He's a professor of microbiology. At lund university in sweden and he studies the materia. That mixed use men in soil. Okay okay so it's not anything about the rain. That smells that way the raindrops are churning. Up this stuff. This geofs men. That's been sitting on top of the soil and then once it's in the air we can smell it. Yes

Ding Lund University Sweden
Massive Online Courses Got a Boost During the Pandemic. Will It Last?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:31 min | 4 d ago

Massive Online Courses Got a Boost During the Pandemic. Will It Last?

"When a couple of stanford professors founded core sarah in two thousand twelve. They promised to democratize access to higher education. By making courses from prestigious colleges available online now nearly a decade later many of us were thrust into the world of online education by the pandemic. and of course sarah saw tens of millions of new users join its platform some just looking for lectures to occupy their time other seeking new skills in areas like machine learning and data science. Jeff magin khalda is ceo. Of course sarah. He says states like new york and tennessee have also paid the company to provide free courses for their unemployed residents. governments have realized that online re-skilling programmes had a speed and scale and cost effectiveness. That is just not really natural. One of the exciting things after a year of seeing really growing in inequality and many women dropping out of the labor force to take care of kids. Who can't go to school what we've been seeing on chris. Era is the percentage of enrollments especially in stem courses. From women has gone up from about thirty. Three percent to forty seven percents. Almost fifty fifty so women are actually turning more to online learning and as we think about the future of work for states who are about reskilling being able to get your citizens access to jobs. That maybe aren't in. Your state is going to be much more possible with remote work.

Sarah Jeff Magin Khalda Tennessee New York Chris
Global Crime Sting Using Messaging App Sees Hundreds Arrested

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 4 d ago

Global Crime Sting Using Messaging App Sees Hundreds Arrested

"The FBI and police agencies around the globe pull off a cyber sting it was called a non a secure messaging service built by the F. B. I. designed to snare criminal groups since October twenty nineteen the FBI and other law enforcement around the world log more than twenty million messages from a total of eleven thousand eight hundred devices with about nine thousand currently active the messages on illegal activity range from drugs to money laundering to high level corruption and plans to kill people in more than a dozen countries John Jay college of criminal justice professor Adam Scott want says the chats provided police all the evidence they need it not only are they able to look at who the people are communicating with they're able to see what was said and basically have copies of all the information on your own servers some eight hundred people have been arrested in raids that netted tons of drugs fifty five luxury cars and close to one hundred fifty million dollars in cash and cryptocurrency I'm Jim acquire

F. B. I. FBI John Jay College Of Criminal J Adam Scott JIM
Critical Race Theory or Marxism?

The Mark Levin Show

02:01 min | 4 d ago

Critical Race Theory or Marxism?

"Going to give you a little history lesson here a little little bit of information that you have not heard. And it is an american marxism. I should know better and keep my mouth shut. Because it'll be repeated and repeated and repeated and then suddenly you'll say well marks repeating what somebody else that i am not this critical race theory. I'm something called critical. Theory and it's part of a marxist movement of the nineteen sixties in this country and the founding father of this critical theory movement was herbert marcus. He's a man that was a professor mini ivy league schools in this country. He was born in germany he say hey galleon marxist ideologue he worked with the franklin school of political theorist was basically a communist beehive and as a young man as a young man in germany he saw the rise of the communist party and he saw the rise of the third reich and he was certain the communist party would win. He was certain that people will be drawn to the communist party. Because of the communist party's ideology he was a true marxist. But that's not what happened for a number reasons. I don't need to get in here. We'll do it another day and he needed an explanation. Why isn't this happening. So we escaped to the united states where he spreads his former what i call american marxist and he writes extensively and one thing you don't know is that he was the brainchild behind the new left movement. The right so the nineteen sixties students for democratic action. The violence that occurred the attempt to blow up the capitol building and other buildings pentagon. He was the idiological mastermind behind that movement. He's the ideological mastermind behind critical race. Theory

Herbert Marcus Franklin School Of Political T Germany Communist Party United States Pentagon
Immune Boosting, Is It a Bust?

Gastropod

02:20 min | 5 d ago

Immune Boosting, Is It a Bust?

"Can you boost your immune system. Yeah what pitting facts against fighting off infections and this idea that we can pop a pill to boost our immune system. It started exploding during the early days of the pandemic. Tim caufield professor of public health at the university of alberta canada was watching as old took off. It was in the air. You know this idea of immune boosting it was just part of the gestalt own remain so and is the pandemic got worse and worse s s idea grew and grew and it felt like products to boost the immune system was suddenly everywhere. Especially as we've seen all over social media. And tim wanted to know what exactly was the stuff that was getting touted all over the internet so he did what any self respecting academic would do and he started scrolling instagram. And i really did i. I went through hundreds and hundreds of post day for work at the lab for you is getting a coffee and scrolling instagram. And you know. I wish i could say it was it was fancier but that's what i did team and he's tame systematically trolled instagram looking for the trending posts labeled with the hashtag immune booster and there was a lot of the stuff that you'd expect so called superfoods vitamins herbs. Were in the mix too i i saw supplements remain a vitamin d to Zinc and obviously vitamin c. Ginger elderberry echinacea saw a lot of smoothies a lot of smoothies out there and of course all they came with a healthy dose of that influence holier vibe. Tim talked about it without producer. Rose ramllah let me see like the instagram post. The mother of all immune boost instagram posts voted like it would definitely be someone sitting on the beach. Our in the forest they would be in a yoga pose foreshore. They would have a smoothie by the their side asset limits in one hand and magical berries in the other

Tim Caufield University Of Alberta Canada TIM Rose Ramllah
Is Fear Controlling Your Career?

The Schmidt List

01:22 min | 5 d ago

Is Fear Controlling Your Career?

"Cat. How are you today. It is still good to see you too about the work you do. You've been you've been doing a lot of you've been doing not only doing livestreams and things like this but you've been consulting people for years on how to find their best selves when it comes to work in the work life balance sort of area. How did you get started in all of that. Did you fall into it. I fell into it. Backwards with my eyes clubs. I've got a bachelors degree in sociology. Because i wanted to change the world and i was fascinated with people and then i realized i had to go back to school if i wanted to be. A professor and side cited not to do that. Around the world. Chased jobs and paychecks. A bartender in alaska camp counselor in california now attendant. I was trying to see the world. I was a flight attendant. Kurt enroll. I wasn't seeing the world. I was flying around the mid west of america. And i couldn't afford to pay my college loans so my dad was getting worried and i decided to start doing temp work on my days. Off and my very first temp job was at a global. It consulting firm I was a secretary actually sprint desk receptionist for one week okay. I had no idea what was happening by friday. I had a job offer to become a recruiter and that started.

Kurt Enroll Alaska California America Sprint
Neurosurgery and Poetry With Paul Kaloostian

The Addicted Mind Podcast

02:20 min | 5 d ago

Neurosurgery and Poetry With Paul Kaloostian

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast. I have a wonderful guest today who we were just talking. And i have a lot of questions dr paul collusion. Who is a neurosurgeon. And he's going to talk about the brain and addiction and all the different parts of that. And what's going on up there. So paul please introduce yourself. We'll good morning. Thank you so much have me. I'm a big fan of yours and i may neurosurgeon. I deal with a wide variety of problems affecting the brain the spinal cord and variety of our nerves throughout our body of work in for about seventeen years now and the brain has really been such. A fascinating oregon. Just i remember going through training and going through my first few surgeries where the skull was opened up. The the covering of the brain was opened up at you see the actual pulse ation of the brain and the structure of Always fascinated me and to this day. I mean it's just It's really all inspiring and really is so important that we really understand our brain. Our spinal cord functions in really become more appreciative of what they do for us on a daily basis. The question i want to ask is how do you say you know. I'm going to be a neurosurgeon. How did that happen. And how did you start to kind of this is what i what interests me. Yeah first thing that came from a family of physicians. So honestly i think medicine was in was in my dna so to speak sitting at the dinner table. I mean that's what we spoke about. Dna all the time and my brother and sister also physicians as well. But i do recall. A course i took it. Brown university in rhode island was a introductory neuroscience course that was taught by a wonderful professor who actually wrote the textbook used in. That was my first introduction to how our brain spinal cord function we literally learned about the sales of the brain and spinal cord what these cells do how they function newbies. So amazed if you just looked at these books and research articles on how this once a single cell of the brain has so many different functions within it.

Dr Paul Paul Oregon Brown University Rhode Island
Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

02:44 min | 5 d ago

Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

"Honored to have dr. Selene ibrahim For the show today in dr selena brahima. She's the author of women and gender in the crown a published from oxford university. Press last year. She's also the editor of one nation. Indivisible seeking liberty and justice from the pulpit to the streets Probably the previous year and her comeback project is on the concept of monotheism in the crown in intellectual history so dr ibrahim Deaf has a lot of a lot to say about some very interesting topics in on gender in the koran. She is very qualified. Masha llah she has a A masters degree in women's and gender studies near eastern judaic studies from brandeis. She has a masters of divinity from harvard in a bachelor's degree with highest honors from princeton Dr ibrahim is a trusted public voice on issues of religion and civic engagement. She's deeply committed to countering counteracting bigotry and fostering varies pluralism integrity and civic responsibility. And we are absolutely honored to have dr ibrahim on the show today. So thank you dr ibrahim or do you prefer to go by selene. How do you want us to call. Let's go with selene. selene okay. Well we'll welcome selene. Dr ibrahim professor ibrahim to the show. We are so delighted to have you. I read your book in In earnest and I got a chance to also up. See some of your more recent obser- podcast media appearances. But it's funny. Actually the first time you ever kind of came across my radar even before you reached out via email was. I saw a lecture. And i don't know if it was livestreamed or a saw recording of it you gave For z to college Was that was that recorded on the west coast. Did you visit the bay area. Or was it one of those in communion out in the communities a tuna now. I had the good fortune of of coming to zeh tuna and it's a such a blessed place in the spirit. There is just incredible. So i it wasn't my first time visiting and hopefully it won't be my last either in shala in shalva that's rain out and we missed you so it was like a public lecture that you gave at. That event has a series where. I'm sure it's on pause during these times. It's probably been taken more online where there is a community outreach program and so there's i think it's a wonderful asset to the community. They really do bring in a number of speakers and not just on islamic topics but really a range of themes in the humanities

Dr Ibrahim Selene Ibrahim Dr Selena Brahima Dr Ibrahim Deaf Masha Llah Dr Ibrahim Professor Ibrahim Oxford University Brandeis Princeton Harvard Shalva West Coast Bay Area Shala
China Filed a Patent Application for a COVID Vaccine Before Admitting Outbreak

The Dan Bongino Show

01:25 min | 6 d ago

China Filed a Patent Application for a COVID Vaccine Before Admitting Outbreak

"Couple more gems in here as well. Ladies and gents. It appears that Chinese military scientists filed a patent application for a covid vaccine. On February 24th of 2020. 2020 what today's date. Can you double check this? Monday, June 7th Wait, Let me go to the map. Google calendar. Let me see if we have that. Oh, 2021. Yes, that is correct. So that sounds like a while ago. February of 2020. They were looking for a vaccine. How are they looking for a vaccine? If they didn't know this was going to happen, and it had just come from a pangolin or some bat soup with some American it or something. How did how did they know that? How did they know it would become a global pandemic and therefore they put in some patent for a vaccine? You want me to read from the peace in case you think we're just throwing this out there? The applicant is listed as the Institute of Military Medicine Academy of Military Sciences of the P L. A. And the lead inventor is military scientists. Ju use in why you s e n Professor Nikolai Petrovsky from Flinders Institute in Australia, who had developed the Covid 19 vaccine said the early timeframe left open the possibility that Chinese scientists were working on a vaccine

Institute Of Military Medicine Google Nikolai Petrovsky Flinders Institute Australia
Dan Ariely on How To Win Big by Betting on Human Capital

Odd Lots

02:17 min | Last week

Dan Ariely on How To Win Big by Betting on Human Capital

"We're going to be speaking with den orioli his famous behavioral economist at duke university and he is also the co founder of a firm called irrational capital. This formed five years ago. And it pursues the idea of looking at a company's human capital factor as a as something that could drive out in an investment to. I don't even know. The human capital factor is. But i'm excited to hear Dan talk about it and what he's learned in five years dan. Thank you so much for coming on odd. Lots my pleasure to be here. Well first of all. I love the name irrational. I love the name irrational capital. It's perfect but i'm curious. What is the founding story of this the funding stories. I'm a university professor. I do research on few things but among them human motivation and in my academic career. I've from time to time. I go to company and i change things around by change bonuses. I tried to increase productivity. Tried to get people to care more about work in my my experience has been. It's always been very easy to come and improve what people do in increasing evasion because most companies. Just don't think about this very carefully if you think about age ourem. Hr is usually a function that is about legal issues in. I don't know training modules. Yeah but but it's not really a function that says let's just get the best out of people just think about. How do we motivate people. How do we get people to come happy to work. So i've been doing this for a long time and it's it's easy to do and it's it's it's helpful but when i met david my partner me whether i think that we could also look at something broader the consent of one company to time whether there's some way to look at companies see how they treat their employees how the employees feel about the company. And whether this could predict stock region. And i said i don't know what the answer. I don't know this the standard answer but we can try it out so we went on the hunt for data to see whether this hypothesis would albano not and it turns out it holds very

Den Orioli Irrational Capital Duke University DAN David Albano
When They've Cut Taxes for the Rich, Government Revenue Has Gone Up

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | Last week

When They've Cut Taxes for the Rich, Government Revenue Has Gone Up

"Tax revenue to the government is actually gone up. Ladies and gentlemen, it's not open for dispute. I know liberals are pulling their hair out flying at their faces right now screaming, eager to call in the show say, my liberal sociology professor told me otherwise. He's an idiot. I'm sorry you could actually go to the government Treasury tax tables and see after Reagan. So when they cut the tax rates, people with money, went back and took that money and invested in the economy and what happened. People in the economy. They invested it in, got more jobs and paid more taxes. The economy grew So even though it was a smaller percentage of the money from the rich. The pie was so much bigger that the revenue was higher matter Fact it doubled from the time Ronald Reagan got into office until he left. By the way, liberals you couldn't do that homework yourself. It's very easy. What about inflation adjusted yet even inflation adjusted. The tax revenue went up dramatically. Andy Puzder is a great piece of real clear. I really, really need you to read. It's fantastic about Biden's lies. It's called Biden and the 1% in my newsletter. Dated June 2nd 2021. You've probably been told right. The 1%. They really got over on the trump tax cuts right? Liberals told you that media people who have no idea what they're doing. They can't even do journalism. No less economics. They told you was all for the 1%. Definitely. Really. Here's a quote from Andy Puzder's piece using, you know, data and facts and

Government Treasury Andy Puzder Reagan Biden Government Ronald Reagan
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:34 min | Last month

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I don't like it as much but you know it's one of those things that i think i'm going to be able to grow into and hopefully you'll grow into it with me and so now i no longer call it the nozzle newsletter. Now we're just calling it the. Ap professor update our tap update for short. Remember t. a. p. p. states for the professor so our tap updates. I'm gonna go from instead of trying to do it five days a week. I'm going to aim for three days a week. So every monday wednesday friday. We'll see how that goes. It's still almost daily if i do that. But that'll allow me some a little bit of extra time to kind of get used to how this process. This workflow is going to work out for for me and for you and one of the things that allows me to do is kind of group them into here the life science updates in here the teaching learning updates in here the the tap updates. And and maybe that'll help you as you scan through if you already subscribe to the nozzle newsletter. You've already probably seen this news. Because i don't know we're up to probably by the time you hear this like seven eight nine ten issues already. So you're ready getting that All my subscribers who had opted into getting the nozzle newsletter just shifted over and it was hopefully pretty seamless. however if you didn't get my nosal newsletter maybe you've never heard about it before. Well now's your chance to sign up for it. It's free and you know there's a unsubscribe but the bottom of every issue so if you don't like it then. Just unsubscribe in pleased. To unsubscribe don't put it in the junk mail folder. Don't just keep deleting it. Because something. I found out is that internet service providers. You know the people that provide the wires that you know. Bring all this stuff to you. They monitor that and if they see that. My newsletter is getting putting the junk folder than they will shut out my newsletter from everybody who uses the internet service provider so people who actually want to get. It are no longer going to be able to get it and so don't ever with any newsletter you get. If you don't want it anymore please. On subscribe to it. Don't just put it in the junk mail folder. So there's another lesson for today in today's episode. We learn that we should never put Things we actually subscribed to into the junk folder. We should unsubscribe from them. But anyway you have that. Option unsubscribe anytime so why not try it and see if it's helpful to you and it's it's only coming out three days a week. Maybe you won't be tempted to put the junk folder when you find that you're not able to keep up with a if you have any suggestions for things i should put in there you know. Just send them to me podcast at the ap professor dot org in. And then you know that will give me a tip is to some hot update that we all need to know about. I can put that in the newsletter if you do that. I'll give you credit in the newsletter as well so the question is how do i subscribe. Well that's really easy. Just go to the ap professor dot org slash updates and that's pleura updates in. It's all small case. So the ap professor dot org slash updates and you'll my almost daily newsletter that we're calling the professor science and education updates the free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the.

today monday one three days a week five days a week three seven eight nine ten issues ap professor dot org one of those things things wednesday friday org days a week ap professor dot ap professor dot
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:47 min | 3 months ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Episode. That is episode eighty seven features a segment about using micro credentials such as badges and certificates and the whole notion of gamification as a teaching and learning strategy. That game ificationbut in a course is a lot like the board game. Monopoly are like almost any video game with a seemingly endless hierarchy of levels and that is it seems to go on and on and on but the thing is we do play such games that go on and on right. Why because we're motivated. We're having fun. Achieving rewards are brain's reward centers are being paying again and again and that keeps us going. And isn't that what we want for our students to make it through to blonde grueling semesters of amp so game vacation can be one of those magical ingredients that we add to our course design. I'm coming back to this topic of gamification because there's a bit more want to say about it. But before. I do that i wanna ask. Have you listened to the previous episode and earned your badge for it. All you have to do is click the link in the show notes on your device or at the episode page at the ap professor dot org slash podcast and then click link. That says claim your credential. I think if you start doing that for these podcast episodes or the books that you read from the amputee professor book club. You'll start to see things from the student perspective and you'll start to see that it's not just me being silly again and proposing yet another non traditional harebrained idea. Well yeah okay. It's partly that but also is because it works it really is magical ingredient and the only way to believe in that magic is to experience it one of the things i want to add to the game of vacation story now has to do. With my example of using badges from the micro credential platform at badger dot com the to be a d. g. r. dot com..

Monopoly one com ap professor dot episode eighty seven org amputee professor book club
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"For listening to that episode or reading. That book are participating in that seminar. Then it's simply a matter of filling out a brief form to verify your work and la. You've earned your credential later this year going to have an episode on micro credentials. Not just how they work in the amp professor arena. But also how they can be used by any of us to demonstrate our continued professional development and also how we can offer micro denzel's within our own ambi courses to both motivate students and give them something more specific than a single course grade to demonstrate mastery of specific concepts within our course. I've been doing that for years. And i think it works really well if you have questions that you want to ask about micro credentials or experiences with micro credentials that you wanna share on this podcast. Now's a great time to send those to me. Preferably in the form of a brief audio file remember the link is the ap professor dot org slash education to find out more.

both later this year single course grade professor dot org years
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:53 min | 10 months ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"In the radio series hitchhikers guide to the future serreze. Douglas adams said this about digital books. Lovers of print are simply confusing the plate for the food. Welcome to the professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host heaven episode. I discuss arm length digital textbooks and a new book club pack. We've been in the age for quite some time. Now and aibo have been around quite a while including the textbooks notice that i just used the terms book and digital textbook. I haven't even had the chance yet. To drop in e textbook electronic book online textbook e taxed nor have i had the chance yet to address the variations of spelling involved in each of those is the book lower case upper case is that e hyphenated or just added onto booker taxed or whatever were pre pending to. You're anticipating that. I'm headed into.

serreze Douglas adams aibo
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:39 min | 10 months ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"We want to hear from you so take a few notes and call the podcast hotline at one. Eight hundred three lion dan. That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or send an audio file or written message to podcast at the professor dot.

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Elizabeth F Barkley once wrote student. Engagement is the product of motivation and active learning is a product rather than a some because it will not occur if either element is missing. Welcome to the. Anp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Heaven Pat in this episode. I talk about a seminar on running concepts and KRISTA Polski joins us for a journal Club about content delivery style a.

KRISTA Polski Elizabeth F Barkley Anp professor Club
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hey I have some exciting news. We have a new kind of segment plan for the next episode. Or maybe the one after that these days. I've learned that one must not make plans based on the world staying on. Anyone assumed trajectory but soon I hope what is it I can tell you. It's not a book club we already have one of those and won't be getting a new book club recommendation soon. So now it's not a book club. It's a journal. Club the ADP Professor Journal Club. And we have a new voice joining in for that one. It's a voice that we've heard before on this podcast and a voice that you may have heard before if you've been active in town hall meetings or in Triple A. Or any of a number of other venues including her own journal articles on teaching and learning. It's my friend. Krista Room Polski who is an associate professor at Moravian College in Bethlehem Pennsylvania and part of the ANC authoring team over at McGraw Hill? Every other month or so she'll be bringing us a journal Article She's found. That helps enlighten us about evidence based approaches to teaching amp. I have a link to the first journal. Article in the show notes in the episode. Page if you WANNA read ahead and perhaps send in your recorded reaction but you don't have to read ahead. Don't worry about that. Crystal will be summarizing. The article in the Journal Club segment. And then she and I will be discussing it a bit as always if you have any ideas to share about that or any other feature of this podcast or perhaps a new feature. You'd like to suggest. Please let us know so that we can better meet your needs. Hey let's have a peer review. Wait we already have that. It's called the listener survey. I don't have nearly as many of those in is. I'd like to have so why not go to the? Ap Professor Dot Org Slash Survey Right now and tell me what you think anonymously. Of course this is professional peer review or after all right searchable transcript and a captioned audio Graham. This episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy at Anatomy Dot Org. Did you know that if you're looking microscopic images to use remote teaching triple a? Has You covered? They have something called the virtual microscopy database or Vm. De.

ADP Professor Journal Club Article Krista Room Polski Journal Club associate professor Professor ANC Bethlehem Pennsylvania McGraw Hill Moravian College American Association Graham
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A in the upcoming full episode. That is episode number sixty six. We're going to continue the conversation about how to quickly and effectively move our on campus amp course to remote learning. And as part of that discussion. I'm going to talk about what author and Professor Bruneta Brown Calls F F ts Now. I translate. Ft's as fumbling first tries. She has another fray she uses. And I'll talk to you about what that phrase is and why it's important for amp teaching in the full episode. Something else I'm going to talk about is a phenomenon called Zoom bombing and it's something that I put some links in the show notes for the previous episode but run across it in time to get it into the audio part so I'm going to be doing that in the full episodes sixty six something else. I'll be talking about briefly. Is the online protein folding game called folded and how we can use that in teaching and learning and how that relates to the current pandemic and the featured topic is going to be about our teaching slides how we can keep them simple and keep them connected to the story. We're going to tell in. These are skills that I've learned in continuing to learn over a period of time. And it can help us now at this time when we're scrambling to deliver our story and our slides in a different way than we're used to but these are principles and techniques that can also be used once we get back on campus too so all of that and more coming up in full episode number.

Professor Bruneta Brown Ft
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hit yet another episode focusing on strategies to cope with teaching amp e during the cove in Nineteen Upright. This one is the third one. The first one was bonus episode sixty three which I titled Mid Winter Winterizing of our AP course in which came out a few weeks ago just before things officially hit the fan with this outbreak in the United States. We better get ready for a pandemics of planning tips and strategies. And that's still helpful even now that we're in the thick of things. The second one was bonus episode sixty four B which came out a little over a week ago enlisted nineteen additional specific tips for quickly moving from an on campus course to a remote environment. I called that episode quickly. Moving to remote delivery the musical and we did have music. Amp teacher and stem music composer. Greg crowder graciously sang three songs to sing along with so yeah really was a musical and now this third episode which probably won't be the last before. I jump into my list of additional tips. I WanNA clarify few things. I you may be listening to this episode way later than when I'm recording this. Which means that you are a survivor of the cove in nineteen outbreak of twenty twenty. That's great congratulations. You made it through but you might be thinking and there's nothing in these episodes for me but you'd be wrong. Most if not all of these tips really can help us in the cove in nineteen scenario but they are also useful for any course anytime anyplace second if you find even one thing in any episode that sparks. An idea for your teaching or is helpful any way. That's a win. Remember Kevin's law a professional development that I mentioned in the bonus APPS conference episode way back in twenty eighteen. It states that if I learned just one useful thing in a professional development experience. It's worth it. I've been reading and listening to a lot of advice often from colleagues who have never even taught online before that. Well just isn't the best advice in my opinion so I'm thinking there will be one thing in this episode that will spark a different way of thinking for you. If in fact you do learn just one thing in this episode or in any episode. Will you do me a favor and share it with a colleague? Email social media singing it off of your balcony would ever gets it out there to folks that could use the help. They're not flying those advertising glimpse anymore so this is the only way to spread the word third. You probably noticed that. I've not been providing my usual update on scientific discoveries in human biology for the last few episodes part of the reason. Is that the big story now. At least that set of stories keeping our attention right now are about the cove in nineteen outbreak could discuss these stories in this podcast but given the rapidly evolving nature of what we know and what we think. We know what we thought we know. But now we know we didn't know and and given the time between planning and episode recording an episode and then getting it all set up for release. Well whatever I say. We'll be out of date by the time you hear it. So what I'm doing instead is putting the top stories in my nosal newsletter which is a daily update of up to ten headlines. I've chosen for that day. Just go to nonsol- dot com slash. The professor nozzle is also nuzzle dot com slash the ABC professor. And take a look at some of the past issues if you think. It's helpful vent subscribe. It's free by the way you just need to put in your email address and share that newsletter. To if you know someone who may be interested fourth wow fourth. This is giving a longer than I intended. Oh men wait a minute. Don't tell me you're surprised by okay..

Kevin professor United States Greg crowder ABC
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Immune. I guess one of the things I would need to keep in mind if I'm teaching. This technique are offering this technique to my students is that I need to emphasize with them. That lets him sitting down with a handful of students in my office and in there asking me you know. How can we deal with this fire? Hose of information and I'm giving them different techniques and they might say well concept. I just can't get the hang of that or flash cards. Just don't do it for me or you have something else you know and and also what about these memory palaces and kind of walk them through the idea of it but I guess something? I need to emphasize with them. Is that when they walk out of my office? They're not going to be fully prepared to that. It's something that they have to just keep coming back to until they get more and more comfortable with it. Would you say that's fair? I definitely think that's fair Personally I actually I heard about some of these demonic techniques before med school unfortunately I just watch a few videos online and tried to learn from that. I think I could remember a couple of numbers better because I made a visuals seen one time but after about a week or two hit a roadblock and I didn't know where to go so I completely cut off the practice without actually developing satisfactory technique. Can I didn't use it all through Mexico only revisiting it later on towards the end because it's not something that you're going to be able to teach in one session. It's something that requires a little bit of practice every day or a couple of times a week or something along those lines so when someone is actually taking this seriously we often recommend they spend ten fifteen minutes a day maybe in the morning first thing before they get out of bed using these demonic going over their old ones trying to create a new one or two at already have Flash Card deck for instance they can go through the flash cards probably on their phone or IPAD and then make a demonic or while. They're sitting there in bed. Write it down or store I would suggest writing it down on your flash card deck or drawing it out or having some reference point for later on because you might not remember it the first time. So there's still space retrieval required in it but it tends to be much less retrieval and much better organized when you can implement these techniques but this technique sounds great. I'm glad to have it now in my little toolbox that I can open up for my students in show. Hey look there's lots of different tools here and it. Kinda you know this this idea of taking a lot of practice kind of brings to mind something that I learned late in life and that I give up too easy you know. I'd need the channel that when I'm talking to my students who likewise you know You give technique like let's say the Memory Palace and and really give along with that. Not just the technique but the encouragement that it's don't give up too easy like I would unites when you're a little kid and you're learning to write for the first time you're learning to read or you're learning to ride a bike or catch a baseball. You keep working out. I mean just think about you know little kids learning to walk. They don't follow over and then give up. They get right back up when they try it again and fall over and get up and fall over and then eventually they get the hang of it and I need to to do that. You know I need to learn to do that as an adult when something is difficult for me. A new learning management system is thrown in my lap. Oh my gosh. I'll never learn. But if I stick with I do and the same thing with these memory palaces if I can encourage my students to stick with it then it can be a very useful technique and and there are a lot of resources out there. That students can to kind of get that. Hang of it and and learn what to do. And that includes some of those At your website and show notes in the episode page so you can learn these memory techniques and you can also point to them off for your students. And they're they seem to be geared toward medical students but I've listened to a lot of them and you know why they applied. Amp students to. I mean everything that they're talking about in their a fits with what our students are going through so I highly recommend it and once again thank you very much chase. No thank you and yes. There's a lot of examples on on the podcast and on our youtube page. They can go and check and feel free to email me or contact me on social media and give a little more instruction possibly a regular listeners. Know this but if you're new or just need reminding don't forget that I always put links and the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas much in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors for this episode chased DeMarco gave me a link for an example of how to build your own memory palace in a video tutorial called memory palaces for medicine they're also links to his podcast episodes on Memory Palaces. The story method pneumonic and a blog. Post on evidence based study strategies. You can reach chase directly by way of email or any of the social media accounts listed in the show notes or you can even set up on one on one session with him. And you're always encouraged to call in with your questions comments and ideas that the podcast hotline. That's one eight three three Lion Dan or one eight three three five four six six three three six or send a recording a written message to podcast at the Professor Dot. Org I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor and textbook author in human.

Memory Palace Professor Professor Dot baseball youtube professor Mexico Dr. Kevin Pat An DeMarco
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Greg crowder is a dedicated and creative. Ap teacher besides being a rockstar literally Rockstar in creating in using music and stem education if you haven't explored his many many songs that relate to m. p. education. You really need to do that. When go to that? Link in the show notes or episode page also find a link to the page for another of Greg's pieces. That's great for a sing along that one students learn some basic ideas about spinal nerve plexus when you go there check out the fact that Greg provides many different ways to experience his songs for this one about nerve flexes. One of the options is a carioca screen. That you and your students can follow as you saying really you need to check these out a tip number fourteen read the book you know that unreasonably large and expensive tax book students bought for your course. Now is the perfect opportunity to get them to actually read it. They'll be socially distance anyway. One hopes and looking for something to read more students raid their textbook rather than actually reading it. Now's a good time to turn the reading of the book into a bigger element of the course. If You keep your instructor provided explanations at a minimum as I advised in an earlier segment then students have no choice but to get a lot of the needed information from their textbook tip number fifteen just in case and center substituting Your Plan Lecture Class activity with a case study. There are plenty of these case studies available online but I found it to be fun making up my own. It's much easier than you think. If you've never done it I often use medical images and make up a story around it and then ask questions. About this. Scenario the tease out important concepts of anatomy physiology one option would be to post that maybe divide the class up into groups in your learning management system and give each one a different case to workout and then posted in a discussion forum of just for that group. And they're easy ways to do that. Your folks at your institution will help you figure out how to do that. And then have them more the case and then have each group present their case to the other groups and what their conclusion was and why tip number sixteen learning is art and art is learning. Drawing drawing is a powerful learning strategy. Nearly everyone can draw. Sure some folks are regular Davinci's when they draw many of us most of us are not and that's okay making stick and ball. Figures can work just as well as the more realistic kind of art. This can really help with lab activities. When the lab's not available consider drawing in labeling exercises drawing out concept maps making organs from household items like paper or doe or scraps of fabric bake a cake in the shape of an Oregon in heaven share picture of it online things like that. Tip number seventeen simulate reality even if we've never used computer simulations of anatomical structures or physiological functions. We know they've been around for a while. Your institution may already provide access to some of these and there are some available online at no cost. I provided links to a few of them but go out searching. Send your students out searching and play around with them and see how that might fit into your remote learning scenario tip number eighteen embrace reality if things go well any temporary move of your face to face class to the online environment is well temporary probably a few weeks then the emergency past and we're back to our usual mode so yeah it may be nerve wracking but normalcy will return soon right tip number nineteen no side trips. Somebody in your course. Maybe you might suggest that you're suspended on. Campus class should meet somewhere off campus. Maybe a cafe or restaurant after all these venues are likely to be virtually deserted and would welcome even a little bit of business. Do not do it do not that would defeat the whole purpose of suspending face to face class meetings which to slow or even break the cycle of the viral outbreak. We're not doing this just for us. We're doing it as part of our social obligation to support and protect each other. So let's keep that our priority. Yeah there are a lot of other things that we can do quickly and easily once we put our minds to it and hopefully this short list has already stimulated some IDs. One final thought. Let's look at this at the adventure it is. The universe has thrown in unexpected challenge at us but tries to the occasion and tap our creativity in our experience to make some awesome. Lemonade or those lemons. Our positive can do attitude can go a long way to reassure our students and to motivate them to do some strong self powered learning a as. I mentioned several times earlier. I put links in the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors tell us what's going on with you your tips and suggestions and your questions at the broadcast hotline. That's one eight three three line Dan or one eight three three five or six six three three six or senator recording a written message to podcast at the AP professor dot work. I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor Textbook. Author in human anatomy.

Greg crowder professor Rockstar Professor Textbook m. p. education instructor Davinci Oregon Dr. Kevin Pat An Dan senator
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hi there this is Kevin Patent. With a brief audio introduction to episode number sixty four of the amp professor podcast also known as top radio and audio salon for teachers of human anatomy and physiology in the upcoming full episode. That is episode sixty four. I'm going to have a conversation with chase DEMARCO. Now Chase. The Marco is widely known is a numbness. That is a memory expert. He's also a consultant entrepreneur more and believe it or not initiative that he's an MD PhD candidate who has a passion for helping medical students succeed in their studies and in their professional exams. Now I got a lot of support from my recent discussions of Flash Card techniques and episode fifty eight fifty nine and sixty and this conversation will complement those with an explanation of a study techniques sometimes called a memory palace which is based on something very old and very effective called the method of Loci. But wait for the full episodes. Sixty four where you'll get to know chase and learn a lot more about this memory technique. The free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master of science and Human Anatomy and physiology instruction the happy degree. I'm on the Faculty of this program so I know the incredible value it is for an MP teachers check out this online graduate program at NYC DOT EDU slash. Happy or click. The Lincoln the show notes episode page. And you gus that it's time once again for were where we practice what we all do in teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're old and familiar terms and sometimes terms that are new to us or maybe they're so new that nobody knows him yet because they just got made up by somebody today. We have a few related to our main topic in that. Is this memory technique that we're going to be discussing with chase the Marco and the first term is come up before actually more than once and passed up assode and we did dissect at once back in episode number fifty nine and that is the word mnemonic so just to refresh our memories a little bit that word part non means memory literally. It means mindful but we use it in terms of memory and then the icy ending needs relating to so pneumonic when you put it all together means relating to memory and usually refers to something that aides memory it can be a mnemonic sentence or phrase where the first letter of each word and sentence has the same first letter of items in a list that we wanna remember but there are other mnemonic techniques. And we're going to be discussing one of those techniques in the full episode regarding pronunciation. I find myself going back and forth between me monarch and pneumonic and that usually depends on the context words around it and my brain just goes there with when to or not. Just come out of my mouth. And maybe they're things like that you do two now. The latter pronunciation MNEMONIC is preferred by most of the sources. I looked at so I'm going to try and stick with that as much candy or we'll see how that goes. The next word on the list is a related term. It's actually just another version of the word pneumonic. And that is numbness. And it's the same as demonic. But we're going to swap out that IC- ending in demonic input in ast ending which means an agent or performer of something and so an honest literally van is a person in agent performer. Someone who performs memory most often the term in the English language is used to describe someone who's adapt out or skilled in feats of memory. Like I dunno remembering the order of cards and a shuffled deck or Memorizing as much as they can from a page from a phone book or maybe trying to learn all the bones of the skeleton. Yeah that's a feat of memory and that takes some work and maybe there are some techniques that we can use to make that. Go more simpler for students at still going to be hard. But maybe there's a way to help them organize that and and get done quickly and effectively really be able to retrieve that information when it needs to be retrieved and yeah I sometimes find myself pronouncing it sometimes which actually that does show up occasionally dictionaries but it's most often pronounced nemesis are honest. I sometimes mistakenly US methodist instead anonymous. I don't know where that comes from. But anyway I swap out the end for a t go figure. I promise to work on that. If you promise to overlook my mistake okay the next term on our were dissection list is Loci L. O. C. I it's a word that's GONNA come up related to demonic technique that we're going to be discussing in the full episode. It can be pronounced. Loci as I just did but other common pronunciations are low cy or Loki but when I hear pronouncing that way Loki High. I think of that trickster. From Norse Mythology Loki L. O. K. I. So loci it is from me but you get to pick your favorite LOCI. Is the plural form of the Latin word locus LLC US which we also use as is an English meaning place or location? In fact the word location is derived from the word locus. We sometimes use locus in genetics. To describe the physical location of a gene within a chromosome. So you may have run across that use already. Loci is the plural form of locus. So it simply means places. We're going to be talking about a technique sometimes called the method of loci which we can now more easily see simply means method of places. This podcast is sponsored by hats. The human anatomy and Physiology Society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit HAP- s- at the professor dot org slash hats that's h? Aps only hey but step into the bookshop and see what we may want to add to our personal professional bookshelf. I'M GONNA go straight over to the medical shelf this time because I know exactly which book I'm looking for. It's called read this before medical school out of study smarter and live better while excelling in class and on your use a complex board exams. It's by chase DeMarco Theodore McConnell and Grodin recognized that name chase DeMarco. He's the guy I'm chatting with in the upcoming full episodes sixty four as you can tell from the title. This book is for students in medical school and you may teach. Medical students are students in some other health profession program. Or maybe you're teaching. Amp TO PRE MED or pre nursing or any of the many other students in the typical amd p course. This book could be helpful to any of them really why because all the students had just mentioned are being hit with what's surely feels like a fire hose of information if feels that way because it really is a lot of information and ideas to learn in a very short period of time and most of them will eventually be facing licensing or other professional exams of some sort right whether it's complex or in class or even try outs for jeopardy advice and strategies offered in. The book could be a game changer for some students. This book covers all the important things to consider when trying to figure out how to succeed in. Aim for example. Why STUDY SKILLS ARE IMPORTANT? Y? Class participation is essential how to use the teacher's time and resources effectively using the school's resources how to study at home making a study plan in managing time effectively. A lot of my students could use. I could use the value of study groups and how to organize and run a study group and even how to optimize work life balance. There's also a big section on test prep which strategies for both course exams and those big professional exams. I just mentioned a moment ago and because there's a lot of memorization required in amp. Yeah you know there is right. There's a big section on memory strategies. This is a great book to have on your teaching show to offer to students as a place to start learning how to study. And how to handle that? Fire Hose of ideas. Amp or perhaps. Add to your list of recommended resources for your students. Just go to the show notes or episode page or the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Book Club to take a look at this book and be sure to listen to the full episodes sixty four featuring a chat with the author chase DEMARCO. Hey you probably forgot about that survey that I've been taking. That's part of my end of season. Debriefing I'm asking you now. Please take just a few minutes of your time to respond to that anonymous survey because it's your experience as an individual listener. That's important to me. Just go to the AP professor dot Org Slash Survey and as always. Thanks for your support. Searchable transcript and a captioned audio gram of this preview episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy. Check out there many resources and events on their newly redesigned website at Anatomy Dot Org. Well this is Kevin Patent signing off for now and reminding you to keep your questions and comments coming. Why not call the podcast hotline right now at one eight three three? That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or visit us at the AP Professor Dot Org. I'll see you down the.

chase DEMARCO professor Kevin Patent Marco amp professor American Association for Anato NYC locus LLC US consultant Loki High Physiology Society DeMarco Theodore McConnell Loki L. O. K. amd Grodin
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It's discouraging to make a mistake but it's humiliating when you find out your so unimportant that nobody noticed it. Welcome to the amp professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin passed in this episode. I talk about how stress turns. Our hair. Grey the discovery of a new type of immune cell and making mistakes. When we're teaching a if.

professor Kevin
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Cartoonist and film producer Walt Disney once we keep moving forward opening new doors and doing new things. Because we're curious and curiosity keeps leaving us down new paths welcome to the amp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy the and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Past this episode is review of the past year of this podcast. Just mentioned in the intro and also talked about out in the preview episode that preceded this full episode. What I'm going to be doing is debriefing? What went on in our podcast cast over the last year and I did something similar last year at the end of the first full year of the P. Professor podcast and I called that episode sowed a big year and so this episode of calling another big year? I should've called it an even bigger year because I was actually Kinda surprised as I. I went through my process of debriefing and Look what went on holy smoke. We covered a lot of stop. And I'm beginning to that in a minute but before I do I just want to remind you that. Debriefing is something that I've mentioned a lot. And that's because I really believe in it. I think that at regular intervals throughout the academic year and maybe even separate debriefings. You know at the end of multiple years like every five years or something like that. We should step back and really take some time and effort and really mindfully debrief and decide and review and reflect on what we've been doing because I think this can be really affirming. I mean it is for me that I can go back in especially in a year or a semester or even a half a semester. When I'm thinking that all I've been doing is putting one foot in front of the other and that really accomplishing publishing? Anything much. Not Anything useful. I often find that when I go back and actually like tally it up and look at it and think about it. I'm really happy about the fact that there were some things in there that I really did accomplish some things. So that's one of the main reasons so I I liked the briefing is because it makes me feel good but it also gives me some great ideas on things that I can leverage and maybe do better next time for or extend in and do more or gives me an idea to do something completely different and so I just WanNa spend a few minutes talking about the advantages of debriefing. It's a good reminder for ourselves what worked well and what didn't work well over the past period of time. It's also also a good time to bring our C. V. up-to-date our resume or publication lists. However it is that we're recording our life's work and we can do anything anything related to that so Chaz it some schools You need to submit a timeline of things that you've done committees you've been on projects you've done and how often you did pet sitting for your deans pats and that goes into your promotion package or it goes into your evaluation file or something like that so you you can really make that debriefing time you can roll a bunch of different tasks into it and make it a really useful thing it in many different ways and and it's also a form of spaced retrieval practice because it gives us an opportunity to identify in reinforce or concepts concepts because we're going over them again in recalling them again and pulling them back out of our brains so as I go through this episode and I mentioned past topics things things are going to get pulled onto your brain. You'RE GONNA go in there and start pulling things out again and that's going to help keep them in your long term memory when we do this in our courses. We could ask students to do that. Students always want in class reviews right for them. I think they see that sometimes as a substitute for actually really studying like let's review the test. Meaning I don't want to spend my own time reviewing for the test. I want you to review for me but might not be a bad idea if you have have class time to do that. Yeah they're looking for specific. Can't on exactly what's going to be on the test. They'd they'd probably preferred if you just gave them a list of the correct panthers or something thank by what you can do is just spark them a little bit and get them thinking about all of the different things that they have been learning all along long and that will help them with their retrieval practice. There are other ways to do it to The way I usually do tonight in class but in the form of online practice exams Right before the midterm exam and final exams so that gives them the way to do their greet debriefing and relearning stop. Because it's Kinda showing them wear wear and their study materials in their textbook. They need to dive back in and refresh themselves. So let's do it. Let's.

panthers Kevin Past Walt Disney professor P. Professor producer Chaz C. V.
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Sixty two of the ANC professor podcast also known as tap radio. You an audio laboratory for teachers of human anatomy and physiology well. This is a preview of the upcoming full episode which is episode number sixty two and it's titled Another Big Year in Teaching Anatomy and physiology and that parallels the title from an episode. We did about a year ago called a big year and that was a debriefing. A review a look back back of the first year of the professor podcast. And so we're going to do that again in episode number sixty two. And so. It's all about debriefing. It's all about reflecting flocking. It's all about looking back and reviewing what we did so we're going to take a moment to think about to remind ourselves about how we as teachers can in deep grief in a way that is constructive and helpful and affirming and then we're going to dive right in and summarize a whole year of this podcast. Okay non exactly summarize everything but at least sit at the scenic overlook and take in the broad view of everything finger pointing out a few of the most interesting things that happened along the way.

professor ANC
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A common and perennial conversation among amp. Faculty is what prerequisites If any should be required for the amp course that is should students have to pass a biology course or some other course maybe chemistry or maybe even some flavor of English or Algebra before they can be expected to succeed in our anatomy and physiology. Of course heck I've thought about requiring a solid study skills course before student gets into my AP class. I think I'd rather they be able to make a news flash cards and make concept maps then to be able to solve quadra equations for example the AP Course skied lines from the human anatomy and physiology society half's suggest a whole list of required and recommended courses with a minimum among grade of C hats. Members can access the course guidelines at the AP professor dot Org Slash perhaps that's Ha ps ps but perhaps guidelines are well intended as recommendations for programs that want to align in well with the learning outcomes which I've mentioned before in this podcast specifically in episode fifty and for courses that one have a high level of rigor in their program in my mind at least these recommendations are not absolute requirement. And that's that's helpful but when things are not strictly definitive are when we have obstacles at our school for implementing anyone's list of recommended prerequisites requisites. Then we meaning. I tend to still fried about things a bit or sometimes fred a lot. Sure sure any answer to the prerequisite question is going to depend on factors unique to that institution or to that program or department. Our course Actually they're even more considerations than those I just listed but I'll circle back to some of those a little later even after we account for all all those factors. The answer never seems to satisfy Est.. Does it at least not over the long term. We we seemed always WANNA come back to it because no matter what our prerequisites aw or our previous decision not to have required Requisites it's we never seem to be fully satisfied that things are just right. Why because not all our students students seem to transition easily Dr Course and not all of them succeed at least not at first so a solution that always seems obvious? Assayas maybe we should reconsider our prerequisite requirements and it seems to me that this is a wheel that is continuously elite. Reinvented over generations. And remember. I'm as old as an oak tree. I've actually been around for generations all that time paying attention to what we're doing with prerequisites because that's what we aim peaches do right we ask teach other about prerequisites and we theorize about what's ideal and it seems that no matter how much or how often we fiddle with our course prerequisites that prerequisites situation. We have just well never really works. I've come to the conclusion that it's not that prerequisite courses don't work it's just the prerequisites never truly fulfill fill the expectations that we have for them so that begs the question. How much should we expect students to remember from their prerequisite? It's my answer to what we should expect from prerequisites. Is this nothing really. We should not expect anything. I know I know that. Seems like a negative cynical answer but but I don't see it that way. I think it's realistic. And it's well kind of freeing in a way if I'm not really expecting expecting my students to really own concept of ions protein synthesis or chemical equilibria or what. ATP is what it does then. I'm free of expectations and because of that I won't front about it really now. I smile the smile of a Buddha when I hear my colleagues fretting about the prerequisite requirements or at least. I like to think I'm doing that not only that now. I'm far less likely to be tempted to judge. Judge my colleagues teaching those prerequisite courses badly and I'm less likely to be tempted to judge my students. Badly to by not having Any expectations of prior learning were all starting with a clean fresh slate. What a great feeling man you might ask ask? Why don't I expect students to remember anything useful from what they may have been exposed to in their prerequisite course or courses well first off? I don't mean to imply that none of them know anything. I'm just saying that I've come to believe leave that. It's just not realistic to assume that most of them remember everything and that's kind of what we do right. Expect them to know everything from their prerequisite courses. Why don't I expect that partly because we don't typically teach for the long term think about it the classic way of teaching and approach that I used myself for many years is to prepare students for the next test best and hope they all pass for those that pass? They've learned at least sixty percent of what I wanted them to learn. Now think about that for for minute. That's just a little over half of what they ought to have mastered and that's just for those who actually passed for those who didn't pass pass that test all is not lost. They can learn about two thirds or so of what they ought to on the next test and it might average out to a passing course grade right. But let's say they're learning a solid. Seventy percent are so on average a C grade that means means they've mastered or at least become familiar with a bit over two thirds of the material for their unit test. But because they're not asked about again until the end of the semester it's going to disappear until the week before the exam one. It's going to be relearned at least in part for another week or a two and then lost again. That is unless we excuse them for the exam. Because they've been doing well on the unit tests that measure short-term learning even those with solid long-term learning need refreshing but let's say they were and of course that really did promote long-term learning. Let's say they had to master eighty five to ninety percent of the concepts and that they were continually expected did to retrieve that knowledge and demonstrate mastery on a test. Okay they're still gonNA forget some of it even if they mastered a hundred hundred percent of the concepts and then taught the prerequisite course or the or maybe they taught all the prerequisite courses. There's still gonNA forget some of it maybe not all of it but some of it but of course the more typical case is they're not that competent when they reach us so again. Isn't it more practical. That is more useful to just assume that.

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