35 Burst results for "Professor."

Bernie Sanders's Economic Advisor Wants to Keep Printing Money

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:20 min | 2 d ago

Bernie Sanders's Economic Advisor Wants to Keep Printing Money

"Is no shock that The New Yorker ran a piece, August 2019, titled The Economist who believes the government should just print more money. Stephanie kelton, a senior economic adviser to Bernie Sanders and Professor of economics and public policy at stony brook university, is popular in a way that economists almost definitionally are not. Filmmakers trail her with cameras. She goes on international speaking tours. And once it sold out a basketball arena in Italy, kelton is the foremost evangelist of a fringe economic movement called modern monetary theory, which argues in part that the government should pay for programs requiring big spending like the Green New Deal simply by printing more money. This is a polarizing idea. This spring at kelton spoke at The Wall Street Journal's future of everything festival on the day as a journal staffer introduced kelton as an economist with an idea that will either solve the world's problems or send it into ruin. She made a face and then walked on stage. So what exactly does she say? Well, adherents of MMT imagine a world built on MMT principles in which the government provides guaranteed jobs, healthcare affordable college, launches clean infrastructure projects to replace crumbling highways airports and bridges. Kelton, who does at least 5 interviews per week, plus lectures speaking gigs in conferences, is more than anyone else responsible for building MMT's digital army. So what exactly is MMT? Well, it means that we just spend money, and don't worry about it.

Kelton Stephanie Kelton Stony Brook University Bernie Sanders The New Yorker Basketball Italy The Wall Street Journal MMT
America Is Not an Evil Place

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:09 min | 5 d ago

America Is Not an Evil Place

"Is, it is almost inevitable. When I talk to young people and they've been led to believe what their professors or teachers at have told them, they're angry, ungrateful, spoke to a bunch of high school kids a few weeks ago. It was a very depressing actually. And I never say that. It was a totally mixed ethnic group, racial and ethnic group. And they were, they pretty much hated me. This was not a common thing with young people. And what they hated was that I said America was a good place and they had essentially no right to walk around angry at their race at racism in America when it's such an unraced place. And they were furious. They were just furious.

America
Eric Reunites With Old Friend James Howard Kunstler

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | Last week

Eric Reunites With Old Friend James Howard Kunstler

"To say that I'm sitting here with an old friend. It's hard to believe how long it's been. I'm sitting here with James Howard kunstler, who lets me call him Jimbo. Jimbo or Jim, you and I have not been in the same room since probably Christmas 91. Well, we veered into very different kind of intellectual trenches. And digging ourselves deeper into them. So we can't see over the top. But it's still crazy to me because I mean, you've been on the program before by a Skype or whatever. But I met you when I was at yaddo in 1986. Yeah, originally, with Alan shoes, I think Alan, we were watching the 1986 World Series at my house. That's right. A tragic death series. That's exactly right. It wasn't tragic for mets fans. Right, not for them. But I was born in Queens a mile from Shea stadium. So it was not tragic for me. But the point is, that was 1986. I was 23. And I was at yaddo, which was a huge deal for me because obviously I want to be a literary writer and I got to go to yaddle where Cheever was so it meant so much to me. But I met this guy named Alan chews. And Alan says, now, how do you describe him? Alan Woods? Well, he was a big kind of bear of a guy. He was a book critic and a professor. And he had an NPR bookshelf. And he was a sweet fellow. Oh, yeah, very sweet. And he was very kind to me because he said, hey, you want to come with me? I know somebody who lives near here a writer named Jim kunstler. And so he drags me along the 23 year old version of me along with him to meet you. And I instantly loved you and started reading your books. That's

Jimbo Jim Kunstler Alan Alan Chews Shea Stadium JIM Skype Alan Woods Mets Cheever Queens NPR
Why Does Arozona Vote for Democrats?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:53 sec | Last week

Why Does Arozona Vote for Democrats?

"Dennis prager here, I might add that there was good news. An example yesterday, one example is the Blake masters win in Arizona. I have met him extensively. I spent hours with him. He's very impressive. So I have a lot of Arizona listeners. Be a very important seat to pick up, still I'm still actually not clear as to why Arizona would tend to vote for a democratic senator. I'd love to know from professor random 100 Democrat voters.

Dennis Prager Arizona Blake
John Zmirak: Transphobia Is Good and Should Be Official Gov't Policy

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:01 min | Last week

John Zmirak: Transphobia Is Good and Should Be Official Gov't Policy

"You have written so much, John that I want to make sure we have time to get into this. You write at stream dot org, what article shall we talk about that we haven't covered on this program yet? Here's a nice when someone transphobia is good and should be official government policy. Transphobia is good and should be official government policy. That's only the title folks. Okay, so what do you mean by that? Well, there was an exchange before the Senate, like two weeks ago and crazy stuff happens. So quickly that it disappears because the next insane thing has happened, you know? But two weeks ago, there was a professor from University of California at Berkeley. Testifying in favor of abortion up through birth for any reason at all, which is what the Democrats want. They pretend that, oh, we only want to allow it for ten year old girls who were raped by Jeffrey Dahmer on top of the Washington Monument. But in fact, they wanted for everybody who happens to be like in law school or using this birth control. They want abortion for everyone paid for by the government in religious hospitals, stuff down your throat. But they're pretend. All right, so she was testifying about how. Protecting unborn life would have a negative impact on people who become pregnant. Who can become pregnant? And senator Josh hawley said, do you mean women? And she got really upset. She said, there are many types of people who can become pregnant. There are trans men, and there are gender queer, and she went through a whole list of made up nonsense terms that sound like Pokémon characters.

Jeffrey Dahmer University Of California John Senate Washington Monument Berkeley Senator Josh Hawley
Seattle Pacific University Sues Washington AG Over Religious Freedom

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:23 min | Last week

Seattle Pacific University Sues Washington AG Over Religious Freedom

"Start in Seattle, Washington. Seattle Pacific university. It is a university that is a part of the free methodist denomination. To be honest, I'm not all that familiar with the free methodist. I know the United methodist are going through all sorts of turmoil over the LGBT nonsense. But Seattle Pacific university affiliated with the free methodist and the free methodists are very conservative on issues regarding marriage and sex. And they follow the Bible's teachings on those issues. Now, this has caused a lot of chaos and controversy over the past couple of months. You've had students. That are now raising concerns, and they're accusing the university of being discriminatory. Now the university, they don't hire people who are engaged in LGBT relationships. They say that goes against their teachings. Now, again, it just seems to me that if you are, if you are a pure hearted person and let's just say that you're a gay person and you're going to go and you're going to apply for a job you want to be a professor and you realize, oh, wait a second. Seattle Pacific university, they don't allow gays to teach. It seems to be at that point you would want to go and find a job where they would embrace you, where that sort of thing is permissible.

Seattle Pacific University United Methodist University Of Being Discrimina Seattle Washington
The Atlantic: How Six States Could Overturn the 2024 Election

Mark Levin

01:21 min | Last week

The Atlantic: How Six States Could Overturn the 2024 Election

"How 6 states could overturn the 2024 election The Atlantic Now look we're getting a lot of this Were the Democrats and their surrogates in the media Their professors and the rest of them are now laying the foundation for an argument that if the Republicans win In 2024 it's not legitimate Now it is they who did that in 2000 it is they who did that in 2004 it is they who did that in 2016 and they were all poised to do the same in 2024 Excuse me 2020 you may recall Well the mailboxes were all moved And you might remember it It was they who were attacking the voting machines and so forth And then when they announcements came and Biden was declared a winner they jena fled They turn on a dime And you see you can't talk about it anymore No Don't say anything Don't say anything Or you're part of the January 6 white supremacist militia

Biden Jena
Caller: Democrats Just Want to Kill of Oppositions to Retain Power

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Caller: Democrats Just Want to Kill of Oppositions to Retain Power

"Is a whole absurdity of this is, you know, all he did is seek accountability. And you have the department of injustice. The travesty of what's going on in this show is a hypocrisy of accountability. It's the lust of the machine to kill off any opposition for future power retention goals. It's an ocean of Liza keeps slapping away against our face. Insulting us. And it's Democrats. They say they're defending democracy while shedding the due process and the constitution and the whole attempt. It is so absurd, it's laughable, but yet all my friends in New York are just hanging, you watching, are you watching? And I'm going, no. It's like this. It's like pornography for them. They're so excited about it. You know, the law professor Jonathan turley Paul yesterday told John Roberts. He said, the fact is this committee. This January 6th committee, there has been zero effort to offer any balance any alternative interpretations in many of the quotes they used evidence that they presented that have been carefully edited and it trips away. They have zero credibility, but yet people like your friend in New York, they saw that and they just said, look at that.

Department Of Injustice Liza Jonathan Turley Paul John Roberts New York
When Children'S Minds Are Made for Study

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

When Children'S Minds Are Made for Study

"Talking about children, I'd like to entertain a subject with you. The subject of my column today, it's a tennis prager dot com and town hall dot com and it'll go to the daily wire and American greatness and Jewish world review and many others. But it's up at my website and up at town hall dot com. And my thesis is that when I was 12 years old and not just I, my classmates and I at 12 had more wisdom than the vast majority of professors at American universities do today, let alone college students. Again, I repeat, I am certain that it's a big claim. I am certain that I and most of my classmates had more wisdom at the age of 12 than almost any professor in America today. From Harvard to anywhere else that you'd like to think about. The professors have more knowledge, but I believe that the average 12 year old at what I attended he yeshiva, which is a religious Jewish education, half the day, hit the Hebrew original sources, and half the day secular teaching. So I went from 9 to 6 very often, always at least 9 to 5, is a very long day, and I learned an immense amount, both secular studies, and religious studies.

Tennis Harvard Yeshiva America
Why a Prominent UCLA Professor Is Calling It Quits

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Why a Prominent UCLA Professor Is Calling It Quits

"Joseph Manson is a anthropologist at UCLA, the University of California at Los Angeles. And he's 62 years old. And really without any particular incident being responsible for it, he's decided to give up his tenure and take early retirement. Now, this is remarkable in itself. It's very rare for ten yard academics to do this. It's one thing if they're in failing health or they want to do something else with their life. None of that is at issue here. This is a professor dedicated successful. He's got students who really like him. And yet he's decided to get out of there. And he has given an account of why he's doing this. And the account can be summarized as I don't want to be the last antelope eaten by the leopards. In other words, what he's saying is that my department at UCLA has been thoroughly corrupted from within. And other scholars are feeling and have felt the bite of the leopard, the leopard here is wokeness, the woke ideology. And the leopard hasn't come for me, but it will. It has to. Why? Because it comes for anyone who believes in independent thought, anyone who thinks for themselves anyone who can test the propositions of woke ideology, and even if you agree with some or even most of them, you might disagree with a few, and that will be enough of a pretext for you to then be targeted, bullied, and your reputation destroyed.

Joseph Manson Ucla University Of California Los Angeles
How John Rawls' 'Veil of Ignorance' Can Be Applied to Abortion

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

How John Rawls' 'Veil of Ignorance' Can Be Applied to Abortion

"The philosopher John Rawls is believed to be one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century. Now there are some people who would say he was the most influential. He was certainly not the greatest philosopher of the century. I think you'd have to say that that was Martin heidegger. The German thinker who was at least for a time infatuated by the Nazis, but nevertheless, whose philosophical reputation is in the league of the great 19th century philosophers like Nietzsche and schopenhauer and then the 18th century philosophers like Kant and others. Now Rawls, however, was a political philosopher. And he's most famous for his book called a theory of justice, published in 1971. I'm telling you all this because Rawls name was recently invoked by a law professor. In the context of the Supreme Court decision this is the Dobbs decision overturning roe versus wade. And he has a really a bardone writing quote, Rawls wrote that the Supreme Court was the quote exemplar of public reason end quote. How sad it is to see how wrong he was. So according to bardon, the Rawls, who always believed that morality is not merely a function of instinct, but is a function of reason. We can reason our way to a sound conclusion.

Rawls John Rawls Martin Heidegger Schopenhauer Nietzsche Kant Supreme Court Dobbs Wade Bardon
Liz Cheney braces for primary loss as focus shifts to 2024

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

Liz Cheney braces for primary loss as focus shifts to 2024

"The lead Republican on the House committee investigating the capitol riot Wyoming's Liz Cheney is bracing for a primary loss back home in less than a month Cheney has spent most of her time about 1600 miles from home I will do everything I can to ensure that the former president never again gets anywhere near the Oval Office Cheney's focus on Donald Trump is not going over well in Wyoming K one I voted for Cheney when she ran last time and I won't vote forever again James king is a political science professor at the university of Wyoming One challenger emerged as the principal challenger And that is attorney Harriet hagerman Virginia Torres for one is voting for hagerman She isn't one that is taking things personally in a less mature way There is growing belief by Cheney's team she may be in a stronger position for the 2024 race for president I'm Ed

Cheney Liz Cheney Wyoming House Committee Donald Trump James King Harriet Hagerman Virginia Torr University Of Wyoming Hagerman
Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Mediaite's Sarah Rumpf Offended by Mark Levin's 'Ranting'

"And it puts some really vicious stupid people to work Now I would not call Sarah rump a vicious stupid person I don't know her All I said is she seemed like a 12 year old Her lack of substance in her writing style she took grave grave not even great grave offense She pointed out I'm a lawyer And she was upset at my ranting And she said of course I didn't provide any substantive information in response to her genius Of course I did it's right there on the video that she attached But she's a slow listener She said you know there's four elements for elements in greenhouse gases really Who knew Sarah I've studied this issue at great length many many years ago When you were 12 years old doctor Edward wegman from page one 32 of liberty and tyranny I wrote that book I thought you should know A professor at the center for computational statistics at George Mason university Chair of the national Academy of Sciences committee on applied theoretical statistics Board member of the American statistical association More than just a lawyer was tasked by congressional committee to lead a group of experts in examining the hockey stick evidence Now this evidence but like getting into great detail you see Sarah broadcasting you have limited time Which is why when you write a stupid essay you have all the time in the world

Sarah Rump Edward Wegman Center For Computational Stati National Academy Of Sciences C Sarah George Mason University American Statistical Associati Congressional Committee Hockey
Betsy DeVos: Dept. Of Education Should Not Exist

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:41 min | 3 weeks ago

Betsy DeVos: Dept. Of Education Should Not Exist

"So Betsy devos, the former secretary of education in the Trump administration, making some headlines she was speaking in Tampa over the weekend. And she made an announcement which should make all of us smile. She says that we need to abolish the Department of Education. Quote, I personally think the Department of Education should not exist. That's what devos said to the moms for liberty summit. And she has been a staunch supporter of private school vouchers. Well, look, I think this is all well and good. So why didn't she advocate for this while she had the platform? Why did Betsy devos not dismantle the Department of Education when she had the opportunity when she was secretary of the Department of Education? And what really bothers me about these Republicans and this was a huge complaint I had with the Trump administration as this is the most important issue. Dismantling the Department of Education and it wasn't even on the radar. It was not even on the radar. The teachers unions, all of it, needs to be dismantled. As a matter of fact, you had doctor misses First Lady Joe Biden, the woman who doesn't know how to pronounce bodega, but she's a professor. She spoke to the teachers union last week and said that the most important thing for the teachers union is to look out for the interest of the teachers, not the kids. Not the children. But the teachers. It's all politics.

Betsy Devos Department Of Education Trump Administration Devos Tampa Lady Joe Biden
Prominent Conservatives Issue Report Rebutting Trump Election Claims

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Prominent Conservatives Issue Report Rebutting Trump Election Claims

"A group of conservatives now reading from a CNN article, a group of conservatives, including prominent lawyers and retired federal judges issued a 72 page report. Categorically rebutting each of the claims made in court by former president Donald Trump in his supporters over the 2020 election results. So you've got a group of these jurists. Who are we talking about? Thomas B Griffith, retired federal appeal court judge, J Michael ludig. A guy I know, Michael McConnell, a very smart guy, and professor at Stanford University, former solicitor general Ted Olson, former U.S. senator John Danforth, and Gordon Smith. And a couple of other people. Now CNN does admit quote several of them are longtime Trump critics. So these are these are kind of never Trump jurists. And they contend, and it looks like this report. It's a 72 page report that was produced to help the January 6th committee. In other words, they're working in a sense to support the democratic narrative on this. And they say that Trump and his supporters quote had an obligation to recognize the election debate was over. Now, on what basis do they come to this remarkable conclusion? Well, it turns out, all that they do is they review in some depth, the cases that went before various courts. Now they admit this group does that many of these cases were not adjudicated. Some of them were dismissed for lack of standing or you filed it in the wrong court. You should have filed this one before the election. And this one is now moot. And so it seems to me that, I mean, I don't have difficulty believing that in those cases, filed in the immediate aftermath of the election, there was insufficient evidence there. That the election was stolen.

Thomas B Griffith J Michael Ludig Michael Mcconnell Senator John Danforth CNN Ted Olson Donald Trump Gordon Smith Stanford University U.S.
Retired Justice Stephen Breyer joining Harvard law faculty

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Retired Justice Stephen Breyer joining Harvard law faculty

"Now that he's off the Supreme Court Stephen Breyer is heading back to school Breyer graduated from Harvard Law and taught there for nearly three decades The school says he's coming back as a Professor of administrative law Breyer literally wrote the book co authoring a textbook on the law surrounding government agencies It's you mister college student that you mister law school students earlier this year the 83 year old Breyer said he wants to make sure younger generations are ready to keep up what he calls America's great constitutional experiment They'll determine whether the experiment still works Sagar Meghani Washington

Breyer Harvard Law Stephen Breyer Mister College Supreme Court America Sagar Meghani Washington
Blake Masters: Dems Have to Retreat & Distract Americans

The Dan Bongino Show

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

Blake Masters: Dems Have to Retreat & Distract Americans

"So Blake master Senate candidate in Arizona Blake I'm sorry about that But I wanted to ask you I'm sure you saw that exchange with Blake Holly and the law professor right Oh yeah Wow What a spectacle So bleak you know why do you think the left is pushing so hard to redefine the truth from your point of view Well I think you know I mean I just saw this survey 88% of Americans think that we're heading in the wrong direction And you know the left knows this Democrats know this They can't admit it though So that's why they're stuck telling lies They don't want to talk about inflation They don't want to talk about how gas prices are to open border And so they have to retreat to talking about drag shows and trying to reinvent the genders and all this crazy stuff It's like they don't have anything else to talk about So I'm convinced this this giant distraction And yeah they're super ideological They're out to lunch And I mean it's really really crazy isn't it

Blake Holly Blake Senate Arizona
LeBron James Critical of United States

The Officer Tatum Show

01:30 min | Last month

LeBron James Critical of United States

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to the off to Tatum show. I got a video from LeBron de James. You know that basketball player that's probably the code is backed by a player and U.S. history outside of Michael Jordan, but that dude is the dumbest person when it comes to politics that I've ever heard. And Brittany griner is even dumber than he is. How are you going to go to another country playing with their laws? This ain't America. They ain't gonna slap you on the wrist. You're going to take it hashish or. And you think you're going to go to Russia and they gonna kiss your butt 'cause you black. Lady, you ain't in America. Now your bud in jail. I want y'all to listen to what LeBron James said because I don't respect him enough to call him LeBron anymore. LeBron de James, listen to what he said and just know that he apologized after he said what he about to say wrote a clip. White people are collecting black art. Have you had to explain that ever to collectors? It's not the responsibility of black folks to use this. I don't think this LeBron James. She is in Russia. She's been there over a 110 days. Now how can she feel like America has her back? I would be feeling like do I even want to go back to America? I'm not saying you will be twice as good to get half as much. I always didn't like that team. So I said, I just want to be twice as good because I want to be trusted. As a forward you take risks all the time. If you're not. So I think we are at the clip. I think it's some other players that are talking in there, but however, LeBron, you heard him say, why would he even want to come back to America? Where you gonna go? Where you gonna go?

Lebron De James Brittany Griner America Tatum Lebron James Michael Jordan Russia Basketball Lebron
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Clue. I guess i don't really need to know. All i need to know is going to be down between midnight and six. Am on touched such a day. But really i kinda liked the know what people are telling me so we need to think about that. I think about that a lot. When i'm discussing things with my students. I always try to stop myself and think to. They know this acronym yet that i'm using. Have they ever heard of that. That's always been a concern of mine. But the reason i bring this up now is that there is a really interesting article in the online journal. Easy life about the use of acronyms in the scientific literature in an apple named article entitled meta research the growth of acronyms in the scientific literature by the way the term meta research means research on research in this article. The authors analyzed more than twenty four years article titles in eighteen million article abstracts published between one thousand nine hundred fifty and twenty nineteen. And what did they find. You may wonder well. They found that there was at least one acronym in nineteen percent of the titles and seventy three percent of the abstracts they also found that acronym use has increased over time. But the re use of acronyms has declined and words. They use them a few times and then We don't want to use that anymore. For example they found that for more than one million unique names in their data just over two thousand so that works out two point. Two percent were used regularly and most acronyms that is seventy nine percent of them appeared fewer than ten times in in all those articles that analyzed now while the authors of this article admit that acronyms are not the biggest current problem in science communication. They do point out that reducing their use is a simple change that would help readers and potentially increase the value of science. So i don't know or should we decrease the use of acronyms. Should we try to find a happy balance that makes them useful but not overuse them. I don't know it's something to think about to tell me what do you think what's the proper role of acronyms in impe teaching and learning. How much is too much. A little is too little anyway. I'd like to know what you think about this whole idea. You tell me just calling to the podcast hotline at one. Eight three three lion done. That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or email me at podcast. At the professor dot org the free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master.

online journal apple
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"In the radio series hitchhikers guide to the future serreze. Douglas adams said this about digital books. Lovers of print are simply confusing the plate for the food. Welcome to the professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host heaven episode. I discuss arm length digital textbooks and a new book club pack. We've been in the age for quite some time. Now and aibo have been around quite a while including the textbooks notice that i just used the terms book and digital textbook. I haven't even had the chance yet. To drop in e textbook electronic book online textbook e taxed nor have i had the chance yet to address the variations of spelling involved in each of those is the book lower case upper case is that e hyphenated or just added onto booker taxed or whatever were pre pending to. You're anticipating that. I'm headed into.

serreze Douglas adams aibo
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It's medically necessary just think how much more reluctant to discuss their symptoms with someone who's clearly embarrassed to be hearing about it. So i have a discussion about that discomfort and tell them that. I had to get used to it as a teacher. I'm not sure i'm completely used to it. Sometimes and they ought to start working on getting used to it too. I had a time before. They're dealing with patients. This reminds me of something that happened. Not too far along in teaching career. I had noticed that in. Ap to near the end when we're talking about the reproductive system. Most of those students i had had for two semesters in. Amp one now named mp to an ap to is coming to a close and so we had reached a high level of comfort with each other. And i i noticed that when i got to the reproductive system suddenly when you know if i was giving a little mini lecture or something like that i would look out in class in. You know all these students that would normally be looking at me jotting. A few notes were now entirely looking down at their notebook and not looking up not making eye contact. Certainly i just. I was amused by that when i first saw it. And i of course. I understand why that's the case. Because reproductive function is one of those taboo subjects that not. Everyone is comfortable with discussing in public. And i wasn't a stranger at that point. But i still was not a close friend or family member and even then i think a lot of people have some difficulty in having those of discussions the next time around in when that came to be i you know. Revisited that discomfort discussion right before we started talking about the reproductive system. And i said hey. I've noticed this happened before in class. And so i'm just pointing out that you know. We need to think about the way we react to things because when we're dealing with patients and.

ap
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"In most of my syllabi where it's you know mildly humorous kind of annoyingly humored attempt at humor but it also sort of is a disclaimer. Saying look you know this is something human did and it's going to have mistakes in it and so i'm telling you there's gotta be you know weird things in it you might say. No animals were harmed in the making of the syllabus. Or you know some weird thing in their kinda lightens. The mood makes that syllabus that's very straight and narrow the maybe kind of lightens it up a little bit and kind of breaks the ice a little bit. Sometimes you could include maybe some kind of little cartoon or playful clip art in there. Make sure it's something you have permission to use but That can lighten the mood a little bit too and make your syllabus that much more engaging wha- mean more engaging syllabi aren't engaging but at least attempts to make it kinda engaging doesn't it something i've mentioned in my podcast and my blogs before is a book i ran across many years ago. I think from two thousand three or something like that but it's still relevant in. It's called professors from mars students from snickers and the subtitle is how to write and deliver humor in the classroom and in professional presentations of. You're not a naturally a joke writer in you. Want to add some humor or some lightness or playfulness in their read. Through this book he's got a lot of its Ronald burke does this and he's got a lot of really great ideas and they i guarantee you. They will spark some ideas for how to lighten up your syllabus and your other course materials and i have linked to that in the.

Ronald burke
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"And i've done that before before i start using my learning management system many moons ago in so you list each one of them as sort of the the question part of a quiz item and then for the answer. They get a choice to either mark on there. I understand i do not understand. In terms of the technical aspects of how the quizzes setup in the learning management system. I understand is marked. Is the correct answer. And i do. Not understand is marked as the incorrect answer. So if they mark i understand to. Let's say ten out of ten items. Then they will get a one hundred percent on that quiz. That's how the learning management system seat. At least if you use that language i understand are i do not understand. They're not necessarily agreeing to them. They are saying. I understand that this is so in other words. This is the way it is. It's not up to you to agree to it or not do agree to. Its whether you understand that. That's the way it is and think about the way toward they have no choice and they're stating that they understand and the way i have my learning management system set up. Is that everything else. In the course that comes after that and that's at the beginning is locked up and it's set so that they have to get one hundred percent on their understanding quiz in order for everything else to be unlocked. So i want them to understand that before the course starts not at the very end so it's very important that they get that done first before they do anything else so they have to get a perfect score in that understanding quiz and what that quizzes well at least two things one is it forces them to read at least those major items even if they slept through that first day activity or missed it or something like that or didn't pay attention to what was going on her forgot what was going on and that happens it forces them to read at least those major items or at least.

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"We want to hear from you so take a few notes and call the podcast hotline at one. Eight hundred three lion dan. That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or send an audio file or written message to podcast at the professor dot.

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

13:45 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Christa. Thank you very much for preparing that summary. For us and it really did nine only hit the high points of where they started and where they ended up but it gave us enough information inbetween to let us know how they did it and how they arrived at their conclusions and one thing. I wanted to mention before we get to our little discussion here at the end is that you and I have not discussed. What our impressions are before have we okay so I feel like I'm a stage magician like you and I never met before we have not priori then but I mean we did Kenna talk about you. Know a Krista is the one that really did a lot of research to find some relevant articles in and we kinda you know she got my input a little bit on how to winnow. That down are not how but you know the actual winnowing process and we settled on doing this. One for variety of reasons is our first one. We have a few more that we're ready to go with as time goes on with this journal. Club and and we did talk. You know a little. I mean we throw a little bit of our impression but we didn't really go into detail so we didn't really to have intentionally but we just realized today as we're preparing to record this. This really is going to be a very organic conversation because we didn't do that kind of prop I mean we did the prop of both reading the article in thinking about it a little bit but I'm not sure you know what Chris Big Takeaway is Until we both agreed that I'd go I and And give at least the major takeaway from it and I have two things that really struck me on this in one is kind of embedded in there a little bit. I'm not I can't really remember how overtly it says this but in my mind what I was hearing is. It doesn't always matter how you teach something or how the students are. You know what methods they're using to learn that's not the important part and that's the thing that we talk about the most as impe teachers when we're being amp teachers and when we're talking to each other. So when I go to happen you know. I want to learn some new techniques for teaching and for teaching for helping my students learn. I want to talk about the techniques. I use and share those. I want to debate about that like what? What's better this this kind of teaching and learning or that kind of teaching and learning and there are many different ways of doing all that and so what I took away from this is? That's not the important question. Important question is how engaged the students are? And then when you hear that you're like Duh of course that is you know I mean just in my own life and my own learning. That's what's important is how engaged. Im it doesn't really yeah. It's better when you have a very engaged teacher. And when you have a course that set up in a way that resonates with the way I learn sure actually I'm kind of giving both takeaway there. By saying that is the first takeaway was the the big question isn't so much how we do it and that leads the second big takeaway from me and that is student engagement so now. I'm thinking this really needs to be more front and Center for me as a teacher that I really need to start with that question. How engaged or my students going to be in. How can I encourage them to get engaged so That that was my first impression. Krista what did you get out of this when you first read this? I think this article is really timely. Because right now we were all forced to imagine courses midstream and for many people that have never bought online. I think the biggest barrier be your own belief in its effectiveness. So I think that this article if you're just looking at test performance so I want to be very clear about that. This is just saying test performance right. Not any of the other amazing things that can come out of face to face engagement or of course even online engagement. But if you're just worried about your grades you know. It's very clear that they can do just as well without having you face to face and I don't know about you Kevin but as a professor that was something even though I'm relatively young in my career he say relatively because I can't get away with it saying young in my career anymore. You know I I love the face to face because I I like talking to people. I like putting on that performance of a lecture especially when I feel confident about it but I have to realize that that's a lot more about me than it is about the students so when I sit back and say man that was a great when I've had days where Afterwards said man. That was a great lecture. If I'm being honest with myself it wasn't because the students were answering questions right or that. They were very active. It was that I didn't trip up and everything flowed well and I thought my explanations were great. None of that has anything to do with student engagement. And so I took away from this that we're here to deliver material to students in a way that excites them and motivates them not. We're not here to show how much we know so I really liked that. Take that kind of take away from the article or at least that was a big takeaway for me. I also want to point out that if this may read like A. This is a flipped classroom. It really isn't because what they did in this article. That's interesting is isolating everything so the main everything the same except the face face versus online. Linda true flipped classroom. You might be doing very different activities in a flipped classroom format versus the traditional lecture so for example in this article they gave them in person and online. They gave him the same handout of activities. Inner Traditional Lecture. You have handout of activities right. I want to discourage anyone at least slightly from thinking that this is a purely flipped classroom or or you know the model active learning a little bit different but what it did do was isolate the effect of the being in person. So it's good in that sense. Another thing I took away from. This was how difficult it is to truly isolate the effects in a classroom or to make a controlled experiment of classroom and the authors acknowledged that by talking about that practical class so they had that three hour lab in person every other week. And there's no way to know for sure what content from in person versus online wasn't being addressed in that classroom and I know from being a lab instructor of a B. When I wasn't the lecture instructor how often I clarified things during lab from lecture for Students. So you know it. I liked that they acknowledge that that it really does make it so difficult to have like a truly trolled experiment in a classroom. But you know. I don't know if that's realistic or something. We even want. Because then we're creating sort of robotic approach to teaching which really isn't isn't our reality. I also WANNA mention that. They reported that the face to face attendance was really four. It was less than twenty five percent. So there's more evidence that we need to reevaluate how tightly. We claimed to be the importance of face to face and how much of that is. Our own is their own bias about the value of that especially in this time. Kovin so those are my main takeaways from from the article beyond beyond what I already summarized. So I'd Kevin How often Have you had to? Have you gotten a chance to experiment like this whether face to face versus online in? What's your experience been of student performance? It's funny you should Sort of describe the idea of what they did here and not being necessarily on a percent natural in in trying to isolate the different aspects of it I That really struck a chord with me. Because I've had the experience of teaching traditional courses face to face and of course. There's a variety of ways to do that. I mean I've been in a course where I had three hundred students and a lecture hall and there's not very much interaction between me and the students and I've experimented with ways to try an increase interaction and try to To make it more interactive than I've seen other people do I experienced myself as a student in my point is that I've done that but also done in the community college which with much smaller groups where it naturally is more interactive so I didn't have to work as hard in creating that interactivity. I've done that but I've also done web enhanced and in what they now call a a hybrid todd course and so. I've done a little bit of that in also actually quite a bit of that and then and now I teach completely online. So I've kind of run the gamut and to be honest. I wasn't looking football. I didn't know about online teaching. When I first started teaching it hadn't been invented yet. I mean we had correspondence courses but that's a whole different thing. I've kind of had that whole spectrum when I first started teaching online. I thought my first impression of it before I taught online was well. You can't really teach. Ap Online you can't teach anything very well online because it's totally disengaged. I need to be there in front of the class. I need to be doing this with the class. When I start teaching online I found it to be very different and like anything new in different. It's uncomfortable and so that kind of confirmed some of my biases that yup see. It's just not the same but the more got into it and the more I learned about how to do it well and the more I really observed other people or hurt you know. Talk to other people who had been doing it a long time and doing it. Well the more I learned about it and now I love teaching online and now I can see that. Yeah I have to do things differently and yes I do miss performing miss going out there and being the Center Ring Act and and you know showing my wonderful slides that I really worked hard on and and you know the the logic of the story that I'm telling in this lecture and in another thing I missed too is when you're lecturing a lot of times. I have insights that. I never had before you know. I've been doing an MP for decades. And I'll be teaching and all of a sudden like Gosh. That's how this and that fit together. I never really appreciated that. Linkage that aspect of that linkage into when I walk out of class sometimes a great class I learned something new that I didn't know before. Now that say it this way. Krista. I'm thinking maybe those classes that I thought were my best classes really. Maybe were worst. Because I wasn't necessarily engaging the student I was all inside my own head thinking about this linkage and so I think that that's an important observation is that there are different ways of doing things and sometimes we just kind of get so comfortable in so wedded to a particular kind of way of doing things that we don't appreciate the other ways of doing things and they can work just as well another thing that you just brought up. Krista is that you know this artificiality of doing the owner of the of comparing different things that you do in class for me. I've never really done what's called scholarship of teaching and learning. Yeah I've had some seminars papers presented and so on and they were more descriptive of. Here's what I tried. Here's what I found and of it. I didn't really have control groups. I didn't really do any of that. Because it was just an organic part of what I was doing as a teacher and I'm a very experimental teacher. I think a lot of people listening to this podcast or experimental. They WANNA learn new things. Otherwise why listen people in APPs and in triple A. and so and also experimental teachers because learn new things? That's why they're there to learn new ways of doing things or learning. Why some of the things they're doing. Maybe aren't the best way to really be doing them. Even though that's what how we were taught or how we were trained to teach a lot of what I've learned in the last podcast I went through a lot of the formative online testing that I do and I recently brought that up in a Hats townhall meeting to in the PODCAST. I wanted to kind of expand on that a little bit. Because it's something that's been very important for me and I've had you know this longtime use of it and things I've tweaked and things at work and things that didn't work for me in and I I have put that out there before I published in various areas. But Not really as a research article because when I go from mostly in class teaching For that example mostly in class teaching to mostly online teaching I just did it and I had all these students so I can tell you how they did compared to previous groups of students so I mean in a way I kind of have control but not exactly and it probably if I was.

Krista Kenna instructor Christa. Kevin Linda football professor
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

13:17 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A if we want to have a different version of anyone attempt of anyone test and we want to allow at least three attampts. Whoa that's a lot of different tests to right. Isn't it allow unlimited tests? Which is the direction which I've been having then. Wow we need a Jillian versions of each test. Any of that is pretty much impossible right or is it impossible. Not only is it possible. It's fairly easy not super easy but fairly easy. All the learning management systems have the ability to use. What I'M GONNA call a question set but each has its own name for this feature. Here's how it works for test item. One I ride three versions. They could be three different ways to ask the same question or they could be three different aspects of the concept that I want to assess in test item one for example it could be three different examples of cardiac muscle tissue to identify or it could be one. Each of three major types of muscle tissue when a student takes attempt one one of those three items in the questions that will be presented as test item one in their next attempt. It could be the same item presented or more likely one of the other two versions because it's randomly selected by the learning management system. Even if it's the same item one that they saw in their first test attempt each item in the task. Let's say fifty items total we'll be similarly randomized so yeah okay. Test Item? One is the same as they've seen before. But maybe probably all or most of the other forty-nine items on attempt to will be different than they've seen before as with a slot machine having three items in each question site for fifty test items will generate now on your seats here. It'll generate seven point two times ten to the twenty third different possible test attempt versions. Yeah that's all right. It's it's more than a mole of different versions. The thing is I usually have more than three items per questions. I divide up. I want my students to know in the fifty categories some of which overlap because I want to attack some things at different levels of understanding or application or style of test item. Then once I get going and I'm constructing three items from my first category or my first question set you know what I always think of a fourth item which boxing idea for fifth item Mandalay that but for multiple choice and matching items I can set the LMS to randomize the choices. So I've got another billion Brazilian versions of that test being generated because not only is the LMS picking random items out of a question set of three or four or five. It's also scrambling up the choices within a multiple choice or matching item. When I first started doing this back in two thousand and two I got a math. Professor help calculate the possible number of versions on any one of my tests and her calculator could not go that high. It just gave an error being a math professor. She had a pretty powerful calculator. And you know what that's all I needed to know. I didn't need to know the exact number I just needed to know. It blew out the math professor's calculator so that was good enough for me. That is good enough to ensure the my students weren't getting the same test and every attempt of course I waited until the semester started to begin making my first time hoops ship. It started that way and advanced so well so heavy days that first semester. When I came home from school I immediately set my timer for twenty minutes and wrote as many test items as I could before the timer went off doing that every day. Yeah it was a chore. But really twenty minutes was not that big of a chore and it became a habit so it really wasn't that hard to sit down and do it for twenty minutes every day. Because that's just kind of what I got used to. After my first test was done I was really getting good at writing test items and getting faster and faster about coming up with good test. Items and his students were taking attempts of their first test. While I was working on test to they were taking the first test. And they were giving me feedback on. Which items were poorly constructed or just odd or Fulla? Typo is or something was wrong with it. I could claim that I did that on purpose. But I didn't know I just got started late but it did turn out to have that silver lining then the next time I taught that course it was easy to add a few more test items to some of the question sets of course I was by now a seasoned pro at test item writing something. I'd always dreaded it because I didn't feel like I was any good at it. But all that retrieval practice gave me a certain level of mastery mentally mastery of test item writing but I also gained insights about the AP concepts that. I was considering for test items. I lived through it and I'm a better person for it or at least a slightly better person for and so yeah like any new project. It seems intimidating but it's like a very long walking trip. You take one step at a time and I don't know if you walked for twenty minutes a day four days a week for two sixteen week. Semesters you'll end up having walked more than one hundred twenty five miles probably with no injuries. No collapsing on the roadside. No dehydration just a smile on your face. So do it one step at a time and you can do it to me and I also want to mention some icing that I put on that retrieval practice cake and decorations after all. Isn't that cake that much better when it has icing and grains one thing? I did that helped a lot. The icing was give students an online pre-test before much of the course and online attempt taken from that huge test bank that built over that coming modules content because I told them to expect to fail it but they had to take it to unlock the videos and other learning resources for the coming module honestly it took a while to convince them not to read ahead and not to study not to prepare for it. It was merely to give them a peek at what they be expected to know later. But we're not in any way expected to know yet and you know what those pretexts helped a lot now. The cake decorations consisted of making my online tests. Cumulative every test had questions from all the previous tests the really important questions the core concepts the big ideas. Yeah of course. They balked at that one. I I told them who wouldn't. We've all learned. The cumulative tests are scary. But it didn't take them long to realize that those questions from prior modules were the easy questions to answer on a new test and by the time they got through a few tests. Those questions got even easier because they kept seeing those kinds of questions again and again questions on those topics cap coming up so they grew to love cumulative testing. I know that sounds weird. I know don't believe me but I swear it's true and I know what you're thinking that if we're doing all formative testing and it's open book and students can even consult with each other than well. Can we trust that? They've actually learned anything that they have any knowledge in their heads that they can use without a book without asking anyone and also there on the right track. Well the answer to that is an emphatic. And wholehearted yes. How do I know that? And how can I be so confident about it? It's because when I first started this and for many years thereafter I also did to summit of exams to see whether all that retrieval practice worked. And you know what it did. Not only students walk into their exams with more confidence. They did way better on them. Then my pass classes had done on their exams before I started doing. Any of his formative testing possibly part of that improvement came from their confidence. But I'm sure that a lot of it came from all those open book formative tests and my students told me that they not only felt confident on exam day. They also told me that they tried to cram for the exam but found that well. There just wasn't any need to as they prepared to cram the night before an age old ritual. They felt compelled to perform they realized as they reviewed the course content that kind of knew it all and knew it pretty. Well so yeah. I don't have any problem thinking that. The formative testing alone gave them what they needed. There's more to my story of retrieval practice in the AP course and a lot of that story is told in previous episodes and in seminar that I have available in the links and the show notes episode page. But before I wrap it up for now I want to mention that I really think it works. Best if we write our own test items most of the time sure the test items at the end of textbook chapters in study guides in online study or quizzing programs and the like are all useful tools and have their place and learning. But I've grown to like making my own and I think if I use my own test items that integrate easily with the way I tell the story of amp it works better for learning. But that's a discussion for another day. A in.

professor AP cardiac muscle dehydration Mandalay
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A in the upcoming full episode. That is episode number sixty six. We're going to continue the conversation about how to quickly and effectively move our on campus amp course to remote learning. And as part of that discussion. I'm going to talk about what author and Professor Bruneta Brown Calls F F ts Now. I translate. Ft's as fumbling first tries. She has another fray she uses. And I'll talk to you about what that phrase is and why it's important for amp teaching in the full episode. Something else I'm going to talk about is a phenomenon called Zoom bombing and it's something that I put some links in the show notes for the previous episode but run across it in time to get it into the audio part so I'm going to be doing that in the full episodes sixty six something else. I'll be talking about briefly. Is the online protein folding game called folded and how we can use that in teaching and learning and how that relates to the current pandemic and the featured topic is going to be about our teaching slides how we can keep them simple and keep them connected to the story. We're going to tell in. These are skills that I've learned in continuing to learn over a period of time. And it can help us now at this time when we're scrambling to deliver our story and our slides in a different way than we're used to but these are principles and techniques that can also be used once we get back on campus too so all of that and more coming up in full episode number.

Professor Bruneta Brown Ft
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hit yet another episode focusing on strategies to cope with teaching amp e during the cove in Nineteen Upright. This one is the third one. The first one was bonus episode sixty three which I titled Mid Winter Winterizing of our AP course in which came out a few weeks ago just before things officially hit the fan with this outbreak in the United States. We better get ready for a pandemics of planning tips and strategies. And that's still helpful even now that we're in the thick of things. The second one was bonus episode sixty four B which came out a little over a week ago enlisted nineteen additional specific tips for quickly moving from an on campus course to a remote environment. I called that episode quickly. Moving to remote delivery the musical and we did have music. Amp teacher and stem music composer. Greg crowder graciously sang three songs to sing along with so yeah really was a musical and now this third episode which probably won't be the last before. I jump into my list of additional tips. I WanNA clarify few things. I you may be listening to this episode way later than when I'm recording this. Which means that you are a survivor of the cove in nineteen outbreak of twenty twenty. That's great congratulations. You made it through but you might be thinking and there's nothing in these episodes for me but you'd be wrong. Most if not all of these tips really can help us in the cove in nineteen scenario but they are also useful for any course anytime anyplace second if you find even one thing in any episode that sparks. An idea for your teaching or is helpful any way. That's a win. Remember Kevin's law a professional development that I mentioned in the bonus APPS conference episode way back in twenty eighteen. It states that if I learned just one useful thing in a professional development experience. It's worth it. I've been reading and listening to a lot of advice often from colleagues who have never even taught online before that. Well just isn't the best advice in my opinion so I'm thinking there will be one thing in this episode that will spark a different way of thinking for you. If in fact you do learn just one thing in this episode or in any episode. Will you do me a favor and share it with a colleague? Email social media singing it off of your balcony would ever gets it out there to folks that could use the help. They're not flying those advertising glimpse anymore so this is the only way to spread the word third. You probably noticed that. I've not been providing my usual update on scientific discoveries in human biology for the last few episodes part of the reason. Is that the big story now. At least that set of stories keeping our attention right now are about the cove in nineteen outbreak could discuss these stories in this podcast but given the rapidly evolving nature of what we know and what we think. We know what we thought we know. But now we know we didn't know and and given the time between planning and episode recording an episode and then getting it all set up for release. Well whatever I say. We'll be out of date by the time you hear it. So what I'm doing instead is putting the top stories in my nosal newsletter which is a daily update of up to ten headlines. I've chosen for that day. Just go to nonsol- dot com slash. The professor nozzle is also nuzzle dot com slash the ABC professor. And take a look at some of the past issues if you think. It's helpful vent subscribe. It's free by the way you just need to put in your email address and share that newsletter. To if you know someone who may be interested fourth wow fourth. This is giving a longer than I intended. Oh men wait a minute. Don't tell me you're surprised by okay..

Kevin professor United States Greg crowder ABC
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Greg crowder is a dedicated and creative. Ap teacher besides being a rockstar literally Rockstar in creating in using music and stem education if you haven't explored his many many songs that relate to m. p. education. You really need to do that. When go to that? Link in the show notes or episode page also find a link to the page for another of Greg's pieces. That's great for a sing along that one students learn some basic ideas about spinal nerve plexus when you go there check out the fact that Greg provides many different ways to experience his songs for this one about nerve flexes. One of the options is a carioca screen. That you and your students can follow as you saying really you need to check these out a tip number fourteen read the book you know that unreasonably large and expensive tax book students bought for your course. Now is the perfect opportunity to get them to actually read it. They'll be socially distance anyway. One hopes and looking for something to read more students raid their textbook rather than actually reading it. Now's a good time to turn the reading of the book into a bigger element of the course. If You keep your instructor provided explanations at a minimum as I advised in an earlier segment then students have no choice but to get a lot of the needed information from their textbook tip number fifteen just in case and center substituting Your Plan Lecture Class activity with a case study. There are plenty of these case studies available online but I found it to be fun making up my own. It's much easier than you think. If you've never done it I often use medical images and make up a story around it and then ask questions. About this. Scenario the tease out important concepts of anatomy physiology one option would be to post that maybe divide the class up into groups in your learning management system and give each one a different case to workout and then posted in a discussion forum of just for that group. And they're easy ways to do that. Your folks at your institution will help you figure out how to do that. And then have them more the case and then have each group present their case to the other groups and what their conclusion was and why tip number sixteen learning is art and art is learning. Drawing drawing is a powerful learning strategy. Nearly everyone can draw. Sure some folks are regular Davinci's when they draw many of us most of us are not and that's okay making stick and ball. Figures can work just as well as the more realistic kind of art. This can really help with lab activities. When the lab's not available consider drawing in labeling exercises drawing out concept maps making organs from household items like paper or doe or scraps of fabric bake a cake in the shape of an Oregon in heaven share picture of it online things like that. Tip number seventeen simulate reality even if we've never used computer simulations of anatomical structures or physiological functions. We know they've been around for a while. Your institution may already provide access to some of these and there are some available online at no cost. I provided links to a few of them but go out searching. Send your students out searching and play around with them and see how that might fit into your remote learning scenario tip number eighteen embrace reality if things go well any temporary move of your face to face class to the online environment is well temporary probably a few weeks then the emergency past and we're back to our usual mode so yeah it may be nerve wracking but normalcy will return soon right tip number nineteen no side trips. Somebody in your course. Maybe you might suggest that you're suspended on. Campus class should meet somewhere off campus. Maybe a cafe or restaurant after all these venues are likely to be virtually deserted and would welcome even a little bit of business. Do not do it do not that would defeat the whole purpose of suspending face to face class meetings which to slow or even break the cycle of the viral outbreak. We're not doing this just for us. We're doing it as part of our social obligation to support and protect each other. So let's keep that our priority. Yeah there are a lot of other things that we can do quickly and easily once we put our minds to it and hopefully this short list has already stimulated some IDs. One final thought. Let's look at this at the adventure it is. The universe has thrown in unexpected challenge at us but tries to the occasion and tap our creativity in our experience to make some awesome. Lemonade or those lemons. Our positive can do attitude can go a long way to reassure our students and to motivate them to do some strong self powered learning a as. I mentioned several times earlier. I put links in the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors tell us what's going on with you your tips and suggestions and your questions at the broadcast hotline. That's one eight three three line Dan or one eight three three five or six six three three six or senator recording a written message to podcast at the AP professor dot work. I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor Textbook. Author in human anatomy.

Greg crowder professor Rockstar Professor Textbook m. p. education instructor Davinci Oregon Dr. Kevin Pat An Dan senator
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

11:27 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hi there this is Kevin Patent. With a brief audio introduction to episode number sixty four of the amp professor podcast also known as top radio and audio salon for teachers of human anatomy and physiology in the upcoming full episode. That is episode sixty four. I'm going to have a conversation with chase DEMARCO. Now Chase. The Marco is widely known is a numbness. That is a memory expert. He's also a consultant entrepreneur more and believe it or not initiative that he's an MD PhD candidate who has a passion for helping medical students succeed in their studies and in their professional exams. Now I got a lot of support from my recent discussions of Flash Card techniques and episode fifty eight fifty nine and sixty and this conversation will complement those with an explanation of a study techniques sometimes called a memory palace which is based on something very old and very effective called the method of Loci. But wait for the full episodes. Sixty four where you'll get to know chase and learn a lot more about this memory technique. The free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master of science and Human Anatomy and physiology instruction the happy degree. I'm on the Faculty of this program so I know the incredible value it is for an MP teachers check out this online graduate program at NYC DOT EDU slash. Happy or click. The Lincoln the show notes episode page. And you gus that it's time once again for were where we practice what we all do in teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're old and familiar terms and sometimes terms that are new to us or maybe they're so new that nobody knows him yet because they just got made up by somebody today. We have a few related to our main topic in that. Is this memory technique that we're going to be discussing with chase the Marco and the first term is come up before actually more than once and passed up assode and we did dissect at once back in episode number fifty nine and that is the word mnemonic so just to refresh our memories a little bit that word part non means memory literally. It means mindful but we use it in terms of memory and then the icy ending needs relating to so pneumonic when you put it all together means relating to memory and usually refers to something that aides memory it can be a mnemonic sentence or phrase where the first letter of each word and sentence has the same first letter of items in a list that we wanna remember but there are other mnemonic techniques. And we're going to be discussing one of those techniques in the full episode regarding pronunciation. I find myself going back and forth between me monarch and pneumonic and that usually depends on the context words around it and my brain just goes there with when to or not. Just come out of my mouth. And maybe they're things like that you do two now. The latter pronunciation MNEMONIC is preferred by most of the sources. I looked at so I'm going to try and stick with that as much candy or we'll see how that goes. The next word on the list is a related term. It's actually just another version of the word pneumonic. And that is numbness. And it's the same as demonic. But we're going to swap out that IC- ending in demonic input in ast ending which means an agent or performer of something and so an honest literally van is a person in agent performer. Someone who performs memory most often the term in the English language is used to describe someone who's adapt out or skilled in feats of memory. Like I dunno remembering the order of cards and a shuffled deck or Memorizing as much as they can from a page from a phone book or maybe trying to learn all the bones of the skeleton. Yeah that's a feat of memory and that takes some work and maybe there are some techniques that we can use to make that. Go more simpler for students at still going to be hard. But maybe there's a way to help them organize that and and get done quickly and effectively really be able to retrieve that information when it needs to be retrieved and yeah I sometimes find myself pronouncing it sometimes which actually that does show up occasionally dictionaries but it's most often pronounced nemesis are honest. I sometimes mistakenly US methodist instead anonymous. I don't know where that comes from. But anyway I swap out the end for a t go figure. I promise to work on that. If you promise to overlook my mistake okay the next term on our were dissection list is Loci L. O. C. I it's a word that's GONNA come up related to demonic technique that we're going to be discussing in the full episode. It can be pronounced. Loci as I just did but other common pronunciations are low cy or Loki but when I hear pronouncing that way Loki High. I think of that trickster. From Norse Mythology Loki L. O. K. I. So loci it is from me but you get to pick your favorite LOCI. Is the plural form of the Latin word locus LLC US which we also use as is an English meaning place or location? In fact the word location is derived from the word locus. We sometimes use locus in genetics. To describe the physical location of a gene within a chromosome. So you may have run across that use already. Loci is the plural form of locus. So it simply means places. We're going to be talking about a technique sometimes called the method of loci which we can now more easily see simply means method of places. This podcast is sponsored by hats. The human anatomy and Physiology Society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit HAP- s- at the professor dot org slash hats that's h? Aps only hey but step into the bookshop and see what we may want to add to our personal professional bookshelf. I'M GONNA go straight over to the medical shelf this time because I know exactly which book I'm looking for. It's called read this before medical school out of study smarter and live better while excelling in class and on your use a complex board exams. It's by chase DeMarco Theodore McConnell and Grodin recognized that name chase DeMarco. He's the guy I'm chatting with in the upcoming full episodes sixty four as you can tell from the title. This book is for students in medical school and you may teach. Medical students are students in some other health profession program. Or maybe you're teaching. Amp TO PRE MED or pre nursing or any of the many other students in the typical amd p course. This book could be helpful to any of them really why because all the students had just mentioned are being hit with what's surely feels like a fire hose of information if feels that way because it really is a lot of information and ideas to learn in a very short period of time and most of them will eventually be facing licensing or other professional exams of some sort right whether it's complex or in class or even try outs for jeopardy advice and strategies offered in. The book could be a game changer for some students. This book covers all the important things to consider when trying to figure out how to succeed in. Aim for example. Why STUDY SKILLS ARE IMPORTANT? Y? Class participation is essential how to use the teacher's time and resources effectively using the school's resources how to study at home making a study plan in managing time effectively. A lot of my students could use. I could use the value of study groups and how to organize and run a study group and even how to optimize work life balance. There's also a big section on test prep which strategies for both course exams and those big professional exams. I just mentioned a moment ago and because there's a lot of memorization required in amp. Yeah you know there is right. There's a big section on memory strategies. This is a great book to have on your teaching show to offer to students as a place to start learning how to study. And how to handle that? Fire Hose of ideas. Amp or perhaps. Add to your list of recommended resources for your students. Just go to the show notes or episode page or the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Book Club to take a look at this book and be sure to listen to the full episodes sixty four featuring a chat with the author chase DEMARCO. Hey you probably forgot about that survey that I've been taking. That's part of my end of season. Debriefing I'm asking you now. Please take just a few minutes of your time to respond to that anonymous survey because it's your experience as an individual listener. That's important to me. Just go to the AP professor dot Org Slash Survey and as always. Thanks for your support. Searchable transcript and a captioned audio gram of this preview episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy. Check out there many resources and events on their newly redesigned website at Anatomy Dot Org. Well this is Kevin Patent signing off for now and reminding you to keep your questions and comments coming. Why not call the podcast hotline right now at one eight three three? That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or visit us at the AP Professor Dot Org. I'll see you down the.

chase DEMARCO professor Kevin Patent Marco amp professor American Association for Anato NYC locus LLC US consultant Loki High Physiology Society DeMarco Theodore McConnell Loki L. O. K. amd Grodin
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Cartoonist and film producer Walt Disney once we keep moving forward opening new doors and doing new things. Because we're curious and curiosity keeps leaving us down new paths welcome to the amp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy the and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Past this episode is review of the past year of this podcast. Just mentioned in the intro and also talked about out in the preview episode that preceded this full episode. What I'm going to be doing is debriefing? What went on in our podcast cast over the last year and I did something similar last year at the end of the first full year of the P. Professor podcast and I called that episode sowed a big year and so this episode of calling another big year? I should've called it an even bigger year because I was actually Kinda surprised as I. I went through my process of debriefing and Look what went on holy smoke. We covered a lot of stop. And I'm beginning to that in a minute but before I do I just want to remind you that. Debriefing is something that I've mentioned a lot. And that's because I really believe in it. I think that at regular intervals throughout the academic year and maybe even separate debriefings. You know at the end of multiple years like every five years or something like that. We should step back and really take some time and effort and really mindfully debrief and decide and review and reflect on what we've been doing because I think this can be really affirming. I mean it is for me that I can go back in especially in a year or a semester or even a half a semester. When I'm thinking that all I've been doing is putting one foot in front of the other and that really accomplishing publishing? Anything much. Not Anything useful. I often find that when I go back and actually like tally it up and look at it and think about it. I'm really happy about the fact that there were some things in there that I really did accomplish some things. So that's one of the main reasons so I I liked the briefing is because it makes me feel good but it also gives me some great ideas on things that I can leverage and maybe do better next time for or extend in and do more or gives me an idea to do something completely different and so I just WanNa spend a few minutes talking about the advantages of debriefing. It's a good reminder for ourselves what worked well and what didn't work well over the past period of time. It's also also a good time to bring our C. V. up-to-date our resume or publication lists. However it is that we're recording our life's work and we can do anything anything related to that so Chaz it some schools You need to submit a timeline of things that you've done committees you've been on projects you've done and how often you did pet sitting for your deans pats and that goes into your promotion package or it goes into your evaluation file or something like that so you you can really make that debriefing time you can roll a bunch of different tasks into it and make it a really useful thing it in many different ways and and it's also a form of spaced retrieval practice because it gives us an opportunity to identify in reinforce or concepts concepts because we're going over them again in recalling them again and pulling them back out of our brains so as I go through this episode and I mentioned past topics things things are going to get pulled onto your brain. You'RE GONNA go in there and start pulling things out again and that's going to help keep them in your long term memory when we do this in our courses. We could ask students to do that. Students always want in class reviews right for them. I think they see that sometimes as a substitute for actually really studying like let's review the test. Meaning I don't want to spend my own time reviewing for the test. I want you to review for me but might not be a bad idea if you have have class time to do that. Yeah they're looking for specific. Can't on exactly what's going to be on the test. They'd they'd probably preferred if you just gave them a list of the correct panthers or something thank by what you can do is just spark them a little bit and get them thinking about all of the different things that they have been learning all along long and that will help them with their retrieval practice. There are other ways to do it to The way I usually do tonight in class but in the form of online practice exams Right before the midterm exam and final exams so that gives them the way to do their greet debriefing and relearning stop. Because it's Kinda showing them wear wear and their study materials in their textbook. They need to dive back in and refresh themselves. So let's do it. Let's.

panthers Kevin Past Walt Disney professor P. Professor producer Chaz C. V.
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Sixty two of the ANC professor podcast also known as tap radio. You an audio laboratory for teachers of human anatomy and physiology well. This is a preview of the upcoming full episode which is episode number sixty two and it's titled Another Big Year in Teaching Anatomy and physiology and that parallels the title from an episode. We did about a year ago called a big year and that was a debriefing. A review a look back back of the first year of the professor podcast. And so we're going to do that again in episode number sixty two. And so. It's all about debriefing. It's all about reflecting flocking. It's all about looking back and reviewing what we did so we're going to take a moment to think about to remind ourselves about how we as teachers can in deep grief in a way that is constructive and helpful and affirming and then we're going to dive right in and summarize a whole year of this podcast. Okay non exactly summarize everything but at least sit at the scenic overlook and take in the broad view of everything finger pointing out a few of the most interesting things that happened along the way.

professor ANC
"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"professor." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A common and perennial conversation among amp. Faculty is what prerequisites If any should be required for the amp course that is should students have to pass a biology course or some other course maybe chemistry or maybe even some flavor of English or Algebra before they can be expected to succeed in our anatomy and physiology. Of course heck I've thought about requiring a solid study skills course before student gets into my AP class. I think I'd rather they be able to make a news flash cards and make concept maps then to be able to solve quadra equations for example the AP Course skied lines from the human anatomy and physiology society half's suggest a whole list of required and recommended courses with a minimum among grade of C hats. Members can access the course guidelines at the AP professor dot Org Slash perhaps that's Ha ps ps but perhaps guidelines are well intended as recommendations for programs that want to align in well with the learning outcomes which I've mentioned before in this podcast specifically in episode fifty and for courses that one have a high level of rigor in their program in my mind at least these recommendations are not absolute requirement. And that's that's helpful but when things are not strictly definitive are when we have obstacles at our school for implementing anyone's list of recommended prerequisites requisites. Then we meaning. I tend to still fried about things a bit or sometimes fred a lot. Sure sure any answer to the prerequisite question is going to depend on factors unique to that institution or to that program or department. Our course Actually they're even more considerations than those I just listed but I'll circle back to some of those a little later even after we account for all all those factors. The answer never seems to satisfy Est.. Does it at least not over the long term. We we seemed always WANNA come back to it because no matter what our prerequisites aw or our previous decision not to have required Requisites it's we never seem to be fully satisfied that things are just right. Why because not all our students students seem to transition easily Dr Course and not all of them succeed at least not at first so a solution that always seems obvious? Assayas maybe we should reconsider our prerequisite requirements and it seems to me that this is a wheel that is continuously elite. Reinvented over generations. And remember. I'm as old as an oak tree. I've actually been around for generations all that time paying attention to what we're doing with prerequisites because that's what we aim peaches do right we ask teach other about prerequisites and we theorize about what's ideal and it seems that no matter how much or how often we fiddle with our course prerequisites that prerequisites situation. We have just well never really works. I've come to the conclusion that it's not that prerequisite courses don't work it's just the prerequisites never truly fulfill fill the expectations that we have for them so that begs the question. How much should we expect students to remember from their prerequisite? It's my answer to what we should expect from prerequisites. Is this nothing really. We should not expect anything. I know I know that. Seems like a negative cynical answer but but I don't see it that way. I think it's realistic. And it's well kind of freeing in a way if I'm not really expecting expecting my students to really own concept of ions protein synthesis or chemical equilibria or what. ATP is what it does then. I'm free of expectations and because of that I won't front about it really now. I smile the smile of a Buddha when I hear my colleagues fretting about the prerequisite requirements or at least. I like to think I'm doing that not only that now. I'm far less likely to be tempted to judge. Judge my colleagues teaching those prerequisite courses badly and I'm less likely to be tempted to judge my students. Badly to by not having Any expectations of prior learning were all starting with a clean fresh slate. What a great feeling man you might ask ask? Why don't I expect students to remember anything useful from what they may have been exposed to in their prerequisite course or courses well first off? I don't mean to imply that none of them know anything. I'm just saying that I've come to believe leave that. It's just not realistic to assume that most of them remember everything and that's kind of what we do right. Expect them to know everything from their prerequisite courses. Why don't I expect that partly because we don't typically teach for the long term think about it the classic way of teaching and approach that I used myself for many years is to prepare students for the next test best and hope they all pass for those that pass? They've learned at least sixty percent of what I wanted them to learn. Now think about that for for minute. That's just a little over half of what they ought to have mastered and that's just for those who actually passed for those who didn't pass pass that test all is not lost. They can learn about two thirds or so of what they ought to on the next test and it might average out to a passing course grade right. But let's say they're learning a solid. Seventy percent are so on average a C grade that means means they've mastered or at least become familiar with a bit over two thirds of the material for their unit test. But because they're not asked about again until the end of the semester it's going to disappear until the week before the exam one. It's going to be relearned at least in part for another week or a two and then lost again. That is unless we excuse them for the exam. Because they've been doing well on the unit tests that measure short-term learning even those with solid long-term learning need refreshing but let's say they were and of course that really did promote long-term learning. Let's say they had to master eighty five to ninety percent of the concepts and that they were continually expected did to retrieve that knowledge and demonstrate mastery on a test. Okay they're still gonNA forget some of it even if they mastered a hundred hundred percent of the concepts and then taught the prerequisite course or the or maybe they taught all the prerequisite courses. There's still gonNA forget some of it maybe not all of it but some of it but of course the more typical case is they're not that competent when they reach us so again. Isn't it more practical. That is more useful to just assume that.

professor ATP